iv

Advisory Committee.

L. Quincy Mumford, Chairman
Paul M. Angle
Roy P. Basler
David G. Mearns
Clyde Walton

v

Lincoln Sesquicentennial Commission.

Ex officio members:
The President of the United States
The President of the Senate
The Speaker of the House of Representatives

Members appointed by the President of the Senate:
Hon. John Sherman Cooper, Kentucky, Chairman
Hon. Homer E. Capehart, Indiana
Hon. Frank Church, Idaho
Hon. Everett M. Dirksen, Illinois
Hon. Paul H. Douglas, Illinois
Hon. William E. Jenner, Indiana
Hon. Ralph W. Yarborough, Texas

Members appointed by the Speaker of the House of Representatives:
Hon. Leo E. Allen, Illinois
Hon. William G. Bray, Indiana
Hon. Frank Chelf, Kentucky
Hon. Winfield K. Denton, Indiana
Hon. Peter F. Mack, Jr., Illinois
Hon. F. Jay Nimtz, Indiana
Hon. John M. Robsion, Kentucky
Hon. Eugene Siler, Kentucky

Members appointed by the President of the United States:
Miss Bertha S. Adkins, Washington, D.C.
Mr. Victor M. Birely, Washington, D.C.
Dr. Ralph J. Bunche, New York
Dr. John S. Dickey, New Hampshire
Mr. John B. Fisher, Washington, D.C.
Dr. R. Gerald McMurtry, Indiana
Dr. L. Quincy Mumford, Washington, D.C.
Rev. Paul C. Reinert, Missouri
Mr. Walter N. Rothschild, New York Hon.
William G. Stratton, Illinois
Mr. Jouett Ross Todd, Kentucky
Dr. William H. Townsend, Kentucky
Hon. Sinclair Weeks, Massachusetts

Statutory member:
Mr. Conrad L. Wirth, Director National Park Service

vii

Introduction.

ALONG the Big South Fork of Nolin's Creek, on a Sunday in frosty February, neighbors like Tom and Betsy Sparrow whispered that it was nearing Nancy's time. When Aunt Peggy Walters, who was to help Nancy, went down the road toward the Lincoln cabin, the Sparrows likely fixed the date in memory: the twelfth of February, 1809. So often, in that Kentucky wilderness, a birth, a death became an elusive event of personal record.

Fifty-six years later when, on a hushed April morning, this child of the frontier, now the sixteenth President of the United States, died of a bullet wound, Abraham Lincoln already belonged to the ages. Lad of the Kentucky hills and Indiana forests, gangling farmhand, railsplitter and shopkeeper, self-taught surveyor and lawyer, hesitant suitor, indulgent husband and father, statesman schooled in the rough and tumble of prairie politics . . . so did Lincoln pass from history into legend, becoming an image of the mind and heart. Time would treat this image kindly; the once gawky, ridiculed figure would acquire dignity, even majesty; into the once homely, deep-seamed face would come composure and even beauty.

Today, a century and a half after his birth, the magic of the man has no geographical boundary. The echo of his thoughts is heard in many lands; his strength of purpose remains vigorously alive wherever people, throwing off the many guises of human oppression, struggle toward the self-determination that he described so beautifully upon a hillside at Gettysburg.

In life, to those who knew and loved him best, Lincoln often seemed an enigma. His devoted partner, William Herndon, once described him as "the most secretive, reticent, shut-mouthed man that ever lived"; and his first biographer, Josiah G. Holland, could not disguise a certain irritation with Lincoln as a subject: "He rarely showed more than one aspect of himself to one man. He opened himself to men in different directions." When Holland told the story of Lincoln's drawing a New Testament from his breast and avowing that here was the "rock on which I stand," Herndon was beside himself with disgust; on the question of Mr. Lincoln's religion, Herndon intended to "tell the truth" about "an infidel — a Deist" who "sometimes in his fits of melancholy was an atheist." So argued two who knew Lincoln personally; later biographers, examining the record, were not so confused. Of the Second Inaugural, Lord Charnwood said: "Probably no other speech of a modern statesman uses so unreservedly the

viii

language of intense religious feeling." And Charnwood believed that he knew why Lincoln attained this distinction: "This man had stood alone in the dark. He had done justice; he had loved mercy; he had walked humbly with his God."

Where does one turn for the truth about Mr. Lincoln — or perhaps more realistically, for the approximate truth? To distinguish history from myth, fact from prejudice, or even a genuine document from a forgery would be a task of considerable perplexity were it not for two contributions to historical scholarship for which the present generation must be long remembered. The first of these achievements was the publication in 1953, under the general editorship of Dr. Roy P. Basler, of the Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln The happy decision of the Lincoln Sesquicentennial Commission to support the compilation and publication of the present three volumes of this chronology adds the other accomplishment. The two works, following the same texts for Lincoln's writing and speeches and employing the same symbols for identifying manuscript sources, are designed to be used together, yet each makes its own distinct (and, in some respects, unique) contribution to our understanding of the man and his age.

Mr. Lincoln left his own record in many places, and even here "opened himself to men in different directions." The world would know him best in his First and Second Inaugurals, his letters to Mrs. Bixby and the parents of Colonel Ellsworth, his Gettysburg Address, the eloquent passages in his messages to Congress, and so to the world he became a statesman of epic vision who possessed the heart and so often the tongue of a poet. Among his contemporaries — this Lincoln who, as Carl Sandburg has said, could be "hard as rock and soft as drifting fog" — he was many memories, and as such exists in their reminiscences, or in the letters they exchanged. Another Lincoln can be found in the musty archives of courthouses scattered across the Eighth Judicial District of Illinois — in some aspects, perhaps as important as any of the Lincoln ghosts that survive; and still another, the Lincoln of the political stump, has left his imprint in newspaper columns the nation over. The Lincoln his generals knew, his Cabinet knew, his wife and children knew — so day by day did the whole man emerge, and to chart that phenomenon for future historians is the function of these volumes.

Until 1830 the record must, of necessity, deal with the activities of Thomas Lincoln and the other members of Abraham's family, but there after the story belongs almost exclusively to the ungainly, good-humored son whose name one day would describe an era in America. So in large part this is the story of the growth of both a man and an age that also produced two other immortal sons named Tom Sawyer and Huckleberry Finn. Like them, Abe Lincoln is easygoing, accepting life as it comes to him.

II

Lincoln was never the enigma to himself that he became to some of his friends and biographers. Once he set his feet on the ground, confident

ix

that he was headed the only way he could go, he progressed steadily. A climactic day in this chronology is September 9, 1836, when the clerk of the Supreme Court of Illinois recorded that, upon the endorsement of two justices, Abraham Lincoln now was licensed to practice law. Four weeks later he participated in his first case. On the bench sat Stephen T. Logan, who would be his second partner. If one can trust the testimony of an Eastern lawyer, who visited the Sangamon County Courthouse at about this time, the judge presided "with his chair tilted back and his heels as high as his head"; a rail divided court and audience "outside of which smoking and chewing and spitting tobacco seemed to be the principal employment." Obviously here was an environment where a knowledge of Blackstone and Chitty would be fine, but a feeling for man and his bedevilments counted for more.

Lincoln fitted the scene like a pea in a pod. After almost a quarter of a century, preparing careful notes for a lecture on the profession of his choice, he was inclined to declare: "I am not an accomplished lawyer." But the pages that follow, revealing more graphically than any other source the real nature of Mr. Lincoln's legal practice, refute this modest self-estimate. True, that practice was a mixture of sometimes important but more often inconsequential litigation which he once characterized as a "great variety of little business," yet week in and week out, over a lifetime until he became President, he was most at home when his mind was filled with the troubles of all manner of people. He became, in time, an adept practitioner in the state's highest tribunal, but never at the cost of losing his touch with a local justice of the peace.

His old friend, Henry Clay Whitney, remembered a day (the twenty-fourth of October, 1854, to be precise) when Mr. Lincoln rode into Urbana "behind his own horse, which was an indifferent, raw-boned specimen, in his own blacksmith-made buggy — a most ordinary one." In an America awakening to the common man as a hero of the spirit, the picture has classic dimension. The age that saw its Tom Sawyers and Huck Finns grow to manhood was a product of no school or cult, unless an understanding heart can go by that name, for this compassion each of its eloquest spokesmen — Emerson and Thoreau, Melville and Whitman and Lincoln — possessed in common. If genius in that age had to be described, then wholeness of character seemed to be the sum of it, and here too Lincoln became more constant than his friends and biographers sometimes realized. What is the source of the astonishing impact that Lincoln one day would make upon the hearts and minds of people around the world? Is it perhaps the fact that wherever one meets Lincoln — in the Sangamon County Courthouse, in the legislative chambers in Vandalia or Springfield, one day in the White House — he is consistently an adversary and an advocate? A man standing for a cause, a mind and heart committed to a principle — no matter in which direction Mr. Lincoln opens himself, this part of him endures.

The thousands of law cases that occupied so much of Lincoln's thought after 1836 tell a significant part of his story. A number of the suits were such that belong to human beings of any age and environment — suits involving

x

infidelity, divorce, widows, orphans, rape, arson, murder, theft, libel and slander, patent infringements. But other cases represented the time, the place — cases involving railroad claims, runaway slaves, the innumerable squabbles over land titles and boundaries that often amounted to vocation and avocation in frontier communities. And even in the sterile realm of legal terminology, Lincoln's frequently infectious personality broke through; thus in the affidavit he filed on November 11, 1852 in Jordan v. Thorpe, a case involving the alleged castration of a bull, his phrase was "the change of condition by which he ceased to be a bull." A spokesman for the temperance movement, although not in these pages the tireless cold water crusader some biographers have sought to make him, Lincoln again seemed in character on May 18, 1854, defending nine ladies from Marion, in DeWitt County, charged with causing a riot. The evidence was all against Lincoln's clients — when the local saloonkeeper had refused to close his place of business, the ladies had destroyed his stock — and although more than a hundred women attended the trial, the jury brought in a verdict of guilty and Lincoln's nine ladies each paid a moderate fine of two dollars. Neither lawyer nor clients had much cause to complain.

Twice yearly, Lincoln traveled the fourteen counties that comprised the Eighth Judicial Circuit; a lonely figure, he rode across the unfenced prairie on horseback; and Judge David Davis believed: "Lincoln was happy, as happy as he could be, when on this circuit and happy no other place." Certainly no one would have conceded more quickly than Lincoln that Davis was entitled to his opinions, especially in view of the fact that the Judge intended to have them in any case. Nor could Lincoln very well deny that he prospered as a lawyer. "Money is always acceptable to me," he would write a client in Peoria on July 27, 1855, "but when I left Chicago, I was not in‘extremis’ on that subject." That September in Cincinnati he observed Ohio's eccentric jurist and wit, Bellamy Storer, preside in Superior Court. "I wish we had that judge in Illinois," Lincoln reputedly told a companion. "I think he would share with me the fatherhood of the legal jokes of the Illinois bar."

Among the first rewards students of Lincoln will find in these pages is the revelation of how active and varied and rewarding his law practice was. He gave it his absorbed interest, and if as a result he was often away from Springfield, one must remember that occasion late in October of 1842 when the Reverend T. O. Prescott of Cincinnati came to Lincoln's home town to lecture at the Christian Church on the "Second Coming of the Lord." Possibly this was the occasion when a famous comment was attributed to Lincoln: "It is my private opinion that, if the Lord has been in Springfield once, he will never come the second time."

III

"I was dabbling in politics," Lincoln wrote a friend on March 10, 1855, "and of course neglecting business." He might have added that he was an

xi

dabbler in this respect, and had no intention of stopping. Nor did he. The very gawkiness that made him stick out in a crowd drew people to him in sympathy and affection and became one of his chief political assets. He was not yet forty when he earned his nickname, according to Galena's celebrated Elihu B. Washburne who remembered the very day and place — July 5, 1847, beneath the balcony of Chicago's Sherman House where Washburne was entertaining a group of friends. In the party was "the accomplished scholar and unrivaled orator," Lisle Smith, who, glancing up, exclaimed:

"There is Lincoln on the other side of the street. Just look at ‘Old Abe.’ "

Washburne insisted that henceforth they all called Lincoln "Old Abe" and Washburne wasn't surprised: "No one who saw him can forget his personal appearance at that time. Tall, angular and awkward, he had on a short-waisted, thin swallow-tail coat, a short vest of the same material, thin pantaloons, scarcely coming to his ankles, a straw hat and a pair of brogans with woolen socks."

In the pages of these volumes the figure that Washburne describes often passes by. His enemies found him an easy subject for ridicule, and a case in point was October 9, 1848, when he arrived in Peoria to campaign for Zachary Taylor over Martin Van Buren. The Democratic Free Press gave way to derisive scorn: "Mr. Lincoln blew his nose, bobbed his head, threw up his coat tail, and in the course of two hours was delivered of an immense amount of ‘sound and fury.’ "In and out of office, Lincoln took politics seriously, and his opponents had good cause to put in a lick wherever they could, for he was an effective campaigner and most times impossible to defeat. After his one term in Congress it May have been true, as Herndon insisted, that "melancholy dripped from him as he walked" and he seemed to lose interest in public life, but by October of 1854 when Whitney pictured Lincoln riding into Urbana in his blacksmith-made buggy — that vehicle, more tempermental than any second-hand automobile, that appeared constantly to be in and out of Obed Lewis's shop for repairs — he was en route to a stinging speech against the Nebraska Bill and back in politics to stay.

Good ideas with Lincoln were precious, and his custom was to nourish them gently and to wait for them to grow. On August 15, 1855 — almost three years before the "House-Divided Speech" that helped carry him to national prominence — Lincoln wrote to George Robertson, a former member of Congress and now a professor at Transylvania College: "Our political problem now is, Can we, as a nation, continue together permanently — forever — half slave, half free?" A day, in incident, an insight into how his mind worked . . . and another such day, perhaps, was June 20, the following year. He was again in Urbana that day when the Chicago paper arrived with a report on the Philadelphia Convention, showing his name among the candidates for vice-president. Lincoln laughed; obviously there must be some mistake — a great man named Lincoln lived in Massachusetts, and he must have been the one for whom the votes were cast. Part of his success, of course, was the fact that he could wait for an opportunity as well

xii

as an idea, and in June of 1858 when he agreed to run against Douglas for the United States Senate, the idea and opportunity met. At least one political adviser who heard his "House-Divided Speech" in advance pronounced it "a damned fool utterance," but Lincoln gave it nonetheless, for in the role of an adversary he could rise to supreme self-confidence.

He worked hard at politics — one gets a good glimpse of him in this regard on the afternoon of September 9, 1859, when he spoke for two hours in Hillsboro, Illinois, standing on a circus wagon for a platform and talking above the rain drumming on the canvas. After his debates with Douglas, he was nationally known and yet unspoiled to his friends. In Clinton, Illinois, on October 6, 1859, the reporter for the Central Transcript observed that "the old familiar face of A. Lincoln is again amongst us," and the magic of the man who, a year hence, would be carrying the "October states" and foreshadowing his election as sixteenth President of the United States, did not escape the Transcript's correspondent: ". . . we cannot help noticing the peculiarly friendly expression with which he greets everybody, and everybody greets him. He comes back to us after electrifying Ohio, with all his blushing honors thick upon him; yet the poorest and plainest amongst our people, fears not to approach, and never fails to receive a hearty welcome from him."

IV

The election was over, and Senator Henry Wilson of Massachusetts, inquiring as to what qualities of presidential caliber Mr. Lincoln possessed, received a passionate response from Herndon: ". . . When on justice, right, liberty, the Government, the Constitution, and the Union, then you May all stand aside; he will rule then, and no man can move him — no set of men can do it. There is no fail here. This is Lincoln, and you mark my prediction. You and I must keep the people right; God will keep Lincoln right" For an old nonbeliever like Herndon to maintain that Divine Providence was on the side of the friend whom he insisted was an atheist reflects, perhaps, the strain of the crisis that soon would bring the nation to four tragic years of war.

The miracle, when that conflict ended, was how in the relatively short space of some fifteen hundred days, surrounded by multiple tensions and a variety of highly individualistic personalities, Mr. Lincoln was able to organize so thorough a victory as far as the heart of humanity was involved. Looking at the problems afresh, as they were approached from day to day, one understands fully why this first war to be fought with the tools and weapons of the Industrial Revolution severely tested the mental capacities of its chief participants whether they came to it through the classrooms of West Point or the courtrooms of Illinois. What now the American citizen at — war was forced to teach himself began as the range of his killing power expanded. Sensibly the fields over which he fought became honeycombed with defense lines; thereafter flexible formations and swift outflanking movements offered practically the only chance of success in battle.

xiii

Blurred though this martial image is, it constitutes the first glimpse anyone would have of what today we call total war. In the grand art of killing one's fellow man, this more sophisticated form, with its attendant perplexities of transportation, supply and finance, may have staggered American imaginations, but there is nothing in the record to show that European observers on the scene were learning as much or as well. And when all the bills were paid for moving all the men and weapons to all the fields of battle, the victory of arms meant little unless the victory of human spirit also was won.

We know that Mr. Lincoln achieved both, and what properly we can ask as we search the record is how did he manage it? Part of the answer is in all three of these volumes, for only in a narrow sense may it be said, as so often it is claimed, that Mr. Lincoln came to the presidency without administrative experience. In that branch of administration which modernists call human management he was superbly trained. Now the lifetime of living with the troubles of all manner of people served him well; at the very tricky science of the nature of human nature, very few, in the end, had anything to teach Mr. Lincoln.

Nor was he, at the cost of destroying a romantic phrase, the railsplitter in the White House. Here dwelt no country bumpkin, as both Secretary Seward and a darling of the Radicals like Thaddeus Stevens quickly learned at opposite ends of the Washington seesaw. What most of all the record day by day of Mr. Lincoln, the President, seems to reveal is a thoroughly sophisticated man, wise to the point of compassion. To the office of Chief Executive he brought an alert, searching mind that found its power in a beautiful balance. How clearly that mind came to hold the image of the whole country, the whole war constantly in view! How tenaciously, after Sumter, in the dark hours before Gettysburg and Vicksburg, through draft riot and threat of life and charge of despotism, that mind held to its strong-willed, single-minded purpose of saving the Union at any price! How persistently, as it grew with the business of a commander-in-chief, that mind ticked off all the theaters of war, knowing to the day and often to the hour the general who had been remiss with an essential report! In the midst of grave national struggles or grievous personal trials, how well that mind recalled old friends, old favors; how stored it was with helpful political minutiae; how patiently, how thoroughly it took the measure of office-seeker, military dodger, mother in quest of reprieve for a son condemned by court-martial, political factotum, White House retainer, inventor of a new weapon or explosive, and how unafraid that mind was to act upon these perceptions. At a dogged pace, as common sense directed, with his generals, with the members of his official family, Mr. Lincoln became The Boss.

Many of course contributed to the ultimate preservation of the Union, and in this respect Mr. Lincoln has been described as "the organizer of organizers," a phrase that is true if it is intended to characterize Mr. Lincoln as the architect of victory. Certainly, as the war progressed, as the turn was taken at last and the Union must endure, his was the dominant

xiv

mind and heart and will and spirit — his, the epic vision. When occasion demanded, with or without the tools and weapons of the Industrial Revolution, with or without Grant or Halleck or Stanton or Seward, Mr. Lincoln could manage to win a decisive victory. When in the spring of 1864 the decision was reached to amend the Constitution so that slavery would be prohibited, the President did not deny that military objectives motivated the new national policy. Mr. Lincoln needed the admission of Nevada as a state to tip the delicate balance in favor of the 13th Amendment; and always a pragmatic politician he was down to counting votes on his fingers and seeking the help of Charles Dana with three doubtful votes — one from New Jersey and two from New York.

"It is a question of three votes or new armies," Mr. Lincoln said.

Mr. Dana placed his own value on what that amendment would be worth: "at least a million men"; and in this maneuver Mr. Dana saw clearly why Mr. Lincoln stood apart, raising in this instance "an intellectual army that would tend to paralyze the enemy and break the continuity of his ideas." What was it that placed Mr. Lincoln, the President, above others around him? Mr. Dana was not afraid to answer: "The great quality of his appearance was benevolence and benignity: the wish to do somebody some good if he could; and yet there was no flabby philanthropy about Abraham Lincoln. He was all solid, hard, keen intelligence combined with goodness. You felt that here was a man who saw through things, who understood, and you respected him accordingly."

Thus spoke Dana — one opinion. A faithful biographer, William E. Barton, once exclaimed: "I think I know the facts; but does anyone know Lincoln?" In Portrait for Posterity, a study of Lincoln and his biographers, Benjamin P. Thomas concluded that both realism and idealism are necessary in finding the real Lincoln. "To purge the human clay from Father Abraham," Mr. Thomas wrote, "is to sunder that intangible communion that the people hold with him. And to deny his idealistic attributes is to disparage his greatness."

In these three volumes, I suspect, lay reader and devoted student alike may be surprised at how much of both qualities emerge. Just as Mr. Dana indicated how fundamentally Mr. Lincoln organized his ultimate full victory — by breaking the continuity of the ideas of the enemy — so Mr. Thomas, among the first Lincoln scholars in this generation to work on compiling the vast mass of material in the present work, found in the day by day growth of the prairie lad who became President the essential elements of understanding. Keen mind, open heart, strong will, trust in the people for whom he believed he fought — the enduring greatness of Mr. Lincoln may very well stem from the simple fact that no one can break his continuity as an idea or an ideal.

V

The editor-in-chief of a work of this dimension constantly is aware of the unselfish helpfulness of others for which he will be forever indebted.

xv

Naturally he wishes to thank the members of the Lincoln Sesquicentennial Commission for the opportunity of serving them, and he is most grateful for the atmosphere of faith and freedom in which he was permitted to work.

To Dr. L. Quincy Murnford, Librarian of Congress and Chairman of the Advisory Committee appointed by the Commission to oversee this project, he expresses his further gratitude for enlightened direction; and to each member of the Advisory Committee — Paul M. Angle, Roy P. Basler, David C. Mearns, and Clyde C. Walton — he is indebted for wise advice tendered by warmhearted companions.

To George W. Bunn, Jr., of Springfield, Illinois and the trustees of the Abraham Lincoln Association acknowledgement must be made for releasing to the Commission the copyrights for earlier volumes upon which the present work is based. It was the happy privilege of the editor-in-chief to know the three scholars — Harry E. Pratt, Benjamin P. Thomas, and Paul M. Angle — who labored on the compilation of these earlier volumes, and it is upon the advice of Mr. Angle, the surviving member of this trio, that their names have been omitted from the present title pages in the belief that history, as Thomas Jefferson said, always belongs to the living generation.

In Professor William E. Baringer, who was directly responsible for the content of the volumes carrying the Lincoln story through 1860, and in Dr. C. Percy Powell, who compiled the volume covering the war years, the editor-in-chief salutes loyal craftsmen of great ability. Each has his own preface wherein he discusses the particular problems he encountered and lists his own special acknowledgements.

Individuals who from the goodness of their hearts and respect for the importance of this project rendered invaluable assistance also deserve grateful mention: Bruce Catton and Carl Haverlin, New York City; E. B. Long, Oak Park, Illinois; Elizabeth E. Hamer, Mary M. Rock, Frank H. Mortimer, and Margaret Wheeler, Washington, D.C. Finally to Lloyd A. Dunlap, who with keen mind and sympathetic heart has been the final editorial guardian of manuscript and proof, goes the respect due one who has earned that rare and wonderful title — gentleman and scholar.

EARL SCHENCK MIERS

Edison, New Jersey

xvii

Preface.

WHEN, thirty-five years ago, the Lincoln Centennial Association of Springfield, Illinois changed its character from a local organization celebrating Lincoln's birthday with an annual banquet to a research organization, the first project undertaken was an attempt to discover where Lincoln was and what he did every day of his life. In 1926 the pioneering result, a slim pamphlet, now a collector's item, Lincoln in the Year 1858, was published. Six others appeared at regular intervals (1859 and 1860 in 1927, 1854 in 1928, 1855 in 1929, 1856 and 1857 in 1930).

In these slender buff paperbacks, each week of the year occupied a page divided into seven spaces. Days for which no information was found were left blank and proved a standing challenge to Lincoln researchers. When days were filled, the publisher (now the Abraham Lincoln Association) printed elongated "stamps" and sent them to its members. Gradually the number of entries grew, and blank days dwindled but never entirely disappeared.

The seven pamphlets, revised, were brought together in 1933 in Lincoln 1854-1861, Being the Day-by-Day Activities of Abraham Lincoln from January 1, 1854 to March 4, 1861, by Paul M. Angle, executive secretary of the Abraham Lincoln Association. The following eight years carried the chronology back to Lincoln's birth with three more volumes — Lincoln 1847-1853 by Benjamin P. Thomas, 1936; and Lincoln 1840-1846 and Lincoln 1809-1839 by Harry E. Pratt, 1939 and 1941 — and the series became known as one of the most useful reference works in the entire range of Lincoln scholarship.

Lincoln's daily activities were chronicled by using every authentic source. In the resulting mountain of material, three sources proved most fruitful: Lincoln's writings; newspapers; and Illinois court records. The opening of the Robert Todd Lincoln Papers in July, 1947, provided much new material, and The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, in nine volumes, appearing in 1953, almost doubled the number of known compositions from Lincoln's pen.

Revising and reprinting the chronology was a project often discussed by Abraham Lincoln Association officials, but never accomplished, as the undertaking would be large and expensive, particularly if carried through Lincoln's years as President. The Lincoln Sesquicentennial Commission, after considering other possibilities, recognized the revision and enlargement of Lincoln Day-by-Day as a research tool indispensable to future generations of students. It is singularly appropriate that an idea conceived by an organization formed to celebrate Lincoln's Centennial

xviii

should be completed by an agency created by Congress to celebrate Lincoln's Sesquicentennial. The Abraham Lincoln Association generously transferred its copyright to the Commission.

To insure the broadest possible coverage, James Hickey and Robert Irving in Springfield investigated newspapers, photostats, court files, and other sources not available a generation ago, producing so large a mass of notes that the revision contains approximately twice as much material as the original. Ellen Whitney completely revised the material on the Black Hawk War. Fugitive court records, and the Herndon & Weik Collection, formerly privately owned and now public property, have permitted an account of Lincoln's law practice probably as complete as documentary survivals allow. The thousands of cases chronicled in these pages do not reveal the complete story of Lincoln, the prairie lawyer, for many court records were unfortunately destroyed by fire and other causes.

These entries mainly speak for themselves, with one exception. In the Herndon & Weik Collection are about a score of legal papers in Lincoln's hand which specify neither court nor date of trial, or papers in cases which never came to trial. It was Lincoln's custom to discourage litigation. But the small number of untried cases in a court career of twenty-four years indicates that, when Lincoln accepted a case, he almost always brought it to trial.

WILLIAM E. BARRINGER

Washington, D.C.

xix

Abbreviation of Sources.

[NOTE FOR THE ELECTRONIC EDITION: All of the abbreviations have eliminated in the electronic edition and extended to their full form. — The Abraham Lincoln Historical Digitization Project.]

The following symbols provide a description of sources abbreviated within the text.

BHWC — Black Hawk War Collection, Illinois State Historical Library, Springfield, Illinois.

CWThe Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953.

DD — David Davis Papers, Illinois State Historical Library, Springfield, Illinois.

EBW — Elihu B. Washburne Papers, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

HW — Herndon & Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

JF — Jesse W. Fell Papers, Illinois State Historical Library, Springfield, Illinois.

JJH — John J. Hardin Papers, Chicago Historical Society, Chicago, Illinois.

LKLincoln Kinsman

JMP — John M. Palmer Papers, Illinois State Historical Library, Springfield, Illinois.

LLLincoln Lore.

LT — Lyman Trumbull Papers, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

OMH — Ozias M. Hatch Papers, Illinois State Historical Library, Springfield, Illinois.

RTL — Robert Todd Lincoln Collection of the Papers of Abraham Lincoln, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

RY — Richard Yates Papers, Illinois State Historical Library, Springfield, Illinois.

SC — Simon Cameron Papers, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

SPC — Salmon P. Chase Papers, Library of Congress, Washington, D. C.

WHH — William H. Herndon Papers, Henry E. Huntington Library, San Marino, California.

The word record, used frequently as a citation, refers to the appropriate official record of the court in which the case in question was filed.

xx

Location Symbols.

[NOTE FOR THE ELECTRONIC EDITION: All of the abbreviations have eliminated in the electronic edition and extended to their full form. — The Abraham Lincoln Historical Digitization Project.]

CSmH — Henry E. Huntington Library, San Marino, California.

DLC — Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

DNA — National Archives, Washington, D.C.

IA — Archives Division, Illinois State Library, Springfield, Illinois.

ICHi — Chicago Historical Society, Chicago, Illinois.

IHi — Illinois State Historical Library, Springfield, Illinois.

ISLA — The Abraham Lincoln Association, Springfield, Illinois. [Files and records on deposit at Illinois State Historical Library, Springfield, Illinois.]

IU — University of Illinois Library, Urbana, Illinois.

IaDaM — Davenport Public Museum, Davenport, Iowa.

IBloHi — McLean County Historical Society, Bloomington, Illinois.

InFtwL — Lincoln National Life Foundation, Fort Wayne, Indiana.

LNT — Howard-Tilton Library, Tulane University, New Orleans, Louisiana.

MH — Harvard University Library, Cambridge, Massachusetts.

NNP — Pierpont Morgan Library, New York City.

OCHP — Historical and Philosophical Society of Ohio, Cincinnati.

RPB — Brown University Library, Providence, Rhode Island.

3

Abraham Lincoln: 1809-1848.

1809

FEBRUARY 12. Hardin County, Kentucky. "I was born Feb. 12, 1809 in then Hardin county Kentucky," wrote Lincoln in June 1860 for Thomas Hicks, "at a point within the now recently formed county of Larue, a mile, or a mile & a half from where Hodgin'sville now is. My parents being dead and my own memory not serving, I know no means of identifying the precise locality. It was on Nolin Creek." [Thomas Lincoln possessed 348 1/2 acres of land when Abraham was born. Abraham's birthplace is approximately three miles south of present day Hodgenville, on Nolin River.] Roy P. Basler (ed.), The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler Editor, Springfield, Illinois IV, 75-6 (cited as CW).

MARCH 15. Elizabethtown, Hardin County, Kentucky. [Thomas Lincoln serves on jury in Daniel Kennedy v. Tobias Hendricks and Jesse Morgan, in Hardin County Court. Order Book C, 277; Louis A. Warren, Lincoln's Parentage and Childhood, 339.]

MARCH 17. [Damage suit for $100, brought by Denton Geoghegan against Thomas Lincoln in Hardin Circuit Court, June, 1808, is dismissed. Alleging that Lincoln had prepared timbers for still in "unworkman like manner," Geoghegan brought suit "in anger" for failure to pay under terms of contract. Warren, 161-64.)

1810

SUMMER. Hardin County. [Thomas Lincoln is taxed as owner of two horses and 200 acres on Mill Creek. He purchased farm for 118 pounds from John F. Stater, Sept. 2, 1803, and with Nancy Hanks lived here for some months after their marriage on June 12, 1806. Hardin County Tax Book, 1810.]

The name of Thomas Lincoln appears on census for Hardin County as a male between 26 and 45 years of age with wife between 26 and 45, boy (Abraham) under ten and girl (Sarah) under ten. This is first time Abraham Lincoln is mentioned in public records.

4

1811

SPRING. Hardin County. Thomas Lincoln moves family from Nolin River farm to better farm of 230 acres on Knob Creek, ten miles north and six miles east of present town of Hodgenville. Farm is on old Cumberland Road, well-traveled highway from Louisville to Nashville. In 1860 Abraham wrote: "The place on Knob Creek . . . I remember very well. My earliest recollection . . . is of the Knob Creek place." Warren, 111-12; The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, IV, 70.

MAY 11. ["Taken up by Thomas Lincoln in Hardin County on Knob Creek, on the road leading from Bardstown to Nolin a gray mare, eight years old . . . . appraised at twenty dollars." Estray Book 1806-1815, 426, Hardin County Court; Warren, 174.]

SEPTEMBER 2. Elizabethtown. [Thomas Lincoln serves on jury in John Handley v. Charles Stewart in Hardin Circuit Court. Order Book D, 49, Hardin Circuit Court; Warren, 339.]

1812

Hardin County. [Thomas, third child of Thomas and Nancy Hanks Lincoln, probably was born this year. Abraham noted that "a brother, younger than himself, . . . died in infancy." How long Thomas Jr. lived is not known. In Redmond family burying ground, one-half mile from Knob Creek farm, headstone marked "T. L." was found in 1933. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, IV, 61; Lincoln Kinsman, No. 9 (cited as Lincoln Kinsman).]

JUNE 11-12. Elizabethtown. [Thomas Lincoln serves on jury in Joseph Kirkpatrick v. William Cessna in Hardin Circuit Court. Order Book D, 188; Warren, 339.]

1813

SEPTEMBER 1-13. Elizabethtown, [Thomas Lincoln is defendant with David Vance and Isaac Bush in suit brought by Richard Mather to force payment of note which he claims Vance has not paid. Mather, original owner of Nolin River farm, sold it to Vance, who sold it to Bush, who sold

5

it to Lincoln. Vance did not complete payment, and obligation was assumed in turn by Bush and then Lincoln. Equity Papers Bundle No. 24, Hardin Circuit Court; Warren, 113.]

SEPTEMBER 7. [Thomas Lincoln, bondsman for Cosbie Scott who is sued on debt, delivers Scott to Hardin Circuit Court. Order Book D.]

1814

APRIL 23. Elizabethtown. Thomas Lincoln calls at Hardin County court house to get deed to Mill Creek farm. Deed has been on file since he purchased farm in 1803. Deed Book B, 253 (marginal note); Warren, 115.]

MAY 9. [Thomas Lincoln, Isom Enlow, Josiah LaFollette, and Daniel Vittetow are appointed to appraise "personal estate and slaves if any of Jonathan Joseph, deceased." Order Book C, 144, Hardin County Court; Warren, 113. Josiah LaFollette was grandfather of Robert Marion LaFollette (1855-1925), governor of Wisconsin, U.S. senator, and in 1924 Progressive candidate for President.]

JUNE 18. Hardin County. [Thomas Lincoln attends sale of his former neighbor Jonathan Joseph. He purchases curry comb for 63 cents and heifer for $9.42 1/2, highest price of three calves sold. Will Book B, 183, Hardin County Court.]

JULY 19. [Thomas Lincoln purchases "1 truck wagon" for eight and one-third ˘ at sale of Thomas Hill (probably child's homemade wagon). Will Book C, 254, Hardin County Court; Warren, 114.]

SEPTEMBER 5. Elizabethtown. Thomas Lincoln files amended answer in Richard Mather v. Vance, Bush, and Lincoln. Equity Papers Bundle 24, Hardin Circuit Court.)

OCTOBER 10. Hardin County. [Thomas Lincoln puts his name to report to Hardin Court on Jonathan Joseph sale. Will Book B, 183, Hardin County Court.]

OCTOBER 27. [Thomas Lincoln sells for 100 pounds to Charles Melton his farm of 238 acres on Mill Creek, seven miles north of Elizabethtown, which he purchased from John F. Stater, Sept. 2, 1803. Deed Book E, Hardin County Court; Warren, 115.]

6

1815

SUMMER. Elizabethtown. [Thomas Lincoln is taxed on four horses and 230 acres on Knob Creek. Commissioners Tax Book for 1815, Hardin County.]

SEPTEMBER 15. [Stout, Sheridan, and Thomas Rhodes bring suit in ejectment against Thomas Lincoln to recover Knob Creek farm. Equity Papers Miscellaneous Bundle, Hardin Circuit Court.]

AUTUMN. Hardin County. "Before leaving Kentucky he [Abraham] and his sister were sent for short periods, to A. B. C. schools, the first kept by Zachariah Riney, and the second by Caleb Hazel." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953 IV, 61. [Riney, a Catholic, presumably kept subscription school on location of present town of Athertonville, two miles northeast of Lincoln's farm. Sarah and Abraham attended this school for a few weeks in fall of 1815. In fall of 1816 Caleb Hazel, who lived across the road from the Lincolns, taught the school. Albert J. Beveridge, Abraham Lincoln 1809-1858, I, 28.]

1816

MAY 18. Elizabethtown. [Thomas Lincoln is appointed "surveyor of that part of the road, leading from Nolin to Bardstown, which lies between the Bigg Hill and the Rolling Fork." He appears to supervise road until he moves to Indiana in autumn. Order Book C, 311, Hardin County Court; facsimile in Ida M. Tarbell, The Life of Abraham Lincoln (1924 ed.), I, 15.]

JUNE 14. Hardin County. [Thomas Lincoln is summoned to answer to Knob Creek ejectment suit. Equity Papers Miscellaneous Bundle, Hardin Circuit Court.]

SEPTEMBER 11-12 Elizabethtown. [Thomas Lincoln's Nolin River farm case is tried. Court orders Isaac Bush to return to Thomas $200 he paid in December, 1808. Equity Papers Bundle No. 24, Hardin Circuit Court.]

AUTUMN. [Austin Gollaher's boyhood recollection of saving Abraham from drowning in Knob Creek is one of the few stories of Lincoln's boyhood in Kentucky which may be factual. This is the one story Gollaher told Herndon in 1865. William H. Herndon and Jesse W. Weik, Herndon's Life of Lincoln (1930 ed.), 18.]

7

OCTOBER 12. [Thomas Lincoln signs marriage bond of Caleb Hazel, his nearest neighbor and Abraham's schoolteacher. Marriage Bonds, 1816, Hardin Circuit Court; Warren, 119-20.]

NOVEMBER 11. Thomas Lincoln swears to truth of statements in cross bill filed in Richard Mather v. Lincoln, Bush, and Vance. Case has been transferred to Nelson County Court, and is Thomas Lincoln's last recorded act performed in Kentucky prior to moving to Indiana. Equity Bundle No. 24, Hardin Circuit Court; Warren, 118.]

DECEMBER. En route from Kentucky to Indiana. "From this place [Knob Creek farm] he [Thomas Lincoln] removed to what is now Spencer county [then Perry County] Indiana, in the autumn of 1816, A. then being in his eigth [sic] year." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, IV, 61. "We reached our new home about the time the State came into the Union. [Indiana admitted Dec. 11, 1816.]" Ibid., III, 511. This trip of 91 miles took approximately five days. Warren, 294.

Lincoln wrote that Indiana was then "a wild region, with many bears and other wild animals still in the woods." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, III, 511. "He [Thomas] settled in an unbroken forest; and the clearing away of surplus wood was the great task a head. A. though very young, was large of his age, and had an axe put into his hands at once; and from that till within his twentythird year, he was almost constantly handling that most useful instrument — less, of course, in plowing and harvesting seasons." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953. IV, 62.

1817

FEBRUARY. Perry County, Indiana. "At this place A. took an early start as a hunter, which was never much improved afterwards. (A few days before the completion of his eigth year, in the absence of his father, a flock of wild turkeys approached the new log-cabin, and A. with a rifle gun, standing inside, shot through a crack, and killed one of them. He has never since pulled a trigger on any larger game.)" Ibid.

OCTOBER 15. Vincennes, Indiana. [Thomas Lincoln enters at government land office at Vincennes farm upon which he is living. (S.W. 1/4 of Sec. 32, T. 4 S., R. 5 W. of 2 P.M.) He pays preliminary installment of $16. Beveridge, I, 47; Land Entry Book, Carter Township, Spencer County, 296.]

DECEMBER. [Thomas Lincoln pays $64 at government land office, completing first installment of $80, one-fourth of purchase price of farm. Beveridge, I, 47.]

8

1818

Spencer County, Indiana. "In his tenth year he [Abraham while at Gordon's Mill] was kicked by a horse, and apparantly killed for a time."The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953. IV, 62 [see Herndon & Weik, 51-2].

SEPTEMBER 21. [Nancy Hanks Lincoln signs as witness to Thomas Sparrow's will, making her mark. Spencer County Court Record. Soon after will is made, Thomas Sparrow and his wife, Elizabeth Hanks Sparrow, die of milk sickness. They are buried on knoll quarter-mile south of log cabin home of Lincolns.]

OCTOBER 5. [Nancy Hanks Lincoln dies of milk sickness and is buried near Thomas and Elizabeth Hanks Sparrow. The Abraham Lincoln Association, Springfield, Illinois. [Files and records on deposit at Illinois State Historical Library, Springfield, Illinois.] — photo, Lincoln Family Bible. Date of Nancy's birth is not known, but she is thought to have been about 25 or 26 years of age when she married Thomas Lincoln in 1806.]

1819

AUGUST. Spencer County. [Thomas Lincoln votes at election held in house of Jonathan Greathouse. Thirty-one votes are cast. History of Warrick, Perry & Spencer Counties, 272.]

DECEMBER 2. Elizabethtown. [Thomas Lincoln and Sarah Bush Johnston are married in Elizabethtown. Rev. George L. Rogers, minister of Methodist Church, performs ceremony. The Abraham Lincoln Association, Springfield, Illinois. [Files and records on deposit at Illinois State Historical Library, Springfield, Illinois.] — Photo., Lincoln Family Bible.]

1820

Spencer County. Abraham is listed in U.S. census as "male under 16." The other seven individuals in Lincoln cabin are Thomas, 42; Mrs. Sarah Johnston Lincoln, 32; Dennis F. Hanks, 21; Sarah Lincoln, 13; Elizabeth Johnston, 13; Matilda Johnston, 9; and John D. Johnston, 10. [U.S. Census, 1850, Charleston, Ill., gives Thomas Lincoln, 72, John D. Johnston, 40.]

WINTER. Nat Grigsby, neighbor, says he attended Andrew Crawford's school with Abraham and Sarah Lincoln. Emanuel Hertz, The Hidden Lincoln, 354; Lincoln Lore, No. 59 [cited as Lincoln Lore).

9

1821

JUNE 14. Spencer County. [Elizabeth Johnston Lincoln, eldest of Abraham's two stepsisters, marries Dennis F. Hanks, first cousin of Nancy Hanks Lincoln. Marriage Register, Spencer County, Lincoln Kinsman, No. 19.]

1822

Spencer County. Abraham attends "blab" school kept by James Swaney for about four months. School is located four miles from Lincoln home. John Hanks, cousin of Nancy Hanks Lincoln, lived "near to and with Thomas Lincoln for four years," beginning this year. Hertz, 346, 354; Lincoln Kinsman, No. 19.)

1823

JUNE 7. Spencer County. [Thomas Lincoln joins Pigeon Baptist Church by letter. Pigeon Church Record.]

1824

Spencer County. Abraham attends school of Azel Dorsey for about six months. Hertz, 354; Lincoln Kinsman, No. 19.

APRIL 10. [Thomas Lincoln is appointed by Pigeon Baptist Church board to attend church conference. Pigeon Church Record.]

"Abraham Lincoln is my nam[e] And with my pen I wrote the same[.] I wrote in both hast[e] and speed and left it here for fools to read"

Well-known verse copied by Lincoln. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, illus.

OCTOBER 9. [Thomas Lincoln is put on Pigeon Baptist Church discipline committee to visit man and wife who had separated. Pigeon Church Record.]

10

1825

JUNE 12. Spencer County. [Thomas Lincoln is one of three church trustees to arrange for repairing Pigeon Baptist Church. Ibid.)

JUNE 21. [Thomas Lincoln's name appears on Pigeon Baptist Church membership list with his wife Sarah. Ibid.)

1826

MARCH. Spencer County. Abraham Lincoln writes "1826" on page of his "Book of Examples in Arithmetic." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, illus.

APRIL 4. [Abraham's sister Sarah is received into membership in Pigeon Baptist Church. Pigeon Church Record.)

AUGUST 2. [Abraham's sister Sarah marries Aaron Grigsby. Marriage Record, Spencer County.)

AUGUST 4. [Thomas Lincoln is appointed on committee of Pigeon Baptist Church to interview persons not in good standing in church. Pigeon Church Record.)

1827

Spencer County. Abraham Lincoln works for James Taylor for nine months as farm hand, and at ferry at mouth of Anderson Greek. Hertz, 362.

Ohio River. Some time during this year Abraham earns his first dollar ferrying passengers to steamer in Ohio River. He is acquitted in Squire Samuel Pate's Court of violating Ohio River ferry ordinance. Beveridge, I, 85; Francis B. Carpenter, Six Months at the White House, 96-8.

MARCH 9. Spencer County. [Pigeon Baptist Church subscription list records gift from Thomas Lincoln of 24 pounds of manufactured corn. Pigeon Church Record.)

APRIL 30. Vincennes. [On Apr. 5, 1827 James McCrery assigns to Thomas Lincoln $80 interest in 80-acre tract in Posey County, Indiana. This

11

interest Lincoln relinquishes to government to complete payment on west 80 acres of his farm; $16 and $64 were paid Oct. and Dec., respectively, in 1817. His patent for west 80 acres is signed by President Adams June 6, 1827. Lincoln relinquishes east half of 160 acres he entered in 1817 to James Gentry. Beveridge, I, 95; Lincoln Lore, No. 413.]

1828

JANUARY 20. Spencer County. [Sarah Lincoln Grigsby, sister of Abraham, dies in childbirth. She is buried in Pigeon Baptist Church burial ground. The Abraham Lincoln Association, Springfield, Illinois. [Files and records on deposit at Illinois State Historical Library, Springfield, Illinois.] — Photo., Lincoln Family Bible.)

SEPTEMBER. [Thomas Lincoln resigns as trustee of Pigeon Baptist Church. Pigeon Church Record.]

OHIO RIVER. "When he was nineteen, still residing in Indiana, he made his first trip upon a flat-boat to New-Orleans." Lincoln and Allen Gentry, son of James Gentry, owner of cargo, make trip. "The nature of part of the cargo-load, as it was called — made it necessary for them to linger and trade along the Sugar coast — and one night they were attacked by seven negroes with intent to kill and rob them. They were hurt some in the melee, but succeeded in driving the negroes from the boat, and then ‘cut cable’ ‘weighed anchor’ and left." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, IV, 62. Flatboat trip, which began at Rockport, Indiana, probably took three months.

1829

SPENCER COUNTY. Lincoln works in James Gentry's store at place later named Gentryville. Lincoln Kinsman. No. 19.

NOVEMBER 26. [Thomas Lincoln receives unknown amount from Charles Grigsby to be applied on purchase of Lincoln farm. Spencer County DeedBook B, 63.)

DECEMBER 12. [Thomas and Sarah Lincoln are granted "letter of dismission" from Pigeon Baptist Church, which is recalled on objection of Mrs. Nancy Grigsby. Differences are patched up, as Thomas is appointed Jan. 10 to committee to settle quarrel between two sisters of congregation. Pigeon Church Record.]

12

1830

FEBRUARY 20. Spencer County. [Thomas and Sarah Lincoln convey 80-acre farm for $125 to Charles Grigsby. Spencer County Deed Book, B, 63. Thomas also owned 20 acres in southeast corner of Sec. 31, adjoining farm on west. Date of purchase and sale of tract are not known. Only record of Lincoln's ownership is in deed made March 11, 1834, by James Gentry to Joseph Gentry. Lincoln Lore, No. 413.]

MARCH 1. En Route to Vincennes. "On the first of March, 1830, his father determined to emigrate once more. . . . The emigrant company was made up of Thomas Lincoln's family, and the families of Mrs. Lincoln's two sons-in-law. Their means of progress and conveyance were ox-wagons, one of which Abraham Lincoln drove." [Mrs. Harriet Hanks Chapman said they had three wagons, two drawn by two yoke of oxen each, and one by two teams of horses.] William Dean Howells, Life of Abraham Lincoln (1938 ed.), 23.

Company consists of Thomas Lincoln, his wife Sarah Bush Lincoln and her son, John D. Johnston; Dennis Hanks, his wife Sarah E. Hanks, their daughters Sarah Jane, Nancy M. and Harriet, and son John Talbot; Squire Hall, his wife Matilda and their son John; and Abraham Lincoln, 13 in all. Sarah E. Hanks and Matilda Hall were daughters of Sarah Bush Johnston Lincoln.

There is no distinct proof of route followed by Lincoln party on 225-mile journey from Gentryville to Decatur, Illinois, except from Vincennes to Lawrenceville. Indiana Lincoln Memorial Way Commission chose TroyVincennes trail, which passed through Polk Patch [now Selvin], Petersburg, and Monroe City. Probably four or five days completed 75-mile journey to Vincennes. Lincoln Lore, No. 161.

MARCH 6. En Route to Lawrenceville and Palestine. Caravan crosses Wabash River, flooded by spring rains. Leaving ferry, they continue west along road, much of which is under water. Ten miles beyond Purgatory Bottom they reach Lawrenceville. Leaving Lawrenceville, they turn northeast toward Palestine. During this day's journey Abraham rescues his dog. Lincoln Lore, No. 480.

MARCH 8-11. En Route to Paradise. The Lincolns probably continue north on old Indian trail to Hutsonville. Route from here to old site of Paradise, three miles southwest of Matoon, cannot be clearly defined. Possibly they continue north to West Union, then turn northwest, passing through Melrose and Martinsville. They proceed northwest to Paradise, where they stay night of March 11 with Sawyers and Radleys, relatives of Mrs. Lincoln. The Abraham Lincoln Association, Springfield, Illinois. [Files and records on deposit at Illinois State Historical Library, Springfield, Illinois.] — Bulletin, No. 11

13

MARCH 12-14. En Route to Decatur. From Paradise caravan turns north through Nelson, crossing Kaskaskia River at Willow Ford, four miles southeast of present Sullivan. Trail then passes through Chipps and Lovington to Decatur. [On night of March 14 they camp in village square of Decatur. Decatur, granted post office a week before their arrival, contains less than a dozen log houses set in grove of oaks.] Ibid.

MARCH 15. Macon County. "Lincoln's family ‘located’ on some new land, ten miles northwest [southwest] of Decatur, on the north bank of the Sangamon river, at a junction of forest and prairie land. Here the father and son built a log-cabin [also smoke house and barn], and split rails enough to fence in their land." [Lincoln farm was located on S.E. 1/4 of the S.W. 1/4 of Sec. 28, T. 16 N., R. I E. of 3 P.M.] Howells, 23; Edwin D. Davis "The Hanks Family in Macon County, Ill.," Illinois State Historical Library, Springfield, Illinois. — Papers, 1939, 83.

SPRING. "Lincoln broke up fifteen acres of land. Abraham and myself split the rails; he owned four yoke of oxen; broke prairie in the summer; broke thirty acres for my brother; he broke prairie for others." Hertz, 347.

MAY 26. Decatur. Lincoln signs petition to Macon County Commissioner's Court asking change of polling place, with 44 other "qualified voters," although he is not yet qualified to vote. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 2.

JUNE 17. Macon County. Tradition has Lincoln attending wedding of Mary (Polly) Warnick to Joseph Stevens, one of nine weddings in Macon County this year. Davis, 89, 95.

SUMMER. Decatur. Lincoln makes first political speech in Illinois during campaign meeting in front of Renshaw's store in Decatur. William L. D. Ewing and John F. Posey of Fayette County, candidates for legislature, speak. Lincoln advocates improvement of Sangamon River for navigation. Howells, 28; Davis, 97.

JULY. Macon County. "The year I [Abraham] passed in Macon County I was with him [Charles Hanks] a good deal — mostly on his own place, where I helped him at breaking prairie, with a joint team of his and ours, which in turn, broke some on the new place we were improving." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, IV, 100.

AUGUST 2. [W. L. D. Ewing and John F. Posey are elected to Seventh General Assembly. Ewing gets 86 votes to 54 for Posey in Decatur. Lincoln does not vote; he is not eligible under law requiring six months residence. Davis, 98-9.]

AUGUST 16. Decatur. Lincoln makes purchase for his father at James Renshaw's store. Ida M. Tarbell, In the Footsteps of the Lincolns, 161.

DECEMBER 16. Lincoln and John W. Reed appraise estrayed mare, "bright bay 14 hands high," at $30. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 3

14

WINTER. 1830-31. Macon County. "Abraham during the winter of 1830-31 walked three miles and made a thousand rails for Major [William] Warnick." Hertz, 347.

1831

FEBRUARY. Macon County. While crossing Sangamon River, Lincoln breaks through ice and gets his feet wet. In going two miles to house of William Warnick he freezes his feet. Mrs. Warnick puts his feet in snow, to take out frost bite, and rubs them with grease, perhaps "rabbit ile." Davis, 103.

MARCH. En Route to Sangamo Town. "In the month of March, 1831, in company with others, I commenced the building of a flatboat on the Sangamo, and finished and took her out in the course of the spring." Lincoln, John Hanks, and John D. Johnston embark in canoe on north fork of Sangamon River for Springfield to see Denton Offutt, who has hired them to take flatboat of produce to New Orleans. Leaving canoe at Jamestown, now Riverton, they proceed afoot to Springfield, finding Offutt at Andrew Elliott's tavern. Next two weeks are spent cutting logs and rafting them from mouth of Spring Greek, four miles north of Springfield, down Sangamon to Sangamo Town, seven miles northwest of Springfield. Logs are sawed at William Kirkpatrick's mill on Prairie Creek one and one half miles southwest of Sangamo Town. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 6; IV, 63.

MARCH 11 (?). Sangamo Town. Lincoln signs his name and names of John Hanks and John D. Johnston to petition to county commissioners' court to fill vacancy in office of constable, Springfield district. Illinois State Historical Library, Springfield, Illinois.

APRIL. Erastus Wright, assessor of Sangamon County, visits Sangamo Town and watches building of flatboat. He sees Lincoln with his "boots off, hat, coat and vest off. Pants rolled up to his knees and shirt wet with sweat and combing his fuzzie hair with his fingers as he pounded away on the boat." The Abraham Lincoln Association, Springfield, Illinois. [Files and records on deposit at Illinois State Historical Library, Springfield, Illinois.] — Bulletin, No. 50.

APRIL 18. En Route to New Salem. "We finished making and launching the boat in about four weeks. We loaded the boat with barrel pork, corn, and live hogs, and left Sangamontown." Hertz, 348. Lincoln describes himself as "a strange(r], friendless, uneducated, penniless boy, working on a flat boat — at ten dollars per month."The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 320.

APRIL 19. New Salem. "We landed at the New Salem mill about April 19 and got fast on Rutledge's mill dam." Hertz, 348. Lincoln gets his first view of New Salem. In his address Mar. 9, 1832 he said: "The time

15

at which we crossed the mill dam, being in the last days of April, the water was lower than it had been since the breaking of winter in February, or than it was for several weeks after." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 6.

APRIL-JULY 8. En Route to and from New Orleans. Flatboat journey to New Orleans is reported to have taken a month. John Hanks left boat in St. Louis, but Offutt, Lincoln, and Johnston continue to New Orleans and appear to have stayed a month. Lincoln and Offutt may have returned together to Springfield, for license to retail merchandise in Sangamon County is granted Denton Offutt July 8, 1831. Five-dollar fee indicates stock in store was valued at $1,000. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953. IV, 64; County Commissioners' Record C, 256.

JULY. New Salem. Lincoln arrives in New Salem late in July, a "piece of floating driftwood" as he later described himself. As he notes in an autobiography in 1860, he is for first time residing "by himself." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, IV, 64.

AUGUST 1. Lincoln casts his first vote and gains reputation as storyteller. Voting place of Clary's Grove precinct, which included New Salem, is at John Camron's house. He votes for James Turney for Congress, who is opposed by Edward Coles, Joseph Duncan, Alexander P. Field, and Sidney Breese. He votes for Bowling Green and Edmund Greer for justices of peace, and for John [Jack] Armstrong and Henry Sinco for constables. Election Returns.

SEPTEMBER 2. Lincoln and William G. Greene witness deed given by William Batterton to Denton Offutt for Lot 14 in town of New Salem. Offutt pays $ 10 for lot on which he intends to erect store building. Lincoln begins clerking in store in September. Record E, 297.

SEPTEMBER 13. [Denton Offutt, with Joseph Glasscock as surety, gives note for $110 to William Porter. Note, drawn in presence of Virgil Hickox, is for 60 days at 60 per cent interest. Porter immediately assigns note to William Brown who files suit against Offutt to collect on note in September, 1832 term of Sangamon Circuit Court. Illinois State Historical Library, Springfield, Illinois. — Files.]

OCTOBER 20. Lincoln signs as witness to following: "This is to certify that I have sold all my Rite and title to the New Salem ferry to John Ferguson this 20th of October 1831 James Richerson." [Richardson had taken over ferry from William Clary.] Photo.

NOVEMBER 12. Lincoln writes bond for deed for James Eastep. Eastep agrees to convey to Solomon Teter within five years land in St. Clair County "which falls to my wife as an heir of Abraham Teter deceased." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 3-4.

16

DECEMBER 9. Lincoln and Charles Maltby witness two deeds given by John Camron to John McNamar. McNamar buys for $200 each 40 and 80 acre tracts on Sand Ridge seven miles northwest of New Salem. Deed Book F, 48-9.

DECEMBER 19. Lincoln and Charles Maltby witness deed for John M. Camron to David Whary. Camron deeds Lot 12 on the __ side of Main Street in first New Salem survey. Deed Book E, 309.

1832

JANUARY 16. New Salem. Lincoln and Bowling Green witness deed given by John Jones, Sr., to John Watkins, Sr., for 80-acre tract located five miles northwest of New Salem. Consideration is $120. Deed Book E, 433-34.

JANUARY 25. Lincoln writes following agreement: "Know all men by these presents that I John Ferguson for and in consideration of the sum of thirty five dollars have given granted bargained and sold all my right and title in and to the New Salem ferry in Sangamon County unto Alexander Trent[.] In testimony where of I have hereunto set my hand this 25th. January 1832." Photo.

MARCH 8. Lincoln writes following receipt: "Mr. James Rutledge please to pay the bearer David P. Nelson thirty dollars and this shall be your receipt for the same. A. Lincoln for D. Offutt." [This is the first record of expression "this shall be your receipt for the same," which Lincoln uses so often.] Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

[Denton Offutt informs farmers of Sangamon and Morgan counties that he will have by last of march 3,000 or 4,000 bushels of seed corn at New Salem, which he proposes to sell at $i per bushel. He will also have quantity of cotton seed from Tennessee. Subscriptions will immediately be opened for seed corn, and subscribers will have preference. Sangamo Journal, Springfield, Ill., Mar. 8.]

MARCH 9. Probably with help of Mentor Graham and John McNamar, Lincoln writes his platform as candidate for Illinois legislature. Published first in "Sangamo Journal," Mar. 15, 1832, it is later issued as handbill. He describes in detail need for improvement of Sangamon River and closes with his views on usury laws and universal education. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 5-9.

MARCH 13-25 (?). Steamboat Talisman, J. M. Pollock, Master, leaves Beardstown to ascend Sangamon to Vincent A. Bogue's mill at Portland, five miles north of Springfield. Several citizens of New Salem and Springfield,

17

including Lincoln, go along to help clear obstructions. Four days are spent breaking through ice at Sangamon entrance. Boat does not arrive at Portland until Mar. 24.

Lincoln probably attends ball at court house in Springfield Mar. 26. After staying week at Portland, trip down Sangamon begins with Lincoln as assistant to J. Rowan Herndon of New Salem, pilot. Sangamo Journal, Mar. 29; Missouri Republican, St. Louis, Missouri, Feb. 21, 28, Mar. 6, 13, 27, Apr. 3.

MARCH 26. Lincoln writes and signs, for Denton Offutt, receipt to William Barnett "in full of all due debts and demands up to this date." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 9.

APRIL 5. [Black Hawk crosses Mississippi River into Illinois for purpose, he declares, of raising corn along Rock River. With him are 400 or 500 horsemen, plus old men and boys in charge of canoes, as well as women and children, totaling about 2,000 people. — Illinois State Historical Library, Springfield, Illinois. — Black Hawk War Collection (Cited as Black Hawk War Collection, Illinois State Historical Library, Springfield, Illinois.] Journal of Albert Sidney Johnston, Apr. 10; Gen. Henry Atkinson to Gov. John Reynolds, Apr., 10, 13, 27, Atkinson Letter Book.)

APRIL 7. Lincoln is elected captain of company in Thirty-first Regiment of Illinois Militia. Thomas Wigginton is appointed first lieutenant and Coonrad Elmore second lieutenant. Archives Division, Illinois State Library, Springfield, Illinois. — Executive Register.

APRIL 19. News reaches New Salem of Gov. Reynolds' call for mounted volunteers to meet at Beardstown Apr. 22 to drive Black Hawk and his band west of Mississippi River. Sangamon County is called on for 350 men. Frank E. Stevens, The Black Hawk War, 113; The Abraham Lincoln Association, Springfield, Illinois. [Files and records on deposit at Illinois State Historical Library, Springfield, Illinois.] — Bulletin, No. 54.

APRIL 21. New Salem and Richland. Lincoln gives William Sampson receipt "in full of all demands up to the day." — Photo. [In 1860 Lincoln wrote: "In less than a year Offutt's business was failing — had almost failed — when the Black Hawk war of 1832 — broke out."The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953. IV, 64.] Black Hawk War recruits of New Salem, neighborhood meet at farm of Dallas Scott on Richland Greek, nine miles southwest of New Salem. They form company and elect Lincoln captain. The Abraham Lincoln Association, Springfield, Illinois. [Files and records on deposit at Illinois State Historical Library, Springfield, Illinois..] — Bulletin, No. 54; Isaac H. Elliott (ed.), Record of the Services of Illinois Soldiers in the Black Hawk War, 100.

APRIL 22. Beardstown. Lincoln's company goes into camp at Beardstown. In wrestling match with Lorenzo Dow Thompson, Lincoln is thrown in two straight falls. Match is to settle whether Lincoln's company or Capt. William Moore's company shall have camp ground. Illinois State Historical Library, Springfield, Illinois. — Trans., 1904, 433-34.

Gov. Reynolds writes to Gen. Henry Atkinson at Fort Armstrong that he expects to have "about 1,500 mounted men on the 25th or 26th inst." Spring of 1832 has been wet and little farm work has been done. Farmers

18

who have volunteered expect to be home from campaign in few days to work fields. Horses are hard to get, and forage is scarce. Illinois State Historical Library, Springfield, Illinois. — Black Hawk War Collection, Illinois State Historical Library, Springfield, Illinois. Reynolds Letter Book.

APRIL 23-26. Lincoln and other captains hold light drills. On 25th, Lincoln draws from Brigade Quartermaster William Thomas corn, pork, salt, one barrel of flour, and five and a half gallons of whiskey. Next day he draws fifty pounds of lead. Illinois State Historical Library, Springfield, Illinois. — Black Hawk War Collection, Illinois State Historical Library, Springfield, Illinois. Quartermaster's Record.

[Sangamo Journal, Apr, 26, bursts into poetry:

Brave Sangamo hath arm'd
All to defend her right
Arouse ye bold Kentucky boys
The foremost in the fight
Away! away! away!

Two Sauk messengers sent by Gen. Atkinson return from Black Hawk's camp and report that Black Hawk and chiefs of band say they have "no bad intentions," but will not return to west side of Mississippi. Illinois State Historical Library, Springfield, Illinois. — Journal of Felix St. Vrain, Apr. 26, Photo)

APRIL 27. Capt. Lincoln draws one axe from quartermaster. Illinois State Historical Library, Springfield, Illinois. — Black Hawk War Collection, Illinois State Historical Library, Springfield, Illinois, Quartermaster's Record.

[Contemporary letters indicate that Lincoln's company, like many others, changed its view of war after five days in camp. Little disposition was at first manifested to question governor's call. But lack of discipline and shameful way appointments are made cause many soldiers to believe they are on holiday excursion and not on expedition against hostile Indians.]

APRIL 28. Capt. Lincoln's company is enrolled in state service by Col. John J. Hardin, inspector general and mustering officer. Stevens, 279. Lincoln draws supplies — soap, candles, flints, 50-pound grid iron, 4 tin buckets, 7 coffee boilers, 7 tin pans, and 16 tin cups, as well as 1 keg powder, whiskey, corn, pork, flour, bread, salt, 3 blankets, 144 yards of domestic, and "1 Buck Tape." Illinois State Historical Library, Springfield, Illinois. — Black Hawk War Collection, Illinois State Historical Library, Springfield, Illinois. Quartermaster's Record. From Cyrus Edwards, acting quartermaster general, he draws 30 muskets and bayonets. [When Lincoln returns these arms, three muskets and nine bayonets are missing.] Archives Division, Illinois State Library, Springfield, Illinois — Governor's Correspondence, Military.

APRIL 29. En Route to Yellow Banks. March from Beardstown begins. Some 150 soldiers without horses are ordered to go by boat to Yellow Banks. Gov. Reynolds and 1,500 mounted militia camp for night three miles east of Rushville. Illinois State Historical Library, Springfield, Illinois. — Black Hawk War Collection, Illinois State Historical Library, Springfield, Illinois. Reynolds Order and Letter Book.

APRIL 30. According to Orville H. Browning, volunteers move to new camp four miles north of Rushville, day's march being seven miles. Stevens, 117-18. William Carpenter of Sangamon County reports day's march as

19

three miles and camp as Rushville. Elliott, xvii. Gen. Whiteside orders that "there is to be no firing of guns in the lines or encampment without permission." Lincoln's company is made part of Fourth Illinois Regiment of Mounted Volunteers, commanded by Col. Samuel M. Thompson, in brigade of Brig. Gen. Samuel Whiteside. Col. Thompson began his services as first lieutenant in Lincoln's company. David Prickett to editor, Illinois Herald, Springfield, May 3; Illinois State Historical Library, Springfield, Illinois. — Black Hawk War Collection, Illinois State Historical Library, Springfield, Illinois. Reynolds Order and Letter Book.

MAY 1. After March of 25 miles, camp is made on Crooked Creek, six miles northeast of Macomb. Elliott, xvii; Diary of O. H. Browning, in Stevens, 117-18.

MAY 2. March of 20 miles is made. Volunteers camp on large prairie, two miles from timber or water, 18 miles south of Yellow Banks. Much dissatisfaction and murmuring is heard from troops about cold and dampness of ground. Ibid.

MAY 3. Henderson River is reached about noon, according to O. H. Browning. Ibid. Gov. Reynolds and Madison County volunteer say they reached river in evening. John Reynolds, My Own Times (1879 ed.), 226; Illinois Advocate, Vandalia, May 8. Gov. Reynolds says river is 50 yards wide and running "like a milltail." By felling trees into river, volunteers cross, swimming their horses. March is resumed and camp made at Yellow Banks. Citizens are calm, and this spirit spreads through army. No guard is placed at night. Stevens, 117-18; Illinois State Historical Library, Springfield, Illinois. — Black Hawk War Collection, Illinois State Historical Library, Springfield, Illinois. Reynolds to Atkinson, May 4; John A. Wakefield, Wakefield's History of the Black Hawk War.

Provisions are scarce and hogs on nearby farms are shot by undisciplined troops. Gov. Reynolds writes Gen. Atkinson that he must "have cartridges for 5 or 600 muskets." Illinois State Historical Library, Springfield, Illinois. — Black Hawk War Collection, Illinois State Historical Library, Springfield, Illinois. Reynolds Order and Letter Book Diary of O. H. Browning in Stevens, 117-18. Gov. Reynolds dispatches three messengers to Fort Armstrong, 50 miles distant, for provisions. In 24 hours troops will be without food. Illinois State Historical Library, Springfield, Illinois. — Black Hawk War Collection, Illinois State Historical Library, Springfield, Illinois. Reynolds Order and Letter Book; Diary of O. H. Browning in Stevens, 117-18.

MAY 6. En Route to Rock River. Before noon steamboat William Wallace arrives with supplies, and later another steamboat arrives with provisions from Fort Armstrong. Volunteers begin march toward mouth of Rock River and camp is made 30 miles north of Yellow Banks on Camp Creek. Reynolds, 227; Elliott, xvii.

MAY 7. Most of baggage wagons are used for officers' equipment. Privates carry cooking utensils and rations for eight to ten days. About nightfall volunteers, after marching 20 miles, make camp on Rock River. On May 8 Gov. Reynolds writes Gen. Atkinson from "Camp at the Old Sac Village," and next day Rock Island Indian agent Felix St. Vrain says that volunteers are "still encamped on the large Island [Vandruff's] in Rock River opposite

20

the Old Village." Rock Island County tradition locates May 7 — May 10 camp on south side of river near town of Milan. Since Vandruff's Island lies between Milan and village on north side of river, it is not unlikely that camps extended from Milan to island and perhaps across to village; good fords cross both channels of river. Elliott, xvii; Illinois State Historical Library, Springfield, Illinois. — Black Hawk War Collection, Illinois State Historical Library, Springfield, Illinois, Johnston Journal; William Orr to John York Sawyer, July I; Journal of Felix St. Vrain, May 9, Photo.; Trans., 1921, 92-106.

MAY 8. Rock River. Gov. Reynolds turns troops over to Gen. Atkinson. Rumor spreads through camp that Black Hawk is coming down river. Gov. Reynolds' volunteers are mustered into Federal service. Gen. Atkinson reviews volunteers and orders troops to be ready to march at moment's notice. Illinois State Historical Library, Springfield, Illinois. — Black Hawk War Collection, Illinois State Historical Library, Springfield, Illinois. Johnston Journal; Atkinson Order Book.

MAY 9. Gen. Atkinson and U.S. troops leave Fort Armstrong at 9:30 A.M. aboard Java, arriving at old Sauk village at 11 A.M. U.S. troops join volunteers at Rapids of Rock River, but steamboat is unable to pass rapids. Illinois Advocate, May 15; Illinois State Historical Library, Springfield, Illinois. — Black Hawk War Collection, Illinois State Historical Library, Springfield, Illinois. Johnston Journal; Journal of Felix St. Vrain, Photo.

MAY 10. En Route to Prophetstown. By order of Gen. Atkinson, 1,500 volunteers under Gen. Whiteside march up left bank of Rock River, following trail taken by Black Hawk. Day's march is 26 miles. Gen. Atkinson and regulars follow in keel and mackinaw boats. Col. Zachary Taylor is in immediate command of regulars and unmounted Illinois infantry. Stevens, 126; Illinois State Historical Library, Springfield, Illinois. — Black Hawk War Collection, Illinois State Historical Library, Springfield, Illinois. Whiteside to Atkinson, May 12; Elliott, xvii.

MAY 11. Prophetstown. Prophet's village is reached at noon. Stopping only long enough to burn Indian huts, men resume march. Twelve miles north, Gen. Whiteside abandons 20 baggage wagons, and orders forced march toward Dixon's Ferry. Camp is made eight miles south of ferry. Elliott, xvii; Illinois State Historical Library, Springfield, Illinois. — Black Hawk War Collection, Illinois State Historical Library, Springfield, Illinois., Whiteside to Atkinson, May 18; Wakefield, 41-4; Reynolds, 229; Illinois State Historical Library, Springfield, Illinois. — William Orr to John York Sawyer, July 1.

MAY 12. Dixon's Ferry. Whiteside's army arrives at Dixon's Ferry at 10 A.M. with less than two days' provisions. Here Whiteside finds Maj. Isaiah Stillman with about 260 men. Gen. Whiteside refuses Gov. Reynolds' request to take command of Stillman's men. Illinois State Historical Library, Springfield, Illinois. — Black Hawk War Collection, Illinois State Historical Library, Springfield, Illinois. Whiteside to Atkinson, May 12, 18.

MAY 13. Battalions under Maj. Stillman and Maj. David Bailey march out, with four days' rations, for Old Man's Creek, where portion of Black Hawk's band is believed encamped. Gov. Reynolds, finding Stillman's and Bailey's troops too impatient to await arrival of Gen. Atkinson and regulars, gives them orders to move against Indians, "for the purpose of taking all cautious measures to coerce [them] into submission." Stevens, 131-32; Illinois State Historical Library, Springfield, Illinois. — Black Hawk War Collection, Illinois State Historical Library, Springfield, Illinois. Whiteside to Atkinson, May 18.

21

MAY 14. Gen. Whiteside's army remains inactive. Illinois State Historical Library, Springfield, Illinois. — Black Hawk War Collection, Illinois State Historical Library, Springfield, Illinois. Reynolds and Whiteside to Atkinson. Several groups of Stillman's men rush out of camp at dusk and attack Black Hawk's truce bearers, bringing on battle with 40 or 50 Indians. Whites are soon routed. Leaving 12 dead, they flee to Dixon's Ferry. Sangamo Journal, May 3, 14, 24, Oct. 6; llinois State Historical Library, Springfield, Illinois. — Black Hawk War Collection, Illinois State Historical Library, Springfield, Illinois. Atkinson Letter Book.

MAY 15. En Route to Stillman's Battlefield. Survivors of Stillman's brush with Indians arrive at Dixon's Ferry in early morning with news of "terrible slaughter." Mad scramble of returning soldiers disheartens those encamped at Dixon's Ferry. Before daybreak, governor issues call for 2,000 volunteers to rendezvous at Hennepin June 10. Illinois State Historical Library, Springfield, Illinois. — Black Hawk War Collection, Illinois State Historical Library, Springfield, Illinois. At 7 A.M. Whiteside's army, including Capt. Lincoln's company, starts for site of Stillman's engagement. They arrive before sunset and find bodies scalped and mangled. Illinois State Historical Library, Springfield, Illinois. — Black Hawk War Collection, Illinois State Historical Library, Springfield, Illinois. Whiteside to Atkinson, May 18; Wakefield, 52; Illinois State Historical Library, Springfield, Illinois. — William Orr to John York Sawyer, July 1.

MAY 16. Stillman's Battlefield and En Route to Dixon's Ferry. Dead soldiers are buried. Before return march to Dixon's Ferry begins, Gen. Whiteside draws up army in battle line, "doubtless by way of challenge to Black Hawk." Hasty march is made by hungry army back to ferry. Gen. Atkinson has not arrived. Volunteers are eager to go home, and only earnest appeal of Gov. Reynolds are officers able to hold men. Gen. Atkinson is encamped six miles below Dixon's Ferry. — Black Hawk War Collection, Illinois State Historical Library, Springfield, Illinois. — Black Hawk War Collection, Illinois State Historical Library, Springfield, Illinois. Johnston Journal; Whiteside to Atkinson, May 18; William Orr to John York Sawyer, July I; Reynolds, 236-37.

MAY 17. Dixon's Ferry. Atkinson arrives at noon with 320 regulars, voluner infantry, and one six-pounder. Two Potawatomi chiefs come into camp and assure him that their people will remain peaceful. Volunteers camp south of river and regulars on north side. Order is issued against unauthorized firing of arms. Illinois State Historical Library, Springfield, Illinois. — Black Hawk War Collection, Illinois State Historical Library, Springfield, Illinois. Atkinson Letter Book; Stevens, 128.

Lincoln's company draws 10 quarts of meal and 10 pounds of pork, although by this time most quartermaster stores are issued to regiments rather than to companies. Illinois State Historical Library, Springfield, Illinois. — Black Hawk War Collection, Illinois State Historical Library, Springfield, Illinois. Quartermaster's Record.

MAY 18. Col. William S. Hamilton, son of Alexander Hamilton, is dispatched with small party of spies to area of Stillman's defeat. Gen. Atkinson spends day organizing for march. Illinois State Historical Library, Springfield, Illinois. — Black Hawk War Collection, Illinois State Historical Library, Springfield, Illinois. Johnston Journal, Whiteside to Atkinson.

MAY 19. En Route up Rock River. Army starts up Rock River, regulars taking cannon and supplies by keelboat. Camp is made 12 to 14 miles from Dixon's Ferry. Stevens, 146-47; Elliott, xvii; Illinois State Historical Library, Springfield, Illinois. — Black Hawk War Collection, Illinois State Historical Library, Springfield, Illinois. Atkinson Order Book, Johnston Journal.

22

MAY 20. Army continues four miles and encamps on Rock River. Atkinson receives news of property destruction in LaSalle County, and on Fox ard Illinois rivers, where some men had been pursued by Indians but none killed. Illinois State Historical Library, Springfield, Illinois. — Black Hawk War Collection, Illinois State Historical Library, Springfield, Illinois. J. B. Campbell and others to Atkinson, May 19; Atkinson to Gaines and Macomb, May 23; Letter Book; Johnston Journal; Elliott, xvii.

MAY 21. Army meets William S. Hamilton at noon about six miles below Kishwaukee River. He reports that Indians had passed up that river. Regulars encamp above mouth of Old Man's Creek, and volunteers below. This is third camp above Dixon. Day's march is 16 miles. On march up Rock, volunteers apparently follow trail which is sometimes distant from river, but they encamp on river each night with regulars, who are in charge of keelboats. Illinois State Historical Library, Springfield, Illinois. — Black Hawk War Collection, Illinois State Historical Library, Springfield, Illinois. Johnston Journal; Elliott, xvii.

MAY 22. En Route to Kishwaukee River. Gen. Atkinson, with regulars, returns to Dixon's Ferry, general headquarters and base of operations. Col. Zachary Taylor is ordered to accompany volunteers as inspector general, and to "superintend their movements, order of encampment, of battle, etc." Capt. W. S. Harney is sent along as assistant inspector. Gen. Whiteside with 1,400 men marches 10 miles northeast to Kishwaukee River. Illinois State Historical Library, Springfield, Illinois. — Black Hawk War Collection, Illinois State Historical Library, Springfield, Illinois. Atkinson Letter Book; Stevens, 161.

MAY 23. En Route to Potawatomi Village. Army marches 12 miles, following Indian trail to small Potawatomi village between the Kishwaukee and its south branch (both streams are sometimes called Sycamore Creek). Elliott, xvii; Illinois State Historical Library, Springfield, Illinois. — Black Hawk War Collection, Illinois State Historical Library, Springfield, Illinois. Zachary Taylor to Atkinson, May 26.

It is probably on this day that two men who have been out in search of their horses return to camp with the report that body of Indians going north toward Rock River has crossed army's trail. Gov. Reynolds calls council of brigade officers, who decide against pursuing Indians. Ibid.; Reynolds, 237-39; Illinois State Historical Library, Springfield, Illinois. Illinois State Historical Library, Springfield, Illinois. — Black Hawk War Collection, Illinois State Historical Library, Springfield, Illinois. Whiteside to Atkinson, May 27; William Orr to John York Sawyer, July 1.

MAY 24. En Route to Fox River. Army moves 25 miles and encamps near Capa's village on South Branch, west of present Sycamore, Ill. Elliott, xvii; R. B. Way (ed.), The Rock River Valley, I, 118.

MAY 25. Lincoln's company marches 20 miles and encamps six miles from Paw Paw Grove. Elliott, xvii. Some volunteers reach Fox River, 20 miles north of Ottawa; day is spent searching men for plunder taken from Indian villages. Stevens, 162; Illinois State Historical Library, Springfield, Illinois. — Black Hawk War Collection, Illinois State Historical Library, Springfield, Illinois, Taylor to Atkinson, May 26.

MAY 26. En Route to Ottawa. Gen. Whiteside's army arrives at Ottawa and mustering out begins. Regiment to which Lincoln's company is attached marches 20 miles and encamps two miles above mouth of Fox River. Elliott, xvii; — Illinois State Historical Library, Springfield, Illinois. — Black Hawk War Collection, Illinois State Historical Library, Springfield, Illinois. Taylor to Atkinson.

23

At suggestion of Col. Taylor, Gov. Reynolds calls for re-enlistment of five or six companies to serve until new levies arrive. Ibid.; Illinois State Historical Library, Springfield, Illinois — Black Hawk War Collection, Illinois State Historical Library, Springfield, Illinois, Reynolds to Atkinson.

MAY 27. Fort Johnson at Ottawa. Capt. Lincoln's company is mustered out of U.S. service by Nathaniel Buckmaster, Brigade major. John G. Nicolay & John Hay, Abraham Lincoln, A History, I, 96. Lincoln writes muster roll of his company, certifying that remarks on activities of several members are accurate and just. The Abraham Lincoln Association, Springfield, Illinois. [Files and records on deposit at Illinois State Historical Library, Springfield, Illinois — Photo. He then enrolls in company of Capt. Elijah Iles for service in 20-day regiment. Illinois State Historical Library, Springfield, Illinois — Black Hawk War Collection, Illinois State Historical Library, Springfield, Illinois, Muster Rolls.

MAY 28. [After all-day ride from Dixon's Ferry, Gen. Atkinson arrives in Ottawa. Illinois State Historical Library, Springfield, Illinois — Black Hawk War Collection, Illinois State Historical Library, Springfield, Illinois, Atkinson's Letter Book.]

MAY 29. Lt. Robert Anderson musters Lincoln and 71 others into company of mounted volunteers under Capt. Elijah Iles. Company contains former generals, colonels, and captains. Lincoln furnishes his own arms and horse. Arms are valued at $10 and horse and equipment at $120. Illinois State Historical Library, Springfield, Illinois — Black Hawk War Collection, Illinois State Historical Library, Springfield, Illinois, Muster Roll, Atkinson Order Book; Illinois State Historical Library, Springfield, Illinois — Journal, X, 422-28 (Anderson to E. B. Washburne, May 10, 1870).

[Lt. Robert Anderson, Third Regiment, U.S. Artillery, was appointed assistant inspector general of troops in field on May 9. Lt. Anderson's order of appointment was signed by Lt. Albert Sidney Johnston. Col. Jacob Fry, in command of re-enlisted volunteers, is ordered by Gen. Atkinson to put Ft. Johnson, on south side of Illinois River opposite mouth of Fox River, into best condition possible to protect inhabitants. Ibid.; Atkinson Letter Book.)

MAY 30. Gen. Atkinson returns in evening after hurried trip to Illinois Rapids (Peru), to see Gov. Reynolds. He has decided not to take up pursuit of Black Hawk until new militia forces arrive June 15. Ibid.

JUNE 4. After first volunteer force was mustered out at Ottawa, Gov. Reynolds, May 28, issued call for small ranger force and 1,000 volunteers, latter to rendezvous at Ottawa June 12 to augment 2,000 men governor called for on May 15. Illinois State Historical Library, Springfield, Illinois — Black Hawk War Collection, Illinois State Historical Library, Springfield, Illinois, Reynolds Letter Book.

Letter of Capt. Bowling Green to Gov. Reynolds, from Lincoln's home village of New Salem, June 4, portrays attitude of Illinois frontier: "I have Raiseed A Malitia Company to Defend the frontiers if Necessery, we shall Wait your order if you think proper we should Like to Ranege on the frontiers at any of the points it is Dangerous the Boys has all got home well Except Hohimer, he is yet Like to Die. They appeared to Complain of the office[r]s when they first Come, but all appear satisfied, and willing to go back if it is thought proper, the people is alarmed in Fulton County and sent to me to Come with men to their assistanc no more, war is the

24

order of the Day P.S. we are not anxious if the good of the Country Does not Require" Illinois State Historical Library, Springfield, Illinois. — Black Hawk War Collection, Illinois State Historical Library, Springfield, Illinois.

JUNE 5. Gen. Atkinson orders Capt. Iles' company to be ready to march "on an excursion of several days." Day is spent running bullets and getting flintlocks in order. Gen. Atkinson expresses satisfaction "at the prompt patriotic & soldierly conduct of the Illinois Corps of Volunteers under Col. Fry," which includes Capt. Iles' company. He urges them to re-enlist at end of their 20 days' service, offering them preference over "new levies," and inviting them "in terms of confidence & esteem to share with him in the trials, dangers, & he hopes honors of anticipated conquest." Elijah Iles, Sketches of Early Life and Times, 46; Illinois State Historical Library, Springfield, Illinois. — Black Hawk War Collection, Illinois State Historical Library, Springfield, Illinois, Atkinson Order Book.

JUNE 6. En Route to Dixon's Ferry. Capt. Iles' company (reduced to about 50 men by assignment of detachment to help transport supplies from Illinois Rapids to Ottawa) leaves Ottawa on march to Dixon's Ferry with orders to report to Col. Zachary Taylor. "We wanted," wrote Capt. Iles, "to be as little encumbered as possible, and took nothing that could be dispensed with, other than blankets, tin cups, coffee pots, canteens, a wallet of bread, and some fat side meat, which we ate raw or broiled." Camp is made southeast of present town of Sublette in Lee County. Iles, 46-8; Stevens, 286.

JUNE 7. Capt. Iles' company reaches Dixon's Ferry in afternoon, and camps at spring half mile above ferry on left bank of river. Iles and Lt. Col. James D. Henry, who has come along for excitement, cross river and report to Col. Taylor. A few days before, when Taylor ordered company of volunteers to march to Galena, the men refused. Taylor wrote: "The more I see of the militia the less confidence I have of their effecting any thing of importance." Iles, 46-8; Illinois State Historical Library, Springfield, Illinois. — Black Hawk War Collection, Illinois State Historical Library, Springfield, Illinois, Taylor to Atkinson, June 2, 9.

JUNE 8. En Route to Galena. Capt. Iles is ordered to Galena. He is to examine country for Indians and collect information. At sundown company meets Col. Henry Dodge of Michigan Territory (now Wisconsin) with about 100 mounted men who are en route to Atkinson's headquarters. Camp is made 20 miles from Dixon's Ferry. Iles, 46-8; Stevens, 286; Illinois State Historical Library, Springfield, Illinois. — Black Hawk War Collection, Illinois State Historical Library, Springfield, Illinois, Taylor to Atkinson, June 9.

JUNE 9. March to Galena continues. Camp is made 100 yards from Apple River fort. There, the night before, Indians stole 12 horses, and today they shot at and chased two men into fort. Company sleeps with guns in their arms. Lt. Col. Henry drills men during night, forming them into two lines, front ready to fire and fall back to reload while other line steps forward. Illinois State Historical Library, Springfield, Illinois. — Black Hawk War Collection, Illinois State Historical Library, Springfield, Illinois, James M. Strode to Atkinson, June 10; Iles, 48-9.

25

JUNE 10. Galena. When company arrives in Galena, they find townspeople demoralized. They report later to Col. Taylor that citizens are so terrified they would take no measures to prevent Indians recrossing Mississippi "were they to pass in sight of their doors." Illinois State Historical Library, Springfield, Illinois. — Black Hawk War Collection, Illinois State Historical Library, Springfield, Illinois, Taylor to Atkinson, June 13; Iles, 49-50; Illinois State Historical Library, Springfield, Illinois. — Black Hawk War Collection, Illinois State Historical Library, Springfield, Illinois, Strode to Atkinson.

JUNE 11. En Route to Dixon's Ferry. With letters and dispatches from Col. James M. Strode, Capt. Iles begins return march to Dixon's Ferry. Camp is made on same spot, near Apple River fort, used on 9th. Iles, 49-50; Stevens, 286.

JUNE 12. March continues. Camp is made on site used on 8th. Ibid.; Iles, 49-50.

JUNE 13. Dixon's Ferry. Capt. Iles brings his company into Dixon's Ferry. At Buffalo Grove, 12 miles from ferry, they pass camp of 170 Sioux, Menominee, and Winnebago Indians, under command of Col. William S. Hamilton. Capt. Iles reports signs of small parties of hostile Indians who have committed minor depredations, but who seem more anxious to get horses than scalps. Ibid.; Illinois State Historical Library, Springfield, Illinois. — Black Hawk War Collection, Illinois State Historical Library, Springfield, Illinois, Taylor to Atkinson.

JUNE 14. En Route to Illinois River. Capt. Iles, charged with delivery of Col. Taylor's letter of June 13 to Gen. Atkinson, probably leaves Dixon's Ferry this morning for Illinois River. On 12th Gen. Atkinson moved his headquarters from Ottawa to Fort Wilbourn, recently erected near Crosiar's ferry on south side of Illinois River at foot of rapids. Fort is one and one-half miles below Little Vermilion River at head of steamboat navigation. Illinois State Historical Library, Springfield, Illinois. — Black Hawk War Collection, Illinois State Historical Library, Springfield, Illinois, Taylor to Atkinson, June 13; Johnston Journal, June 12; Sangamo Journal, June 28; J. M. Peck, A Gazetteer of Illinois, 219.

JUNE 16. Fort Wilbourn. Capt. Iles' company is mustered out by Lt. Robert Anderson. Lincoln re-enlists for 30 days as private in independent spy company under Capt. Jacob M. Early, Springfield preacher and physician who was private in companies of Lincoln and Iles. Elliott, 174-76. Spy company is given privileges — camping within lines, freedom from camp duties, and drawing rations as often and as much as they please. Henry E. Huntington Library, San Marino, California — William H. Herndon Papers, Henry E. Huntington Library, San Marino, California. George M. Harrison to W. H. Herndon, no date.

JUNE 17. Gen. Atkinson issues order against vending ardent spirits to Illinois volunteers. Illinois State Historical Library, Springfield, Illinois. — Black Hawk War Collection, Illinois State Historical Library, Springfield, Illinois, Atkinson Order Book.

JUNE 20. Capt. Early's company is mustered into service. Illinois State Historical Library, Springfield, Illinois. — Black Hawk War Collection, Illinois State Historical Library, Springfield, Illinois, Muster Roll.

JUNE 22. En Route to Dixon's Ferry. Capt. Early is ordered to proceed with his company of spies to Dixon's Ferry and report to Gen. Hugh Brady.

26

Early's company remains at Dixon's Ferry until June 25. Illinois State Historical Library, Springfield, Illinois. — Black Hawk War Collection, Illinois State Historical Library, Springfield, Illinois, Atkinson Letter Book.

JUNE 25. En Route to Kellogg's Grove. Battle is fought June 25 at Kellogg's Grove, about 38 miles northwest of Dixon's Ferry, between small force under Maj. John Dement and party of Sauk commanded by Black Hawk. Five white men are killed. Maj. Dement calls for assistance. At 4 P.M. Capt. Early's company is dispatched to grove. Illinois State Historical Library, Springfield, Illinois. — Black Hawk War Collection, Illinois State Historical Library, Springfield, Illinois, Gen. Alexander Posey to Atkinson, June 26; Early to Atkinson, June 26; Broadside, July 10, 1834.

JUNE 26. Kelloggs Grove. Capt. Early writes Gen. Atkinson: "I arrived here by day brake this morning [26th] & found Gen. Posey's men encamped here. The circumstances connected with the attack on Maj. Dement's Bat[talion]. are as well as I can gather substantially these Yesterday morning the Maj. ordered out a small party for the purpose of examining a trail leading to the Mississippi The detachment had not proceeded more than half a mile when they discovered a few Indians at a small distance from them the men rushed on them in a disorderly manner till they came to the main body of Indians where they were secreted in a thicket on seeing the Indians the men wheeled & fled precipitately & all the efforts of Maj. Dement to rally them were unavailing (for at the time the men commenced retreating before the Indians Maj. Dement came up with a reinforcement from the garrison The Maj. stated to me that his force on the field was equal in numbers to that of the enemy After the men retreated to the fort the Indians surrounded the house & Commenced killing the Horses, they kept up a constant fire on the House & Horses for 2 or 3 hours. Major Dement Lost 5 killed & several wounded but none mortally when the Indians left the ground they retreated toward their encampment on the 4 lakes.

"When Gen Posey came up about an hour by sun he sent a regiment in the direction in which the Indians had retired. When they had proceeded about 1/2 mile the Indians showed themselves from a thick wood which skirted the praeria . . . they [regiment] retired to their camps without engaging the enemy. The trail spoken of above has not yet been examined. Gen Posey says he will send a detachment with me to examine it. As soon as I see it you shall have the best information in my power to give you." Illinois State Historical Library, Springfield, Illinois. — Black Hawk War Collection, Illinois State Historical Library, Springfield, Illinois.

JUNE 28. En Route to Dixon's Ferry. Capt. Early's company starts back to Dixon's Ferry from Kellogg's Grove. Illinois State Historical Library, Springfield, Illinois. — Black Hawk War Collection, Illinois State Historical Library, Springfield, Illinois, Lt. Col. Wm. Davenport to Atkinson.

Brig. Gen. James D. Henry's brigade of volunteers, and regulars under Col. Zachary Taylor, accompanied by Gen. Atkinson and Gov. Reynolds, leave Dixon's Ferry at noon and take up line of march along left bank of Rock River. Each horseman packs 15 days' provisions. Twelve miles out, army camps. Stevens, 203-04; Illinois State Historical Library, Springfield, Illinois. — Black Hawk War Collection, Illinois State Historical Library, Springfield, Illinois, Johnston Journal

27

JUNE 29. En Route up Rock River. Stillman's battlefield is reached in afternoon and army makes camp. Early's company reaches Dixon's Ferry some time before 6 A.M., and probably accompanies Col. Enoch G. Marsh and John Marsh to Atkinson's camp. Illinois State Historical Library, Springfield, Illinois. — Black Hawk War Collection, Illinois State Historical Library, Springfield, Illinois, Johnston Journal; Atkinson Letter Book, Lt. Reuben Holmes to Atkinson, Atkinson to Wm. S. Hamilton.

JUNE 30. Army crosses Kishwaukee River and four miles above touches Rock River "which is very narrow at this place & Continues to decrease in width rapidly to its source." Howard-Tilton Library, Tulane University, New Orleans, Louisiana. — Johnston Journal.

JULY 1. In afternoon army crosses into Michigan Territory (now Wisconsin) at Turtle Village, where Beloit now stands. Camp is made on "the plain between Rock river & the creek." Illinois State Historical Library, Springfield, Illinois. — Black Hawk War Collection, Illinois State Historical Library, Springfield, Illinois, Johnston Journal; Wakefield, 76-7.

JULY 2. Army encamps opposite mouth of Yahara River (sometimes called River of the Four Lakes). Illinois State Historical Library, Springfield, Illinois. — Black Hawk War Collection, Illinois State Historical Library, Springfield, Illinois, Johnston Journal.

JULY 3. Capt. Early's company marches in advance of army. They find main trail of Black Hawk's band near southern outlet of Lake Koshkonong. Camp is made one and one-half miles below the lake until July 6. Early's company is busy performing spy and scout duty. Illinois State Historical Library, Springfield, Illinois. — Black Hawk War Collection, Illinois State Historical Library, Springfield, Illinois, Johnston Journal; Wakefield, 78-80.

Lincoln's mess is composed of his stepbrother John D. Johnston, G. B. Fanchier, George M. Harrison, privates, and First Corp. R. M. Wyatt. Henry E. Huntington Library, San Marino, California. — William H. Herndon Papers, Henry E. Huntington Library, San Marino, California. George M. Harrison to W. H. Herndon, no date.

JULY 6. En Route to White Water River. Regulars and Henry's brigade march up east bank of Rock River under command of Gen. Brady. They camp four or five miles above mouth of White Water at an old Indian village. Illinois State Historical Library, Springfield, Illinois. — Black Hawk War Collection, Illinois State Historical Library, Springfield, Illinois, Atkinson Letter Book, Johnston Journal; M. L. Clark to W. Clark, Photo.

JULY 7. Indians fire on camp, wounding soldier. Black Hawk is believed in camp in the fork of White Water and Rock. In search of ford, Gen. Atkinson advances up White Water over difficult and almost impassable route some 10 miles, and camps. Illinois State Historical Library, Springfield, Illinois. — Black Hawk War Collection, Illinois State Historical Library, Springfield, Illinois, Johnston Journal, Atkinson to Adj. Gen. Roger Jones, Nov. 19; Journal of Ninevah Shaw, Photo.

JULY 8. Camp on White Water, Old Indian Village. Indian guides advise Gen. Atkinson that White Water cannot be turned. Council of war is held, deciding to return to mouth of river, near present Fort Atkinson. After two-day chase through swamps and sink holes, enemy is as far away as ever. "If we had pushed on up the river," wrote Gov. Reynolds later, "by forced marches, for a day or two, the Indians would have been reached

28

and the war ended." Reynolds, 251. On reaching camp site of 6th, army halts. Illinois State Historical Library, Springfield, Illinois. — Black Hawk War Collection, Illinois State Historical Library, Springfield, Illinois, Atkinson Letter Book, Johnston Journal; Wakefield, 83.

JULY 9. Gen. Atkinson writes Gen. Winfield Scott: "The country is so cut up with Prairie, wood and swamp, that it is extremely difficult to approach them. Indeed many parts of the country for miles is entirely unpassable, even on foot. We are engaged at this moment [July 9] in throwing a Bridge across this creek (White Water) with a view of getting up with the enemy, who is represented to be only five or six miles before us." Gen. Atkinson has 450 regulars, and about 2,100 mounted volunteers, with 100 Indian allies. Illinois State Historical Library, Springfield, Illinois. — Black Hawk War Collection, Illinois State Historical Library, Springfield, Illinois, Atkinson Letter Book.

Early's company is probably one of scouting parties sent out in morning. They report Indians still nearby, but later party returns with news that Sauk have advanced "up the country" about 12 miles, causing Atkinson to postpone pursuit, Ibid.; Wakefield, 83-4; Stevens, 210; Illinois State Historical Library, Springfield, Illinois. — Black Hawk War Collection, Illinois State Historical Library, Springfield, Illinois, Johnston Journal.

JULY 10. En Route to Rock River. Lacking provisions, volunteer troops are dispersed. Brigades of Alexander and Henry are sent to Fort Winnebago, now Portage, Wis., for supplies. Posey's brigade is sent to southern Wisconsin mineral district to remain until further orders, and Capt. Early's company is mustered out. Lincoln writes Early's mustering-out roll. Discharge papers sent by Capt. Early July 26 to Lincoln and other members of his company state that company is honorably discharged "with the special thanks of Brig. Gen. H. Atkinson, Commander in Chief of the Army of the Illinois Frontier . . . at Headquarters on White Water of Rock River." Photo.; Illinois State Historical Library, Springfield, Illinois. — Black Hawk War Collection, Illinois State Historical Library, Springfield, Illinois, Atkinson Letter Book, Atkinson Order Book.

Early's company begins march to Dixon's Ferry. Stevens (211) says that Early's men accompany Col. John Ewing's regiment on march, but that regiment left army before 10th. Illinois State Historical Library, Springfield, Illinois. — Black Hawk War Collection, Illinois State Historical Library, Springfield, Illinois, Return of Illinois Mounted Volunteers; Illinois State Historical Library, Springfield, Illinois. — Eddy MSS, Affidavit of Tarlton Dunn, Aug. 2, 1833; Sangamo Journal, July 19. It was probably detachment under Adj. Isaac Parmenter that Early's company escorted back to Dixon's Ferry. Illinois State Historical Library, Springfield, Illinois. — Black Hawk War Collection, Illinois State Historical Library, Springfield, Illinois, Muster Rolls. Night previous to starting home, Lincoln's horse and that of George M. Harrison are stolen. Henry E. Huntington Library, San Marino, California. — William H. Herndon Papers, Henry E. Huntington Library, San Marino, California, Harrison to W. H. Herndon, no date.

U.S. Infantry encamps near mouth of White Water. Illinois State Historical Library, Springfield, Illinois. — Black Hawk War Collection, Illinois State Historical Library, Springfield, Illinois, Johnston Journal.

JULY 11-14. En Route to Peoria. Four days are probably passed by Capt. Early's company in traveling 200 miles to Peoria by way of Dixon's Ferry. Ferry is probably reached on night of 12th. Through generosity of friends, Lincoln and Harrison ride horseback part of way. Henry E. Huntington Library, San Marino, California. — William H. Herndon Papers, Henry E. Huntington Library, San Marino, California, George M. Harrison to W. H. Herndon, no date; Ward H. Lamon, Life of Abraham Lincoln, 118; Illinois State Historical Library, Springfield, Illinois. — Black Hawk War Collection, Illinois State Historical Library, Springfield, Illinois, Z.. C. Palmer to Johnston, July 13.

29

JULY 15-16. Peoria and En Route to Havana. Company breaks up at Peoria. Lincoln and Harrison purchase canoe and start down Illinois River. Stop is made at Pekin, where Lincoln makes oar and Harrison purchases provisions. Resuming journey, one pulls oar while other steers. River is very low and it is hard pull to "make half the speed of legs on land; in fact we let her float all night and in the morning always found objects still visible that were beside us the previous evening."

They are invited aboard log raft to share meal of "fish, corn bread, eggs, butter and coffee . . . the only warm meal . . . for several days." Henry E. Huntington Library, San Marino, California. — William H. Herndon Papers, Henry E. Huntington Library, San Marino, California, George M. Harrison to W. H. Herndon, n.d.

JULY 17. Havana and En Route to New Salem. Selling canoe in Havana, Lincoln and Harrison start afoot to New Salem. "The long strides of Lincoln after slipping back in the burning sand six inches every step were just right for me," wrote Harrison. "And he was greatly diverted when he noticed me behind him stepping in his tracks to keep from slipping." Ibid.

JULY 19. [Sangamo Journal, at Lincoln's request, carries correction: "Some weeks ago [May 3] we gave a list of those candidates [eight] of this County (omitting, by accident the name of Capt. Lincoln, of New Salem,) who were on the frontier periling their lives in the service of their country."]

JULY 24. New Salem. Lincoln certifies that Nathan Drake served in his company, having been enrolled April 29 and discharged June 8. "Given under my hand this 24th July 1832. A. Lincoln, Captain." The Abraham Lincoln Association, Springfield, Illinois. [Files and records on deposit at Illinois State Historical Library, Springfield, Illinois.] — photo.

JULY. Pappsville. Lincoln makes campaign speech at Pappsville, 11 miles west of Springfield, to crowd attending sale. He stops fight in which his friend J. Rowan Herndon is involved. A. Y. Ellis recalled that Lincoln advocated national bank, internal improvements, and high protective tariff. Benjamin P. Thomas, Lincoln's New Salem, 58.

AUGUST 4. Springfield. Lincoln and other candidates make closing speeches of campaign. Stephen T. Logan recalled that Lincoln spoke in old court house in Springfield. "He was," says Logan, "a very tall and gawky and rough looking fellow then — his pantaloons didn't meet his shoes by six inches. But after he began speaking I became very much interested in him. He made a very sensible speech . . . attacking Benton's theory [of gold circulation] and I thought he did it very well." The Abraham Lincoln Association, Springfield, Illinois. [Files and records on deposit at Illinois State Historical Library, Springfield, Illinois.] — Bulletin, No. 12.

AUGUST 6. New Salem. Lincoln is defeated in his first campaign for legislature, running eighth in field of 13 candidates. He receives 277 of 300 votes cast [viva voce] in New Salem precinct. John T. Stuart receives 182, second highest vote. Lincoln receives 657 votes in Sangamon County. Four candidates elected are Edmund D. Taylor, John T. Stuart, AchiIles Morris, and Peter Cartwright. George Forquer defeats William F. Elkin,

30

1086 to 1077, for senator from Sangamon. Theodore Calvin Pease, Illinois Election Returns; Thomas, 59-60.

AUGUST 18. Springfield. Lincoln probably attends county wide meeting to choose delegates to state meeting at Vandalia to select anti-Jackson electoral ticket. Sangamon delegates are pledged to vote for Henry Clay for President. Sangamo Journal, Aug. 25.

AUGUST. New Salem. Lincoln buys J. Rowan Herndon's interest in store in New Salem operated by Herndon and William F. Berry. Thomas, 60. [William is son of Rev. John M. Berry of Rock Creek, five miles south of New Salem.]

SEPTEMBER 3. Lincoln, J. Rowan Herndon, and Peter Elmore witness deed from Ranson Lane to James Goldsby for 80 acres in Rock Creek vicinity, four miles south of New Salem. Farm sells for $560. Deed Book F, 240.

SEPTEMBER 9. [Peter Cartwright opens large Methodist camp meeting west of Springfield. More than 1,000 converts are made during two week meeting. Cartwright is described as "not tall, but burly, massive . . . crowning foliage of luxuriant, coal black hair, wreathed into long, but rough and curling ringlets . . . a head that looked as large as a half-bushel . . . a swarthy complexion, rich, rosy lips, always slightly parted, as if wearing a perpetual happy smile." Illinois Journal, Jan. 30, 1850.]

SEPTEMBER 20. Lincoln and William Green serve as clerks at election held at house of John McNeil [assumed name of John McNamar]. John Clary is elected constable with 41 votes, defeating four rivals, J. Rowan Herndon, William McNeely, Baxter B. Berry, and Edmund Greer. Lincoln did not vote. Bowling Green certifies that judges and clerks qualify according to law. James Rutledge, Hugh Armstrong, and James White serve as judges. Election Returns; The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 13.

SEPTEMBER 21. Lincoln fills in printed form of honorable discharge for Lewis W. Farmer, private in Lincoln's company of Mounted Volunteers for "protection of the North Western Frontier against an Invasion of the British Band of Sac and other tribes of Indians." Farmer served 48 days, from April 21 to June 7, 1832. Facsimile in Stevens, 281.

SEPTEMBER 29. Lincoln fills out printed form of honorable discharge for Travice Elmore for 48 days service in Black Hawk War, from April 21 to June 7, 1832. Elmore was private in Lincoln's company of Mounted Volunteers, Facsimile in Tarbell, Life, I, 169.

OCTOBER 30. New Salem? Lincoln and Nelson Alley sign printed form note for $104.87 1/2 [marked in ink No. 13], which reads, "SIX MONTHS

31

after date we or either of us, promise to pay to J. D. HENRY Sheriff of Sangamon County, or order, (for the benefit of the creditors of V. A. Bogue)." The Abraham Lincoln Association, Springfield, Illinois. [Files and records on deposit at Illinois State Historical Library, Springfield, Illinois.] — Photo.

NOVEMBER 5. New Salem. Lincoln and William Green serve as clerks of election held at house of Samuel Hill in New Salem precinct. Five Jackson electors each receive 185 votes to 70 for Clay electors. Lincoln votes last, casting his vote for Clay. James Rutledge, Bowling Green, and Hugh Armstrong serve as election judges. Election Returns. [Henry Clay received approximately two-fifths of votes at New Salem and in Sangamon County. Total county vote is Jackson 1,035 and Clay 810. Pease, 81.]

NOVEMBER 6. Springfield? Lincoln probably takes election returns to Springfield. [On Dec. 4 county commissioners allow $1 for services as clerk and $2.50 for returning New Salem poll book to clerk.] The Abraham Lincoln Association, Springfield, Illinois. [Files and records on deposit at Illinois State Historical Library, Springfield, Illinois.] — Bulletin, No. 36; Sangamon County Commissioners Court Record, 341.

DECEMBER. Lincoln is elected Captain of militia company in Clary's Grove some time in December. Robert T. McNeely places this election before Black Hawk War, but this appears to be year too early. Henry E. Huntington Library, San Marino, California. — William H. Herndon Papers, Henry E. Huntington Library, San Marino, California.

DECEMBER 15. Near New Salem. Lincoln serves as witness for plaintiff in Close v. Ritter before John N. Moore, justice of peace. Record.

1833

[1833?]. New Salem. Lincoln writes bill to Sangamon County, $12.50 for surveying. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 15.

New Salem. Lincoln writes, for Henry Onstot, New Salem cooper, statement of James Eastep's account. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 15.

JANUARY 4. Springfield. Lincoln is probably in Springfield at request of T. P. Andrews, paymaster of U.S. Army who is paying Black Hawk War soldiers. "The company officers are requested to attend early on the first day . . . as information not furnished by the Muster Rolls, is, in many cases, required, and absolutely necessary, to insure payments to the companies." Lincoln received about $125 for his services. Sangamo Journal Dec. 8, 1832; Thomas, 70.

JANUARY 10. New Salem. Lincoln and James Duncan witness two deeds from George Warburton to Hezekiah King of St. Louis. Warburton sells for $300 interest in town of Petersburg "consisting of lots with buildings," and for $500 152-acre tract near Petersburg. Record F, 433-34.

32

JANUARY 12. Lincoln writes for James Rutledge bill to James Odham for board and horse feed while Odham carried mail for year (1830-31), at $27.00 Bill is signed by James Rutledge and attested by Bowling Green. Photo.

JANUARY 15. Lincoln draws up and attests mortgage given by William Green, Jr. to Reuben Radford. Green deeds west half of Lot 5, north of Main Street in New Salem to Radford to secure payment of two notes, each for $188.50. Green purchases Radford's store for $400 and pays $23 cash and delivers notes. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 15-16; Record F, 471. Berry & Lincoln on same day purchase store from Green for $750. They pay $265 cash, and assume payment of two notes of $188.50 each, given by Green to Radford. Berry gives Green horse, saddle, and bridle for remainder. Thomas, 70.

JANUARY 23. [While cleaning rifle preparatory to hunting trip, J. Rowan Herndon accidentally discharged it, ball striking his wife in neck, severing one of principal arteries and causing death almost instantly. Sangamo Journal, Jan. 25.]

JANUARY 31. Lincoln and William G. Green sign David Rutledge's bond for $150. Rutledge contracts to convey to Alexander and Martin S. Trent before July 1, 1833 east half of Lot 5 in first survey. New Salem. Photo.; The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 16-7.

FEBRUARY 4. Lincoln signs petition to county commissioners to lay out road from Petersburg to Morgan County line in direction of Beardstown. Other signers are Bowling Green, Nelson Alley, James Rutledge, Isaac Guliher, Alexander Trent, Martin S. Trent, Samuel Hill, John A. Kelso, John Armstrong, and William F. Berry. Illinois State Historical Library, Springfield, Illinois. — Original.

FEBRUARY 9. Lincoln writes and signs petition to commissioners of Sangamon County asking allowance for support of Benj. Elmore, "An insane man." Lincoln writes 19 of 26 names on petition. Illinois State Historical Library, Springfield, Illinois. — Original.

MARCH 2. [John Calhoun's commission as surveyor of Sangamon County is dated Mar. 2, 1833. He later appoints Lincoln deputy surveyor to work in northwestern part of county but date is not known. There is no record of survey by Lincoln prior to Jan. 14, 1834.]

MARCH 6. [William F. Berry of Berry & Lincoln obtains license from Sangamon County Commissioners to keep tavern in New Salem for one year. Berry signs his own and Lincoln's name to $300 bond. Bowling Green also signs bond. Record; Illinois State Historical Library, Springfield, Illinois. — Original. Berry & Lincoln pay $7 for license. This allows them to charge 37 1/2˘ for breakfast and dinner or supper for stage passengers, 12 1/2˘ for lodging, 25˘ for 1/2 pint of wine or French brandy, and 18 3/4˘ for 1/2 pint of rum, peach brandy, or Holland gin.

33

APRIL 9. Lincoln is served with summons by sheriff to appear in Sangamon Circuit Court as witness for appellee in John Ritter, appellant, v. John Close, appellee, appeal from John N. Moore's justice of peace court where Close got judgment for $73 Dec. 15, 1832. Bowling Green and J. Rowan Herndon are also summoned to appear for Close [Moore lives four miles northeast of New Salem.] Files. Lincoln is also summoned to appear as witness in behalf of Jacob Bale in Pollard Simmons v. Bale, appealed from Bowling Green's justice of peace court at New Salem. Ibid.

APRIL 15. Springfield. Judge Samuel D. Lockwood opens two-week term of Sangamon Circuit Court. Stephen T. Logan and Edward S. Phillips of Springfield are admitted to bar. Lincoln is present as witness in Ritter v. Close. Record.

APRIL 16. Lincoln, William Green, Jr., and Jesse Baker appear in court as bondsmen of Thomas Edwards and acknowledge themselves indebted to state. Edwards' bond on indictment for rape is set at $300, and $200 on indictment for riot. John Marshall and his wife, Sally, state's witnesses, are put under $50 bond to appear at September term of court. Photo.

Lincoln is witness for defendant in Pollard Simmons v. Jacob Bale. Plaintiff dismisses suit. Lincoln, Jacob Bale, Tilmon Hornbuckle, and John Close of New Salem serve on jury in State Bank v. Daniel Parkinson. Jury awards plaintiff $326 damages. Record.

APRIL 17. Lincoln, Jacob Bale, Tilmon Hornbuckle, and John Close of New Salem serve on jury in State Bank v. James Bowling. Jury returns verdict for defendant. Ibid.

APRIL 18. Lincoln, J. Rowan Herndon, George Close, and James H. Hornbuckle of New Salem neighborhood serve on jury in People v. Alexander C. Milrose, indicted for larceny. Jury finds defendant not guilty. Ibid.

APRIL 25. Lincoln is defendant's witness in John Ritter v. John Close, appealed from John N. Moore's justice of peace court. Circuit court affirms judgment of lower court, but sets damages at $35. Ibid. [Lincoln receives $1.75 for services as witness and juror. Witnesses receive 50˘ per case per day and jurors 25˘. The Abraham Lincoln Association, Springfield, Illinois. [Files and records on deposit at Illinois State Historical Library, Springfield, Illinois.] — Bulletin, No. 57.]

APRIL 29. [William F. Berry gives Eli C. Blankenship conditional deed for $250 to west half of Lot No. 1 south of Main Street in New Salem. "The condition of the above deed is such. If A. Lincoln shall satisfy the demands of a note by him executed and endorsed by J. R. Herndon bearing date APRIL —, 1833, payable to E. C. Blankenship, the above to be null and void." Deed is acknowledged by Berry May 23. Deed book F, 440.]

MAY 7. New Salem. Lincoln is appointed postmaster at New Salem by

34

President Jackson. Lincoln, avowed supporter of Whig Leader Henry Clay, receives appointment from Democratic administration because, Lincoln states, office is "too insignificant to make his politics an objection." Nelson Alley and Alexander Ferguson sign Lincoln's $500 bond. The Abraham Lincoln Association, Springfield, Illinois. [Files and records on deposit at Illinois State Historical Library, Springfield, Illinois.] — Bulletin, No. 31. Lincoln writes receipt which Richard Larimore signs: "Received of John Close two dollars and fifty cents being the amount of fees due me for attendance as a witness in a suit in the Sangamon Circuit Court — John Close v. John Ritter." Photo.

MAY 23. Lincoln writes, on printed forms, summons in Nelson Alley v. Jason Duncan, case in justice of peace court of Bowling Green, who signs summons. Photo.

JUNE 4. Lincoln and John A. Kelso witness deed given by Hiram L. Allen to Hawkins Taylor. Taylor buys two lots for $25 in Middletown. Deed Book I, 487.

SUMMER. [John Hanks says he met Lincoln in Springfield in summer of 1833: "He was in town on business and so was I." Hertz, 349.]

JULY 10. Lincoln appears before Robert Conover, justice of peace, and swears he was present as witness to conditional deed given by William Green, Jr. to Reuben S. Radford Jan. 15. Record.

JULY 13. Lincoln and Bowling Green witness deeds to two tracts sold by Joseph Watkins to Thomas Dowell. One tract of 120 acres, situated five miles northwest of New Salem, sells for $300. They also witness deed for 40 acres nearby which Watkins buys from Dowell for $75. Record.

JULY 26. Lincoln writes deed conveying 80-and 40-acre tracts of land from Jesse and Christiana Baker to James Eastep for $500 consideration. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 18-19.

AUGUST 10. Lincoln writes E. C. Blankenship of Springfield what he recalls of David Rankin leaving his company at Dixon's Ferry during Black Hawk War. Rankin exchanged places with Isaac Gulihur, each man answering to other's name at roll call. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 19. [Muster roll of Lincoln's company shows that David Rankin transferred to foot company of Capt. Seth Pratt May 19, and on this day Isaac Gulihur transferred to Lincoln's company from Pratt's company. Photo.]

[Suit is filed in Sangamon Circuit Court in "Jas. D. Henry for the use of Jas. McCandless and Henry Emerson v. Nelson Alley and A. Lincoln," seeking judgment on note given by Alley and Lincoln Oct. 30, 1832. Record.]

AUGUST 20. Lincoln is served with summons to appear at September term of Sangamon Circuit Court in case of James D. Henry, sheriff, for use of

35

James McCandless and Henry Emerson v. Nelson Alley and Abraham Lincoln. William H. Townsend, Lincoln the Litigant, 55-6.

AUGUST 26. [Suit is filed in Sangamon Circuit Court by Alexander and Martin S. Trent against David Rutledge, William Green, Jr., and Lincoln on bond for $150 executed by defendants Jan. 31, 1833, to secure conveyance of "the east half of Lot number five South of Main Street in the first survey in the town of New Salem." Ibid.]

SEPTEMBER 11. [Defendant in People v. Thomas S. Edwards, indicted for riot in Sangamon Circuit Court, is called by prosecuting attorney. Edwards fails to appear and "Abraham Lincoln, William Green and Jesse Baker the bail of said defendant was also three times called to produce the body, and neither of them answering . . . their recognizance be forfeited and sci. fa. to next term." Record.]

SEPTEMBER 13. Springfield. Defendants default and clerk assesses damages of $107.31 in James D. Henry, sheriff, for use of James McCandless and Henry Emerson v. Nelson Alley and Abraham Lincoln. Record. [Judgment was paid in six installments, last payment made Jan. 28, 1834. Costs of $11.75 were added to judgment.]

SEPTEMBER 16. By consent of parties, suit of Alexander and Martin S. Trent v. David Rutledge, William Green, Jr., and Lincoln in Sangamon Circuit Court is dismissed with each party paying half of costs. Record.

SEPTEMBER 21. New Salem. Lincoln, with two others, signs note for $50 to Nelson Alley, who assigns it to Bell & Tinsley on $453.84 note he owes. Photo.

SEPTEMBER 28. Lincoln writes letter for James Eastep to Edward Mitchell asking that July 26 deed be not recorded, as he has resold land to Jesse Baker. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 19.

OCTOBER 19. William Green's two notes to Radford for $188.50 each, assumed by Berry & Lincoln Jan. 15, fall due and Berry, Lincoln, and Green sign new note for $379.82 payable to Radford one day from date. Radford credits them with payment of $125 leaving balance of $254.82. Photo.

OCTOBER 25. Lincoln, Hugh Armstrong, and J. Clemment, at request of D. Dickinson, deputy sheriff of Sangamon County, appraise two lots in New Salem. Lot No. 5 in first survey, on which stands Berry & Lincoln store, they value at $100. Lot No. 1 in second survey they value at $50. Lots are put up for sale to satisfy judgment obtained by Nelson Alley against Henry Sinco, but not sold for lack of bidders. Photo.

36

NOVEMBER 29. Lincoln and Bowling Green witness deed given by Silas Watkins to Charles Bell. Watkins deeds Bell 40-acre tract five miles west of New Salem. Deed Book G, 230.

1834

JANUARY 1. New Salem. [Beginning today, New Salem receives mail on new schedule. Stage leaves Springfield each Saturday at 4 A.M. for Warren Court House (Monmouth), by way of Sangamo Town, Athens, New Salem, Havana, Lewistown, Canton and Knox Court House (Knoxville), distance of 115 miles. Return mail leaves Warren Court House each Tuesday at 6 A.M., arriving in Springfield 10 P.M. Thursday. Sangamo Journal, Aug. 17, 1833.]

JANUARY 4. [Meeting is held in court house in Springfield to select delegates to April convention in Rushville to agree on one of four northern towns as new state capital. Dan Stone presides and appoints Peter Cartwright, John T. Stuart, and Stephen T. Logan committee on resolutions. Delegates appointed are Stuart, Logan, Cartwright, George Forquer, E. D. Taylor, and Samuel Morris. Ibid., Jan. 11.]

JANUARY 14. Lincoln writes description of his first known survey — 80-acre tract for Russell Godbey six miles north of New Salem and mile east of Sangamon River. Godbey later wrote: "He staid with me all night, and [I] sold him two buckskins — well dressed to fox his surveyors pants. Mrs. [John] Armstrong did the foxing." Henry E. Huntington Library, San Marino, California. — William H. Herndon Papers, Henry E. Huntington Library, San Marino, California. Lincoln described land as "the West half of the North east quarter of Section 30 in Township 19 North of Range 6 West." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 20-1.

FEBRUARY 13. Lincoln begins survey of Section 16, school section in Township 18 North, Range 6 West, four miles northeast of New Salem. County Commissioners Record D, Mar. 5.

FEBRUARY 14. Lincoln completes survey begun yesterday. On Mar. 5 county commissioners allow him six dollars from funds of township. Ibid; Record in office of County Supt. of Schools of Sangamon County. [On June 2, 1834, county commissioners allow him $6.50 additional. Record D.]

FEBRUARY 25. Lincoln draws up and signs petition to commissioners' court of Sangamon County asking them to "appoint viewers to view and locate a road from Musick's ferry on Salt creek via New Salem to the county line in the direction of Jacksonville. Illinois State Historical Library, Springfield, Illinois. — Original.

37

FEBRUARY 26. [New Salem Temperance Society meets; speaker is Thomas J. Nance. Illinois State Historical Library, Springfield, Illinois. — Copy of minutes.]

MARCH 1. Public meeting is held to nominate candidate for governor. Bowling Green presides and appoints Lincoln secretary. Dr. John Allen, Nelson Alley, and Samuel Hill draft resolution that General James D. Henry, former sheriff of Sangamon County and hero of Black Hawk War, is their choice for governor. [Henry died in New Orleans, Mar. 5, 1834.] Sangamo Journal, Mar. 15; The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 21-2.

MARCH 3. Lincoln writes and signs survey for Jesse Gum. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 22-23. [Reuben Harrison presents petition to County Commissioners' Court for new road from Musick's Ferry via New Salem to county line in direction of Jacksonville, which Lincoln wrote and signed Feb. 25. Lincoln deposits $10 with clerk of court as law prescribes. He is appointed surveyor and with Hugh Armstrong and Michael Killion, viewer of new road. Their report is filed at June term of court. Record.]

MARCH 8. ["We are desired to state that John T. Stuart, Esq., is a candidate for the House of Representatives of this State." Sangamo Journal, Mar. 8.]

MARCH 17. [Judgment is satisfied on note for $104.87 1/2 signed by Lincoln and Nelson Alley Oct. 30, 1832, for benefit of creditors of Vincent A. Bogue. Sheriff James D. Henry, representing creditors, got judgment in Sangamon Circuit Court Sept. 13, 1833. Execution Docket.]

MARCH 28. Springfield. [Mass meeting attended by 1,000 persons is held to promote Alton and Springfield Railroad chartered by legislature. Lincoln's name does not appear in proceedings, but it is project in which he is interested. Sangamo Journal, Apr. 4.]

APRIL 5. [Political meeting is held at Richland, nine miles southwest of New Salem. Nominations made are as follows: Gen. James D. Henry for governor, William L. May for Congress, William F. Elkin for state senator, and Peter Cartwright, Job Fletcher, Samuel Morris, and John Dawson for representatives from Sangamon. Ibid. Apr. 19.]

APRIL 7. [Stuart & Dummer file praecipe with circuit clerk of Sangamon County in case of Peter Van Bergen v. A. Lincoln, William F. Berry, and William G. Green. Clerk issues summons to defendants to appear on first day of April term. Coroner serves summons on Green but reports "Berry & Lincoln not found in any bailiwick." Peter Van Bergen, to whom Reuben Radford has made partial assignment of note given by Berry, Lincoln, and Green Oct. 19, 1833, brings suit against three signers in Sangamon Circuit Court for $500 and $50 damages. Thomas, 72.]

38

APRIL 19. [Lincoln's name appears in Sangamo Journal as candidate for legislature.]

APRIL 20. [Memorial service for Gen. James D. Henry (1797-1834), hero of Black Hawk War who died in New Orleans March 5, is held in court house. Lincoln and other candidates doubtless attend. Sangamo Journal, Apr. 25.]

APRIL 26. Lincoln and Berry lose appeal from justice of peace court to Sangamon Circuit Court. William Watkins is awarded $57.86, amount of note and interest, and costs. Record. [Note was given by Lincoln for horse purchased of Watkins. Thomas, 72.]

APRIL 29. [In Sangamon Circuit Court, Van Bergen v. Lincoln, Berry, and Green is called. Green, only defendant who has been served, fails to appear and judgment by default for $204.82 and $18.42 damages is awarded against him. It is ordered that a "scire facias issue to the said Abram Lincoln and William F. Berry requiring them to show cause . . . why they should not be made a party to this judgment." Photo; Record B, 336. Only $154 of the $204.82 and $18.42 damages awarded against Green is due Van Bergen, remainder due Reuben Radford.]

MAY 5. New Salem. Lincoln and Mentor Graham serve as clerks at election of sheriff of Sangamon County. Polls are opened in house of William F. Berry. Garret Elkin receives 84 votes, David Dickinson 77, and Zachariah Peter 4. Lincoln votes for Dickinson. Bowling Green, Hugh Armstrong, and David Whray act as judges. Illinois State Historical Library, Springfield, Illinois. — Original; The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 23-4. [Lincoln is allowed $1 as clerk of election by County Commissioners' Court. Record D, 84.]

MAY 6. Springfield Lincoln returns poll book of special election. Ibid. [Dr. Garret Elkin is elected. On June 3 county commissioners allow Lincoln $2 for returning poll book]

JUNE 2. Springfield(?) Lincoln writes and signs Samuel Rogers' name to Rogers' bill as trustee of school section. Photo. [Lincoln is allowed $15 as surveyor and $2.50 for making plat of road from Musick's Ferry on Salt Creek via New Salem to county line in direction of Jacksonville. Report of Lincoln, Michael Killian and Hugh Armstrong is accepted. Armstrong is granted $3.75 for five days as axeman and John A. Kelso and Robert Lloyd same amount as chainmen. Record D, 82.]

JUNE 3. Springfield. Lincoln signs receipt for clerk of County Commissioners Court: "Recd of C. R. Matheny Clerk $10.00 deposited by me at the last term [Mar. 3] of com. court on application for a road." Illinois State Historical Library, Springfield, Illinois. — Original. [Lincoln is appointed by County Commissioners' Court "to survey the road from Athens to Sangamo Town in place of Charles Winn

39

and that the viewers have to next court to make their report." Record D, 91]

JUNE 4. New Salem and Springfield. Dr. Charles Chandler, for whom Chandlerville, Illinois is named, overtakes Lincoln on way to Springfield. Dr. Chandler is hurrying to land office to enter 80 acres ahead of Henry Ingalls. [Some time later Lincoln surveys this land for Dr. Chandler, and also farm for Ingalls adjoining Chandlerville.] Illinois State Historical Library, Springfield, Illinois. — Journal, XXIV, 438; XXVIII, 282.

[JULY.] "During the Legislative canvass of 1834, John T. Stuart advised Lincoln to study law, and after the election he borrowed some of Stuart's books, and began to read." [This statement in Howells' Life of Lincoln, 48, was read and approved by Lincoln in 1860; he corrected initial in Stuart's name.]

JULY 1. New Salem. Lincoln writes to George Spears: "At your request I send you a receipt for the postage on your paper ["Sangamo Journal"]. . . . The law requires News paper postage to be paid in advance and now that I have waited a full year you choose to wound my feelings by insinuating that unless you get a receipt I will probably make you pay it again." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 25.

JULY 19. Lincoln probably attends public meeting at Andrew Meredith's mill at head of Lick Creek, ten miles southwest of Springfield. Meeting is held for "especial benefit of candidates for the legislature." Sangamo Journal, July 12.

AUGUST 2. Lincoln probably attends, with 12 other candidates, barbecue at Hill's mill on Sugar Creek, six miles south of Springfield. All "candidates of every grade, and all the voters of every denomination; are respectfully invited to attend." Ibid., July 26.

AUGUST 4. Lincoln is elected to Ninth General Assembly. He runs second among 13 candidates, receiving only 14 votes less than John Dawson who leads field. Lincoln votes for Duncan for governor, W. F. Elkin for state senate, and for Stuart, Neale, Carpenter, and Dawson for legislature. On question of permanently locating state capital, New Salem precinct casts 250 of 256 votes for Springfield. Election Returns.

AUGUST 20. Dr. Garret Elkin, sheriff, serves writ of scire facias on Lincoln to appear in Sangamon Circuit Court at next term in Peter Van Bergen v. Abraham Lincoln and William F. Berry, to show cause why he should not be made party to judgment for $204.82 and $18.42 damages awarded Apr. 29 against William G. Green. Photo.

40

["I Charles R. Matheny Clerk of the County Commissioners Court of said County do hereby certify that Abraham Lincoln is duly elected. Representative from Sangamon County at the General Election held on Monday the 4th day of August A.D. 1834 as appears from the Returns filed in this office. Given under my hand and seal of office at Springfield this 20th day of August A.D. 1834 C. R. Matheny Clerk" Photo.]

AUGUST 25. Lincoln and Bowling Green witness deed of John F. and Parthena Harrison to Robert McNabb for 160 acres [S.W. 1/4 of Sec. 34 T. 18 N.R. 6 W.], five miles east of New Salem. Record.

SEPTEMBER 30. New Boston. Lincoln surveys town site of New Boston [or Upper Yellow Banks] on Mississippi River, 100 miles northwest of New Salem, now in Mercer County. Plat filed July 12, 1836 shows proprietors as William Deniston, William H. Denison, and Peter Van Bergen, agent for Elijah Iles. [Van Bergen and Iles, both of Springfield, are large speculators in farm land and town sites.] Record. [Auction sale of lots is held July 12, 1836, day Lincoln's plat of town is filed for record. Sangamo Journal, July 16, 1836.]

Lincoln and James Erwin witness deed of William and Rachel Deniston who deed lots in New Boston to Elijah Iles of Sangamon County. They also witness deed of William and Rachel Deniston of New Boston lots to William H. Denison. Deed Records, Warren County, I, 301, 322.

OCTOBER 1. Monmouth. Plat of New Boston which Lincoln surveyed is filed with Warren County recorder by Peter Van Bergen, who pays $6 fee. [Lincoln is probably with Van Bergen.] File Record, Warren County.

OCTOBER 2. Van Bergen picks up plat. Lincoln is probably with him, having been sent to New Boston as surveyor by Elijah Iles, who sent Van Bergen as his business agent. Ibid.

OCTOBER 27. New Salem. Lincoln and Mentor Graham serve as clerks at election for representative in Congress. Polls are located in house of William F. Berry. Lincoln votes for William L. May, who receives 72 votes, to three for Benjamin Mills and one for James Turney. James Pantier, Pollard Simmons, and William Jones serve as judges and John Clary as constable. Lincoln writes out returns which are certified by Bowling Green. Election Returns. [County Commissioners' Court allows Lincoln and Graham $1 each for clerking. Record D, 99.]

NOVEMBER. Lincoln surveys for David Hart plot consisting of 12.48 acres on south side of Rock Creek, mile south of present Tallula, and six miles southwest of New Salem. Photo. [In Lincoln's deposition, taken Sept. 2, 1837, he stated that he surveyed land for Hart and that he understood Hart had sold it to Elijah Houghton. Hart and Houghton both assist in survey. Record Book A. Lincoln describes survey as a "part of the West

41

half of the South East quarter of Section 13 in Township 17 North of Range 7 West of the 3rd Principal Meridian." In June, 1838, Samuel H. Treat, who had been appointed by court, reported that he had conveyed land to Houghton.]

Lincoln surveys tract for Isaac Cogdal sometime this month.

NOVEMBER 4. Athens. Lincoln writes and signs with James Strawbridge and Levi Cantrall report as viewers to relocate part of road from Sangamon town to Athens. "We have made the said relocation on good ground and believe the same to be necessary and proper." Lincoln's bill is $3 for one day's labor as surveyor and 50˘ for map. Illinois State Historical Library, Springfield, Illinois. — Original; County Commissioners' Record, D, 01-02.

NOVEMBER 14. Clary's Grove. Lincoln and Samuel Hill appraise at $30 two-year-old brown filly taken up by Thomas Dowell at his farm near Clary's Grove. Photo.

NOVEMBER 19. Springfield. Lincoln and Berry are made parties to judgment obtained in Sangamon Circuit Court by Peter Van Bergen against William G. Green Apr. 29. On Oct. 11 Berry turned over horse to Radford at agreed value of $35, and on Oct. 19 paid balance due Radford, therefore judgment is reduced by order of court to $154 owed to Van Bergen. Record; Thomas, 72. [Lincoln and Berry are unable to pay judgment, and sheriff levies on their personal possessions, including Lincoln's horse, saddle, bridle, and surveying instruments. James Short buys and returns them to Lincoln. Ibid., 73-4.]

NOVEMBER 22. Meeting of Sangamon County citizens is held at court house to consider common schools and elect delegates to state education convention, Vandalia, Dec. 5. Edmund Roberts presides and Henry E. Dummer is secretary. Resolution of Dan Stone favoring common schools is adopted and 11 delegates selected: Lincoln, Stone, Roberts, Stuart, Logan, John Dawson, William Carpenter, J. M. Early, C. R. Matheny, George Forquer, and E. D. Taylor. Sangamo Journal, Nov. 29.

NOVEMBER 28-29. En route to Vandalia. Lincoln and five members of General Assembly from Sangamon County probably leave Springfield on stage for Vandalia. Stage leaves at 6 A.M. and goes by way of Macoupin Point and Hillsboro. It completes 75-mile journey following afternoon at 4 P.M. Ibid., Jan. 11, 1834.

DECEMBER 1. Vandalia. Lincoln takes seat as one of 55 House members. He votes for Charles Dunn for speaker, but James Semple is elected. David Prickett is unanimously elected clerk, and Ebenezer A. Ryan, for whom Lincoln votes, is elected engrossing and enrolling clerk. House Journal. [Supreme Court convenes and remains in session until Feb. 13, 1835.]

42

DECEMBER 2. Acting-Gov. W. L. D. Ewing sends farewell address to Senate and House. He advocates change in criminal code, invites attention to state debt of $214,000, advocates new state bank, circuit court system, and other improvements. Lincoln votes yea on resolution to adjourn Feb. 2. Ibid.

DECEMBER 3. Gov. Joseph Duncan is sworn in and delivers address to Senate and House. He favors system of common schools, but unlike Gov Ewing, favors canal rather than railroad between Illinois River and Chicago He is noncommittal on state bank. Lincoln votes nay on printing 5,000 copies of governor's address. Ibid.

DECEMBER 4. Lincoln is appointed by speaker to Committee on Public Accounts and Expenditures. Jesse K. Dubois of Lawrence County, one of Lincoln's close friends for remainder of his life, is also member. Day is devoted to unimportant resolutions. Ibid.

DECEMBER 5. Lincoln gives notice he will "on monday next, or some day thereafter," ask leave to introduce bill entitled an "act to limit the jurisdiction of Justices of the Peace." Day is given over largely to such notices. State education convention, to which Lincoln is delegate, meets. Ibid.; Photo.; The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 26.

DECEMBER 6. Lincoln votes nay on resolution calling for joint committee of both Houses to draft memorial to Congress asking that federal lands in state be subject to taxation as soon as sold. House Journal. ["Sangamo Journal" advertises Lincoln as its agent at New Salem. On Mar. 8, 1835 periodical announces it will take "Meal, Buckwheat, flour, pork on newspaper accounts."]

DECEMBER 8. Lincoln votes nay on question whether bill relating to justices of peace should be read second time. He votes yea on printing 55 copies of bill on public roads. Lincoln, Gordon, and Wyatt of Morgan are appointed committee to which is referred "an act to increase the number of election precincts in Morgan County." House Journal.

DECEMBER 9. Committee to which Lincoln was appointed yesterday reports with amendment which is accepted. Lincoln introduces "act to limit the jurisdiction of Justices of the Peace." He gives notice that he intends to introduce bill to authorize Samuel Musick to build toll bridge across Salt Creek in Sangamon County. Ibid.; Photo.

DECEMBER 10. Lincoln votes nay on ordering second reading of "act to amend an act, entitled an act regulating elections." Motion is defeated 27 to 23. House Journal.

43

DECEMBER 11. On question of ordering second reading of "act for the incorporation of Agricultural Societies," Lincoln votes yea with majority. He votes yea on "act relating to clerks of the county commissioners' courts." His motion to add to rules of House, "It shall not be in order, to offer amendments to any bill after its third reading," is voted down. Ibid.; The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 29.

DECEMBER 12. Lincoln does not vote on roll call — motion to recess. Day is devoted to adoption of memorials to Congress for mail routes and choosing dates for election of state officers. House Journal.

DECEMBER 13. Senate and House, by joint vote, elect commissioner to sell Gallatin County Salines. Lincoln votes for Tyler D. Hewitt, who is elected. Probate judges are elected for four counties. Ibid.

DECEMBER 15. Lincoln introduces "act to authorize Samuel Musick to build a toll bridge across Salt Creek in Sangamon County." Ibid.; Photo.; The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 29-30.

DECEMBER 16. Lincoln writes report of Committee on Public Accounts and Expenditures concerning contingent fund. Hughes of St. Clair presents report to House. Lincoln also writes, and Hughes introduces, report of same committee concerning relief of Vandalia lot buyers. Photo.; The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 30-1. Stuart introduces resolution requesting Illinois congressmen to secure franking privileges for members of legislature. House Journal.

DECEMBER 17. Lincoln moves "that the report of the committee on Public Accounts and Expenditures, relative to the contingent fund . . . laid upon the table, be now taken up." He votes yea on bill providing for election of county recorders and surveyors. Lincoln, Stuart, and Carpenter are appointed committee to consider Lincoln's toll bridge bill. Ibid.

DECEMBER 18. Lincoln's only vote favors Senate resolution setting Saturday, Dec. 20th, for election of successor to John M. Robinson in U.S. Senate. Ibid.

DECEMBER 19. [Lincoln's name does not appear in Journal, no roll calls being taken; it is not known whether he is present.]

DECEMBER 20. Carpenter of Sangamon reports from select committee offering amendment to bill "authorizing Samuel Musick to build a toll bridge across Salt Creek in Sangamon County." Amended bill passes House. John M. Robinson is reelected to U.S. Senate. Lincoln votes for Richard M. Young. Ibid.

44

DECEMBER 22. Lincoln votes with majority to change hour of convening House from 10 to 9 A.M. He votes on two minor questions in party fight over duties of public printer. Ibid.

DECEMBER 23. House refuses to reconsider petition to compensate witnesses for coming to Vandalia to testify in case of People v. Lamborn. Lincoln votes yea. Ibid.

DECEMBER 24. Committee to which was referred bill limiting jurisdiction of justices of peace reports substitute. Amendment is offered. Bill, report, and amendment are referred to select committee of Lincoln, Rowan of Gallatin, and McHenry of White. Lincoln votes nay on motion to adjourn over Christmas. Ibid.

DECEMBER 26. Senate reports concurrence in passage of Lincoln's toll bridge bill. Lincoln votes against resolution requesting Judiciary committee to inquire into expediency of making prosecutor liable for costs in suit brought by state and not sustained. Ibid.

DECEMBER 27. Lincoln votes yea with majority on "an act concerning Public Roads," and again with majority to change hour of assembly from 9 to 10 o'clock. Ibid.

DECEMBER 29. Stuart reports from committee without amendment "act to establish a uniform mode of holding circuit courts." Lincoln's two votes on bill are favorable. On his motion Committee of the Whole discusses Senate resolution setting date for election of state officers. Ibid.

DECEMBER 30. House devotes afternoon to discussion of circuit court bill. Lincoln votes with majority to pass bill, which is approved 31 to 23. Ibid.

DECEMBER 31. On Lincoln's motion House takes up Senate resolution concerning election of auditor, treasurer, and attorney general. After discussion, resolution is adopted, and election scheduled for next day. Ibid.

1835

JANUARY 1. Vandalia. Senate meets in House at 11 A.M. Lincoln votes for James T. B. Stapp of Fayette for auditor, John Dement of Morgan for treasurer, and Ninian W. Edwards of St. Clair for attorney general. All are elected. House Journal.

JANUARY 2. [No roll calls are taken and Lincoln's name does not appear in proceedings. Ibid.]

45

JANUARY 3. Select committee reports objections and recommends rejection of amendments to act concerning public roads. Lincoln votes nay with minority on motion to table bill and amendments until July 4, usual method of killing bill. Ibid.

JANUARY 5. J. B. Thomas, Jr. of Madison introduces seven resolutions condemning Bank of U.S. and praising President Jackson's exposure of "soulless corporation." Lincoln votes yea on motion to refer to Committee of the Whole. He votes yea to table "act, regulating the salaries of auditor and treasurer." Ibid.

JANUARY 6. Lincoln speaks on recent appointment of Schuyler County surveyor by Assembly to fill nonexistent vacancy. Lincoln humorously remarks that there is no danger of new surveyor ousting old so long as he persists in not dying. Matters should be left as they are. If incumbent should decide to die, new surveyor would be ready. Sangamo Journal, Jan. 17.

JANUARY 7. [Lincoln does not vote on single roll call. House Journal.]

JANUARY 8. Lincoln, Wyatt of Morgan, and Anderson of Jefferson are appointed select committee to study "act concerning marks and brands." [Approved Feb. 6, this act revived act of 1829 providing penalty for changing livestock brands with intent to steal.] Ibid.

JANUARY 9. Day is spent debating Thomas' resolutions against Bank of U.S. and upholding President Jackson in actions on bank, and for his handling of American claim against France for damages in War of 1812. Lincoln's votes support bank. Ibid.

JANUARY 10. Day is devoted to discussion of "act concerning Estrays." Lincoln proposes resolution urging Illinois congressmen to procure passage of law entitling state to receive annually 20 per cent of amount paid into U.S. Treasury for public lands in state. Ibid.

JANUARY 12. [No roll calls are taken and Lincoln's name does not appear in proceedings. Ibid.] Stuart introduces bill, in Lincoln's handwriting, for state road from Wabash River to Yellow Banks on Mississippi (which passes Jan. 16.) The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 32-3.

JANUARY 13. Select committee to which was referred "Act, to provide for the election of a County Recorder and Surveyor" reports substitute bill. On motion to table both, Lincoln votes nay with majority, then yea with majority to accept committee report. House Journal.

JANUARY 14. In joint session, Assembly elects public printer and five circuit judges. John Y. Sawyer, editor of Illinois Advocate, Vandalia, is

46

elected public printer over M. Greiner for whom Lincoln votes. Stephen T. Logan is elected judge of first judicial district, which includes Sangamon County. Other judges chosen are Sidney Breese, Henry Eddy, Justin Harlan, and Thomas Ford. Ibid.

JANUARY 15. [Lincoln's name does not appear in proceedings, and his attendance is not certain. Ibid.)

JANUARY 16. Lincoln is put on committee with Moore of St. Clair, McHenry of White, Hunt of Edwards, and Hampton of Gallatin to which is referred "act to amend an act, to regulate Mills and Millers, approved Feb. 9, 1827." He votes yea on engrossing and reading third time bill to incorporate Jacksonville Female Academy. Ibid.

JANUARY 17. Lincoln presents petition of citizens of "counties of Sangamon, Morgan, and Tazewell, praying the organization of a new county out of said counties." On his motion petition is referred to Committee on Petitions. He votes nay on motion to table until July 4 "act, concerning county commissioners." He introduces amendment to bill concerning marks and brands. Ibid.; The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 33.

JANUARY 19. Lincoln votes against amendment to female academy incorporation bill which would bind property of trustees on payment of contracts. Pie then votes with majority to pass act. House Journal.

JANUARY 20. Lincoln is placed on select committee with Gordon of Morgan and Hughes of St. Clair to consider debt collection bill. He votes with majority (yeas 40, nays 9) to save time and money by not printing memorials in "House Journal." Ibid.

JANUARY 21. Lincoln votes with majority to defeat proposal to set up joint committee to reapportion General Assembly in accordance with state census soon to be taken. Purpose is to avoid special reapportionment session. He favors proposal to investigate reduction of county officers fees. Ibid.

JANUARY 22. On Lincoln's motion House rules are suspended to read second time Schuyler County road bill. He votes with majority to refer to select committee bill providing for equitable distribution of school fund. Ibid.; Photo.

JANUARY 23. Lincoln votes to reconsider resolution concerning Bank of U.S. and national currency. Committee of which Lincoln is member reports act to simplify legal debt collections. Report and amendments are referred to Judiciary Committee. House Journal

47

JANUARY 24. Lincoln's first bill, "act to limit the jurisdiction of Justices of the Peace," passes 39 to 7. "Act for the relief of debtors of the State Bank of Illinois" is referred to select committee composed of Lincoln, Dunn of Pope, and Harris of Macoupin. Ibid.

JANUARY 26. Lincoln votes yea on school bill, which fails to pass. He votes nay on tabling resolution requesting members not to ask for pay until March 1836 (tabled 25 to 23). House discusses act providing compensation for jurors. Lincoln votes twice on amendments before bill is referred to select committee. Ibid.

JANUARY 27. Lincoln gives notice that on Thursday next he will introduce road bill. [Bill introduced by Dawson of Sangamon and becomes law.] He votes to table act to remove school fund, and nay on amendment to State Bank of Vandalia debtor relief bill. Ibid.

JANUARY 28. On Lincoln's motion "act making appropriations for the years 1835 and 1836" is referred to Committee of the Whole, and made order of day for Thursday next. Lincoln, Cloud of Morgan, and Thompson of Randolph are appointed select committee to take up Sangamon-Morgan boundary bill. Ibid.

JANUARY 29. Lincoln is appointed to select committee with Dawson of Sangamon, Harreld of Jackson, Murphy of Perry, and Harris of Macoupin to take up militia bill. He votes yea to pass bank debtor relief bill, which fails. Ibid. He introduces bill for road from Springfield to Miller's Ferry on "Sangamo river." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 35-6.

JANUARY 30. Lincoln votes nay on question of raising salary of secretary of state from $800 to $1,000. Seven other votes are recorded during day. Lincoln, Gregory of Greene, and Gordon of Morgan are appointed select committee to consider Senate school fund bill. House Journal.

JANUARY 31. Select committee recommends rejection of bill relative to attorney general's duties. On motion of Stuart, bill is referred to new select committee composed of Lincoln, Stuart, and Harris of Macoupin. Lincoln votes with majority for third reading of "act for the construction of the Illinois and Michigan Canal." Ibid.

FEBRUARY 2. Lincoln debates "act concerning the School Fund." He moves previous question and bill fails. He votes with majority in refusing to table "act concerning Religious Societies." Ibid.

FEBRUARY 3. Lincoln votes with majority in refusing to table bill for distributing interest on school fund. He votes to reduce, from five to three, number of Illinois and Michigan canal commissioners. [House restores five commissioners Feb. 9.] Ibid.

48

FEBRUARY 4. [Webb of White announces death of his colleague, Maj. William McHenry, and delivers eulogy. Rev. Newton Cloud of Morgan preaches funeral sermon in House at 3 P.M. Ibid.]

FEBRUARY 5. Lincoln votes with majority to pass "act concerning the School Fund," removing fund from Bank of U.S., St. Louis, and bestowing it on treasurer. Ibid.

FEBRUARY 6. Lincoln votes yea on passage of antigaming bill. On his motion, "act to improve the navigation of the Sangamon River," which has passed House, has title changed to "act to authorize a special election in Sangamon County." Lincoln's name appears on five other roll calls. Ibid.

FEBRUARY 7. Lincoln votes with majority on resolution asking Senate to return to House "act to incorporate colleges." He votes to incorporate Alton Hotel Co. Ibid.

FEBRUARY 9. Illinois and Michigan canal bill passes 40 to 12. Sangamon delegation, Lincoln, Stuart, Dawson, and Carpenter, votes yea. Bill setting up new state bank with headquarters at Springfield passes House with one vote to spare, Lincoln voting yea. Ibid.

FEBRUARY 10. Lincoln votes to table bills providing for education of orphan children, and for killing wolves. He votes for Jesse B. Thomas, Jr., Democrat, who is elected attorney general, and for John J. Hardin for states' attorney, first judicial district, who is defeated by Stephen A. Douglas. Ibid.

FEBRUARY 11. Lincoln votes yea on resolution to adjourn sine die next day. Resolution fails. He votes on two routine motions, and at 6 P.M. Senate meets with House to elect Alexander F. Grant over Walter B. Scates judge of third judicial circuit and Elijah C. Berry president of Bank of Illinois at Vandalia. Ibid.

FEBRUARY 12. Lincoln votes yea on adding to property excluded from legal attachment one work horse or yoke of oxen. This provokes further discussion on exempted property. He votes yea with majority to pass "act for the benefit of Bank Debtors." He calls for yeas and nays on two votes in afternoon. Ibid.

FEBRUARY 13. Senate bill, "act concerning the lessees of the Gallatin Saline Reserve," is read three times and passed, 19 to 18, Lincoln voting nay. He votes to increase from $100 to $175 fee for copying "House Journal." House closes session with prayer. Ibid.

FEBRUARY 14. En route to New Salem. [Lincoln is summoned as witness in Peter S. Harvel v. David Wooldrige, at order of Forquer & Treat, attorneys for plaintiff. Photo.]

49

FEBRUARY 21. Springfield. Garret Elkin, sheriff of Sangamon County, and Josiah Francis, deputy sheriff, sign attachment: "Levied February 21st 1835 one set of surveying instruments, one horse saddle and Bridle and the undivided half of Lots no. 16 & 17 north of Main Street New Salem the property of Abraham Lincoln." Unpaid debt is for $223.24, in case of Peter Van Bergen v. William F. Berry, Abraham Lincoln, and William Green. Photo.

FEBRUARY 23. New Salem. Lincoln is served summons as witness for plaintiff in Harvel v. Wooldrige. Photo.

MARCH 7. Under Feb. 21 order, Sheriff Elkin sells Lincoln's surveying instruments, horse, saddle and bridle for $81. Sale of house and lots is stayed by order of plaintiff, Van Bergen. Photo.

MARCH 10. Lincoln draws up description of two surveys he has made for William McNeely. First tract is on north bank of Gum's Branch 4 1/2 miles west of New Salem. Other, 4-acre tract, is located 1 1/2 miles northeast of New Salem. [Lincoln described two pieces of land as "part of the South West fractional quarter of Section 30 in Township 18 North of Range 7 West," and "Also, the West half of the South West quarter of Section 21 in the afforesaid Township."] Photo.

MARCH 24. Lincoln, deputy surveyor, surveys N.W. 1/4 of N.E. 1/4 of N. E. 1/4 Section of 33 in Township 18 North of Range 6 west of Third Principal Meridian for Archibald Kincaid. His corner posts are Spanish Oak and three white oak trees. Forty-acre tract is located about 3 miles northwest of Athens. Photo.

MARCH 28. [Sangamon citizens meet in Springfield to adopt measures relative to construction of railroad from Springfield to Alton. William F. Elkin presides, and C. R. Matheny and Elijah Iles act as secretaries. Committee of nine is appointed to cooperate with Macoupin and Madison counties. Sangamo Journal, Apr. 4.]

APRIL 25. Lincoln and Bowling Green witness deed to three tracts granted by John and Lydia Jones to J. John, Jr. Deed Book H, 365.

MAY 29. "Taken up by James Eastep on his farm on Crain Creek, one chestnut sorrel horse seven or eight years old, a star on his forehead with no brands perceivable and appraised to $35.00 by A. Lincoln and James F. Halsey. Bowling Green, J.P." Photo.

JUNE 13. [Meeting is held at court house in Springfield of citizens who favor Hugh L. White for President. Committee is appointed to publish address. (Published July 11.) Bowling Green and Samuel Berry of New

50

Salem are put on committee with John Dawson, Andrew McCormick, and Dr. A. G. Henry. Sangamo Journal, July 11.]

JUNE 19. Lincoln and Bowling Green witness deed of Alexander Latine to Henry Anno. Deed Book H, 393.

JULY 4. New Salem [?] Lincoln writes for Lewis E. Reed and John Armstrong promissory note to Charles Houghton, which J. E. Vance attests. Photo.

AUGUST 3. Lincoln votes for John Calhoun in preference to A. G. Herndon to succeed E. D. Taylor in state senate, and for Job Fletcher instead of Peter Cartwright to succeed George Forquer in state senate. Both are elected. His vote helps elect Thomas M. Neale county surveyor over Reuben Harrison and Parnell Hamilton. Election Returns.

AUGUST 17. [Matthew S. Marsh, who lives near New Salem, writes: "On the night of the 17th of August a tornado passed over this place, laid the fences flat, rooted up trees, blew down corn and done other damage. The next morn by daylight as I was putting up my fence, two great wolves walked along unconcerned within 50 yards of me." Illinois State Historical Library, Springfield, Illinois. — Trans., 1926, 125.]

AUGUST 25. [Ann Rutledge, ill six weeks, dies at Rutledge farm seven miles northwest of New Salem. Ibid., 121.]

SEPTEMBER 16. [Lincoln is absent from his post office. Matthew S. Marsh calls, and not finding Lincoln, looks through mail and takes home letter from his brother, George H. Marsh of Portsmouth, N.H. Ibid., 122.]

SEPTEMBER 17. [Mail comes to New Salem from Springfield on Saturday of each week on route to Warren County Court House (Monmouth). On return trip it reaches New Salem on Thursdays. Apparently Lincoln is in post office only these two days. Ibid.]

SEPTEMBER 22. Lincoln franks letter from M. S. Marsh to his brother in New Hampshire. Marsh writes that Lincoln is very careless in leaving office open and unattended, and that he could have charged double postage he marked on cover of recent letter. But Lincoln, says Marsh, would not have done that even if he had noticed incorrect amount. Photo.

SEPTEMBER 24. Lincoln surveys ten-acre lot of timber located about 1 1/2 miles southwest of New Salem. He notes, "Timber land surveyed by A. Lincoln from Wm. Green to M. S. Marsh, 24 Sept. 1835." Privately owned.

51

NOVEMBER 3. Lincoln writes to Francis P. Blair, Sr., and John G. Rives of Washington, D.C.: "Your subscriber at this place John C. Vance, is dead; and no person takes the paper ["Congressional Globe] from the office [.]" The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 38.

NOVEMBER 10. Lincoln writes Gov. Joseph Duncan: "Understanding that Mr. Levi Davis of Vandalia, is an applicant for the office of Auditor of Public Accounts, I take the liberty to say to you, that his appointment to that office would be entirely satisfactory to me, and, I doubt not, to most others who are the friends of quailification [sic] and — merit — " [Davis is appointed Nov. 16.] Ibid.

DECEMBER 7. Vandalia. Lincoln is present at opening of special session of Ninth General Assembly. Forty-eight of 55 members answer House roll call. In afternoon, Democratic convention, first Illinois state-wide political convention, meets in House. House Journal.

DECEMBER 8. Lincoln is appointed to Committee on Public Accounts and Expenditures. Gov. Duncan has called legislature to deal with reapportionment, financing Illinois and Michigan canal, and financing state bank. Democratic convention meets again at 3 P.M. Ibid.

DECEMBER 9. John Henry of Morgan, Whig, proposes resolution condemning as antirepublican convention system for nominations. Lincoln and Henry call for yeas and nays on vote to table resolution. Lincoln and 18 others vote nay as it is tabled. Ibid.

DECEMBER 10. Lincoln gives notice that on Saturday next he will introduce bill amending law of 1829 for relief of insolvent debtors. Ibid. He writes to Thomas J. Nance at New Salem: "There is but little of interest doing in the Legislature as yet: owing mostly to the census returns from several counties not having been made." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 38.

DECEMBER 11. Lincoln reports road bill affecting Sangamon and Morgan counties. On his motion committee of five, of which he is chairman, is appointed to consider incorporation of Sangamon Valley Canal Company. House Journal; Photo.

DECEMBER 12. Lincoln introduces his insolvent debtor relief bill. He reports bill to incorporate Beardstown and Sangamon Canal Co. He votes nay on amendment to Illinois and Michigan Canal Act, which passes 28 to 27. House Journal.

DECEMBER 14. Lincoln, Brown of McLean, and Pace of Jefferson are appointed committee to consider Tazewell County road petition. He votes nay on Senate resolution for expunging U.S. Senate's censure of President Jackson for his removal of public funds from Bank of U.S. Ibid.

52

DECEMBER 15. Lincoln, for committee appointed Dec. 9, reports "act to I relocate a part of the state road, leading from Springfield to Lewistown." On his motion, Beardstown and Sangamon Canal Co. bill is read third time and referred to committee of Hunter of Bond, Craig of Union, and himself. Ibid.; Photo.

DECEMBER 16. Lincoln votes with majority to engross and read third time Illinois and Michigan Canal bill, which passes. House Journal. [Supreme Court convenes and remains in session until Jan. 16, 1836. Record.]

DECEMBER 17. Lincoln expresses disapproval of increase in House membership in accordance with 1835 state census. He votes against lower population total for each House member. House Journal.

DECEMBER 18. Lincoln suggests member of House for each 8,500 of population, and sees his motion defeated. He votes nay on motion to read third time bill "supplemental to an act to incorporate the subscribers of the Bank of the State of Illinois, in Springfield." Ibid.

DECEMBER 19. [Lincoln's name does not appear in proceedings of joint session to elect probate judges for eight counties. Ibid.]

DECEMBER 21. Lincoln moves to amend eighth section of Illinois and Michigan Canal Act by adding: "The Governor, during the recess of the General Assembly, for any good cause, shall have power to remove any or all of the said commissioners from office, and to supply vacancies occasioned by such removals." Motion fails. Ibid.

DECEMBER 22, Lincoln votes yea on passage of "act to incorporate the Morgan County Mutual Fire Insurance Co." On his motion title of another insurance bill is changed after passage to: "Act to incorporate the Sangamon Fire Insurance Co." His amendment to supplemental act incorporating subscribers to Bank of Illinois, Shawneetown, is voted down. Ibid.

DECEMBER 23. Lincoln votes nay on bill distributing interest from loan of school funds, and with minority on adoption of Senate amendments to House resolutions in relation to improvement of Great Wabash River. Ibid.

DECEMBER 24. Lincoln votes for Stuart's amendment in regard to appointment and removal of canal commissioners. Amendment loses, 24 to 31, while bill passes 29 to 26, Lincoln voting yea. Ibid.

DECEMBER 26. On motion of Lincoln it is "Resolved, that the committee on Public Accounts and Expenditures" inquire into expediency of authorizing publication of general state laws in newspapers. lIbid.; The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 44.

53

DECEMBER 28. House meets and adjourns out of respect for Ellas Kent Kane, U.S. Senator from Illinois since 1824, news of whose death in Wash ington Dec. 12 arrives. House Journal.

DECEMBER 29. Legislature meets in joint session to elect U.S. senator. William L. D. Ewing is elected on ballot 12. Lincoln votes for Richard M. Young on four ballots, for Alexander M. Jenkins on three, then for Ewing. Ibid.

DECEMBER 30. [Lincoln's name does not appear on two roll calls.]

DECEMBER 31. [Lincoln's name does not appear on four roll calls.]

1836

JANUARY 1. Vandalia. [Lincoln's name does not appear in proceedings. His unusual three-day absence from House is accounted for by introduction, Jan. 2, of report of Committee on Public Accounts and Expenditures, by John D. Hughes of St. Clair. Report, listing state expenses for 1836 at $89,150, is in Lincoln's hand, showing that he spent these days in committee gathering and discussing statistics. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 45.]

JANUARY 2. Lincoln votes on amendments to "act to incorporate the stockholders of the Alton Exporting Co." He votes yea on granting second reading to bill from Education Committee. House Journal.

JANUARY 4. Lincoln casts four negative votes: on passage of act concerning justices of peace and constables; on passage of act for electing county commissioners court clerks; on motion to refer to select committee Vermilion Saline lands bill; and on amendment to Saline bill. Ibid.

JANUARY 5. Lincoln votes with majority to pass Vermilion Saline bill. He votes nay on resolutions proposed Jan. 2 condemning Whig party and lauding Democratic presidential ticket for 1836. Resolutions are adopted 31 to 20. Ibid.

JANUARY 6. Lincoln votes on two roll calls. Ibid.

JANUARY 7. Illinois and Michigan Canal bill is returned to House with amendments. It passes 38 to 14, Lincoln voting for it. He votes nay with majority in refusing to move penitentiary from Alton. Ibid.

54

JANUARY 8. Lincoln votes nay on advancing election bill to third reading. As House quickly finishes its current business, three votes on adjournment for day are taken. Lincoln votes nay thrice, but House adjourns. Ibid.

JANUARY 9. Lincoln votes on two private bills, and for Senate amendment to railroad incorporation bill. Ibid. Brown of Tazewell and McLean introduces bill in Lincoln's hand for road from Pcoria to Pekin. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 45-7.

JANUARY 10. House members attend funeral of Benjamin A. Clark of Wayne, who died Saturday. [On Jan. 11 members vote their day's pay to widow and children.] House Journal.

JANUARY 11. Senate bill for Sangamon River bridge is amended by Lincoln to require bridge at or near New Salem. Ibid.

JANUARY 12. Lincoln votes yea (31 yeas, 19 nays) on resolution instructing governor to sue public printer for failing to print complete "House Journal" and laws of regular session. After amendment, Gallatin Saline bill is read third time. Ibid.

JANUARY 13. On Lincoln's motion, House recedes from amendment to Sangamon County bridge bill requiring bridge at New Salem. Gallatin Saline bill passes after further amendment, Lincoln voting yea. Ibid.

JANUARY 14. House discusses Springfield state bank bill most of morning, which Senate amended. Sangamon delegation votes yea. Lincoln votes yea on bill incorporating Illinois Central Railroad Co. Ibid.

JANUARY 15. On Lincoln's motion, Senate bill on cattle is discussed in Committee of the Whole. Nicknamed "little bull law," it required young bulls to be penned up and provided prizes for best bulls in each county. Bill passes 24 to 16. Ibid.

JANUARY 16. Lincoln moves reconsideration of House committee amendment to Alton exporting company incorporation bill. Despite his objections, House adopts (24 to 18) amendment making stockholders liable for debts of corporation. Ibid.

JANUARY 18. In brief session, House hears that passed bills have been correctly enrolled, that Council of Revision has approved them, and adjourns sine die on motion of Stuart of Sangamon without roll call. Ibid.

JANUARY 19-20. En route to New Salem.

__. New Salem. Lincoln surveys 12-acre tract for David Hart, and writes technical notes. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 44.

55

FEBRUARY 3. New Salem. Lincoln writes and signs petition to county commissioners' court asking for increased allowance for support of Benjamin Elmore, "an absolute mad man." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 47.

FEBRUARY 13. Petersburg. Lincoln addresses large crowd promoting Beardstown and Sangamon Canal. Company charter is read and plea for subscriptions delivered. Sangamo Journal, Feb. 20.

FEBRUARY 17. "I hereby certify that the town of Petersburgh has been surveyed according to law, and that this is a correct plat of the same. A. Lincoln." [John Bennett, Petersburg hotel keeper in 1836, recalled in 1882 that Lincoln "spent most of the month of March in Petersburg, finishing up the survey and planning the town he had commenced the year before."] Record I, 293; Osborn H. Oldroyd, The Lincoln Memorial, 558.

FEBRUARY 27. Lincoln buys share of stock in Beardstown and Sangamon Canal, paying $1 down and owing $4. Seventy-eight shares are bought by 65 others, mostly New Salem and Petersburg residents. Photo.

MARCH 8. [George G. Miller presents petition, written by Lincoln, for public road to Sangamon County Commissioners. He asks that road be located from Morgan County line near Watkin's Mill to Miller's Ferry, then to Sangamon County line toward Pekin. Lincoln, William G. Jeter, and Robert Conover are appointed to locate road. County Commissioners' Record, Book D, 189]

[On Aug. 17, 1835, Thomas Plasters entered N.E. 1/4 of the S.E. 1/4 of Section 36, T. 19 N.R.10 W. Controversy arose between Plasters and Dr. Charles Chandler, whose land adjoined on west, as to location of the north-south line between them. Lincoln surveyed line some time in spring of 1836. Land is near present town of Chandlerville.]

MARCH 16. Springfield. Lincoln purchases from federal government tract of 47 acres at $1.25 per acre, on Sangamon River 12 miles northwest of New Salem. State Auditor's Record. [On Nov. 1, 1839 President Van Buren issues Certificate No. 15,701 to N. part of N.W. 1/4 of Sec. 3 in T. 19 N. of R. 7 W. Book 31, 355, original owned by Mrs. Edna Orendoff Macpherson, Springfield, Ill.]

MARCH 18. Lincoln's horse strays or is stolen from stable. He describes it as "large bay horse, star in his forehead, plainly marked with harness; supposed to be eight years old, has been shod all around, but is believed to have lost some of his shoes, and trots and paces." Sangamo Journal, Mar. 26.

MARCH 19. [Lincoln, Ninian W. Edwards, and Robert L. Wilson announce as candidates for legislature. John T. Stuart announces for Congress. Ibid. Mar. 19.]

56

MARCH 23. Lincoln serves as witness for plaintiff in trespass case of William G. Green v. John Purkapile in Sangamon Circuit Court. Case goes to Tazewell on change of venue. Record C, 169.

MARCH 24. Lincoln's name is entered on record of Sangamon Circuit Court as person of good moral character, first of three steps in obtaining law license. He buys from Thomas Edwards, farmer living near New Salem, his first Springfield property, two lots on north side of Jefferson Street between Sixth and Seventh. Lots are Nos. 6 and 8 in Old Town Plat. Record; Deed Book J, 515; The Abraham Lincoln Association, Springfield, Illinois. [Files and records on deposit at Illinois State Historical Library, Springfield, Illinois.] — Bulletin, Nos. 16 and 17.

MARCH 26. Lincoln inserts in "Sangamo Journal" card on his missing horse, "Any person who will take up said horse, and leave information at the Journal office, or with the subscriber at New Salem, shall be liberally paid for their trouble. A. Lincoln." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 47. In Green v. Purkapile, defendant pleads guilty and change of venue is set aside. Defendant admits damage ($2,000) to plaintiff, whereupon Green releases Purkapile from damages on agreeing to pay costs. The Abraham Lincoln Association, Springfield, Illinois. [Files and records on deposit at Illinois State Historical Library, Springfield, Illinois.].

APRIL 2. [Sale of lots is held in town of Huron, surveyed by Lincoln in March. Proprietors, Stephen T. Logan, James Adams, Gershom Jayne, John T. Stuart, David Prickett, Simeon Francis, Ninian W. Edwards, Samuel Morris, and William Carpenter, are all of Springfield. Illinois State Historical Library, Springfield, Illinois. — Broadside.]

APRIL 4. New Salem. Lincoln writes to Levi Davis, auditor, concerning status of quarter section south of Gladstone in Henderson County which Williamson Trent has deeded to Michael McDierman. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 47-8.

APRIL 9. [Postmaster Lincoln advertises 64 names of persons who have letters in New Salem post office. He warns that unless collected by July 1, they will be sent to dead letter office. Sangamo Journal, Apr. 9.]

APRIL 30. [Tracy and Reny announce that four-horse stage will leave Springfield every Wednesday morning at six for Yellow Banks (Oquawka) via Sangamo Town, New Salem, Petersburg, Huron, Havana, Lewistown, Canton, Knoxville, and Monmouth. Stage returns through New Salem on Tuesday. Ibid., Apr. 30.]

MAY 10. New Salem. Lincoln draws up plat with field notes of his survey of school section four miles southeast of New Salem. Illinois State Historical Library, Springfield, Illinois. — Original. [Land was Sec. 16 in T. 17 N. R. 6 W. of 3 P. M., divided almost equally by Sangamon River.]

MAY 21. [Lincoln certifies plat of his survey of town of Huron, which is recorded in Sangamon County. Town, situated at George G. Miller's ferry on south bank of Sangamon River at eastern terminus of proposed

57

Beardstown and Sangamon Canal, 12 miles northwest of New Salem, is being promoted by several leading Springfield business men. Sale of lots was held Apr. 2. Photo.]

MAY 30. [New Salem post office is discontinued. Abraham Lincoln, post master, receives $19.48 for his final three months of service, and $55.70 apparently for 12 months from April 1, 1834. to March 31, 1835. Register of Officers and Agents . . . in the Service of the United States, 1837, 1835, 1831.]

JUNE 1. New Salem Lincoln, Robert Conover, and William G. Jeter locate road from Watkins' Mill [ten miles northwest of New Salem] northeast to Huron and then north and east to county boundary in direction of Pekin. Lincoln writes on plat, "make us an allowance for one day and a half each." Illinois State Historical Library, Springfield, Illinois. — Original.

JUNE 2. Lincoln draws up plat of road begun day before. He signs names of Conover and Jeter as other road viewers. Ibid.

JUNE 7. [Lincoln, Conover, and Jeter are allowed $1.50 each for services in viewing and locating road. County Commissioners' Record D, 248-49.]

JUNE 13. Lincoln announces his platform as candidate for re-election to legislature. He advocates "all sharing the privileges of the government, who assist in bearing its burthens . . . admitting all whites to the right of suffrage, who pay taxes and bear arms, (by no means excluding females.) . . . I go for distributing the proceeds of the sales of the public lands to the several states." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 48.

JUNE 16. Albany. Lincoln draws up plat of Albany, town three miles west of present city of Lincoln, for John Wright and John Donavan. He lays out public square and seven blocks divided east and west by Meridian Street, and north and south by First, Second, and Third Streets. Each lot is 66' x 124'. Deed Book J, 271; The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, opp. 49.

JUNE 21. New Salem. Lincoln writes to Col. Robert Allen of Springfield, asking him to make public facts which Allen has said would, if made known, defeat Lincoln and Ninian W. Edwards in August election. [Allen does not reply.] The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 48-9.

JULY 1. [Lincoln advertises 48 letters still on hand in New Salem post office. Addressees are told in "Sangamo Journal" that if not called for by Oct. 1, letters will be sent to general post office as dead letters. Sangamo Journal I, July 9.]

JULY 2. ["Sangamo Journal" announces that "Republican," Springfield's Democratic paper, compliments Lincoln for course he took in legislature

58

on bill "permitting the State Bank to take the million dollars worth of reserve stock and obligating the bank to pay the Wiggins loan" of $100,0000 made in 1831. Sangamo Journal, July 2.]

JULY 4. Petersburg. Lincoln and other candidates for legislature probably attend celebration of Fourth of July. Moses K. Anderson, candidate for Senate, and R. M. Quinton, candidate for House, are only two speakers mentioned in Sangamo Journal, July 9.

JULY 11. Springfield. Lincoln is debater at political meeting in court house. Ninian W. Edwards, Whig, is followed by Dr. Jacob M. Early, Democrat, and he in turn by Dan Stone, Whig. John Calhoun replies to Stone. Lincoln follows Calhoun and is replied to by Richard Quinton. All are legislative candidates. Sangamo Journal, July 16; The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 49-50.

JULY 14. Salisbury. Lincoln and other candidates attend rally and address "collection of citizens" at Salisbury, village on New Salem-Springfield road. Sangamo Journal, July 16.

JULY 16. Athens. Lincoln probably keeps first of ten speaking engagements for legislative candidates announced in today's Sangamo Journal. [Robert L. Wilson wrote Feb. 10, 1866: "We travelled on horse back from one grove to another. . . . The speaking would begin in the forenoon, the candidates speaking alternately until all who could speak had his turn." Henry E. Huntington Library, San Marino, California. — William H. Herndon Papers, Henry E. Huntington Library, San Marino, California.]

JULY 18. Varsell's on Sugar Creek. Seventeen candidates meet at Varsell farm in southern Sangamon County. Sangamo Journal, July 16. Lincoln takes leading part in campaign, "espousing the Whig side of all questions . . . [and] manifesting skill and tact." Henry E. Huntington Library, San Marino, California. — William H. Herndon Papers, Henry E. Huntington Library, San Marino, California, R. L. Wilson to W. H. Herndon, Feb. 10, 1866.

JULY 19. Mechanicsburg. Candidates hold meeting. Lincoln steps in to see that there is fair play when gang of roughs pick fight with John Bell. Hertz, 382; Sangamo Journal, July 16.

JULY 20. Cotton Hill. Legislative aspirants are scheduled to speak at meeting six miles south of Springfield. Ibid.

JULY 21. New Salem. Another legislative rally is held, with all candidates invited to speak. Ibid.

JULY 25. Allenton. Today's meeting is scheduled at Allenton, a mile and a half north of modern Taylorville. Ibid.

JULY 26. Campbell Farm. Stump speeches are scheduled at Thomas Campbell's farm, eight miles west of Springfield. Ibid., July 23.

59

JULY 27. Petersburg. Caravan moves north, and new town of Petersburg entertains its first political candidates. Ibid.

JULY 29. Spear's Farm and Springfield. Candidates halt at farm of Isaac Spear, six miles southeast of Springfield, address voters, and move on to Springfield. Lincoln, passing new home of George Forquer, sees his first lightning rod. Oldroyd, 143-45.

JULY 30. Springfield. Winding up campaign, candidates speak at court house. Ninian W. Edwards, Whig, bellows denial of charge of Dr. Early, Democrat. Early challenges Edwards to duel. Lincoln speaks next and astonishes audience by ability with which he handles subject in dispute. Henry E. Huntington Library, San Marino, California. — William H. Herndon Papers, Henry E. Huntington Library, San Marino, California, R. L. Wilson to W. H. Herndon, Feb. 10, 1866.

AUGUST 1. New Salem. Lincoln receives highest vote of 17 legislative candidates. In New Salem he gets 107 votes, 23 more than any other candidate. He leads in Athens and is third in Springfield, receiving 783 votes to 798 for Edwards and 811 for W. F. Elkin. Lincoln votes for Whigs, including John T. Stuart, who is defeated for Congress by William L. May. Election Returns.

AUGUST 2. Lincoln is one of 132 signers of petition to county commissioners court asking for "scrapers" on public roads to encourage labor and "facilitate, cheapen and comfort the business and traveling public." New "road tax to be levied this fall will produce more labor." Illinois State Historical Library, Springfield, Illinois. — Original.

AUGUST 22. Lincoln writes and attests will of Joshua Short, farmer of New Salem area. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 51.

SEPTEMBER 4. Lincoln draws and signs petition asking county commissioners court to relocate road leading from Watkins' Milll via Miller's Ferry north to county line toward Pekin. Illinois State Historical Library, Springfield, Illinois. — Original.

SEPTEMBER 7. [Lincoln is voted $12.50 by county commissioners court of Morgan County for surveying school lands (Sec. 16. T. 19 N. R. 3 W., in northeast Cass County, then part of Morgan). Record.]

SEPTEMBER 9. Springfield. Lincoln is licensed to practice law in all courts of state by two justices of Supreme Court. Record of Clerk of Supreme Court.

SEPTEMBER 19. [Macon County Circuit Court opens three-day session, Judge Stephen T. Logan presiding. Record.]

SEPTEMBER 22. [McLean County Circuit Court opens three-day session in Bloomington. Judge Logan presides. Record.]

60

SEPTEMBER 26. [Tazewell County Circuit Court convenes for four-day term at Tremont. Judge Logan appoints Dan Stone to serve as prosecuting attorney in absence of Stephen A. Douglas. Record.]

OCTOBER 3. Sangamon County Circuit Court opens fall term. Judge Stephen T. Logan presides. Among lawyers present are Lincoln, Stuart, Henry E. Dummer, Dan Stone, George Forquer, Samuel H. Treat, Cyrus Walker, Josephus Hewett, Edward D. Baker, and Thomas Moffett. Record.

OCTOBER 5. Lincoln files plea in his first lawsuit, Hawthorn v. Wooldridge. Plea is in Lincoln's hand, signed by Stuart. Actions in assumpsit, trespass vi et armis, and replevin have been filed against his client, David Wooldridge. He writes Wooldridge's sworn statement, which his client signs, and files affidavit asking that plaintiff furnish bond for costs. Lincoln also writes Hawthorn's account ($264 for 1834-36) against Wooldridge. Record; Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection [cited as Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.].

OCTOBER 6. Lincoln franks letter to Ira I. Fenn of Columbia, Putnam County, enclosing document from Judge Samuel D. Lockwood, In Hawthorn v. Wooldridge, plaintiff files bond for costs. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 52; Record.

OCTOBER 7. In Hawthorn v. Wooldridge, plaintiff moves court to release securities for costs. Court grants release on plaintiff entering himself as surety, thereupon plaintiff produces another bond with John Owens his surety. This order is entered in actions of trespass and assumpsit. Record.

OCTOBER 8. In Hawthorn v. Wooldridge, action in trespass vi et armis is tried before jury and Lincoln loses when plaintiff is awarded $36 and costs. Actions in assumpsit and replevin are continued. Record.

OCTOBER 30. Oakford. [Lincoln stops overnight at Deer Lick Tavern on his way to survey town of Bath. Statement on sign on site of Deer Lick Tavern.]

OCTOBER 31. En route to Bath. [Lincoln meets Ashley Hickey and they proceed by horseback to Bath. Ibid.]

NOVEMBER 1. Bath. Lincoln surveys town of Bath for John Kerton, proprietor, his last recorded town survey. Later in day he returns to Oakford. History of Menard and Mason Counties (1879), 412.

[In speech at Bath August 16, 1858, Lincoln recalled that 22 years before he had "with his own hands staked out the first plat of this town of Bath, then a wooded wilderness." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 543. Charles R. Matheny, clerk of Sangamon County Commissioners Court, certifies that Lincoln is elected to Tenth General Assembly. Photo.]

61

NOVEMBER 7. New Salem. Lincoln votes for Hugh L. White electors for President. White leads Van Buren in New Salem 65 to 34; 719 to 376 in Springfield; and 1464 to 903 in Sangamon County. Van Buren, however, carries state 18,459 to 15,240. Election Returns.

NOVEMBER 14. [Tazewell County Circuit Court convenes at Tremont for special four-day term. Judge Logan presides. Record.

NOVEMBER 16. Lincoln draws up survey of tract for Alvin Ringo, five miles west of New Salem (parts of Sections 30 and 31 in Township 18 North, Range 7 West of 3rd Principal Meridian.) The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 52-3.

NOVEMBER 17. Lincoln surveys for Alvin Ringo two tracts four miles southwest of New Salem and mile and a half northeast of present town of Tallula. [This is Lincoln's last survey, according to W. H. Herndon. Lincoln describes tracts as follows: "a part of the North half of Section 5 in Township 17 North of Range 7 West . . . and a part of the East one-half of the South West one-quarter of the said Section 5."] Ibid.

NOVEMBER 19. [Meeting of Sangamon citizens is held in Springfield to discuss internal improvements and to adopt measures to bring action by legislature. Sangamon delegation is instructed to vote for general system of internal improvements. Sangamo Journal, Dec. 3.]

NOVEMBER 30. [Before leaving for Vandalia, Lincoln draws up petition for county commissioners court requesting "establishment of a county road to commence at Middletown near Musick's bridge, thence the nearest and best rout [sic] to Meaddow's Mill at the Sugar Grove and thence to the county line." Petition is presented by Coleman Smoot Dec. 5. Photo.]

DECEMBER 5. Vandalia. Lincoln and other eight members of Sangamon delegation, nicknamed Long Nine because of their height, attend opening session of Tenth General Assembly. He votes four times for Newton Cloud for Speaker, but James Semple is elected. On Lincoln's motion House elects David Prickett clerk. House Journal.

DECEMBER 6. House continues with election of doorkeeper. Jefferson Weatherford, one of seven candidates, is elected. House is waiting for Gov. Duncan's address and adjourns soon after noon. Ibid.

DECEMBER 7. Select committee appointed to draft House rules reports and recommends two new standing committees, "Roads & Canals, Agriculture," and "Commerce and Manufactures." Report recommending nine members on each standing committee is adopted. Ibid.

DECEMBER 8. [No session of House.]

62

DECEMBER 9. Gov. Duncan addresses legislature, denouncing President Jackson's policies. He points out difficulties attendant on sale of state bonds to finance internal improvements, necessity of militia, need of public education, and recommends that state purchase stock reserved in state bank. Ibid.

DECEMBER 10. Lincoln is appointed to two of 14 standing House committees: important Committee on Finance, and minor Penitentiary Committee. ibid.

DECEMBER 12. [House meets in morning. Lincoln's name is not mentioned in proceedings. Ibid. Supreme Court convenes and remains in session until Mar. 2, 1837. Record.]

DECEMBER 13. Lincoln writes Mary Owens at New Salem of his depressed feelings since leaving home. He mentions fight among Democratic candidates for U.S. Senator, uncompleted state house, John Taylor's petition for new county [Menard], and opposition of Morgan delegation. He thinks there is good chance of moving capital to Springfield. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 54-5.

DECEMBER 14. Lincoln moves report of auditor be tabled and 2,000 copies printed. Motion adopted. He votes for Archibald Williams of Quincy for U.S. senator on three ballots. Richard M. Young of Jonesboro is elected. House Journal.

DECEMBER 15. Lincoln votes with majority to refer divorce petition of Henry King to Committee on Petitions. He votes yea on granting second reading to bill repealing act to improve cattle, passed last session. Ibid.

DECEMBER 16. Dubois and Lincoln call for vote on amendment to "act to provide for receiving a distributive share of the surplus revenue of the United States on deposit." Lincoln votes nay on resolution: "That it is unconstitutional and foreign to the duties of . . . the Legislature to grant bills of divorce." Ibid.

DECEMBER 17. Senate sitting with House elects W. B. Scates Judge of third judicial circuit. Lincoln votes for S. D. Marshall, who is elected prosecuting attorney of same circuit. House adopts Senate resolution "requiring the treasurer . . . to demand specie on the drafts of the Secretary of the Treasury of the United States for her proportion of the public deposits." Ibid.

DECEMBER 19. "Little Bull law," deemed undemocratic by voters, is rpealed 81 to 4. Lincoln votes with majority. bid.; William E. Baringer, Lincoln's Vandalia, 6-7.

63

DECEMBER 20. Douglas, from committee on Petitions, reports bill for new county to be formed out of Sangamon. On Lincoln's motion it is referred to select committee of Wilson of Sangamon, Richardson of Schuyler, and himself. He introduces resolution asking doorkeeper if assistant is necessary. House Journal; Photo.; The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 55.

DECEMBER 21. Lincoln reports committee bill with amendments for Sangamon County division, says bill is compromise, and favors it because county can be divided only by vote of people. He is opposed to offering to people territory too small for acceptance. Illinois State Register, Vandalia Jan. 12, 1837; House Journal.

DECEMBER 22. Day is devoted to Sangamon division bill. Linder's motion to have only people in new county vote brings debate in which Linder, Douglas, Webb, and Lincoln take part. Linder's afternoon motion to eliminate referendum clause brings Lincoln again into debate. Ibid.

DECEMBER 23. Smith of Wabash proposes resolutions which become system of internal improvements. McClernand of Gallatin reports committee reply to Gov. Duncan's charges against President Jackson. Party fight ensues with Hardin of Morgan leading Whigs. Ibid.

DECEMBER 24. Lincoln writes John McNamar that he has received petition to change state road. If McNamar does not wish this change he should get up remonstrance. Lincoln attends legislature, reporting, from select committee, amendments to Van Buren County bill. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 57-60; House Journal.

DECEMBER 26. [House celebrates Christmas; no session.]

DECEMBER 27. House devotes most of day to accounts of John Dement, former state treasurer. Whigs, led by Hardin of Morgan, ask that "all the money which appeared to be due from said Auditor's supplemental report" be turned over by Dement. Hardin's resolution is tabled, Lincoln voting nay. Ibid.

DECEMBER 28. House is notified of death of Resolve Graham, member from Gallatin. House adopts resolutions of regret and adjourns. Ibid.

DECEMBER 29. Funeral services for Resolve Graham are held in capitol; House and Senate attend. Hogan of Madison delivers funeral address, and House follows cortege to edge of town on its way to Gallatin County. Illinois State Register, Dec. 30.

DECEMBER 30. Lincoln votes with majority to table resolution instructing Election Committee to inquire into expediency of voting by ballot. He votes to table resolution asking Congress for alternate sections of land along

64

creeks and rivers for purpose of improving them. House Journal. Lincoln signs bond of Charles Gregory as treasurer. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 60-1.

DECEMBER 31. [Lincoln's name does not appear in proceedings. No roll calls are taken. Dawson of Sangamon proposes resolution that is strikingly similar to Homestead Law enacted by Congress in 1862. House Journal.)

1837

JANUARY 1. Vandalia. [Lincoln returns to New Salem during early part of week, or is too ill to attend House sessions, or is busy in committee.]

JANUARY 2. [Lincoln's name does not appear in proceedings. House Journal.]

JANUARY 3. [Lincoln's name does not appear in proceedings. Ibid.]

JANUARY 4. [Lincoln's name does not appear in proceedings. Ibid.]

JANUARY 5. [Lincoln's name does not appear in proceedings. No roll calls are taken. Ibid.]

JANUARY 6. Lincoln votes nay on tabling Senate resolution for employing "Vandalia Free Press" to print bills and documents. This attempt of Whig Senate to take some of state printing from Democratic "Illinois Advocate" is turned down in House 64 to 12. Ibid.

JANUARY 7. Linder of Coles introduces resolutions for sweeping investigation of Bank of Illinois in Springfield. House orders 150 copies printed, Lincoln voting yea. House orders engrossed for third reading bill making clerks of county commissioners' courts and county treasurers elective. Ibid.

JANUARY 8. [Rev. Josephus Hewett addresses members of legislature and citizens of Vandalia in House. Ibid.]

JANUARY 9. Report of Committee on Internal Improvements is presented by Smith of Wabash. Lincoln votes nay on resolution to print 4,000 copies; it is adopted 57 to 26. House refuses use of hall to citizens of Vandalia to celebrate Jackson's victory at New Orleans. Ibid.

JANUARY 10. Dougherty of Union proposes resolution requesting governor to furnish House with list of pardoned convicts. Lincoln votes nay on resolution, which is lost 39 to 42. Ibid.

65

JANUARY 11. Linder brings up his resolutions demanding investigation of state bank. Lincoln leads opposition in long speech directed at Linder and deprecating any investigation. He denies he is special advocate of bank, but he will oppose any move to injure bank's credit. Ibid.; The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 61-9.

JANUARY 12. Lincoln's name does not appear in proceedings, but he is probably present to hear report on antiabolitionist memorials from six states. Report deplores slavery but denounces abolitionists for scattering "fire brands of discord and disunion." House Journal.

JANUARY 13. Lincoln votes on one roll call. Gov. Duncan transmits printed report of commissioners of Illinois and Michigan Canal. Ibid.

JANUARY 14. Judge and two prosecuting attorneys are elected. J. H. Ralston is elected judge of fifth judicial circuit over W. A. Minshall and G. P. W. Maxwell. Lincoln votes for S. H. Little for prosecuting attorney of fifth circuit. H. L. Bryant is elected. A. C. French gets Lincoln's vote and is elected, 107 to 15, prosecuting attorney of fourth circuit over G. B. Shdledy. Ibid.

JANUARY 16. Lincoln presents petition and remonstrance against relocation of part of state road from Springfield to Lewiston, and petition on Beardstown and Sangamon Canal. Both are referred to Committee on Petitions. In joint session, legislature elects auditor, treasurer, attorney general, public printer, and penitentiary warden. Ibid.

JANUARY 17. Resolution of Carpenter of Hamilton "that no business shall be received in either House after Monday the 6th of February; and that the General Assembly adjourn sine die on Thursday the 16th of February next" is tabled 51 to 26, Lincoln voting yea. Ibid.

JANUARY 18. Linder of Coles moves to amend his bank resolutions and substitute House committee of five to investigate bank. Hardin of Morgan moves to amend by having investigation made by joint select committee. Lincoln votes yea, but Hardin's motion is defeated. Ibid.

JANUARY 19. Lincoln calls for vote on Linder's resolution and it is defeated. Senate resolution for investigation of Springfield and Shawneetown banks is adopted with minor amendments. Lincoln continues to oppose investigation. Ibid.

JANUARY 20. House takes up committee report on slavery resolutions. To resolution stating that Congress has power to deal with slavery in District of Columbia, but should do nothing, Lincoln proposes amendment: "Unless the people of said district petition for the same." Amendment is lost. Ibid.

66

JANUARY 21. Committee of Whole House discusses "an act to encourage the killing of wolves." Proposal to have bounty paid by county instead of state is lost. Lincoln votes for this amendment and against reduction of bounty. Amendment to Illinois and Michigan Canal act is given second reading and ordered printed. Ibid. State road bill in Lincoln's hand is introduced by McMurtry of Warren, Knox, and Henry. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 69-70.

JANUARY 23. Lincoln, Dawson, and McCormick of Sangamon are appointed select committee to take up road petition. Discussion begins on internal improvement bill. Lincoln votes yea on $50,000 appropriation for improvement of Big Muddy; $320,000 to build railroad from Bloomington to Pekin, and nay on submitting improvement bill to people. House Journal.

JANUARY 24. House debates internal improvement bill. Lincoln votes yea on amendments adding improvements, and against motion to donate, out of first money obtained by loans under act, grant of $25,000 to each county for schools. Ibid.

JANUARY 25. Lincoln votes nay on "act to encourage the killing of wolves." Douglas reports "an act for the formation of the county of Coffee." Bill is denied further consideration, 34 to 33, Lincoln voting yea. [Bill later passed. Coffee was to be set off from portions of Stark and Peoria counties, but was never organized.] Ibid.

JANUARY 26. Lincoln, Murphy of Vermilion, and Dairman of Pope are appointed select committee to consider act declaring certain streams navigable. Lincoln calls for vote on amendment to bill for construction of railroad from Naples to Jacksonville Ibid.

JANUARY 27. On Lincoln's motion, bill for state road from Jacksonville to Syracuse and Bloomington is read second time and referred to select committee of Lincoln, Stuart of Sangamon, and Hinshaw of McLean. Ibid.

JANUARY 28. Lincoln votes yea on tabling bill for distribution of state school fund among counties, according to number of children under 20 years of age. Motion is lost 61 to 9. Ibid.

JANUARY 30. Lincoln reports from select committee, with amendments, bill for state road from Jacksonville to Syracuse and Bloomington. Bill is ordered engrossed for third reading. He votes yea on two amendments designed to add miles of railroad to internal improvement bill. Ibid.; The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 70.

JANUARY 31. Amendment to act incorporating Alton Marine and Fire Insurance Co., reserving to legislature right to alter, amend, or repeal act, is lost, 46 nays, 36 yeas. Lincoln votes nay. Internal improvement bill

67

passes House, 61 to 25. Seven Sangamon representatives vote for bill. House Journal.

FEBRUARY 1. Death of David Nowlin, representative from Monroe, is announced. After appointment of committee to make funeral arrangements, House adjourns. Ibid.

FEBRUARY 2. House, Lincoln voting yea, changes hour of assembly from 10 to 9 o'clock. [Hour is moved back to 10 week later.] He votes yea on second reading of bill granting several divorces. He does not vote on four afternoon roll calls. Ibid.

FEBRUARY 3. Bill to erect county of Bureau is reported from committee. Lincoln votes for indefinite postponement, but motion fails. Ibid.

FEBRUARY 4. Act for relief of clerk of county commissioners' court of Franklin is referred to select committee of Harris of Macoupin, Dollins of Franklin, and Lincoln. Joint committee reports that $10,378.22 1/2 is due and should be paid to builders of new capitol. Ibid.

FEBRUARY 6. Act to extend charter of Bank of Kaskaskia is tabled 39 to 37, Lincoln voting yea. Douglas moves to table bill extending act incorporating Bank of Illinois at Shawneetown. Ibid.

FEBRUARY 7. Lincoln votes nay on five amendments to bill extending act incorporating Shawneetown Bank, and yea with majority ordering it engrossed for third reading. Afternoon is devoted to amendments to school fund distribution act. Lincoln adds amendment which is adopted. Ibid.; The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 71.

FEBRUARY 8. Senate resolution setting Feb. 13 as last day for new business and 28th for adjournment is adopted, 60 to 10, Lincoln voting nay. He votes with majority to compensate Vandalia citizens for new state house, erected in 1836 without authority. He votes yea on passage of bill extending Shawneetown Bank incorporation. House Journal.

FEBRUARY 9. Douglas presents Sangamon petition for division of county. On Lincoln's motion bill is referred to select committee of Douglas, Dawson, Harris, Reddick, and himself. David Prickett is elected prosecuting attorney of first judicial circuit which includes Sangamon. Lincoln votes for him. Ibid.

FEBRUARY 10. Lincoln votes against act to forbid circulation of state bank notes smaller than $5. He writes and reports from committee on Finance bill to relocate part of state road from Springfield to Lewiston. It is read twice and ordered engrossed. Ibid.; Photo; The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 71-2.

68

FEBRUARY 11. First direct move to gain capital for Springfield is made in attempt to repeal act of 1833 on permanent seat of government following referendum. Lincoln leads move for repeal and Dement of Fayette [Vandalia, county seat] opposes. House Journal.

FEBRUARY 13. Lincoln reports from committee petition for three new counties. Committee, finding 1,437 names on petition for Sangamon division and 2,213 names on remonstrance, unanimously recommends rejection. He makes similar report on petitions from Montgomery and Shelby counties. Bridge bill in Lincoln's hand is introduced by William McMurty. Ibid.; Photo; The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 72-3.

FEBRUARY 14. Fight to move capital occupies House through afternoon. Move to table bill until December 1839 is defeated 42 to 38. House Journal; The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 73.

FEBRUARY 15. Lincoln votes yea on bill to incorporate Illinois Beet-Sugar, Silk and Vegetable Oil Manufacturing Co. He opposes move to table bill relocating penitentiary. House Journal.

FEBRUARY 16. Lincoln reports from Committee on Finance annual income and expenses of state. Income is $57,895.15 and expenditures $55,151.95. Committee believes too little is allowed for contingent fund, and adds $15,000, producing deficit of $12,256.82. Ibid.; Photo; The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 74.

FEBRUARY 17. Senate bill for permanent location of capital is before House. Motion to organize board to examine geographical center of state as possible site is defeated. Bill is tabled 39 to 38. House Journal.

FEBRUARY 18. Capital bill tabled yesterday is taken up. Motion to table until July 4 fails after discussion. On Lincoln's motion, bill is tabled until Monday. He also has tabled motion to submit bill to referendum. He votes yea on resolution to adjourn Feb. 27. Ibid.; Baringer, 105-07.

FEBRUARY 20. Lincoln votes nay on tabling bill to amend act for construction of Illinois and Michigan Canal, approved Jan. 9, 1836. [Bill is taken up on Feb. 21, and passed 78 to 2.] House Journal.

FEBRUARY 21. Lincoln votes yea on bill amending act incorporating town of Alton, and yea on bill continuing charter of Bank of Kaskaskia. Motion to keep capital removal bill tabled is defeated 41 to 40, and bill is discussed Ibid.

69

FEBRUARY 22. Omnibus divorce bill is amended to read, "and all other persons who are desirous of being divorced." Bill and proposed amendment are referred to Committee of the Whole. Lincoln votes with majority in refusing to put internal improvement bill to vote of people. Ibid.

FEBRUARY 23. Lincoln and Sangamon delegation oppose move for constitutional convention. Ibid.

FEBRUARY 24. Capital removal bill is read third time. Lincoln moves to amend by adding meaningless provision that "General Assembly reserves the right to repeal this act at any time hereafter," which is adopted, and the bill passes 46 to 37. Sangamon delegation votes yea. Ibid.

FEBRUARY 25. Senate reports concurrence in House amendments to relocation bill. Council of Revision reports rejection of internal improvement bill. Lincoln votes with majority to repass bill, 53 to 20. [Bill passes Senate Monday 23 to 13.] Ibid.

FEBRUARY 27. Bill to appropriate residue of Vermilion Saline lands to Vermilion County for bridge across Big Vermilion River is referred to select committee of five, which includes Lincoln. Evening session is devoted to discussion on per diem of members. Ibid.

FEBRUARY 28. Senate joins House to select permanent seat of government. Springfield leads 20 towns on first ballot, and receives majority on fourth (Springfield 73, Vandalia 16, Jacksonville 11, Peoria 8, Alton 6, Illiopolis 3). Six other towns receive one vote each. Ibid.

MARCH 1. Lincoln votes with majority to pass bill increasing by $2,000,000 capital stock of Bank of Illinois at Springfield, and also to pass "act for the relief of persons in cases of ejectment." His name is entered on roll of attorneys in office of Supreme Court clerk. Ibid.; Record.

MARCH 2. Lincoln votes with majority, 55 to 17, to pass act clarifying internal improvement act. Amended act regulates sale of bonds, and pledges credit of state to pay principal and interest. Lincoln votes with majority to pass bill distributing school fund. House Journal.

MARCH 3. Lincoln and Dan Stone of Sangamon protest antiabolitionist resolutions adopted Jan. 20. Difference between their views and those expressed by House was moral — injustice of slavery. They declare that "promulgation of abolition doctrines tends rather to increase than abate" evils of slavery. Protest is made part of "House Journal." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 74-5.

MARCH 4. Lincoln and Senator Browning are tellers of election which results in choice of Thomas Ford as judge of circuit which includes Chicago E. C. Berry is elected president of Bank of Vandalia. Lincoln is one of 51

70

signers of $50,000 bond of Charles Oakley as fund commissioner appointed under internal improvement act. House Journal; Photo; The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 76.

MARCH 6. House meets and adjourns sine die. House Journal.

MARCH 7-8. En Route to New Salem.

MARCH 13. Springfield. Spring term of Sangamon Circuit Court opens. Judge Dan Stone of sixth circuit presides by agreement with Stephen T. Logan, judge of first circuit. Record.

MARCH 14. Three actions in Hawthorn v. Wooldridge are settled. Costs are divided in action in trespass; plaintiff pays costs in replevin, and defendant in assumpsit action. Lincoln represents plaintiff in first, acts with Hewett in latter two actions. Ibid.

MARCH 15. Stuart and Lincoln have three cases, in two of which Lincoln defends New Salem friends. In Joseph Torrey v. Tarleton Lloyd, plaintiff asks $200 damages, and $200 damages in Torrey v. Felix Green. Firm also appears for defendant in Demint et al. v. Sintz. Rule is entered on all defendants to file pleas. Ibid.

MARCH 16. Baker & Hewett move for continuance, granted, in Demint et al. v. Sintz, Lincoln files defendant's demurrer in Torrey v. William Green. Demurrer is overruled and plaintiff given permission to amend declaration and case continued. Ibid.

MARCH 17. Stuart and Lincoln file demurrer in Torrey v. Lloyd. Their petition for partition of lands in Carrico v. Carrico is granted. On their motion in Sarah Broadwell v. John Broadwell et al., summons is granted against two of defendants and case continued. Lincoln and Thomas appear for defendant in attachment suit of Johns v. Raley. Ibid.

MARCH 18. Stuart and Lincoln, attorneys for complainant in Elizabeth Baker v. Michael Baker, are awarded summons to Greene County and case continued. Nathaniel A. Ware v. Duncan et al. is continued, as Judge Stone is interested party as former counsel. Stuart, Lincoln, Logan, and Baker represent defendants. Ibid.

MARCH 27. [Morgan Circuit Court opens five-day term at Jacksonville. Judge William Brown presides. There is no evidence that either Stuart or Lincoln attends Morgan Court during three terms in 1837. Record.]

APRIL 7. [Calhoun Circuit Court convenes at Gilead.]

APRIL 10. Meeting is held to procure co-operation of residents to promote railroad from Quincy to Indiana state line. Nine delegates, including Lincoln,

71

Stuart, Treat, and Logan, are appointed to represent Sangamon at general meeting June 5. Sangamo Journal, April 15. [Greene Circuit Court convenes at Carrollton.]

APRIL 12. [Springfield paper announces that "J. T. Stuart and A. Lincoln, Attorneys and Counsellors at Law, will practice conjointly in the courts of this Judicial Circuit Office No. 4 Hoffman's Row upstairs. Springfield, April 12, 1837." Ibid.]

APRIL 15. In autobiography prepared for John Locke Scripps in 1860, Lincoln wrote: "In the autumn of 1836 he obtained a law licence, and on April 15, 1837 removed to Springfield, and commenced the practice, his old friend, Stuart taking him into partnership." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, IV, 65.

APRIL 17. [Macoupin Circuit Court convenes at Carlinville.]

APRIL 19. Lincoln writes Levi Davis, auditor, introducing Dr. Anson G. Henry who visits Vandalia to draw money to enable commissioners to commence state house in Springfield. Lincoln conclude: "We have, generally in this country, peace, health, and plenty, and no news." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 77.

APRIL 20. Lincoln gives quit claim deed to Lot 6 in Block 1 in Springfield to Josephus Hewett and E. D. Baker for $75. This is one of two lots he purchased Mar. 24, 1836. Deed Book K, 616.

APRIL 21. Lincoln acknowledges before Justice of Peace Thomas Moffett quit claim deed he gave Hewett & Baker yesterday. Ibid.

APRIL 24. Lincoln writes and files praecipe in Sangamon Circuit Court in James Webb v. Benjamin Watson. He signs Stuart's name. Plaintiff is suing for $200 debt and $100 damages. Lincoln writes copy of bond on which suit is based, which reads: "Know all men by these presents that we Andrew Orr and Benjamin Watson are held and firmly bound unto James Webb." Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. [Macon Circuit Court begins two-day session. Judge William Brown appoints Jesse B. Thomas, Jr. prosecuting attorney pro tem.]

APRIL 27. [McLean Circuit Court opens three-day term. On John T. Stuart's motion, George F. Markley is admitted to practice. Record. David Davis said Lincoln attended McLean court in 1837. If so, it was probably this term, as he appears to have been in Springfield during Sept. term. Beveridge, I, 212n.]

APRIL 29. [Stuart dismisses debt case of Daniel Beeman v. William G. Thompson in McLean Circuit Court. Lincoln notes case in firm's fee

72

book. Record; Fee Book owned by Mrs. Edna Orendorff Macpherson, Springfield, Ill.]

MAY 1. [Tazewell Circuit Court convenes at Tremont for four-day term. Judge William Brown appoints Jesse B. Thomas, Jr., prosecuting attorney pro tem in absence of David Prickett. Record.]

MAY 5. [Circuit court of new county of Livingston, which should have met this week, does not hold its term until Oct. 21, 1839. Record.]

MAY 7. Lincoln writes to Mary Owens. He says he finds living in Springfield "a dull business," and is lonesome. There is much "nourishing about in carriages" which Mary will not share should she marry him. "You would have to be poor without the means of hiding your poverty." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 78-9.

MAY 9. Lincoln gives quit claim deed to Gershom Jayne to "right, title and interest and estate" in undivided one-half of 47-acre tract on north bank of Sangamon River, 12 miles northwest of New Salem. Consideration is $30. Deed Book K, 686.

MAY 23. Lincoln writes report of three commissioners, George Pasfield, Washington Iles, and John Williams, appointed by county commissioners "To view a road from the Public Square in Springfield to Nathan Hussey's on the Fort Clark [Peoria] road." Illinois State Historical Library, Springfield, Illinois. — Original.

MAY 25. Benjamin Talbott, recorder, brings to office of Stuart & Lincoln papers which become basis of controversy between Lincoln and James Adams over ten-acre tract north of Springfield, claimed by Adams and heirs of Joseph Anderson. C. R. Matheny, William Butler, and S. T. Logan examine assignment from Anderson to Adams. Sangamo journal, Aug. 19, Sept. 9.

MAY 26. Lincoln draws up contingent fee agreement between John T. Stuart, S. T. Logan, Edward D. Baker, and himself with Mary Anderson and her son Richard. Attorneys are to have one-half of ten-acre tract if they win suit. This is case leading to Lincoln's controversy with James Adams. Photo.

MAY 30. Lincoln writes to third auditor of U.S. enclosing papers concerning compensation due Archelaus Demmon for service in Black Hawk War. [Auditor allows $32.68 June 28.] The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 79-80.

JUNE 2. Lincoln mails letter to third auditor. Photo.

JUNE 3. Lincoln records in firm's free book, "Deposition to be taken on 3rd June" in Abraham DingMan v. Daniel Dearing. Stuart & Lincoln

73

represent appellant, Walker & Hewett and Baker & Logan appellee. Fee Book.

JUNE 5. [Gov. Duncan issues proclamation calling legislature into special session July 10 to consider suspension of specie payments by state bank at Springfield. Sangamo Journal, June 10. Supreme Court meets from June 5 to 7, and adjourns to July 13. Record.]

JUNE 6. Lincoln certifies that map of John Bennett's addition to Petersburg is correct as surveyed by him in spring of 1836. Record L, 988.

JUNE 9. Lincoln writes and files praecipe in Ellis & Co. v. Smith in Sangamon Circuit Court and affidavit of Joshua Speed, one of three plaintiffs. He also files affidavit of William Herndon in Herndon v. Smith. Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

JUNE 14. Lincoln closes accounts as New Salem postmaster. William Carpenter, Springfield postmaster, records: "For cash rec'd of A. Lincoln late P. M. New Salem $248.63." Thomas, 68. Lincoln writes his first "Sampson's Ghost" letter. . He asks James Adams, who has attacked state house commissioners, to remember his own house stand on "disputed ground." Sangamo Journal, June 17.

JUNE 15. Lincoln files with circuit clerk of Sangamon County notice written by Stuart. He writes bill in chancery and petition for summons in Elijah Houghton v. heirs of David Hart. Record Book A; Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

JUNE 17. Lincoln writes, swears, and files affidavit of plaintiff in Ellis & Co. v. Smith in Sangamon Circuit Court. Ibid.

JUNE 19. [Daniel Webster is escorted into town from Berlin, 15 miles west of Springfield, by Capt. E. H. Merryman's Artillery. Webster attends barbecue given at Porter's Grove on west side of town and delivers stirring address to large crowd. Sangamo Journal, June 24. Morgan Circuit Court opens two-week session at Jacksonville.]

JUNE 21. Lincoln's second "Sampson's Ghost" letter is written from "Fork Prairie." He defends Dr. A. G. Henry and asks Adams how he procured his home lots. "Sampson" says he always wrote his own name and any instrument not written with his own hand, which affects his interest, is forgery. Sangamo Journal, June 24.

JUNE 22. Stuart & Lincoln and Logan & Baker file suit of Mary Anderson and her son, Richard, against James Adams (Joel Wright, adm., et al. v. Adams) for recovery of ten acres north of Springfield, alleging that Adams

74

title has been procured by fraud. Beveridge, I, 214. Lincoln files declaration in Truett & May v. Ransdell, and Miller v. Christman. In latter case he writes chancery bill conveying land, signing "Stuart & Lincoln." Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

JUNE 24. Meeting is held in court room to investigate accusations against commissioners in charge of erecting new state house. John T. Stuart is chairman and Robert Allen, Democrat, secretary. Lincoln introduces resolution to appoint bipartisan committee of investigation. [Committee gives commissioners clean bill of health.] Sangamo Journal, July 1.

JUNE 26. ["Illinois Republican" (Springfield) of July 5 says that "Sampson's Ghost did not appear in the ‘Journal’ last week but was seen passing from Springfield to Vandalia and from Vandalia to Springfield during last week." "Republican" believed Dr. Henry author of "Ghost" letters. Lincoln's authorship is revealed Aug. 7. Sangamo Journal, July 8, Aug. 12.]

JULY 1. Lincoln buys from Elijah Iles lots 12 and 13 in Iles addition, on credit. He pays $136 for each, giving note for $272 due in 18 months. Photo, of Iles Record Book. [Election is held to fill vacancy caused by resignation of Representative Dan Stone. Lincoln does not vote, perhaps because of friendship with Baker and sense of obligation to Calhoun, under whom he served as deputy surveyor, 1833-1835. Baker opposed division of Sangamon favored by Calhoun. Baker is elected 1,178 to 872. Pease, 306; The Abraham Lincoln Association, Springfield, Illinois. [Files and records on deposit at Illinois State Historical Library, Springfield, Illinois.] — BULLETIN, No. 36.

JULY 3. Sangamon Circuit Court opens, Judge William Brown on bench. Stuart & Lincoln are engaged in eight attachment cases which are continued. In Neff and wife v. Holmes, $2,000 damage suit, Dummer and Lincoln for defendant enter motion to strike suit from docket. They are given leave to open plaintiff's depositions in Trailor v. Radford. Record.

JULY 4. Short session of court is held in morning before laying of state house cornerstone. Lincoln is appointed guardian ad litem for infant heirs in Weaden v. heirs of S. J. Campbell. On Lincoln's motion, alias subpoena is awarded complainants in Lucinda Mason v. Noah Mason et al. and Noah Mason, Jr. v. Lucinda Mason et al. Ibid.

JULY 5. Stuart & Lincoln obtain divorce for Ruth Ethridge from Thomas Ethridge. By consent, judgment of justice of peace in two cases of Cutter v. Cassady is reversed; Cutter pays costs in both courts. Court overrules Lincoln's demurrer filed Mar. 17 in Torrey v. Green. Stuart, Lincoln, and Logan appear for plaintiffs in Wright et al. v. Adams. Ibid.

JULY 6. Lincoln writes and files bond of Reuben Radford and George Forquer in Radford v. Trailor. He files bill of complaint in Ellis v. Smith, Herndon v. Smith, and Coffman v. Smith, writing and signing declaration

75

in all three cases. Lincoln files answer as guardian in James Weaden v. heirs of Shadrack Campbell. Stuart & Lincoln have eight cases called, in two of which, Billan v. White, and Webb v. Watson, they obtain judgments by default for $145.34 and $87.75. Photo; Record; Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

JULY 8. Lincoln endorses on back of promissory note of Pollard Simmons for $213.62, "Received on the within $80, July 8th, 1837." Ibid.

JULY 10. [Vandalia. Lincoln does not attend opening session of House which organizes with James Semple as speaker, and on motion of Hardin of Morgan, decides to meet at 8 A.M. Joint rules of last session are adopted. Editors of "Vandalia State Register" and "Free Press" are permitted to come within bar to report proceedings. House Journal.]

JULY 11. Vandalia. Lincoln and N. W. Edwards take seats. Gov. Duncan's address is read. He asserts that panic is due to President Jackson's removal of deposits from U.S. Bank, and recommends repeal of internal improvement act. He calls attention to forfeiture of charters of two state banks which hold $1,055,604.40 of state funds. Ibid.

JULY 12. Lincoln presents road petition from Sangamon and Cass. It is referred to select committee of Lincoln, Walker of Morgan, and Elkin of Sangamon. He gives notice that he will soon introduce bill authorizing Rhoda Hart et al. to sell real estate. Ibid.; Photo. Springfield corporation bill, in Lincoln's hand, is introduced by Archer G. Herndon of Sangamon. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 81-2. [Fourth "Sampson's Ghost" letter is dated today.]

JULY 13. Committee of Whole devotes most of morning to state bank at Springfield. Lincoln reports from select committee act to establish state road from Beardstown to Petersburg by way of Robinson's mill. On his motion, bill is read second time and ordered engrossed for third reading. House Journal; Photo. [Supreme Court begins eight-day session.]

JULY 14. Lincoln, Edwards, and Baker of Sangamon are appointed committee to consider bill extending corporate powers of Springfield. Lincoln presents petition of citizens of Sangamon praying establishment of new county. He also presents road petition, referred to committee of Lincoln, McCormick, and Elkin. House Journal.

JULY 15. Opponents of internal improvement system introduce bill to repeal act of Feb. 27. Sangamon delegation join in tabling it 53 to 34. Lincoln introduces "act to authorize Rhoda Hart and others to sell and convey certain real estate." J. B. Thomas Jr., is elected judge of first Judicial circuit to succeed S. T. Logan, resigned. Ibid.; Photo.

JULY 16. Lincoln writes and mails to Stuart joinder of issue in Parker v. Braucher. Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

76

JULY 17. Resolution inquiring whether directors or officers of state bank hold seats in House is discussed. Baker moves to amend by inquiring whether any members are indebted to bank. Lincoln votes to table resolution and casts four other votes favorable to bank. He reports bill extending corporate powers of Springfield. House Journal.

JULY 18. Ewing of Fayette leads fight to repeal law moving capital to Springfield. Lincoln's motion to table Ewing's amendment fails. Select committee is appointed to report on bill and amendment. On committee are Reddick of Macon, Voris of Peoria, Turney of Wayne, Ewing, and Lincoln. Ibid.

JULY 19. Lincoln reports "act to relocate a part of the State road leading from William Crow's in Morgan County, to Musick's Bridge in Sangamon County." On his motion, bill is amended by adding that "Bowling Green, Bennett Abel and John Bennett relocate so much of the State road leading from Springfield to Lewiston, as lies between New Salem and Petersburg." Ibid.; Photo. Amended bill, in Lincoln's hand, for building state house at Springfield is reported by select committee. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 84-5.

JULY 20. Lincoln opposes efforts of bank's enemies to limit issue of bills to amounts of $10 or more, binding stockholders for debts of bank, and reserving right to alter, modify, change, or repeal charter. House Journal. [Fifth "Sampson's Ghost" letter is dated today. Sangamo Journal, July 22.]

JULY 21. Lincoln votes yea on motion to strike $600 grant to William Walters, state printer. Motion fails, and on passage of appropriation bill he votes yea. He is only representative from Sangamon to vote against bill giving state bank right to continue suspension of specie payments until end of next session. House Journal. Lincoln, and 42 others, signs petition to Edward Smith, representative from Wabash, asking that he not resignas internal improvements engineer. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 87.

JULY 22. Lincoln's name does not appear in short proceedings of House, which adjourns sine die before noon. Smith of Wabash reports on complaint made by Gov. Duncan in his address to legislature. Committee upholds internal improvements system, and dissents from governor's views. House Journal.

JULY 25. Springfield. Sangamon delegation and other members of legislature en route home celebrate at Spottswood's Rural Hotel. Following Col. McClernand's toast to Sangamon County, Lincoln proposes: "All our friends — They are too numerous to be now named individually, while there is no one of them who is not too dear to be forgotten or neglected." Sangamo Journal, July 29; The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 87.

77

JULY 26. Lincoln writes sixth "Sampson's Ghost" letter from "Fork Prairie." He again calls on Adams for lease to lots on which his house stands, and reminds him Joseph Anderson's widow has brought suit in circuit court to recover ten acres illegally held by Adams. Sangamo Journal, July 29.

AUGUST. With 54 other citizens of Sangamon County, Lincoln signs petition to governor asking pardon for Jesse F. Massie of Springfield, convicted in St. Louis for larceny early in 1836 and imprisoned. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 87-8.

AUGUST 3. Athens. Citizens of Athens give public dinner to Sangamon legislators. Toasts are given by many of 150 persons present. Lincoln is called "One of nature's nobility." Responding, he declares Sangamon will ever be true to her best interests and never more so than in reciprocating good feelings of citizens of Athens and neighborhood. Sangamo Journal, Aug. 12; The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 88.

AUGUST 5. Springfield. Lincoln writes John Bennett that special act incorporating Petersburg passed legislature. He does not know whether provision for relocating road from New Salem to Petersburg passed. His handbill detailing history of controversy between Anderson heirs and James Adams appears. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 89-93.

AUGUST 7. Contest for probate justice of peace, which has kept Springfield in turmoil for two months, ends with election of James Adams over Dr. Anson G. Henry by 1,025 to 792. Sangamo Journal, Aug. 12. Lincoln votes for Henry, for Matheny for county clerk, and John Constant for treasurer. Matheny and Constant are elected. Election Returns.

AUGUST 15. Lincoln, Robert Allen, William Butler, and Archer G. Herndon sign Charles R. Matheny's bond for $1,000 as clerk of county commissioners' court. Record Book D, 354-55.

AUGUST 16. New Salem and Springfield. Lincoln returns from visit to Mary Owens at New Salem and writes on marriage. He urges her not to feel obliged to accept him, and releases her from obligation. "I am willing, and even anxious to bind you faster, if I can be convinced that it will, in any considerable degree, add to your happiness." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 94-5.

AUGUST 19. [Adams replies to Lincoln's handbill of Aug. 5. Sangamo Journal, Aug. 19.]

AUGUST 22. Springfield. Lincoln writes, signs, and files affidavit that Nancy and Peyton Chrisman of George Miller v. St. Clair Chrisman et al. reside in Illinois. He files summons in case. Record.

AUGUST 28. Lincoln writes answer of Thomas Cassaday, defendant in chancery suit brought by Joseph C. Foster. Cassaday refuses to deed tract

78

to Foster, contrary to verbal agreement, on ground that both Foster and his agent trifled with him when he was in mood to make exchange. Six-page answer is sworn before William Butler. Photo.

SEPTEMBER 2. Depositions of Lincoln and Isaac Cogdal are taken before Thomas Moffett, justice of peace, concerning survey and transfer of plat of 12.48 acres surveyed by Lincoln, Nov. 1834. Lincoln says he surveyed land for Hart and understood Hart would transfer it to Houghton. Deposition is to be used in Houghton v. heirs of David Hart. Record. Lincoln writes and signs his own deposition, which is filed Sept. 6. Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

SEPTEMBER 4. Lincoln writes and files bill of complaint in his first divorce case. Nancy Green charges Aaron Green with desertion. Ibid.; Photo. [On Oct. 10, 1838, Lincoln has complaint dismissed in Sangamon Circuit Court. Record.]

SEPTEMBER 5. Lincoln is one of attorneys in George R. Rice v. Alexander Lindsay before Thomas Moffett, justice of peace. Case is continued until next Tuesday. Stuart & Lincoln fee book.

SEPTEMBER 6. Lincoln replies to Adams' statement published in "Illinois Republican." He points out discrepancies in Adams' story. He says Adams' assertion that he has disproved charges of "Sampson's Ghost" and bogus assignment in Anderson case "is all as false as hell, as all this community must know." Sangamo Journal, Sept. 9; The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 95-100.

SEPTEMBER 8. Lincoln files in Sangamon Circuit Court bill of complaint in trespass case of Thomas and John L. Wilbournv Pollard Simmons. He writes declaration and praecipe, signing "Stuart & Lincoln." Simmons failed to pay note for $170. Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. [Calhoun Circuit Court convenes at Gilead.]

SEPTEMBER 9. Lincoln writes to Third Auditor of U.S. offering proof of horse lost by John W. Warnsing in Black Hawk War. He explains that Warnsing has sold his claim to Thomas Epperson and asks that letter enclosing draft be sent to him rather than to Warnsing or Epperson. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 100-01.

SEPTEMBER 11. Lincoln writes and files notice in Sangamon Circuit Court that he will take depositions in chancery case of Joel Wright et al. v. Adams. Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. [Macoupin Circuit Court convenes at Carlinville.]

SEPTEMBER 12. Lincoln is one of attorneys in George R. Rice v. Alexander Lindsay before Thomas Moffett, justice of peace. Stuart & Lincoln fee book.

79

SEPTEMBER 14. Letter to Third Auditor written by Lincoln Sept. 9 is postmarked "Springfield, Ill. Sept. 14," so evidently he is in Springfield. Illinois State Historical Library, Springfield, Illinois. — Original.

SEPTEMBER 16. Lincoln writes and files praecipe in Peyton L. Harrison, assignee of John Taylor v. Pollard Simmons, assumpsit. He signs "Stuart & Lincoln for plff." Photo.

SEPTEMBER 18. [Tazewell Circuit Court opens six-day term at Tremont. Judge John Pearson, who has exchanged circuits with Judge Jesse B. Thomas, Jr., appoints Stephen A. Douglas prosecuting attorney pro tem. Record.]

SEPTEMBER 21. Lincoln files bill of equity in chancery case of Simeon Francis v. estate of Edward Mitchell and John T. Stuart. Photo.

SEPTEMBER 22. Lincoln files in Sangamon Circuit Court declaration, praecipe, and bond in Billow v. White; complaint, praecipe, and bond in Von Phul and McGill v. Porter; affidavit in Foster & Co. v. Lockerman; declaration in Peyton L. Harrison v. Pollard Simmons; and declaration, praecipe, and two bills of complaint in Rupert & Lindenberger v. Garrett & Garrett. Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.; Photo.

SEPTEMBER 25. [McLean Circuit Court opens five-day term in Bloomington. Judge John Pearson of the seventh circuit presides, exchanging courts with Judge Jesse B. Thomas, Jr. Stephen A. Douglas is appointed prosecuting attorney pro tem. John T. Stuart, Franklin Brattan, Josephus Hewett, and David Davis are among attorneys attending court. Record.]

SEPTEMBER 26. Lincoln writes and files in Sangamon Circuit Court declaration, praecipe, and bond for costs in McKee et al. v. Tharp. Plaintiff is resident of St. Louis. He writes instructions for D. Tecum in Fleming v. Ransdell. Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

SEPTEMBER 27. Lincoln witnesses deed given by Samuel Neale, Sr., to A. G. Herndon for 80 acres four miles west of Springfield. Deed Book M, 247.

SEPTEMBER 30. [Note signed "An Old Settler" in "Sangamo Journal" may have been written by Lincoln. He claims that he has read "Sampson's Ghost" letters and understands there are irregularities in Adams' handling of lots and plot of ten acres. He has examined these matters carefully and will give his conclusions soon. Sangamo Journal, Sept. 30.]

OCTOBER 2. [Macon Circuit Court convenes for three-day term at Decatur. Judge John Pearson presides.]

80

OCTOBER 3. First of "Old Settler" letters, perhaps written by Lincoln, appears in "Journal." Adams is accused of irregularities in acquisition of lots in Springfield. In article is letter of Elijah Iles giving details of another case, in which he claims Adams dealt unfairly. Sangamo Journal, Oct. 7.

OCTOBER 9. Stuart & Lincoln have three cases called on first day of fall term, Sangamon Circuit Court. They represent Rachel Roll who is granted divorce from Jacob E. Roll. In Jonas Whitney v. Joel Johnson they confess defendant's indebtedness for $250. Court grants their petition for partition of land in Broadwell v. Broadwell. Record. Lincoln writes and signs praecipe filed in Rupert and Lindenberger v. H. Garrett & Co., and declaration in Thomas H. Buckmaster v. Alexander Garrett. Photo.

OCTOBER 10. Lincoln files answer as guardian ad litem for William Nelson, infant defendant in Craig White v. David P. Harris et al., petition for partition of land. Record.

OCTOBER 11. Stuart & Lincoln get judgment by default for $133.15 in Bell & Co. v. Trailor. On their motion, Jemima Dingman is made plaintiff in Dingmanv. Dearing, in place of Abraham Dingman, deceased. Their motion, entered July 3, to strike from docket Neff and wife v. Holmes, is overruled. Two of firm's cases are dismissed and one continued. Ibid.

OCTOBER 12. Defendants file pleas in Buckmasterv. Garrett, Rupert and Lindenberger v. Garrett, and Rupert and Lindenbergerv. Garrett & Co. Stuart & Lincoln ask damages of $500 in first case and $200 each in others. Ibid.

OCTOBER 14. Stuart & Lincoln file defendant's plea in Torrey v. Felix Green and Torrey v. Lloyd. Court grants their petition to sell land to pay widow's dower and debts in Carrico v. GarriCo. Jury disagrees in Torrey v. William Green in which Lincoln appears for defendant. He also wins Levick & Jenkins v. Withers & Co. when case is dismissed at cost of plaintiff. In Fleming v. Ransdell, he writes summons for Charles S. Dorsey of Tazewell County, witness. Ibid.; Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

OCTOBER 16. Torrey v. Lloyd, Torrey v. Felix Green, and Torrey v. William Green are dismissed at cost of defendants. Stuart & Lincoln represent defendants in first two cases and Logan & Lincoln in third case. Stuart & Lincoln get judgment for $696.26 in McKee et al. v. Tharp. Lincoln files petition for partition in Moses Martin v. John Martin's heirs. He wins case when court orders real estate sold, Lincoln writing court decree. Record; Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

OCTOBER 17. Logan and Lincoln file replication in Wright et al. v. Adams. In Buckmaster v. Garrett, Rupert and Lindenberger v. Garrett, and Rupert

81

and Lindenberger v. Garrett & Co., defendant withdraws plea and cases are dismissed at defendant's cost. Stuart & Lincoln appear for plaintiffs in these cases and in Trailor v. Radford, in which leave is given to open depositions, Lincoln writing notice and signing "Lincoln & Stuart." Ibid.

OCTOBER 18. Stuart & Lincoln get judgments for $175.60 in each of two suits of Wilbourn v. Simmons, and for $67.60 in Klein v. Smith. They file pleas in Fleming v. Ransdell, and Chiles v. Sudduth. They file affidavit and move that appellant give additional security in Campbell v. Knox. Record. Lincoln writes second reply to James Adams, published in "Sangamo Journal" Oct. 28. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 101-06.

OCTOBER 19. Lincoln, P. C. Latham, Garrett Elkin, and John T. Stuart sign William Butler's bond for $2,000 as circuit court clerk. On motion of Stuart & Lincoln, appellant is given leave to open depositions in Dingman v. Dearing, and court orders appellant nonsuited. Record.

OCTOBER 20. Stuart & Lincoln win nine cases by default, getting damages of $935.71. Stuart is appointed guardian ad litem in Musick v. Musick. In two chancery cases of Mason v. Mason, bills are taken as confessed and commissioners are appointed to set aside dower in one case and to partition land in other. Ibid.

OCTOBER 21. Stuart & Lincoln file defendant's affidavit (written by Lincoln) in Fleming v. Ransdell. Jury awards plaintiff, their client, $21.50 in attachment case of Coffman v. Smith. Ellis v. Hughes is dismissed at cost of plaintiff. Their bill is taken as confessed in St. John v. Chitton et al., and they are given leave to take depositions. Ibid.; Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

OCTOBER 23. [Public protest meeting against abolitionists resolves that "efforts of abolitionists in this community are neither necessary nor useful," and that immediate emancipation is at variance with Christianity. Sangamo Journal, Oct. 28. Morgan Circuit Court convenes.]

OCTOBER 25. [Benjamin Talbott, Sangamon County recorder, writes long letter defending himself and Lincoln against assertions made in letter of James Adams published in "Republican" today. Sangamo Journal, Nov. 4. Citizens meet to take steps to pay first installment of $50,000 pledged toward cost of new state house. Trustee's Minutes.]

OCTOBER 26. [Illinois Antislavery convention opens three-day meeting in Upper Alton. Call is signed by 20 residents of Springfield, 12 of whom are members of Second Presbyterian Church. Clinton L. Conkling, "History of Westminster Presbyterian Church" (Ms.).]

OCTOBER 30. Lincoln writes and attests Crawford B. Dalby's permission for his daughter Hester Ann to marry Edward H. Tyler. Photo.

82

NOVEMBER 6. [Greene Circuit Court is in session all week.]

NOVEMBER 7. Lincoln represents plaintiff in forcible detainer case of Joel Johnson v. John Gray in court of Justice Clement. He takes $6 fee in board at Johnson's hotel. Stuart & Lincoln fee book.

NOVEMBER 11. Lincoln takes deposition of Isiah Stillman to be used by heirs of Joseph Anderson in Wright et al. v. James Adams. Stillman swears he talked to Adams in 1832 and latter did not mention that Anderson had assigned controverted claim to Adams. Townsend, 103-04.

NOVEMBER 12. Lincoln takes deposition of Stephen Dewey, clerk of Fulton Circuit Court, who contradicts statements made by Adams in land controversy with heirs of Joseph Anderson. Ibid., 104.

NOVEMBER 13. [Cass Circuit Court meets for first time. Jesse B. Thomas Jr., presides at one-day session at Beardstown. Record.]

NOVEMBER 18. [A. G. Herndon writes long letter telling why he believes Adams guilty of obtaining two lots under false pretenses from Andrew Sampson. He says he could give stronger evidence of Adams' lack of integrity, but refrains, although he will give it if Adams insists. Sangamo Journal, Nov. 18.]

NOVEMBER 20. Lincoln takes from Joshua S. Hobbs written order on William Butler to pay Thomas Hunter $4.75 for hauling 38 loads of manure. Photo.

NOVEMBER 27. [Stuart, for Stuart & Lincoln, certifies on judgment docket of Sangamon Circuit Court receipt of $23.59, amount of judgment in Campbell v. Knox, affirmed Oct. 19. Book A.]

NOVEMBER 28. Lincoln draws up several deeds for Kerr & Co., St. Louis merchants. He records that Robert Irwin & Co., Springfield store indebted to Kerr & Co., have credited him $5 on their books for writing deeds and have made corresponding change in their accounts against Kerr & Co. Stuart & Lincoln fee book.

DECEMBER 6. Stuart & Lincoln are notified by Samuel H. Treat, attorney for complainant in Joseph Foster v. Thomas Cassady, that John Calhoun's deposition will be taken Dec. 22 in Thomas Moffett's office. Record.

DECEMBER 7. Lincoln writes William A. Minshall of Rushville that Stuart will run for Congress again. Let "our friends in your parts know. . . . Write me all you know and all you think, in regard to our prospects. . . We have adopted it as part of our policy here, to never speak of Douglass at all. Is'nt that the best mode of treating so small a matter?" The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 107.

83

DECEMBER 11. [Illinois Supreme Court convenes at Vandalia. Court is in session until Dec. 25.]

DECEMBER 14. [Sangamon Circuit Court meets in special one-day session to take up case of John S. Davis, larceny. Judge Jesse B. Thomas, Jr., presides. Record.]

DECEMBER 20. Lincoln writes and files commissioner's report in Elizah Houghton v. Jefferson Hart et al. Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

DECEMBER 21. Judge S. H. Treat signs above report. Ibid.

DECEMBER 22. Stuart or Lincoln probably are in Thomas Moffett's office when John Calhoun deposes for Joseph Foster v. Thomas Cassady. Record.

1838

JANUARY 2. Springfield. Lincoln writes and signs, for Stuart & Lincoln, declaration and praecipe in Reed and wife v. Arnold and Butler. Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

JANUARY 6. [Sangamo Journal announces that Cyrus Walker is not candidate for Congress, but is advocating John T. Stuart. Stuart is absent but "Journal" has no doubt he will be candidate.]

JANUARY 12. Lincoln writes and files declaration in Sangamon Circuit Court in Cannan v. Kenney, signing "Stuart & Lincoln for pIff." Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

JANUARY 13. Lincoln swears affidavit before William Butler that he believes Mary Ann, Laura Rowena, and Edward Mitchell, of Simeon Francis v. heirs of Edward Mitchell, are not residents of Illinois. Record.

JANUARY 17. ["Being unexpectedly called from home . . . likely to detain me until a week previous to our next court, I take this method of informing those who have confided their business to . . . Walker & Hewett that whenever not adversely employed, either Messrs. Logan & Baker or Messrs. Stuart & Lincoln will give advice or assistance needed during my absence. J. Hewett." Sangamo Journal, Jan. 20.]

JANUARY 25. [Special term of Sangamon Circuit Court is held to try Isaac Silcon on charge of larceny. Grand jury fails to indict him. Record.]

84

JANUARY 27. Lincoln writes and signs declaration and praecipe in Harrison v. Dickinsen and Taylor. Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. He delivers address before Young Men's Lyceum on "The Perpetuation of Our Political Institutions." His theme is danger of mobs and value and necessity of law and order, probably prompted by Alton riot which caused death of Elijah P. Lovejoy, though he makes only slight reference to it. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 108-15.

JANUARY 29. Lincoln writes and files declaration in the Sangamon Circuit Court in trespass case of Ellis and Vaughn v. Ransdell. He asks $200 damages. He also writes, signs, and files complaint in Cromwell v. Taylor. He writes promissory note signed by Jonas and Dewey Whitney. Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

FEBRUARY 2. Lincoln files with clerk of Sangamon Circuit Court notice to issue summons in James Anderson, Jr., William Bell, and John W. Anderson v. George Patterson and Frederick A. Patterson. He enters himself security for costs. Photo.

FEBRUARY 3. Lincoln writes addendum to his "Conservative" letter of Jan. 27. He again complains of nomination of Douglas for Congress "in these trying times . . . instead of some man of talent and acquaintance with the people, and possessing other suitable qualifications." Illinois State Historical Library, Springfield, Illinois. — Journal, XXIX, 136.

FEBRUARY 6. Lincoln writes, signs, and files in Sangamon Circuit Court, long bill of complaint in chancery case of Garrett v. Levering. Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

FEBRUARY 9. Lincoln records in firm's fee book receipt of note for $1,695.98 and mortgage given by Alexander Garrett to Edward Grow & Co. [In Sangamon Circuit Court on Oct. 20, Crow & Co. are awarded $1,952.49. On March 15, 1839, land is sold to pay judgment.] Record; Stuart & Lincoln fee book.

FEBRUARY 10. ["Journal" contains column of letters (one signed W. L. May), expressing same strictures on Douglas' nomination for Congress found in Lincoln's two letters signed "A Conservative," which appeared Jan. 27 and Feb. 3. Lincoln is probably author of all except that signed by May. Illinois State Historical Library, Springfield, Illinois. — Journal, XXIX, 136.]

FEBRUARY 12. Lincoln votes for Francis Taylor for justice of peace. Marvellous Eastham, Democrat, is elected 236 to 198. Lincoln votes for Edward Stapelford who is elected constable. Election Returns.

FEBRUARY 13. Lincoln writes and files in Sangamon Circuit Court bill of complaint in chancery case of Wilson v. Simpson. Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

85

FEBRUARY 14. Lincoln writes and files bill of complaint in Sangamon Circuit Court in Thomas J. Payne v. Nicholas Bryan, chancery suit to foreclose chattel mortgage. Ibid.

FEBRUARY 16. Stuart & Lincoln file bill of complaint and process in Payne v. Bryan, Lincoln giving bond for complainant. Record.

FEBRUARY 19. Lincoln writes and files in Sangamon Circuit Court bill of complaint in John E. Roll v. John Anderson. Roll is seeking to recover black mare. Logan represents defendant. Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

FEBRUARY 20. Lincoln fills out printed summons form in Klein v. Webb, which William Butler, Sangamon County clerk, signs. Ibid. Stuart & Lincoln file bill of complaint in Charles Hunter v. Salome Enos et al. Record.

FEBRUARY 22. Lincoln writes and signs declaration in Archer G. Herndon v. Sudduth et al., Sangamon Circuit Court action. Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

FEBRUARY 23. Lincoln writes and files bills of complaint in Sangamon Circuit Court in Stone & Co. v. Hughes, Colbern v. Wallace, Mason v. Renshaw, Herndon v. Sudduth et al., and Wright v. Brooks and Shackelford. In first four cases plaintiff is seeking to collect on notes long overdue. Ibid. He writes, for Sheriff Garret Elkin, endorsement on back of summons in Hunter v. Enos. Photo.

FEBRUARY 24. ["We are authorized to announce A. LINCOLN, as a candidate for the State Legislature." Sangamo Journal, Feb. 24.]

[MARCH, 1838] Lincoln writes for James Wright application to County Commissioners' Court for permit to build mill dam on Brush Creek. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 116.

MARCH 5. Sangamon Circuit Court opens two-week session. Judge Jesse B. Thomas Jr., presides. Stuart & Lincoln appear for New Salem storekeeper Samuel Hill in attachment suit against Robert McNabb, which is dismissed at defendant's cost. They get judgment for $481.69 in Hickman v. Braucher. They ask security for costs of plaintiff in Sinnard v. Kyle. Lincoln writes and signs declaration in Bell & Co. v. James Gambrel. Record; Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

MARCH 6. Lincoln is appointed guardian ad litem for infant defendants in Thayer v. Phillips et al. Stuart & Lincoln file defendant's plea in Sinnard v. Kyle. Ware v. Duncan et al. is continued, and in Foster v. Cassady leave is given to open depositions. They represent defendants in both cases. Lincoln does most of paper work in these suits, and also writes and signs plea in Fleming v. Ransdell. Record; Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

86

MARCH 7. Stuart & Lincoln amend bill of complaint in Hickman v. Braucher, and file letters of administration in case and in Dingman v. Dearing. In Thayer v. Phillips et al., and Francis v. heirs of Edward Mitchell, they file certificates of publication. In Cannan v. Kenney, plaintiff, their client, is ordered to give security by Mar. 15. Lincoln writes bill of complaint. Record; Photo.

MARCH 8. Stuart & Lincoln lose Ware v. Duncan et al. when court finds defendant indebted for $172.25. They file defendant's plea in Trowbridge v. Hughes. On their motion Roll v. Anderson is continued for want of summons in time. In Wright et al. v. Adams, defendant is granted leave to open depositions. Stuart, Lincoln, and Logan appear for plaintiffs. Record.

MARCH 9. Stuart & Lincoln have 23 cases called. They get judgments in nine cases totaling $3,045.17. Defendant's plea is filed in five cases, five are continued, two dismissed, and motion to reverse judgment is filed by defendants in two others. Ibid. Lincoln writes and signs declaration and praecipe in Anderson et al. v. Garrett and Garrett. He writes bond, which Stuart signs. In another Sangamon Circuit Court case for same plaintiffs, Anderson et al. v. Patterson and Patterson, he writes and signs declaration. Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

MARCH 10. Stuart & Lincoln ask that description of property in bill of complaint be corrected in Noah Mason v. Lucinda Mason et al. Plaintiffs file their affidavit in Neff and wife v. Holmes. Dummer and Lincoln represent defendant. Record.

MARCH 12. Stuart & Lincoln obtain judgment by confession for $860.48 by Alexander Garrett, and get summons to Henry Garrett in Anderson, Bell & Co. v. Garrett and Garrett. They get leave to amend complainant's bill in Francis v. heirs of Edward Mitchell, and Lucinda Mason v. Noah Mason et al. Record. Lincoln writes commissioner's report re Lucinda Mason's dower, which three commissioners sign. Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

MARCH 13. [Circuit Court selects jury to try William Moffett for murder. Friday he is found guilty of manslaughter and ordered imprisoned for eight months. Record.]

MARCH 14. Stephen A. Douglas is appointed prosecuting attorney pro tem to conduct trial of Henry B. Truett, indicted for murder of Dr. Jacob M. Early. John D. Urquhart, prosecuting attorney, is witness. Stuart, Lincoln, Logan, Baker, and Cyrus Walker are attorneys for Truett. Record.

MARCH 15. Lincoln writes Levi Davis of Vandalia, apologizing for delay in attending to affairs of Davis' clients. He assures him no damage has been done by delay. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 116 .

87

MARCH 16. Reed v. Fleming and Goodacre v. Simpson are tried by jury, which disagrees in former, but finds for defendant in latter case. Bill of complaint is amended in executors of Moses Hart v. heirs of Moses Hart. Stuart & Lincoln represent plaintiffs in each case. Two other cases are continued. Record.

MARCH 17. Stuart & Lincoln obtain divorces for Andrew Finley from Cynthia V. Finley, and John Winn, Jr. from Mary Winn. They win three chancery cases of Hickman v. Braucher et al., Miller v. Chrisman et al., and Anderson, Bell & Co. v. Garrett. Plaintiff is ordered to give security in Cannan v. Kenney. Stuart & Lincoln appear for Cannan. Ibid. Lincoln writes court order in Miller v. Chrisman et al., and affidavit of William Goodacre, plaintiff of Goodacre v. Simpson. In George W. Wilson v. James W. Simpson et al. he writes court decree ordering Simpson to convey real estate title to plaintiff. Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

MARCH 19. [Morgan Circuit Court convenes at Jacksonville for two-week session. Judge Jesse B. Thomas, Jr., presides. Josiah Lamborn and firm of William Thomas & William Brown have most cases. John J. Hardin and Murray McConnel are among term's leading lawyers. Record.]

MARCH 21. Henry B. Truett, indicted Mar. 14 for murder of Dr. Jacob M. Early, gives Stuart & Lincoln each note for $250 secured by mortgage on two sections of land in northern Sangamon County [now in Chester Township in Logan County]. Deed Book M, 412-13. Stuart writes and files petition in Elizabeth Musick v. heirs of Samuel Musick, and Lincoln fills out summons form. Photo.

MARCH 22. Lincoln is one of 101 citizens of Springfield signing note for $16,666.67 to state bank to enable town to pay second instalment of one third of $50,000 pledged in Feb. 1837 to obtain capital. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 116.

MARCH 26. [John T. Stuart and Stephen A. Douglas debate issues of their campaign for Congress in Jacksonville. Illinois Standard (Jacksonville), Mar. 31.]

APRIL 1. Lincoln writes to Mrs. O. H. Browning of Quincy, relating details of his courtship of Mary Owens. He describes his determination to propose and have matters settled — her refusal three times, which mortified him in "a hundred different ways. . . . But let it all go. I'll try and out live it." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 117-19.

APRIL 2. Lincoln writes bond for costs signed by Joseph Smith and J. P. Anderson in Cannan v. Kenney in Sangamon Circuit Court. Case involves possession of sorrel horse worth $65. [Lincoln wins suit on appeal to Illinois Supreme Court in 1841.] Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

88

APRIL 3. Lincoln writes and evidently mails to Tremont James Bell's bond for costs in Kennedy and Julian v. Hawley. Photo.

APRIL 4. [Bond in Lincoln's hand, case of Kennedy v. Hawley, is filed in Tremont. Photo. Stuart and Douglas attend spring courts of first judicial circuit. They debate this week during meeting of Greene Circuit Court at Carrollton. R. W. English, Usher F. Linder, Edward D. Baker, and Stephen T. Logan are among attorneys attending court. Sangamo Journal, Apr. 21.]

APRIL 6. [Calhoun Circuit Court convenes at Gilead.]

APRIL 9. [Macoupin Circuit Court begins five-day term at Carlinville. In absence of prosecuting attorney, Judge Jesse B. Thomas, Jr. appoints Usher F. Linder prosecuting attorney pro tem. Record.]

APRIL 13. Lincoln writes and signs, for McNair v. Adams, notice of depositions and questions to be put to witnesses. Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

APRIL 16. Tremont. Tazewell Circuit Court convenes at Tremont. Sangamo Journal comments Apr. 28: "Our business last week called us to Tremont during the sitting of the circuit court, Judge Thomas presiding. There were about 220 cases on the docket — all of which were disposed of in 4 1/2 days."

APRIL 17. Lincoln, plaintiff's attorney in Kellogg v. Crain, moves change of venue to Peoria because judge has been counsel in case. Record.

APRIL 18. Lincoln's venue motion is granted. Ibid.

APRIL 20. Lincoln writes note to Stuart & Lincoln for $25 payable in six months. It is signed by James M. Grain with agreement to pay $500 fee if they win full claim of Crain v. heirs of Lewis F. Crain. If they do not succeed in recovering property purchased of Peter Menard, Jr., but succeed in rest they will get $300. Privately owned. Lincoln writes and files Crain's replication. Photo.

APRIL 21. Lincoln writes petition to sell real estate in ex parte Kellogg, administrator. He writes first part of report, which Stuart completes and signs. Case considered at Sept. term. Record; Photo.

MAY 5. [Sangamo Journal announces: "Our bills for McLean County are made out, and settlement can be made with A. Lincoln, Esq. who will be present at the term of the Circuit Court in Bloomington next week."]

MAY 7. Bloomington. McLean Circuit Court opens six-day session. On docket are 7 criminal, 16 chancery, and 352 common law cases. Record.

89

MAY 8. Jury awards plaintiff $38 damages for trespassing on timber land in Josiah Horr v. Jesse Frankinburger. Lincoln represents plaintiff. Record; Stuart & Lincoln fee book. "Sangamo Journal" gives him bills due in Bloomington and announces that all who wish to pay should call on Lincoln at court house. Sangamo Journal, May 5.

MAY 9. Lincoln appointed guardian ad litem for infant defendants in Rhodes and Water v. Mary Lyon, widow, and infant heirs of Meril Lyon, deceased. Record.

MAY 10. [During week Lincoln debates issues of congressional campaign with Douglas. Stuart is ill and Lincoln substitutes for him. Bloomington Pantograph, Mar. 12, 1898.]

MAY 14. Decatur. Lincoln attends opening of two-day term of Macon Circuit Court. In evening he drives John Hanks' team to Hanks farm and stays all night. Hanks is serving on petit jury. Judge Jesse B. Thomas, Jr. presides. Illinois State Historical Library, Springfield, Illinois. — Papers, 1939, 135. Lincoln writes bond for costs in Noe v. Cunningham. Otto R. Kyle, Abraham Lincoln in Decatur, 46.

MAY 15. Lincoln is appointed guardian ad litem for infant heirs of John Lowry, deceased. Lowry, administrator of estate of John Lowry, has filed petition for sale of real estate. Court decides Noe v. Cunningham by attorneys' agreement, awarding defendant $22. Record.

MAY 21. [Cass Circuit Court meets at Beardstown for two-day term. Judge Jesse B. Thomas, Jr. presides. Record.

MAY 25. [Cyrus Edwards, Whig candidate for governor, speaks in Springfield. Sangamo Journal, May 26.]

JUNE 2. Springfield. Lincoln receives from Elijah Iles deeds on two lots bought July 1, 1837. Illinois State Historical Library, Springfield, Illinois. — E. Iles Record Book, Photo.

JUNE 4. [U.S. Circuit Court and Democratic state convention meet in Vandalia. The lllinoian (Jacksonville), June 2.]

JUNE 5. [Lincoln files answer as guardian ad litem in Macon Circuit Court in petition of John Lowry to sell real estate. He says he knows no good reason why petition should not be granted. Record.

JUNE 11. George Power gives trust deed to Lincoln for A. G. Herndon for 24 acres situated ten miles northwest of Springfield, to guarantee payment $525 loaned by Herndon to Power for three months. [Herndon acknowledges receipt in full Sept. 17.] Deed Book M, 624-25.

JUNE 14. Lincoln writes acknowledgement of service of notice in McNair v. Adams. Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

90

JUNE 15. Lincoln fills out printed summons form in Garrett v. Levering. Photo.

JUNE 16. Bartell's on Sugar Creek. First of four meetings to which all candidates for legislature are invited is held at Bartell's on Sugar Creek, five miles southeast of Springfield. Lincoln probably attends and speaks. Sangamo Journal, June 23.

JUNE 18. Springfield. Lincoln, William Butler, and A. Y. Ellis sign Charles R. Matheny's bond for $1,000 as clerk of county commissioners' court. Book D, 435. County commissioners allow Stuart & Lincoln $36 for use of their office as jury room at terms of circuit court in July and October, 1837 and March, 1838. Book D, 434. Lincoln writes to Sangamon County Commissioner's Court Thomas Arnold's request for writ of ad quod damnum. He collects from Sheriff Elkin $420 on judgment in Hickman v. Braucher, and signs receipt. Photo.

JUNE 19. Lincoln writes and files in Sangamon Circuit Court declaration in assumpsit suit of Matthew McNair v. James Adams. He asks $1,000 damages. Treat and Campbell represent defendant. Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. In Edward Crow et al. v. Alexander Garrett, Lincoln signs plaintiffs' bond, and files bill of complaint and process. Record. [Praecipe and bond for costs which Lincoln wrote and sent to clerk of Morgan Circuit Court, in Harwood v. Forsythe & Buckner, is filed. Ibid.]

JUNE 22. Colburn's mill. Candidates for legislature address citizens of southwestern Sangamon County at meeting at William Colburn's mill on Lick Creek near present town of Loami. All candidates have been invited and Lincoln probably attends. Sangamo Journal, June 23.

JUNE 23. Berlin. Candidates for legislature address citizens at meeting at Berlin (now Old Berlin), 12 miles west of Springfield. Lincoln probably attends. Ibid.

JUNE 28. Springfield. Lincoln writes and signs declaration in Stockton v. Tolly. Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

JUNE 30. Water's Camp Ground. Candidates address citizens at Water's Camp Ground on Spring Creek, four miles west of Springfield, last of four meetings to which all candidates have been invited. Lincoln probably attends. Sangamo Journal, June 23.

JULY 2. Springfield. Sangamon Circuit Court opens for two-week term, Judge Jesse B. Thomas, Jr., presiding. Lincoln is appointed guardian ad litem for infant defendants in State Bank v. Elizabeth Musick et al. In chancery suit of Stevenson v. Abrams, plaintiff is given leave to take deposition of Abrams. Stuart, Lincoln, and Treat represent plaintiff. Record.

91

Lincoln writes and signs joinder in pleas in McNair v. Adams, and praecipe and bond in Anderson et al. v. Gambrel. Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

JULY 3. In McNair v. Adams, defendant files five pleas. Stuart & Lincoln appear for plaintiff. Clark v. Lake is dismissed by plaintiff, and in Fleming v. Ransdell, plaintiff takes nonsuit. Stuart and Lincoln appear for defendant in both cases. They dismiss Foster & Co. v. Lockerman, and get judgment for $280 in Herndon v. Smith. Record.

JULY 4. [Meeting is called for today in Springfield of all persons interested in division of Sangamon County. Lincoln probably attends. Sangamo Journal, June 23.]

JULY 5. Lincoln files answer as guardian ad litem in Thayer v. Phillips et al. In People v. Henry B. Truett, murder, prisoner enters plea of not guilty and moves courts for continuance to Oct. term. Stuart & Lincoln have seven other cases called. Record.

JULY 6. In People v. Truett, prosecuting attorney is directed to show cause why continuance should not be granted. In Demint et al. v. Sintz, plaintiffs suggest death of defendant and on their motion Nicholas Moore, administrator, is made defendant. Baker & Hewett appear for plaintiffs and Stuart & Lincoln for defendant. Ibid. Lincoln writes and signs replications in McNair v. Adams. Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

JULY 7. Douglas, prosecuting attorney, files reasons why People v. Truett should not be continued. Defendant by Logan and Lincoln files amended affidavit setting out materiality of witnesses named. Arguments are heard and court takes time. Defendant in Wright et al. v. Adams asks leave to withdraw assignment of judgment filed as exhibit. Record. Lincoln writes and signs joinders to demurrers in McNair v. Adams. Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

JULY 9. Judge Thomas orders People v. Truett continued from day to day. Leave is granted in Wright et al. v. Adams to withdraw exhibit by leaving attested copy with clerk. Stuart & Lincoln lose two cases when jury awards plaintiff $180 in Robinson v. Garvey, and $77.23 1/2 in Neale v. Duncan, Taylor, and Blankenship. Record.

JULY 10. Clark v. Lake, trespass, is tried by jury. Unable to agree, jury is discharged. Logan represents plaintiff and Stuart, Lincoln, and Baker defendant. Defendant files answer in Garrett v. Levering. Ware v. Grass is continued. Stuart & Lincoln appear for plaintiff in both cases. Ibid.

JULY 11. People v. Truett is continued to Oct. term. John S. Roberts, James F. Reed, and John D. Urquhart, witnesses, are put under $1,000 bond. Lincoln files his answer in State Bank v. Musick et al. Stuart & Lincoln have six other cases called. Ibid.

92

JULY 12. Drs. E. H. Merryman and W. S. Wallace give $1,000 bond to appearas witnesses in People v. Truett. In Wright et al. v. Adams, defendant files affidavit and moves court for change of venue to Schuyler County. Stuart & Lincoln have 17 other cases called. Ibid. Lincoln writes and signs joinder in pleas in Bell & Co. v. Gambrell. Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

JULY 13. Stuart & Lincoln win Bell & Co. v. Gambrell when jury awards plaintiffs $207.65. They lose two cases appealed from justice of peace and have three others continued. Record.

JULY 14. On last day of July term, court orders property in Francisv. heirs of Mitchell transferred to complainant and E. D. Baker is appointed commissioner. Cannan v. Kenney, Strawbridge v. Craft, and Stevenson v. Abrams are dismissed by Stuart & Lincoln for complainants. Foster v. Cassady, in which they appear for Cassady, is to be decided during vacation. Ibid. Lincoln does paper work in three chancery cases: answer as guardian in Knapp v. Enos heirs; answer of Josephus Hewett, guardian, in Francis v. Mitchell et al.; and report of Moses M. Martin, administrator of Isaac Martin estate. Photo;Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

JULY 16. Jacksonville? [Morgan Circuit Court convenes at Jacksonville for six-day term. Judge Jesse B. Thomas, Jr. presides. Lincoln is present Saturday and MAY have attended entire week. Record.]

JULY 21. Jacksonville and Springfield. Lincoln is attorney for plaintiff in Lilburn Harwood v. Forsythe and Buckner in Morgan Circuit Court. Record. Lincoln returns to Springfield after absence of several days. In evening he receives letter from Jesse W. Fell of Bloomington. Illinois State Historical Library, Springfield, Illinois. — Fell Mss. [cited at Jesse W. Fell Papers, Illinois State Historical Library, Springfield, Illinois].

JULY 22. Springfield. Lincoln replies to Fell's letter received last evening, telling him to deny Douglas' charges against Stuart. Illinois State Historical Library, Springfield, Illinois. — Jesse W. Fell Papers, Illinois State Historical Library, Springfield, Illinois; The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 120.

JULY 23. Lincoln answers second letter from Jesse W. Fell. He repeats that Fell can deny charges made by Douglas concerning Stuart's views on national bank. He hopes Stuart will speak in McLean County before election. "If we do our duty we shall succeed in the congressional election, but if we relax an iota, we shall be beaten." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 120. Lincoln writes contract of Daniel Ragsale to build house for David Spear. Photo.

JULY 25. Lincoln is one of 14 signers of petition to Gov. Duncan to appoint John Dixon to vacancy on Board of Commissioners of Public Works to succeed J. A. Stephenson, resigned. Original owned by George C. Dixon, Springfield, Ill.

93

AUGUST 3. [Campaign of Stuart and Douglas, for Congress, becomes violent. A few days before election they debate in Springfield. Douglas uses language offensive to Stuart. Latter grabs Douglas and contemptuously carries him. Douglas, retaliating, bites Stuart's right thumb. Illinois State Historical Library, Springfield, Illinois. — Trans., 1902, 110.]

AUGUST 6. Lincoln is re-elected to legislature, leading field of 17 candidates. He votes for Cyrus Edwards for governor, and for William H. Davidson against Joseph Anderson for lieutenant-governor. Neither wins, but his vote helps Stuart defeat Douglas by 36 votes in total of 36,495. Election Returns.

AUGUST 13. Lincoln writes praecipe, and files notice with clerk of Sangamon Circuit Court to issue summons, and enters himself security for costs, in suit of Albert G. Williams v. John M. and George L. Cabaniss. Illinois State Historical Library, Springfield, Illinois. — Original. [Greene Circuit Court is in session.]

AUGUST 14. Lincoln writes and signs bill of divorce and general replication and joinder in Samuel Rogers v. Polly Offill Rogers. Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

AUGUST 16. Lincoln writes and files in Sangamon Circuit Court bill for divorce in Foster v. Foster. Ibid.

AUGUST 22. Stuart and Lincoln sign marginal release of mortgages given by Henry B. Truett for $500 Mar. 21. Deed Book M, 413.

AUGUST 27. [Special one-day term of Sangamon Circuit Court is held to take up case of Berry Monahan, larceny. Grand jury fails to indict him. Judge Jesse B. Thomas, Jr. presides. Record.]

AUGUST 28. ["I, Charles R. Matheny clerk of the County Commissioners Court in and for said County do hereby certify that Abraham Lincoln was duly elected Representative to the General Assembly of the State of Illinois from the County of Sangamon at the general election in August A.D. 1838 as appears from the returns filed in my office. C. R. Matheny Clerk C.C.C." Photo.]

AUGUST 31. [Calhoun Circuit Court convenes at Gilead.]

SEPTEMBER 3. Lincoln draws up list of seven notes due estate of George Spears, Sr., deceased. Unpaid notes totaling $479 are due from residents of New Salem neighborhood. Among those known to Lincoln were T. J. Nance, Jacob Bale, and Levi Summers. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 121. [Greene County Circuit Court convenes at Carrollton.]

SEPTEMBER 6. Lincoln writes order which James Wright signs: "Mr. Robert Allen: Please pay Stuart & Lincoln five dollars and charge to [James Wright] Sept. 6th. 1838." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 122.

94

SEPTEMBER 10. Lincoln writes and files declaration in assumpsit suit of John Durley v. Jesse Mitts and Joseph A. Ball. He asks $200 damages. He writes and signs declaration in Abner Y. Ellis v. Levi Nave (SC) . Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

SEPTEMBER 13. Josephus Hewett writes Gov. Duncan resigning as prosecuting attorney of first judicial circuit. At bottom of letter Lincoln, Hewett, Logan, Baker, Stuart, Treat, Ninian W. Edwards, and Cyrus Walker sign recommendation of Antrim Campbell for office. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 122.

SEPTEMBER 15. [In Fellows v. Snyder et al., Macon County case, Lincoln writes praecipe, bond, and declaration. Photo.]

SEPTEMBER 17. [Tazewell Circuit Court convenes at Tremont for four-day term. Judge Jesse B. Thomas, Jr. appoints Antrim Campbell prosecuting attorney pro tem.]

SEPTEMBER 18. Lincoln writes and files declaration and bill of complaint in George Trotter v. Ebenezer Phelps, suit to collect note, in Sangamon Circuit Court. Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

SEPTEMBER 19. Lincoln writes and files praecipe in Judy v. Manary and Cassity in Sangamon Circuit Court. Douglas represents defendants. Ibid. [In Macon County case of Fellows v. Snyder et al. he writes, signs, and files, evidently by mail, second declaration. Photo.]

SEPTEMBER 20. Lincoln writes, signs, and files declaration in Sangamon Circuit Court in Silas Harlan v. Thomas and John B. Moffett, assumpsit. Lincoln writes and signs declaration in Judy v. Manary and Cassity. Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. Lincoln is listed as attorney in Bell v. Mitchell in Tazewell court but case is probably handled by Farnham, Frisby, & D. Stewart, also retained. Record.

SEPTEMBER 21. Bills of complaint in Judy v. Manary and Cassity, and Short v. Quinton et al., are filed by Lincoln. He writes declaration and praecipe in Short v. Quinton and Morgan, and praecipe in Peter Van Bergen v. Thomas M. Neale, signing "Stuart & Lincoln." Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

SEPTEMBER 22. Lincoln writes, signs, and files declaration in Sangamon Circuit Court, for plaintiff, in Van Bergen v. Neale. [Neale and James D. Henry borrowed $59.40 at 50 per cent a year interest, at time of enlistment in Black Hawk War, April 1832. Henry became general and war hero. His death Mar. 5, 1834 left Neale responsible for note.] He writes conditional title bond executed between Daniel Ragsdale and Joseph W. Hornsby. Photo.

95

SEPTEMBER 24. Lincoln writes and files in Sangamon Circuit Court declaration and praecipe in Edward D. Baker v. Reeves & Co. He signs names of Logan and Baker as attorneys for plaintiff. Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. [McLean Circuit Court convenes for three-day term.]

SEPTEMBER 25. Bloomington? Rhodes et al. v. Mary Lyon et al., chancery bill to foreclose mortgage, is heard by court, and complainants' bill is granted against Mary Lyon, Frederick S. Dean, administrator, and Abraham Lincoln guardian ad litem for David C. Lyon and Merit D. Lyon, infant heirs of Merit Lyon, deceased. Record.

SEPTEMBER 26. Springfield. Lincoln writes, signs, and files with clerk of Sangamon Circuit Court replication of complainant in Nancy Orendorff v. Rowland and William Stringfield. Photo.

SEPTEMBER 27. Lincoln writes and files declaration and bill of complaint in Sangamon Circuit Court in Albert G. Williams v. John M. and George L. Cabiness. Cabiness brothers gave their note to Nathaniel Owens for $100 current money of Kentucky. Owens held note for 15 years and assigned it to Williams, who is seeking to collect. Photo.

SEPTEMBER 28. Lincoln writes and signs, for plaintiff, petition asking judgment in Hurat v. Ragsdale, Sangamon Circuit Court. Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

SEPTEMBER 29. Two thousand Whigs and Conservatives celebrate Stuart's election to Congress with barbecue at Porter's Grove. Speeches are made by Lincoln, Stuart, May, Hardin, Servant, Bond, Baker, and Henry. Lincoln's speech is "pithy in his own peculiar style and showed off some of the prominent features of Mr. Van Buren's administration." Alton Telegraph, Oct. 10. Lincoln writes and signs declaration in Thompson v. Osborn. Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

OCTOBER 1. On unspecified day this month Stuart & Lincoln collect $250 fee from Allenand Stone in case against R. W. center, evidently settled out of court. Clipping from Stuart & Lincoln cash book, Ibid.

OCTOBER 2. Sarah Mottashed gives Lincoln, for use of A. G. Herndon, trust deed to lot on Jefferson Street in Springfield, to guarantee payment of two promissory notes, $50 and $200. Deed Book D, 277-78.

OCTOBER 5. Lincoln writes answer of Salome Enos filed in Charles W. Hunter v. Enos et al. Photo.

OCTOBER 6. Lincoln writes two bonds for costs in Orendorff et al. v. Springfield et al. Photo. As complainants' attorney, he witnesses deposition of James Adams and Levi Cantrall, Orendorff v. Stringfield witnesses, at Thomas Moffett's office. Record.

96

OCTOBER 8. Sangamon Circuit Court opens two-week session. Judge Jesse B. Thomas, Jr., is on bench. On motion of Stuart & Lincoln, Demint et al. v. Sintz is dismissed and defendant, their client, is granted costs. They lose Grass v. Ware when plaintiff is granted one cent damages. Ibid.

OCTOBER 9. Henry B. Truett is tried for murder of Dr. Early. Stephen A. Douglas, prosecuting attorney, moves to amend order of last term to show that jury list and copy of indictment were furnished prisoner previous to arraignment. Six jurymen are selected from six panels. Ibid.

OCTOBER 10. Stuart & Lincoln have nine cases called in morning, five of which are dismissed. In People v. Truett, panel after panel of jurors are called, but only five are chosen. These with six chosen yesterday are locked up over night. Ibid.

OCTOBER 11. Court grants complainant's petition in administrator of Green Casey v. heirs of Green Casey, Stuart & Lincoln appear for complainant; Lincoln writes answer of Cyrus Walker, guardian in case. They file defendant's plea in Heredith v. Matheny. Twelfth juror is chosen in People v. Truett, and presentation of evidence begins. Ibid.; Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

OCTOBER 12. Evidence is concluded in People v. Truett, and arguments continue through day. David M. Woodson, new prosecuting attorney, is sworn in, and assists Douglas. Defense is conducted by Lincoln, Logan, Baker, and Cyrus Walker. Record; Peoria Register, Oct. 20.

OCTOBER 13. In Truett trial, Logan contends that Early, a larger man, carried upraised chair as deadly weapon, and Truett thought he intended to strike him. Prosecution asserts that Truett came to Spottswood's Hotel with gun and picked quarrel. Truett is acquitted. Lincoln's plea to jury is in part responsible for verdict. Ibid.; The Abraham Lincoln Association, Springfield, Illinois. [Files and records on deposit at Illinois State Historical Library, Springfield, Illinois.] — Bulletin, No. 12. For Thomas Payne, Lincoln bids $222 for 74 acres of land sold at auction by Sheriff Elkin on writ of execution against Nicholas Bryan. Photo.

OCTOBER 15. Stuart & Lincoln get aggregate damages of $1,637.02 in six default cases: Durley v. Mills and Ball; Ellis and Vaughn v. Maxcy; Trotter v. Phelps; Harlan v. Moffett & Co.; Van Bergen v. Neale; Simpson v. Coffman. They get jury verdict for $15 in Dingman v. Dearing, and $74.15 in Kincaid v. Powers. They file defendant's plea in May v. Weber, Ruckel & Co. Record.

OCTOBER 16. Stuart & Lincoln have easy day in court. They dismiss Hill v. H. B. and Miers Truett at plaintiff's cost and file certificate of publication in Ellis v. Nave. Defendant files plea in Poor v. Stafford, and Thompson v. Osborn and A. G. Williams v. John M. Cabiness et al. They represent plaintiff in all cases. Ibid. Lincoln writes and signs "Stuart & Lincoln" to joinder in plea in Judy v. Manary and Cassity. Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

97

OCTOBER 17. Stuart & Lincoln have five cases called in circuit court. Record.

OCTOBER 18. Stuart & Lincoln, representing appellant, dismiss appeal in Capps v. Van Deventer. Ibid.

OCTOBER 19. Lincoln is appointed commissioner to survey lands described in complainant's bill in Butler v. Tilford et al. Stuart & Lincoln win Foster v. Cassidy when complainant is ordered to convey land involved. They get judgments in three cases, have three continued, and file complainant's bill in Todd v. Kendall. Ibid.

OCTOBER 20. Stuart & Lincoln have 11 cases called on last day of October term. Lincoln writes and files his affidavit stating that he drew original complaint in divorce case of Samuel Rogers v. Polly Rogers, and that he advised his client to leave charge of adultery out of bill. Court gives leave to amend bill. Ibid. Lincoln writes part of answer of Stephen T. Logan, guardian, in George Miles v. Mary Jane Sales et al. Photo.

OCTOBER 22. Lincoln acknowledges payment on back of promissory note given by Wharton Ransdell, local hotel keeper, for $208.50. Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. [Morgan Circuit Court convenes at Jacksonville for two-week term.]

OCTOBER 24. Stuart & Lincoln purchase for John Goshorn, at sheriff's sale, 80-acre tract for $611.91. [Goshorn won judgment for $569.79 and costs of $8.37 against John Calhoun July 12 in Sangamon Circuit Court.] Execution Files.

OCTOBER 26. Jacksonville. Stuart & Lincoln obtain judgment by default for $508.27 in Lilburn Harwood v. Newton Forsythe and A. H. Buckner, in Morgan Circuit Court. Record.

NOVEMBER 3. [Article, perhaps written by Lincoln, appears in Sangamo Journal excusing western Whigs for overlooking Henry Clay and Daniel Webster as favorite for presidential nomination because their "fame is already immortal" and "come weal, come woe, their names will never be forgotten, so long as Cicero, Pitt and our immortal Washington shall be remembered." Beveridge, I, 270.]

NOVEMBER 5. [Cass Circuit Court does not convene for fall term. Record.]

NOVEMBER 8. [First eight miles of track are completed on Northern Cross Railroad running east out of Meredosia. First locomotive west of Alleghenies and north of Ohio River makes trial trip with ceremony. Illinois State Historical Library, Springfield, Illinois. — Journal, XXVIII, 6.]

98

NOVEMBER 12. Rushville. Attorneys in publicized case of Wright v. Adams appear in Schuyler Circuit Court, change of venue from Sangamon, and agree to continuance to next term. Record.

NOVEMBER 26. Springfield. Lincoln records in firm fee book receipt of $109.29 from Harlan & White, part payment on note for $317.03 placed in their hands for collection by Jacob Forsyth & Co., Pittsburgh merchants. Seven other notes totaling $2,522.48 are being collected. Stuart & Lincoln fee book; Letter book of Robert Irwin & Co.

NOVEMBER 27. American House, considered finest three story brick hotel west of Alleghenies, is opened with brilliant dinner attended by 200 guests. No guest list is given, but it is likely that Lincoln attends. Sangamo Journal, Dec. 1.

NOVEMBER 30-DECEMBER 1. En route to Vandalla.

DECEMBER 3. Vandalia. Lincoln attends opening of Eleventh General Assembly. He is nominated by Whigs for speaker, but beaten on fourth ballot by W. L. D. Ewing of Fayette. Six members are absent — three Whigs, one Conservative, two Democrats. Lincoln gets 38 votes out of 85 on four ballots. House Journal.

DECEMBER 4. Whigs elect Ebenezer Z. Ryan assistant clerk over Samuel S. Brooks. Lincoln is placed on select committee to prepare rules of House. Ibid.

DECEMBER 5. House meets at 10 A.M. and adjourns until 2 P.M. Votes for governor and lieutenant-governor are canvassed and Thomas Carlin and Stinson H. Anderson declared elected. Hardin of Morgan introduces resolutions calling for complete accounts of boards of Fund Commissioners and Public Works. Ibid.

DECEMBER 6. Little work is done in House. Cloud of Morgan reports from Committee on Rules, to which Lincoln was appointed Dec. 4. House adopts report and adjourns until 2 o'clock Dec. 7. Ibid.

DECEMBER 7. Senate sits with House to hear address of Gov. Carlin. He advocates comprehensive system of common schools, expresses opposition to state banks, and favors Illinois & Michigan Canal. No roll calls are taken but it is safe assumption that Lincoln is present. Ibid.

DECEMBER 8. Lincoln is appointed on two standing committees, important one on Finance and less important one on Counties. He is put on latter to direct Sangamon division. Inspectors of penitentiary report and recommend "leasing the whole concern to some trusty and responsible person for six, eight or ten years." Ibid. Speaking in House on resolution to

99

investigate internal improvements, Lincoln says he does not regard inquiry as unfriendly. "We had gone too far to recede, even if we were disposed to do so." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 122-23.

DECEMBER 10. Lincoln is appointed, with Menard of Randolph and Morgan of Monroe, to select committee to consider petition of president and directors of Kaskaskia Bridge Co. praying repeal of part of company charter. House Journal. [Supreme Court begins winter term, which ends Feb. 28.]

DECEMBER 11. No roll calls are taken and little business transacted in morning session. At 2 o'clock memorial service is held for Peter Pruyne of Cook, House member who died recently. Ibid.

DECEMBER 12. Committee on Finance reports resolution and asks concurrence of House: "Resolved, That it is inexpedient to collect the State revenue in gold and silver exclusively and to provide for its safe keeping and disbursement, by the officers collecting the same." Lincoln votes with majority to adopt resolution. Ibid.

DECEMBER 13. Reports of treasurer and auditor are presented to House. Latter points out that expenses of state are twice as large as revenue, and recommends changes in revenue law. Remainder of day is devoted to hearing petitions and resolutions. Ibid. In debate on bill concerning judgments, Lincoln tells House that present law has worked hardship on owners without aiding creditors. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 123.

DECEMBER 14. [No roll calls are taken, and Lincoln's name does not occur in proceedings. Ibid. Bill in Lincoln's hand to limit justices of the peace and constables is introduced by Cunningham of Coles. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 124.]

DECEMBER 15. Morning is devoted to amending bill enabling settler to collect for improvements he has placed on public lands. Lincoln votes with majority to defeat bill allowing squatter to sue in justice of peace court for improvements not exceeding $100. House Journal.

DECEMBER 17. [No roll calls are taken and Lincoln's name does not appear in proceedings. Ibid.

DECEMBER 18. Williams of Adams, chairman of committee on Finance, to which was referred part of governor's message, reports for Whig majority of committee. Lincoln is believed to be author of report. Majority and minority reports are printed in "Journal." Ibid.; Beveridge, I, 240-44.

DECEMBER 19. Lincoln takes no part in proceedings. Ficklin of Coles, Whig leader, offers eight resolutions outlining constitutional powers of executive and history of violations since 1789. Resolutions are tabled and 150 copies printed. They are political, aimed at President Van Buren. House Journal.

100

DECEMBER 20. Lincoln, Smith of Madison, and Thomas of St. Clair are appointed committee to consider petition for repeal of act incorporating Upper Alton. He votes with majority (44 to 42), expressing disapproval of General Assembly electing members to state offices "as corrupting in its tendencies." Ibid.

DECEMBER 21. Resolution adopted at close of yesterday's session is reconsidered. Lincoln moves reference to Committee on Internal Improvements. Smith of Wabash takes this as direct attack. Lincoln replies he has no such intention. Ibid.

DECEMBER 22. [No roll calls are taken and Lincoln's name does not appear in proceedings. Ibid.]

DECEMBER 24. [No roll calls are taken and Lincoln's name does not appear in proceedings. His absence for week indicates he probably returned to Springfield for Christmas holiday. Ibid.]

DECEMBER 26. [Lincoln's name does not appear in proceedings. A. G. Henry and Archibald Job, commissioners appointed to erect new state house in Springfield, report pursuant to resolution of Hankins of Fayette, adopted Dec. 21. Ibid.]

DECEMBER 27. [So many members have been granted leave of absence that little effort is made to conduct business. After hearing titles of petition, remonstrance, and report, House adjourns. Ibid.]

DECEMBER 28. [Gov. Carlin presents semiannual reports of Board of Commissioners of Public Works, and 5,000 copies are ordered printed. In his report concerning state's military stores, governor says, "owing to the improper organization of the militia . . . and the loose and imperfect" method of keeping stores, he can make no report. Ibid.]

DECEMBER 29. [House meets, but adjourns without quorum. Ibid]

DECEMBER 31. [House resumes business and day is devoted to petitions for roads, counties, bridges, referring to select committees. Lincoln's name is not mentioned. Ibid.]

1839

JANUARY 1. Vandalia. Rawalt of Fulton reports from Finance Committee resolution on purchase of public lands by state, and asks to be discharged. This is agreed to, but later Lincoln asks reconsideration, which is granted.

101

Senate reports bill appropriating funds for completion and furnishing state house at Springfield. House Journal.

JANUARY 2. Lincoln serves for first time as chairman of Committee of the Whole. Discussion is held on adverse report of Internal Improvement committee on incorporating Albion and Graysville Railroad Co. When speaker resumes chair, Lincoln reports progress on bill and asks leave to sit again, which is granted. Ibid.

JANUARY 3. [Lincoln's name is not mentioned in proceedings. Ibid.]

JANUARY 4. Lincoln votes with majority to pass bill incorporating Danville. He moves House adopt rule that "no bill shall be referred or amended after its engrossment for the third reading, without the consent of two-thirds of the members present." Motion is lost. [Similar motion he made Dec. 11, 1834 was disapproved.] Ibid.

JANUARY 5. Lincoln proposes two rules which are adopted: "(I) No bill shall be committed or amended . . . on passage, except by the consent of two-thirds of all the members present," and "(2) When any petition, remonstrance, or claim is presented by a member . . . upon the motion of that member it may be referred to committee without reading unless some member objects." He makes brief remarks about fugitive slave resolutions, and moves indefinite postponement of "the subject." Ibid.; The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 125-26.

JANUARY 6. [Col. Lehmanowsky, formerly officer in Napoleon's army, preaches "original, ingenious and eloquent sermon" in Presbyterian Church. He announces series of lectures on life of Napoleon. Alton Telegraph, Jan. 19.]

JANUARY 7. On Lincoln's motion. House resolves itself into Committee of the Whole, on bill appropriating $128,300 to complete state house. Friends of Vandalia, led by Ewing and Hankins of Fayette and Ficklin of Coles, attempt to defeat bill. Lincoln leads fight for Springfield. House Journal.

JANUARY 8. House meets briefly. Lincoln's motion to adjourn fails, but few minutes later they adjourn. Democrats invite "the true friends of the late and present administration" to Ferguson's Tavern to celebration in honor of Jackson's victory at New Orleans. Whigs invite "everyone" to House to hear E. D. Baker. Ibid.

JANUARY 9. Hankins of Fayette proposes to appoint commissioners to locate new capital but is voted down 61 to 23. Proposal by Green of Clay to submit appropriation of $128,300 for state house to public vote is turned down 63 to 23; appropriation bill is ordered to third reading. Ibid.

102

JANUARY 10. Late in afternoon Lincoln moves to postpone order of day and take up Senate bill appropriating $128,300 for state house at Springfield. His motion is lost and House adjourns. Ibid.

JANUARY 11. Lincoln reports, from select committee, bill repealing all laws in relation to state road leading from William Crow's in Morgan County to Musick's bridge in Sangamon County. Lincoln's fight to hold capital in Springfield succeeds when House approves, 56 to 26, appropriation bill. Ibid.

JANUARY 12. Lincoln presents remonstrance of Sangamon County citizens against division into four parts. On his motion it is referred to Committee on Counties of which he is member. Ibid.

JANUARY 14. Party conflict over public printer ends with election of Democrat, William Walters, 65 to 63. Levi Davis and John D. Whiteside are re-elected auditor and treasurer, respectively. Lincoln votes for Whiteside. He votes for G. W. Olney for attorney general, but W. Kitchell is elected. Ibid.

JANUARY 15. [Lincoln's name does not appear in proceedings. Penitentiary Committee recommends construction of new prison. Larger shops should be built, library and hospital added, and warden's salary raised. Ibid.]

JANUARY 16. Lincoln writes bill establishing counties of Menard, Logan, and Dane. It is read twice and referred to committee of Calhoun of Sangamon, Thornton of Shelby, Fish of Montgomery, Roman of St. Clair, and Lincoln. Photo. Bill amending election laws is debated, with Lincoln, Baker, and Hardin demanding more care in counting votes. House Journal

JANUARY 17. Lincoln reports from Finance Committee plan to pay for internal improvements. Federal government should sell to state 20,000,000 acres of public lands at 25 an acre. State would borrow money to buy land and resell it at $1.25 an acre. Report is tabled. Lincoln enters debate on "partiality" in federal government's handling of tax money collected in Illinois. Ibid.; Photo; The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 132-34.

JANUARY 18. John Calhoun reports from select committee, of which Lincoln is member, bill to establish counties of Menard, Logan, and Dane. Lincoln adds two amendments and bill is ordered engrossed for third reading. Bill making school commissioners elective passes 54 to 17. Lincoln and Baker vote nay. House Journal.

JANUARY 19. [Lincoln's name does not appear in proceedings. Dawson presents "petition and remonstrance of sundry citizens of Sangamon County, praying the establishment of the county of Dane, and against a

103

division of Sangamon County into four equal parts." On Dawson's motion petition is tabled. Ibid.]

JANUARY 21. Act to prevent circulation of bank notes of smaller denomination than $5 passes House 63 to 20. Lincoln has steadily opposed measure and is only Sangamon representative to vote nay. He votes yea on bill incorporating Graysville and Albion Railroad Co. Ibid.

JANUARY 22. House fights over resolutions concerning independent treasury and recharter of national bank. By slight majority Whigs condemn both as "injudicious, inexpedient and unwise." Lincoln and others call for various divisions of resolutions and amendments to get votes on record. Ibid.

JANUARY 23. Several members wishing to change vote on resolutions of yesterday. House considers requesting Senate to return resolutions. Motion is lost 51 to 38, Lincoln and other Sangamon Whigs voting nay. He votes yea on bill incorporating Charleston Marine and Fire Insurance Co. Ibid.

JANUARY 24. House discusses resolutions relative to examination of affairs of state bank at Springfield and Bank of Illinois at Shawneetown. They table resolutions 47 to 32. Lincoln and Dawson oppose investigation, and Calhoun, Elkin, and McCormick of Sangamon favor it. Ibid.

JANUARY 25. House discusses constitutional right of W. G. Flood of Adams to hold his seat and also serve as register of Quincy Land Office. Lincoln says he will vote against referring to Judiciary Committee, and for tabling until near end of session. Alton Telegraph, Feb. 2; Quincy Whig, Feb. 9.

JANUARY 26. House adopts four resolutions by large majorities requesting Federal government to deposit money collected in state in banks of state. [Money collected in Illinois was deposited in St. Louis.] Lincoln votes yea on each ballot. House Journal.

JANUARY 28. Lincoln calls up resolutions tabled on 17th concerning purchase of 20,000,000 acres of public land. On motion of Baker of Sangamon, resolutions are referred to select committee of Lincoln, Johnson of Bond, Thornton of Shelby, Grain of Washington, and Elkin of Sangamon. Ibid.

JANUARY 29. House adopts resolution authorizing joint committee to investigate whether state bank is engaging in lead trade at Galena, or trading in salt pork at Alton or elsewhere, and what amounts are owed bank by its directors. Lincoln votes nay, but resolution is adopted 68 to 13. Ibid. Lincoln writes and sends to Springfield return on summons in Rhoda Hart, executrix v. Jefferson Hart et al. Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. Lincoln writes, for E. D. Baker, letter to William Butler, who has complained about Sangamon county division, and writes one of his own to Butler, denying that Sangamon delegation has been "bought up." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 138-40.

104

JANUARY 30. House, Lincoln voting yea, concurs with Senate on inexpediency of legislature acting on resolutions which merely involve national politics. House Journal.

JANUARY 31. Lincoln reports from Committee on Finance, without amendment, "act to regulate the interest on Auditor's warrants," and recommends its passage. He votes with majority to turn down amendment intended to exempt warrants for building state house. He is appointed to represent Sangamon on committee to arrange time of holding circuit courts. Ibid. He writes to William Butler asking details of Butler's claim for bank fees, and relating how Whigs defeated Democrats in fight over "Anti-Sub-Treasury resolutions." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 140-41.

FEBRUARY 1. Lincoln presents petition of 631 citizens of Sangamon County "praying the repeal of all laws authorizing the retail of intoxicating liquors," which is, on his motion, referred to Judiciary Committee without reading. He votes yea with minority on granting third reading to "act to authorize limited partnerships." House Journal. Lincoln again writes to William Butler, attempting to make peace between Butler and Baker. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 141.

FEBRUARY 2. House, 44 to 36, Lincoln voting yea, tables Calhoun's resolutions declaring that Congress should not abolish slavery in District of Columbia, or territories, or prohibit slave trade between states. House Journal.

FEBRUARY 4. [Lincoln's name does not appear in proceedings. Ibid.]

FEBRUARY 5. Lincoln votes yea with majority to pass, 53 to 23, "act to provide for securing to mechanics and others, liens for the value of labor and materials." Ibid.

FEBRUARY 6. Lincoln writes and reports from Committee on Finance bill for relief of Sangamon County circuit clerk. It is referred to select committee of Allen of Franklin, Hankins of Fayette, and Lincoln. He directs through House Senate bill establishing Menard, Logan, and Dane counties. Photo; House Journal.

FEBRUARY 7. [Lincoln's name is not in proceedings. Ibid.] He gives receipt for $7.50 to Moses M. Martin for legal services to estate of Isaac Martin. Probate File.

FEBRUARY 8. Act to distribute school fund to counties occupies House during morning. Lincoln votes yea on amendments making it optional whether fund be distributed or placed in bank to constitute trust fund to be loaned on real estate, banks to guarantee 8 per cent. House Journal.

FEBRUARY 9. Lincoln votes with majority to raise salaries of Supreme Court judges to $1,500 a year. He votes yea on bill to apprehend horse

105

thieves, and yea on passage of bill to prohibit betting on elections. Ibid. Lincoln tells House that Democratic protest against Whig antisubtreasury resolutions contains false statements. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 143.

FEBRUARY 11. Lincoln, from Committee on Counties, reports bill to amend law in relation to sheriffs and coroners. It is ordered engrossed for third reading. House begins discussion of important revenue bill. House Journal.

FEBRUARY 12. House devotes afternoon to revenue bill. Hardin's amendment that taxes on lands owned by nonresidents be paid direct to state treasury is brought to vote. Lincoln favors amendment, but House does not adopt it. Motion to engross revenue bill fails. Lincoln votes yea. Ibid.

FEBRUARY 13. House passes bill establishing Illinois Asylum for Deaf and Dumb, Sangamon delegation voting yea. Lincoln votes nay on passage of bill to distribute school fund to counties. Vote is 47 yeas and 33 nays. Ibid.

FEBRUARY 14. Lincoln writes to Stuart giving instructions about renewing his note at state bank. Money to renew it is in hands of William Butler. He sends note signed in blank for Stuart to use. He closes with: "Ewing wont do any thing. He is not worth a damn." This probably refers to Ewing's attempt to repeal bill removing capital to Springfield. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 143.

FEBRUARY 15. On Lincoln's motion, House agrees to hear reports of select committees. He reports bill for relief of Sangamon circuit clerk, with amendments, which are concurred in. House Journal.

FEBRUARY 16. House adopts resolution 54 to 33 recommending vote at next general election on convention to amend constitution. Lincoln and Baker are only Sangamon representatives to oppose resolution. Ibid.

FEBRUARY 18. Revenue bill is voted down 42 to 40, but vote is reconsidered and bill passes 37 to 32. Seven representatives from Sangamon vote yea on both ballots. Lincoln votes nay on postponing indefinitely bill to increase capital of state bank. Ibid.

FEBRUARY 19. On Lincoln's motion. House rules are dispensed with, and bill to incorporate Vandalia and Alton Turnpike Road Co. is read by title and ordered to second reading. On his motion, Menard, Logan, and Dane counties are added to eighth judicial circuit. Ibid.

FEBRUARY 20. Lincoln writes and reports from Committee on Counties supplemental bill to act establishing Menard, Logan, and Dane counties. It is ordered engrossed for third reading. He votes yea with rest of Sangamon

106

delegation on bill appropriating $20,000 for improvement of Big Muddy River, which passes 52 to 21. Ibid.; Photo.

FEBRUARY 21. Committee, including Lincoln, is appointed to take up bill vetoed by Council of Revision, supplementing "act for the limitation of actions and for avoidance of vexatious law suits." On Lincoln's motion. House is granted Vandalia residents tomorrow evening for "any public amusement they may choose to indulge in." House Journal.

FEBRUARY 22. House adopts resolution 56 to 26 authorizing vote on constitutional convention. Lincoln votes nay on this and also on Baker's motion to table bill dividing state into judicial circuits. He votes yea on allowing presiding officers of House and Senate $7 a day. Ibid.

FEBRUARY 23. Bill increasing capital stock of Bank of Illinois is amended by striking out section restricting notes smaller than $5. Sangamon delegation votes yea. On Lincoln's motion, bill for relief of Sangamon circuit clerk is amended to include clerks of Clinton, Fayette, and Franklin. Ibid. Lincoln writes to William Butler of Springfield on renewal of his note: "I would rather you should not be at the trouble of sending me a horse, as you kindly offered to do. . . . No news." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 145-46.

FEBRUARY 25. Lincoln continues to defend internal improvement system by votes to postpone indefinitely bill classifying railroads, and for three fund commissioners in preference to one. He votes yea on bill authorizing limited partnerships. Bill fails 42 to 35. House Journal.

FEBRUARY 26. Lincoln votes for bills providing branch railroad to Carlinville from Alton & Shelbyville, and for additional $50,000 to be added to $100,000 appropriated for Rock River improvement. He votes yea on bill relocating penitentiary, and nay on act regulating tavern licenses. License bill fails. Ibid.

FEBRUARY 27. Whigs open 1840 presidential campaign at evening meeting. Lincoln states object, and suggests committee to draft address to people "setting forth the causes of our opposition to the present administration and recommending all the opponents of misrule of the Government to unite upon the common platform of Union and compromise." Sangamo Journal, March 16.

FEBRUARY 28. House turns down, 39 to 36, bill to increase capital of Bank of Illinois. Afternoon motion to reconsider is accepted, and on second vote bill fails 39 to 38. Lincoln, Edwards, and Elkin vote yea. Lincoln votes yea with majority to pass Senate bill incorporating Quincy House Co. House Journal.

107

MARCH 1. Bill appropriating $20,000 for Big Muddy River improvement comes back from Senate with amendments which House adopts. Motion to table fails, 49 to 12, Lincoln voting nay with others from Sangamon. He votes yea on Senate bill for relief of purchasers of canal lots and lands. Ibid.

MARCH 2. Dawson of Sangamon moves that House appropriate $2,000 each to Menard, Logan, and Dane counties. Motion fails, it being introduced only to call attention to Senate amendment granting $2,000 to Scott County. Lincoln and Dawson call for vote and amendment fails 51 to 13. [House adjourns sine die Mar. 4.] Ibid. Lincoln writes to William S. Wait, Bond County Democrat, defending tax law lately enacted. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 147-48

MARCH 4. Springfield. Stuart & Lincoln have four cases in Sangamon Circuit Court. Steele confesses judgment for $186.03 in Vaughn v. Steele and Smith. Iles v. Hobbs, and Keeland v. Bragg & Co. are dismissed at plaintiff's cost. Van Bergen v. H. M. and H. J. Armstrong, suit to collect debt of $300, is dismissed at defendant's cost. They appear for plaintiff. Record.

MARCH 5. Two chancery cases are Stuart & Lincoln's only business in court. They represent complainant in Green Casey, adm. v. Green Casey's heirs, and defendants in Bohannan v. heirs of Kipper. In latter case, petitions, exhibits, and notice of publication are filed and William Butler appointed guardian. Ibid.

MARCH 6. Judge William Thomas, commissioned judge of First Circuit Feb. 26, 1839, takes place of Judge Thomas Ford, and presides until Circuit Court closes Mar. 16. William Butler, appointed guardian in Bohannan v. heirs of Kipper, files his answer. Ibid.

MARCH 7. Stuart & Lincoln have five cases in circuit court. Two are dismissed and one continued. In Darling v. Norred, court orders land divided equally. Treat appears for plaintiff and Stuart & Lincoln for defendant. They get judgment by default for $455.59 on Bailey v. Low. Ibid.

MARCH 8. On motion of Stuart & Lincoln, leave is given plaintiff to withdraw note filed in Klein & Co. v. Thomas P. Smith. Commissioners in Darling v. Norred file report. Asa D. Wright, one of defendants in Atwood and Jones v. Douglas and Wright, files plea. Stuart & Lincoln represent Plaintiffs. Ibid.

MARCH 9. Eastham v. Clark et al., and Langford v. Dryer et al.; are dismissed by Stuart & Lincoln representing plaintiffs. Atwood and Jones v. Douglas and Wright is continued. James M. Shackelford is made party to judgment which Lincoln obtained for Erastus Wright against C. G. Brooks Oct. 15, 1838. Ibid.

108

MARCH 11. Stuart & Lincoln dismiss one case at cost of their client, and win seven others by default, obtaining total damages of $1,515.38. Lincoln writes report, which Baker signs, in Simeon Francis v. heirs of Edward Mitchell. Mitchell, late postmaster of Springfield, failed to give deed to lot. Record; Photo.

MARCH 12. Stuart & Lincoln have eight cases in circuit court; two come to trial. They get $3 judgment for William Butler against A. W. center, but lose May v. Weber, Ruckel & Co., in which court awards plaintiff $208.50. Lincoln asks that defendant in William Edwards v. Oliver H. P. Rush be held to bail. Record. Lincoln writes and files bill in Duncan v. Goforth and Brooker, Springfield hatters. Photo. He writes report of James W. Simpson that real estate title has been conveyed to George W. Wilson as ordered in Wilson v. Simpson et al. Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

MARCH 13. [Lincoln is not engaged in any of eight cases called in circuit court. Stuart replies to Douglas' letter of Mar. 4, declining Douglas' proposals to recanvass votes in congressional election of Aug. 6, 1838. Stuart also declines to resign his claim to office and run race over. Original owned by Mrs. Logon Hay, Springfield, Ill.]

MARCH 14. Stuart & Lincoln file defendant's answer and exhibits in Darling v. Norred and Baker. In similar case of Darling v. Norred they enter motion for summons to commissioners who reported Mar. 8, and ask time to bring witnesses before commissioner's report is approved. Record.

MARCH 15. Stuart & Lincoln obtain divorce for complainant in Samuel Rogers v. Polly Rogers. Alimony of $1,000 is granted. They lose Johnson v. Dryer, Coffin & Co. when judgment of justice of peace is affirmed for $39.88. When court orders land sold in Darling v. Norred, they ask appeal to Supreme Court, which is granted. Ibid.

MARCH 16. Three cases of Stuart & Lincoln are called on last day of term. Todd v. Kendall is dismissed by agreement, and Kendall v. Richardson, ejectment suit, is dismissed by plaintiff. They appear for plaintiff in first and defendant in second case. They obtain leave to take deposition of W. D. Chitton in St. John v. Chitton et al. Ibid.

MARCH 30. Stuart & Lincoln receive from James Manary $168.80 in full payment of judgment obtained Mar. 12, 1838, in Sangamon Circuit Court in Eli Judy v. James Manary and William Cassity. Execution Docket D.

APRIL 2. Lincoln signs for Stuart agreement for change of venue to Sangamon of McNair v. Adams. Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

APRIL 4. Lincoln writes on margin of Sangamon County mortgage record: "We do hereby enter full satisfaction on the within mortgage this 4th April

109

1839 Stuart & Lincoln attorneys for the administrator of Nicholas Sintz, deceased." St. Clair Chrisman gave mortgage to Nicholas Sintz Apr. 5, 1836, in consideration of $1,200. Deed Book I, 473.

APRIL 5. Notice appears in today's "Sangamo Journal" which is probably from Lincoln's pen: "We, a portion of the Sangamon delegation learning that great disatisfaction prevails among you, relative to the New Revenue Law, ask the favor of you, to attend a public discussion . . . on Saturday, April 13. . . . A. Lincoln, A. McCormic[k], A. G. Herndon, J. Calhoun, N. W. Edwards." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 148-49.

APRIL 10. Lincoln records in firm fee book receipt of $208 from Harlan & White to complete payment on note, given to Jacob Forsyth & Co., forwarding merchants of Pittsburgh. Stuart & Lincoln fee book; Letter book of Robert Irwin & Co.

APRIL 11. Leroy L. Hill gives Lincoln and Benjamin Talbott, trustees of A. G. Herndon, trust deed to tract containing 79.48 acres, and to lot in Springfield in consideration of loan of $350 for 12 months at 12 per cent. [Herndon acknowledges full satisfaction on June 6, 1839.] Record.

APRIL 12. Lincoln files writ of attachment in Sangamon Circuit Court against William H. Wernwag, in behalf of William H. Marsh. Marsh claims Wernwag is indebted to him $216 for labor and materials on Sangamon River bridge of which Wernwag is contractor. Sangamo Journal, April 29.

APRIL 13. Lincoln writes affidavit and praecipe of Benjamin H. Lockwood, and files in Lockwood v. Wernwag. Lockwood declares William H. Wernwag owes him $104.38 for labor and materials for bridge over Sangamon River, north of Springfield, for which Wernwag is contractor. Illinois State Historical Library, Springfield, Illinois. — Original. Lincoln probably attends revenue law meeting. Lincoln signs petition to Gov. Carlin, with 106 others, for appointment of Joseph Duncan as state agent to sell bonds for Illinois and Michigan Canal. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 149.

APRIL 16. Lincoln files writ of attachment in Sangamon Circuit Court against William H. Wernwag in behalf of Moses Hoffman. Hoffman claims Wernwag owes him $128.65 for labor on the Sangamon River bridge. Sangamo Journal, Apr. 29. Lincoln writes bill in Ball et al. v. Lockridge et al. (filed Apr. 17.) Photo.

APRIL 20. [Lincoln probably leaves Springfield for Carthage to attend opening of spring term of Hancock Circuit Court on Monday. He is attorney for defendant in People v. William Fraim.]

APRIL 21. [Lincoln is probably en route to Carthage all day in order to cover 115 miles from Springfield in time to attend opening of Hancock Circuit Court.]

110

APRIL 23. Carthage. Lincoln and T. Lyle Dickey defend Wm. Fraim for murder of Wm. Neathhammer Feb. 17, 1838. Fraim, aged 20, employed on steamer Hero, stabbed fellow laborer in drunken brawl at Frederick. Case has come to Hancock County on change of venue. Jury brings in verdict of guilty. Lincoln files motion for arrest of judgment. Record.

APRIL 25. Lincoln's motion for arrest of judgment in People v. William Fraim is argued, but Judge Ralston overrules it and sentences Fraim to be hanged May 18. Ibid. [Sentence is carried out.]

APRIL 27. En Route to Springfield. Lincoln meets Dr. Felix Regnier, New Salem physician, on road between Rushville and Beardstown. They talk of John Rowan Herndon of Adams County, formerly of New Salem. Dr. Regnier later misquotes conversation, and on June 11 Lincoln writes Herndon what he said to Regnier. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 150-51. [See June 11, 1839.]

MAY 4. Springfield. Lincoln votes for Jonas Whitney, who is defeated 195 to 133 in special election for justice of peace to fill vacancy caused by resignation of Marvellous Eastham. William Lavely is elected; Thomas P. Peters receives 90 votes. Election Returns.

MAY 6. [Judge Stephen T. Logan, commissioned Feb. 25, resigned May 1 and no successor has been appointed by Gov. Carlin in time to hold Tazewell Circuit Court today. The Illinoian, June 22; Archives Division, Illinois State Library, Springfield, Illinois. — Executive Register.]

MAY 8. Lincoln writes and files petition to sell real estate in Whaley v. McElyea et al. in Sangamon Circuit Court. Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

MAY 11. Lincoln writes A. P. Field, secretary of state, that law passed by legislature for benefit of clerks of circuit courts of Sangamon, Hamilton, and Fayette counties does not appear in printed laws. It passed both houses, says Lincoln, but may not have been "duly acted on by the Council of Revision." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 149-50.

MAY 13. [No spring term of McLean Circuit Court is held.]

MAY 16. Lincoln writes and files declaration, bill, complaint, and praecipe in Kerr & Co. v. David Prickett in Sangamon Circuit Court. Kerr & Co. are seeking to collect on note for $2,661.77 given them by Prickett at St. Louis May 1, 1838. Illinois State Historical Library, Springfield, Illinois. — Original.

MAY 20. Lincoln writes bond for costs, which John Irwin signs, in Forsyth & Co. v. Truett and May (filed May 22). Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

MAY 21. [Frances Todd, sister of Mary Todd, is married to Dr. William S. Wallace of Springfield.]

111

MAY 22. Lincoln writes and signs "Stuart & Lincoln" to declaration, praecipe, and reply to answer in Forsyth & Co. v. Truett & May. Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

MAY 23. Lincoln writes heading of petition of Upper and Lower Lick Creek justices districts, asking county commissioners court, at June term, to combine two districts into one. Photo.

MAY 24. Lincoln writes and files affidavit and praecipe in John M. Hurt v. Reuben Winters. Plaintiff signs former, Lincoln signs Stuart & Lincoln to latter. Photo.

MAY 27. Lincoln writes and files writ of attachment in Sangamon Circuit Court on behalf of John M. Hurt against Reuben Winters. Hurt swears that Winters owes him $61 for horse, and that Winters has left state, but has property in Sangamon County. Sangamo Journal, June 7.

MAY 29. Lincoln writes and files narrative and complaint for seizure of horse in case of Manly F. Cannan v. Matthew P. Kenney, in Sangamon Circuit Court. Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Photo.

MAY 30. Lincoln writes to Nathan Dresser, clerk of Menard Circuit Court, enclosing papers to begin trespass suit for $200 damages for Levi Summers, administrator of Alfred Summers v. Henry Sears. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 150.

MAY 31. Lincoln writes and signs for "Stuart & Lincoln" declaration and praecipe in Levi Summers, administrator of estate of Alfred Summers v. Henry Sears, Menard County case. Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

JUNE 3. Decatur. Macon Circuit Court convenes for three-day term. Judge Samuel H. Treat, appointed on May 27 by Gov. Carlin to succeed Judge Logan, presides. Stuart and Lincoln attend. Lincoln writes agreement in John Sawyer v. David Condell, is appointed guardian of Amanda Gray in Henry M. Goran, school commissioner v. Elizabeth Gray, and guardian of infant heirs of Henry Butler in petition to sell real estate. Latter two are chancery cases. In Fellows and Fellows v. Snyder et al., Lincoln writes declaration, bonds, and praecipes for both sides, and case is dismissed by agreement. Record.

JUNE 4. In David Adkin v. Robert Hines, slander, he writes defendant's plea and wins case when jury, on which his relatives Joseph and Charles Hanks serve, finds defendant not guilty. He writes defendant's plea also in David Adkin v. Levi Meisenhelter. Ibid.

JUNE 5. Chancery petition to sell real estate in ex parte Jesse Butler, executor of Henry Butler, deceased, is granted. Ibid.

112

JUNE 9. Springfield. Lincoln writes, for defendant, plea in Lewis Ferguson v. George England, Menard County replevin suit for recovery of mare and colt, and evidently mails it to Petersburg. Record.

JUNE 10. [First session of Dane Circuit Court scheduled for this date is not held.]

JUNE 11. Lincoln writes to his New Salem friend, J. Rowan Herndon, giving him details of conversation which he and Dr. Felix Regnier had concerning Herndon. [This conversation took place on road between Rushville and Beardstown when Lincoln was returning from participation in Fraim murder trial at Carthage.] The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 150. [See Apr. 27, 1839.]

JUNE 13. [Logan Circuit Court meets in one-day session at Postville.]

JUNE 14. Lincoln writes and files, for plaintiff, praecipe in Charles R. Hurst v. Samuel Smith and Joseph Taggart. He asks clerk of Sangamon Circuit Court to issue summons directed to sheriff of Morgan County. He writes bill in chancery in Bruner v. Houser, Tazewell Circuit Court case, signing for plaintiff. Photo.

JUNE 16. Petersburg. Lincoln and Benjamin Talbott, trustees of A. G. Herndon, receive from Erastamus J. B. Harrison trust deed for 60 acres of Menard County land as security for $250 loan to run two years at 12 per cent interest. Menard County Deed Record, 25-6.

JUNE 17. Menard Circuit Court meets for first time. Second case on docket, suit for $200 damages of Levi Summers, adm. of Alfred Summers v. Henry Sears, is dismissed on motion of Stuart & Lincoln, attorneys for plaintiff. Record.

JUNE 18. [Menard Circuit Court meets again in house of John Taylor, and a few cases are heard, but Lincoln does not appear to have been engaged.]

JUNE 20. Springfield. Lincoln writes and files declaration in assumpsit suit of John M. Hurt v. Reuben Winters. Winters has refused to pay for horse purchased from Hurt for $61. Lincoln also writes and files declaration of Benjamin H. Lockwood against William H. Wernwag. Lockwood is seeking to collect $104.38 for work done on Sangamon River bridge. Lincoln writes and signs, for plaintiff, declaration in Marsh v. Wernwag. Photo.

JUNE 21. Lincoln writes and signs declaration in James McGee v. Wharton Ransdell. Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

JUNE 22. Lincoln writes and files declaration and notice with Sangamon Circuit Court clerk to issue summons in trespass case of James Bell and

113

Joshua F. Speed (doing business as James Bell & Co.) v. Garret Elkin. He writes and files declaration in Hurst v. Smith and Taggart. Photo.

JUNE 24. Anticipating that Douglas may go to Washington and contest Stuart's seat in Congress, five Springfield Whigs ask editor of Chicago "American" to forward poll book information on illegal votes for Douglas. Lincoln, Speed, Baker, Matheny, and Milton Hay sign letter. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 151. Lincoln is elected to succeed S. H. Treat on town board. Minutes of Board of Trustees. Lincoln writes and signs declaration in George Stewardson and John W. Shoemaker v. Erskine Douglas. He signs praecipe and bond in John N. Lane and Willoughby L. Webb (trading as John N. Lane & Webb) v. John B. Webber. Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

JUNE 26. Lincoln writes and signs praecipe in Samuel Parker v. Isaac Braucher. He also writes bond for costs, which Stuart signs. Ibid.

JUNE 27. He writes and signs, for plaintiff, declaration in Parker v. Braucher. Photo.

JUNE 28. Lincoln, for Stuart & Lincoln, writes and files declaration in Henry F. Luckett v. D. E. and J. Ruckel. Luckett is seeking to collect on note for $118.50 given by Ruckels Oct. 15, 1838, for rent on cabinet shop and ware room. Photo.

JUNE 29. Lincoln writes and swears affidavit that Isaac Anderson, of his company in Black Hawk War, turned $55 horse out to graze in May 1832 "in consequence of sufficient forage not being furnished by the United States, and was thereby lost . . . without any fault or negligence on the part of said Anderson. . . . The affiant makes the above statements from memory only, but feels confident they are substantially correct." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 152.

JULY 4. Fourth of July parade, of which Lincoln Is assistant marshal, ends at state house where James C. Conkling delivers oration. Globe Tavern accommodates 100 at noonday dinner. Toasts are given by Dr. E. H. Merryman, Simeon Francis, Dr. F. A. McNeil, Milton Hay, E. D. Baker, and others. Sangamo Journal, July 12.

JULY 6. Lincoln writes answer of John D. Urquhart, guardian ad litem, filed in Charles W. Hunter v. Pascal P. Enos et al. Photo.

JULY 8. Summer term of Sangamon Circuit Court opens. Lincoln is appointed commissioner to convey land in Butler v. Tilford et al. Stuart & Lincoln have one case dismissed, one continued, and Lincoln is appointed guardian ad litem for infant heirs of Thomas J. Musick, and commissioner to convey to John Houston 23 acres from V. A. Bogue. Record. Lincoln writes answer of Alexander P. Field in John A. McClernand, secretary of

114

state, v. Robert Irwin & Co. Douglas is for complainant, Lincoln for defendant. Photo.

JULY 9. Motion to continue made yesterday by Stuart & Lincoln as attorneys for defendant in William Patterson v. Joseph Bondurant, debt case, is overruled and judgment for $200 is awarded plaintiff. Douglas and Urquhart appear for plaintiff. Record.

JULY 10. Stuart & Lincoln appear for plaintiff in four circuit court cases. In Forsyth & Co. v. Truett & Co., and Stewardson & Co. v. Erskine Douglas, debt, defendant files plea. On their motion, sheriff is allowed to amend his return in Hunter v. Enos, chancery. They lose Williams v. Cabiness when jury finds for the defendant. Ibid.

JULY 11. Lincoln attends meeting of town board and is appointed with P. C. Canedy committee to report on proper width of side walks on Fourth Street. Clerk's Minutes. Stuart & Lincoln file defendant's plea, which Lincoln writes, in circuit court in Johnson v. Wattles, trespass. They appear with Logan and Baker for plaintiff in Andrew v. Taylor. Record; Photo.

JULY 12. Stuart & Lincoln have three cases called. On their motion, Edwards v. Rush is continued. In Andrew v. Taylor, appellant tenders bill of exceptions, which is made part of record. In Fisk v. Lott et al. they file replication, demurrer, and joinder to six pleas of defendant. Record.

JULY 13. Stuart & Lincoln win three cases by default, getting judgments for $204.07 in Hurst v. Smith and Taggart, $198.30 in McGee v. Ransdell, and $513.49 in Kerr v. Prickett. They file defendant's plea in Ritchey & Co. v. Goodacre et al., and printer's certificate in Wood and Abbott v. Ross. They get verdict in Purviance v. Bell & Co. and in Johnson v. Wattles. Ibid.

JULY 14. James Adams, probate justice of peace, hands to Lincoln letters of guardianship in estate of A. McElyea. Photo.

JULY 15. Stuart & Lincoln obtain two judgments by default in Trumbo v. Power and Roe, and Herndon v. Johns. By agreement, their client, George Stewardson, is awarded $1,783.60 against Erskine Douglas. They lose Fredenburg v. Hussey when jury awards plaintiff $13.75. They file rejoinder to defendant's plea in Stockton v. Tolley, and have two cases dismissed. Record.

JULY 16. Stuart & Lincoln get judgment for $898 in Forsyth & Co. v. Truett & Co. and costs for defendants in Newton v. Henry and Herndon, state house commissioners. In Cannan v. Kenney, case involving sorrel horse, which later goes to Illinois Supreme Court, motion to instruct as in nonsuit is sustained and defendant granted costs. Lincoln writes bill of

115

exceptions in Cannan v. Kenney. In Margaret Bevans v. John D. Bevans he writes defendant's answer. He writes and signs process in David Newsom v. Joel Newton, Stuart & Lincoln for plaintiff. Record; Photo; Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

JULY 17. Plaintiff's bill of exceptions is filed by Stuart & Lincoln in Cannan v. Kenney. Commissioners appointed (1838) in chancery case of Sarah Broadwell v. John B. Broadwell, file report. On Lincoln's motion, costs are apportioned. He confesses judgment for $159 in Bell & Co. v. Elkin. Stuart is attorney for plaintiffs. Record.

JULY 18. Lincoln is appointed commissioner to convey 50-acre tract awarded to complainant in Joseph St. John v. W. D. Chitton et al. In David Spear, adm., v. Joel Newton, time is given defendant to answer by Sept. 1. I. S. Britton is appointed auditor. Stuart & Lincoln and Logan & Baker appear for plaintiff. Ibid. [Judge Wm. Thomas presides for Judge Treat July 18-20.] Lincoln writes court decree to sell real estate in Johnson Whaley v. Arraminto McElyea et al. Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

JULY 19. Stuart & Lincoln get judgments for plaintiffs of $113.66 in Sargent and West v. Ragsdale, and $1,177.81 in Fisk v. Lott et al. They represent complainant in two chancery cases of Mills v. Temple et al. One case is dismissed at defendant's cost and other continued. In Hunter v. Enos, Stuart & Lincoln, for plaintiff, file amended bill. Record.

JULY 20. Stuart & Lincoln lose Orendorff et al. v. Stringfield et al. when complainant's bill is dismissed. Three lawyers, Douglas, Stuart, and A. Campbell serve on jury which awards damages in Lee and Brady v. Crawford. Thomas Moffett is appointed to settle Darling v. Baker et al., in which Stuart & Lincoln represent defendants. Ibid.

JULY 22. Affidavit of John Strode is filed by Stuart & Lincoln in Orendorff et al. v. Stringfield et al. Their motion to set aside decree of Saturday is sustained, and case continued with complainants paying costs. They file Nancy Orendorff's replication. This is last day of July term. Ibid.

AUGUST 5. Lincoln votes Whig ticket for A. L. Wilson against James Adams for probate judge, James M. Bradford for treasurer, T. M. Neale for Surveyor, C. R. Matheny for county clerk, and W. G. Gantrall for county commissioner. All are elected but Wilson and Cantrall. Election Returns.

AUGUST 6. Lincoln, in name of Stuart & Lincoln, gives David Prickett receipt for $250 to be applied on judgment in Sangamon Circuit Court against Prickett, awarded Kerr & Co. for $513.49 July 13. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 152-53. He writes and signs "Stuart & Lincoln" to praecipe filed in William Goodacre v. Abner Smith. Photo.

116

AUGUST 7. Lincoln writes Thomas Bohannan acknowledging receipt of notes of Allen & Stone for $ 117.94 and J. Francis for $50.35. Though he has been promised payment, he has received nothing, and will sue unless payment is made soon. He attends meeting of town board and in Matheny's absence serves as chairman. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 153; Clerk's Minutes.

AUGUST 8. Lincoln's letter written yesterday to Thomas Bohannan of Louisville, Kentucky is postmarked Aug. 8. Photo.

AUGUST 9. Town board meets, and in Matheny's absence Lincoln is chairman. Board receives petition from Stuart and others requesting erection of stone culvert and agreeing to defray most of cost. Board requests engineers grading for Northern Gross Railroad to remove puddles. Clerk's Minutes.

AUGUST 19. Lincoln writes and signs petition for Supreme Court to review Manly F. Cannan v. Matthew P. Kenney. Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

AUGUST 26. Lincoln files survey in William Butler v. William Tilford, according to court order of Oct. 19, 1838. Record.

AUGUST 28. Lincoln annotates document in Margarrete Bevans v. John D. Bevans: "I certify that I delivered a copy of the forgoing Notice and interrogatories to John D. Urquhart this 28th day of August 1839 —" James M. Maxey signs. Photo.

AUGUST 29. Stuart & Lincoln file notice that on Sept. 11 they will take depositions of two witnesses, in Thomas Moffett's office, for use in Orendorff v. Rowland and Stringfield. Record.

SEPTEMBER 1. Lincoln writes acknowledgement on back of summons in Braucher v. Orendorff et al. Margaret and John Orendorff sign. Photo.

SEPTEMBER 11. Pittsfield. In Manly Thomas v. Argyle and Hodgen in Pike Circuit Court, Lincoln represents appellant and William A. Grimshaw appellee. Case is tried by court. Judgment for amount of note andinterest $65.04 is awarded appellee. Judge's Docket.

SEPTEMBER 12. Lincoln writes two pleas which E. D. Baker signs in J. H. and G. W. Finch v. Job Gardner. Suit is to collect for horses, harness, and omnibus used on mail line between Columbus and Naples. Files.

SEPTEMBER 17. Springfield. Lincoln writes deed for John Houston, who signs. Deed Book O, 632; Photo.

SEPTEMBER 20. Lincoln records receipt of note given by H. B. Truett & Co. to Charles Harkness of Philadelphia. [Stuart & Lincoln bring suit and get judgment in Sangamon Circuit Court Nov. 23 for $234.50, amount of note, and $40.34 damages.] Stuart & Lincoln fee book.

117

SEPTEMBER 21. Lincoln writes endorsements on promissory note of John W. Gray for $416.6 2/3 in Thomas Lewis v. Garret Elkin et al. (filed July 16, 1841). Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

SEPTEMBER 23. Tremont. [Tazewell Circuit Court opens for two-week term. On docket are 23 criminal, 78 chancery, and 229 common law cases. Court attracts 25 lawyers, including most of Peoria bar, and Stuart, Lincoln, Baker, Logan, Doremus, D. B. Campbell, and Urquhart from Springfield. Judge Wm. Thomas of first circuit exchanges circuits with Judge Treat. Record]

SEPTEMBER 24. Defendant enters plea of not guilty in slander suit of James S. Bell v. Benjamin Mitchell, in which Stuart, Lincoln, and Frisby represent defendant. Ibid.

SEPTEMBER 25. Jury is called in Bell v. Mitchell, whereupon plaintiff takes nonsuit. In debt case of Brooks & Coggswell v. William and G. C. Dodge, defendants default, but later in day enter motion to set aside default. Lincoln, Jones, Urquhart, and Frisby appear for plaintiffs. Ibid. [Deed written by Lincoln for John Houston Sept. 17 is sworn before William Butler, Sangamon Circuit clerk. Photo.]

SEPTEMBER 26. Lincoln writes and files affidavit, bond for costs, and petition for partition for David Bruner in Bruner v. Hauser et al. Photo.

SEPTEMBER 27. In Brooks & Coggswell v. William and C. C. Dodge, plaintiffs are given leave to insert in declaration: "who sues for the use and benefit of Waterman Palmer." Jury is sworn, whereupon plaintiffs say they will no longer prosecute. Record.

SEPTEMBER 28. Lincoln writes part of bill of exceptions in administrator of N. Cromwell v. David Bailey, slave girl case. Stuart writes rest of bill. Photo.

SEPTEMBER 30. Lincoln writes defendant's answer in George Power v. Daniel M. Bailey. Photo.

OCTOBER 1. Lincoln writes and files defendant's affidavit in N. A. Ware v. Alexander H. Kellogg. He writes, signs, and files defendants' pleas and answer in Kimball Dow v. Riley Averill and Alfred Lowell. Photo.

OCTOBER 4. Report written by Lincoln in Kellogg v. Grain is approved by court. Photo.

OCTOBER 7. Springfield. First Whig state convention assembles. Lincoln is not delegate, but is nevertheless one of its leaders. Day is devoted to selection of committees and working up enthusiasm for William Henry

118

Harrison as party choice in coming presidential election. Sangamo Journal, Oct. 11; Illinois State Register, (Springfield) Oct. 12; Niles Register, Nov. 7.

OCTOBER 8. Whig convention continues until late afternoon. Lincoln is chosen presidential elector with Cyrus Walker, B. S. Morris, Samuel D. Marshall, and E. B. Webb. He is appointed to state central committee with Dr. A. G. Henry, R. F. Barrett, E. D. Baker, and Joshua F. Speed. Ibid. "These men . .," comments the Democratic paper, "were appointed exclusively with reference to their supposed stumping abilities." Register, Oct. 12.

OCTOBER 9. [Gov. Thomas Carlin calls special session of legislature to convene in Springfield Dec. 9 to devise remedy for state's financial condition.]

OCTOBER 10. Lincoln writes, and evidently mails to Clinton, praecipe and declaration in Daniel Scott v. Fred Troxel. He is for plaintiff. Photo. [Charles R. Matheny, president of board of trustees of Springfield, of which Lincoln is member, dies. Matheny served as recorder of Sangamon County 1821-1827, and clerk of County Commissioners' Court from 1821 until his death.]

OCTOBER 14. Lincoln attends meeting of town board. Trustees resolve: "That in the death of C. R. Matheny . . . the town lost an estimable and useful public citizen." Clerk's Minutes. [McLean Circuit Court opens second week of two-week session at Bloomington.]

OCTOBER 18. Decatur. Lincoln wins Adkin v. Meisenhelder when case is settled by agreement with Adkin paying costs. He writes sheriff's endorsement on back of summons in Samuel and James Nesbitt v. John G. Speer. Record; Photo.

OCTOBER 19. Springfield. Lincoln asks clerk to issue summons in his first case in U.S. Circuit Court-Hopper, Martin, and Smith v. Benjamin Haines, surviving partner of B. Haines & Son. Record. He writes and signs for Stuart & Lincoln praecipe in Elijah Iles v. Lorence White, Sangamon Circuit Court. Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

OCTOBER 20. Lincoln annotates commissioner's report in Grow et al. v. Garrett, and writes and signs chancery bill to foreclose. Ibid.

OCTOBER 21. [Livingston Circuit Court meets in one-day session at Pontiac. Record.]

OCTOBER 22. Lincoln writes and signs declaration, praecipe, and bond for costs in Joseph W. Hornsby v. Daniel Ragsdale. Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. He writes and files his own affidavit as plaintiffs' attorney in Forsyth & Co. v. William L. May. Photo.

119

OCTOBER 23. Lincoln writes note, which Joshua Speed signs, certifying that $126 is remitted by mail to "Messrs Thos. Bohannan & Co. of Louisville Ky." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 153.

OCTOBER 24. Clinton. DeWitt Circuit Court meets for first time. Judge Treat presides, David B. Campbell is prosecuting attorney, and Kersey H. Fell clerk. Lincoln's case Scott v. Troxel is before court, in which he fills out printed summons form. Court adjourns at close of day. Record.

OCTOBER 28. Decatur. Macon Circuit Court convenes for four-day term. Adkin v. Meisenhelter, slander, on which Lincoln negotiated agreement Oct. 18, is formally dismissed. Lincoln writes and files pleas in Nesbitt and Nesbitt v. Schulty. He is for plaintiffs. Record; Photo.

OCTOBER 29. Plaintiff in Adkin v. Meisenhelter, slander, changes mind and gives notice that case will be appealed. Samuel G. and James L. Nesbitt v. Nicholas Schulty, assumpsit with $500 damages claimed, is tried before jury, which retires. Record. [In Springfield, Stuart receives $180 on judgment won Aug. 6 for A. & G. Kerr & Co. The Abraham Lincoln Association, Springfield, Illinois. [Files and records on deposit at Illinois State Historical Library, Springfield, Illinois.] — Files.]

OCTOBER 30. Lincoln wins Nesbitt & Nesbitt v. Schulty when jury finds defendant owes plaintiffs $219 and costs. Record.

OCTOBER 31. Lincoln is appointed by Judge Thomas to defend David Adkins, indicted for larceny. Jury finds defendant not guilty. Lincoln is appointed guardian ad litem for infant defendants in William Wamick, adm., v. heirs of John Warnick, and also in Shepherd and Manly, admrs., v. heirs of Russell Shepherd. Record.

NOVEMBER 2. Springfield. John T. Stuart leaves to take seat in Congress. Lincoln signalizes his partner's departure for Washington by entering in firm's fee book, "Commencement of Lincoln's Administration." Stuart & Lincoln fee book. He does preliminary paper work in two Sangamon Circuit Court cases, writing and signing "Stuart & Lincoln" to declaration in Calvin Kendall v. Willis G. Moffett, and declaration and praecipe in Henry Kendall v. James F. Hardin and John R. Reager. Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. He writes to William Doughty of Tremont, where he left his coat. He asks Doughty, keeper of Franklin Tavern, to buy length of coarse domestic (for which Lincoln will pay), wrap it around coat, tie in bundle with enclosed addressed card showing, "and hand the bundle to the Stage driver on his trip towards Springfield." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 154.

NOVEMBER 4. Lincoln writes and files bill of complaint of Neff, Wanton & Co., St. Louis merchants, against Josiah Francis, Athens storekeeper. They seek to collect note for $353.61. Photo. He also writes and files in Sangamon Circuit Court declaration in Iles v. White, suit to collect note, declaration in Jacob and Townsend Carman v. Glasscock et al., declaration

120

in Samuel O'Neal v. Josephus Gatten, declaration in Foley Vaughn v. Wharton Ransdell, and another declaration in George Trotter v. Robert C. Arnold and Moses Fairchild. Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

NOVEMBER 5. Lincoln records his employment in fee book in Nathaniel Hay v. Thomas Laswell, and Hay v. Mock and Laswell. Hay seeks damages for nondelivery of cord wood, and to recover stud horse and bridle, for which Lincoln writes and signs four legal instruments: declaration; praecipe; reply to answer; joinder in plea. Stuart & Lincoln fee book; Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

NOVEMBER 6. Lincoln notes in firm fee book his employment in four cases, in preparing which he writes and signs six legal papers: three declarations; two praecipes; one bond for costs. [Two cases of Wm. L. May v. Isaac P. Spear are dismissed Nov. 23 at plaintiff's cost. Glasgow et al. v. Herndon, in which he represents defendant, is settled out of court. He collects note for $316.67 for Joseph H. Dollis.] Stuart & Lincoln fee book; Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

NOVEMBER 7. [Logan Circuit Court convenes at Postville.]

NOVEMBER 8. Lincoln writes article published in "Sangamo Journal" on history of state bank at Springfield. He replies to several critical articles in "Illinois State Register," saying bank is not solely Whig institution, but was advocated by many Democrats, including Gen. Ewing, Senator Will, Judge Theophilus Smith, Col. J. A. McClernand, and Col. J. Fry. He writes notice (published Dec. 5) for complainant in case of petition for partition of real estate in David Bruner v. heirs of Abraham Howzer, that affidavits of nonresidents in case must be filed before trial at May term of Tazewell Circuit Court. Sangamo Journal, Nov. 8, Dec. 5.

NOVEMBER 9. Lincoln files declaration in U.S. Circuit Court in Hooper, Martin and Smith v. Benjamin Haines, alleging failure of defendant to pay promissory note for $567.28, and debt of $12.63. Record. Lincoln takes for collection three notes of D. B. Hill to Kerr & Co. totaling $2,045.78. Stuart & Lincoln fee book.

NOVEMBER 11. Petersburg. Lincoln, representing plaintiffs, moves continuance of Sears et al. v. Summers et al., petition to make title to tract of land. Case is continued to June term of Menard Circuit Court. Record.

NOVEMBER 12. Lincoln writes praecipe in Henry Clark, James Baxter, and William Baxter v. Henry Holland, for plaintiffs, trespass and damages ($500). Photo.

NOVEMBER 14. Springfield. Lincoln writes Stuart that Douglas has given up contest to get Stuart's seat in Congress. He believes Noah W. Matheny will be elected to succeed C. R. Matheny, his father, as county clerk.

121

Lincoln fears outcome of approaching legislative contest between T. J. Nance (Dem.) and John Bennett (Whig). The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 154.

NOVEMBER 16. Election is held to fill unexpired term of Charles R. Matheny, county clerk. Lincoln votes for Noah W. Matheny, who is elected over Edmund Taylor, 966 to 653. Journal, Nov. 23. Lincoln writes answer of Jesse Ditson filed in State Bank v. R. Quinton et al. Photo. "Register" fires two shots at Lincoln and Whig associates. Commenting on Lincoln's bank article of Nov. 8, opposition paper says: "The longest of the long-nine" says state bank is "our dog and we may whip it." Also complained of is "dictation" of "Springfield Junto" in selecting candidate for special election to fill House vacancy. "Would Mr. Lincoln be likely to urge a candidate upon the people, unless he were well assured that he would, if elected, go the whole hog with the Springfield Junto members?" Register, Nov. 16.

NOVEMBER 18. [Sangamon Circuit Court opens three-week session. Judge Treat presides.]

NOVEMBER 19. Week of political debate begins. Cyrus Walker leads off for Whigs and Douglas replies. Lincoln closes debate. Register (Nov. 23) terms it plot of "two pluck one," and accuses Lincoln of an assumed clownishness he is advised to correct. He files replication in Atwood and Jones v. Douglas and Wright. Record.

NOVEMBER 20. Debate continues with Douglas discussing national bank. Lincoln replies, beginning, says Register (Nov. 23), with embarrassment and continuing without making the slightest impression. "Mr. L. of Wednesday night was not the L. of Tuesday." Lincoln writes and signs joinder in demurrer in Foley Vaughn v. Wharton Ransdell. Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

NOVEMBER 21. Lincoln wins two cases of Gest and Mills v. Henkle by default; files joinder to defendant's demurrer in Vaughn v. Ransdell, dismisses Goodacre v. Smith at plaintiff's cost, withdraws replication filed Tuesday in Atwood and Jones v. Douglas and Wright. Newson v. Newton is submitted to three arbitrators. Record.

NOVEMBER 22. Lincoln's demurrer, filed yesterday in Vaughn v. Ransdell, is sustained in part, and leave given to amend declaration, and case is continued. He files demurrer in Atwood and Jones v. Douglas and Wright. ibid. He writes and signs declaration in John Fouch v. Wesley Thomas et al. Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

NOVEMBER 23. Lincoln has 11 cases called, in five of which he gets judgment. He writes and signs, for defendant, pleas in Glasgow, Shaw, and Tatem v. William D. Herndon. He writes court order in West v. Stevens

122

and Stevens. John Calhoun for Democrats, and E. D. Baker for Whigs, continue debate. A. P. Field declares he has always opposed internal improvement system. Lincoln's failure to comment on this statement annoys "Register." Record; Photo.; Register, Nov. 30. Nor does Register (Nov. 23) care for Lincoln's public remarks on its criticism of Junto dictation. "He [Lincoln] asserted that he did not advise etc. the running of John Bennett for the Legislature, but was in favour of Bowling Green; and that the editors of the Register had lied in making such a statement. Mr. Lincoln said further that we had no authority for making the statement; and that having no authority, even if we had published the truth, we were still liars. Such was the language of the man selected by the Whig Party to be an elector of the high office of President of the United States."

NOVEMBER 25. [Special election to fill vacancy caused by John Calhoun's resignation from legislature is held. Vote is close in district which includes Sangamon, Logan, Menard, and Dane counties. Thomas J. Nance wins by 36 votes. Pease, 328; Register, Nov. 30; The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 154.]

NOVEMBER 26. Lincoln gets judgment for $440.14 in Kerr & Co. v. Constant and Francis. Court awards him $7 for survey and report in Butler v. Tilford et al. [T. M. Neale made survey.] Record; Deed Book F, 80; Photo.

NOVEMBER 27. Carman v. Glasscock, trespass case involving loss of boatload of corn on fish-trap dam on Sangamon River, is continued on Lincoln's motion. He argues assumpsit suit of Hay v. Laswell before jury. Laswell has failed to deliver 100 cords of wood to Hay's brickyard. Unable to agree, jury is discharged. He writes all papers of these two cases — affidavit, declaration, memorandum, and, for good measure, writes administrator's report in Casey's administrators v. Casey's heirs. Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

NOVEMBER 28. Lincoln gets judgment in two cases, Kendall v. Moffett for $157.90, and Atwood and Jones v. Douglas and Wright for $568.22. Stockton v. Tolley, suit for damages to cook stove, is dismissed at plaintiff's cost. Lincoln appears for defendant. He files answer as guardian in Levica Davenport, adm. of Marshall Davenport v. William Davenport et al. Record. In Rhoda Hart v. John Sackett et al., he writes answer of Antrim Campbell, guardian, and decree of court approving sale of land. Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

NOVEMBER 29. Article in Sangamo Journal on Douglas' pretensions to Stuart's seat in Congress is probably from Lincoln's pen. He files complainant's report in Green Casey's adm. v. Green Casey's heirs, and case is continued, along with Trotter v. Arnold et al. Record. Lincoln writes answer of J. A. Brown filed in State Bank v. Quinton et al. Photo. Chicago American of Nov. 29 notices Lincoln's labors on stump.

123

NOVEMBER 30. Lincoln has two cases called. He moves to dismiss Lockwood v. Wernwag and agrees to three months stay of execution in Kendall v. Moffett. He writes bill of exceptions in Nathaniel Hay v. Henry Mock and Thomas Laswell. He earns $5 for services as commissioner in Huston v. Bogue, on making report. [On Mar. 25, 1840, Lincoln took Kendall v. Moffett execution to Schuyler County, but nothing was realized for want of bidders. Docket D.] Record; Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C..

DECEMBER 2. In James F. Reed and Peter Rickard v. Catherine Early et al. Lincoln writes and signs petition to sell real estate, writes answer of James C. Conkling, guardian, and writes court order to sell real estate. He receipts on back of execution order in Forsythe & Co. v. William L. May that Springfield lots have been "levied." Ibid.; Photo. At meeting of town board, Lincoln, J. Whitney, and P. C. Canedy are appointed to investigate names on petitions for and against liquor licenses. Clerk's Minutes. [U.S. Circuit Court meets in Christian Church. Nathaniel Pope, presiding judge, is described as an "able jurist and distinguished lawyer." Quincy Whig, Dec. 14.]

DECEMBER 3. Lincoln is admitted to practice in U.S. Circuit Court by Judge Pope. Record. Lawyers in attendance are Logan, Breese, Butterfield, Baker, Gatewood, Field, Williams, Cole, Douglas, Levi Davis, G. T. M. Davis, Foreman, and some 20 others. Quincy Whig. Dec. 14.

DECEMBER 4. Lincoln notes in fee book of Stuart & Lincoln his employment by Isaac Cogdal, friend of his New Salem years, in suit brought against Cogdal by Webster & Hickox, Springfield merchants. Stuart & Lincoln fee book.

DECEMBER 5. Defendant defaults in Hooper, Martin, and Smith v. Benjamin Haines, and plaintiffs, Lincoln's clients, are awarded $626.82 damages in U.S. Circuit Court. Record. Lincoln writes supplementary bill in chancery in David Spear, administrator v. Joel Newton, which Spear, his client, signs and swears. Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. [Committee reports to Springfield Mechanics Union that they have consulted Lincoln about obtaining charter from legislature. Minutes of Union.]

DECEMBER 6. Lincoln's motion for new trial in Blankenship and Ellis v. Powell is granted in Sangamon Circuit Court. [Plaintiffs failed in justice of peace court and on Dec. 2 were given costs in circuit court. On Mar. 13, 1840 they are awarded $95.77.] Stuart & Lincoln fee book.

DECEMBER 7. Lincoln gets judgment by default in chancery case of Wood and Abbott v. Emery C. Ross. Judgment is for amount of note, $827.56, with interest at 6 per cent from Dec. 15, 1838. Record. He writes answer of Thomas Morgan in State Bank v. Quinton et al. As guardian, he files

124

answer to petition of Lucy C. Haines, administrator v. heirs of Isaac Haines. Photo.

DECEMBER 9. Legislature meets in Springfield for first time. House sits in Second Presbyterian Church. Oscar Love and Richard Kerr of Pike contest seat. Debate is held on resolution of Williams of Adams referring case to election committee. Lincoln, Webb of White, and Marshall of Gallatin support resolution. House Journal; Alton Telegraph, Dec. 21. Lincoln writes and signs petition to review in David Bailey v. administrator of Nathan Cromwell. Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

DECEMBER 10. On Lincoln's motion, rule of House is dispensed with and he introduces bill authorizing "Collector of __ [sic] county to collect certain taxes." Bill is read twice and on his motion referred to committee of Lincoln, Naper of Cook, and Bowman of Wabash. J. Calhoun is elected House clerk. Lincoln votes for Andrew Johnston. House Journal; Photo; The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 155.

DECEMBER 11. Lincoln writes in form of legal petition invitation to Mrs. O. H. Browning of Quincy to "repair, forthwith to the Seat of Government, bringing in your train all ladies in general, who may be at your command." John Dawson, E. B. Webb, and J. J. Hardin sign with Lincoln. Hardin writes accompanying letter, "endorsed" by Lincoln and Webb. Springfield Whigs meet and adopt resolution, written by Lincoln, challenging Democrats to debate resolutions adopted by Democratic convention which adjourned Dec. 10. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 155-56.

DECEMBER 12. Lincoln and Edwards of Sangamon call for yeas and nays on resolution requesting commissioners of board of public works to report expenditures on each railroad, and number of engineers employed. He votes nay on tabling, and nay on resolution repealing internal improvement system. House Journal.

DECEMBER 13. New resolution instructing committee on Internal Improvements to report bill repealing improvement system is tabled 44 to 42. On Lincoln's motion. House postpones seating either Love or Kerr of Pike County. Ibid.

DECEMBER 14. Lincoln's motion, agreed to yesterday, is reconsidered but tabled 44 to 41. "Lord Coke" appoints standing committees of "The Lobby." Committee on Etiquette, Politeness & Ceremony consists of Wickliffe Kitchell, chairman, and Lincoln, Wheeler of Pike, French of Edgar, and Hinshaw of McLean. Ibid.; Register, Dec. 25.

DECEMBER 16. House continues to discuss Kerr-Love contest. Resolution to seat Kerr loses 45 to 43. On resolution to seat Love, Lincoln moves to strike out words "until further testimony is heard on the subject." His

125

amendment is adopted, but resolution to seat Love loses by tie vote, which pleases Whigs. House Journal.

DECEMBER 17. Lincoln presents petition for charter for Springfield Mechanics Union, which is referred to select committee of himself, Henry of Morgan, and Green of Greene. He introduces for John Bennett petition (written Monday) praying vacation of part of Bennett's addition to Petersburg. It is referred to committee of which Lincoln is chairman. Ibid.; The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 157.

DECEMBER 18. Day is devoted to discussion of suspension of specie payments by state bank. Amendment by Daley of Greene to legalize suspension is tabled, Lincoln voting nay. Many members declare that bank should wind up its affairs when 60-day period of suspension expires Dec. 21. House Journal. Lincoln opens debate on fiscal policy, Democrats having accepted challenge "after many efforts on the part of the Locos to get off." He attacks Democratic subtreasury. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 157-58.

DECEMBER 19. Lincoln reports from committee bill to incorporate Springfield Mechanics Union. It is ordered to second reading. House by large majority decides not to postpone investigation of charges against Judge John Pearson of seventh circuit, and report of Judiciary committee is adopted. Lincoln votes nay on postponing and yea on report. House Journal; Photo.

DECEMBER 20. Finance committee reports bill in relation to state bank, with amendment providing that "nothing in this act shall be construed to legalize the suspension of specie payments." Motion to table bill and amendment loses 58 to 26, Lincoln voting nay. He favors retention by legislature of right to alter bank charter. House Journal.

DECEMBER 21. Act to authorize limited partnerships is refused third reading. Lincoln votes yea. Resolution to reserve hall of House [Second Presbyterian Church] for use of committees every night is amended by Lincolnto read Monday, Wednesday, and Friday. Ibid.

DECEMBER 23. Lincoln writes Stuart about lost deeds belonging to old Mr. Wright and $80 which Stuart is supposed to have paid Robert A. Kinzie. He notes that Douglas is in town "but he is not now worth talking about." In House, he takes part in debate on opening session with prayer. Ibid.; The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 158-59.

DECEMBER 24. At meeting of town board, Lincoln and other trustees decide to license smaller groceries for $25 for two-month period. Clerk's Minutes. Contest between Kerr (Whig) and Love (Dem.) for House seat from Pike County is settled with Kerr seated 44 to 43. Lincoln votes yea. House Journal.

126

DECEMBER 26. As member of joint select committee to investigate state bank, Lincoln attends first of almost daily hearings. He delivers subtreasury speech in evening. "A speech which no man can answer, but Calhoun will try Saturday evening," says Quincy Whig (Jan. 4, 1840). The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 159-79; Sangamo Journal, Mar. 6, 1840.

DECEMBER 27. Lincoln reports bill to vacate part of Bennett's addition to Petersburg. He is put on committee with Nance of Sangamon and Hull of Tazewell to take up bill incorporating Petersburg. Motion to postpone indefinitely bill making school commissioners elective fails 53 to 25. Lincoln votes nay. House Journal; Photo. As member of joint committee to investigate state bank, Lincoln, with other members, signs letter to Thomas Mather, bank president, conveying resolution of investigation. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 179-80.

DECEMBER 28. State bank investigating committee holds its first session in evening at bank. House adopts resolution instructing committee on state roads to prepare bill granting county commissioners' courts superintendency over state roads as with public roads. Lincoln votes yea. House Journal; House Report, 340.

DECEMBER 30. Lincoln votes nay on consideration of bill to distribute school fund to counties. State bank investigation committee meets in evening, and on Lincoln's motion, elects chairman and clerk. Woodworth of Cook is named chairman and L. T. Jamison clerk. House Journal; House Report, 340-41.

DECEMBER 31. House rejects, 55 to 24, resolution to investigate Bank of Illinois at Shawneetown. Lincoln votes nay. State bank investigation committee meets and resolves to present joint resolution listing all items to be investigated "to the Bank as it is, and that full and complete answers be required to all interrogatories." Ibid.

1840

JANUARY 1. Springfield. Lincoln writes John T. Stuart in Washington, sending resolutions he had introduced in legislature, and asks Stuart to show them to John C. Calhoun. Proposal is for Illinois to buy all public land in state for 25˘ an acre. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 181. Stuart & Lincoln deposit $38.25 in stock at Robert Irwin & Co. Irwin Ledger.

JANUARY 2. Lincoln votes with majority to table amendments to act concerning justices of peace and constables. He moves amendment to public

127

revenue act: "That hereafter all Revolutionary pensioners in Illinois be permitted to loan their pension money without paying a tax." He votes to table resolution requiring all male inhabitants to work three days a year on public roads. House Journal.

JANUARY 3. Lincoln is appointed to committee with Nance of Sangamon and Moore of McLean to consider petition of Sangamon County citizens asking for change in Menard County line. He votes to table bill dealing with estrays, and votes against printing 1,500 copies of report on public expenditures. On Lincoln's motion. Senate bill to incorporate Clinton Steam Mill Co. is passed. Ibid.

JANUARY 4. Most of day is spent on internal improvement bill. Lincoln votes to make state stockholder in all railroads to extent of its expenditures on each project. He opposes several resolutions to suspend construction on railroads and river improvement. Ibid. Lincoln writes power of attorney for himself from Jesse K. Dubois to sell two Springfield lots. Illinois State Historical Library, Springfield, Illinois. — Original.

JANUARY 6. Lincoln's name is not mentioned in legislative proceedings. Day is devoted to discussion of charges against Judge John Pearson, in which Lincoln is greatly interested. Pearson is considered incompetent by Chicago bar, and his removal is desired. Issue has risen over his falure to heed mandamus issued by Illinois Supreme Court. House Journal.

JANUARY 7. Lincoln is appointed one of committee of seven to enquire whether, under constitution, law can be passed authorizing appropriation to indemnify Fayette County for keeping state prisoner. Ibid.

JANUARY 8. Lincoln votes affirmatively on ordering to second reading bills relating to state bank and also on act in relation to garnishees. Ibid. Illinois State Register charges that Lincoln has "bolted" internal improvements and "become a joint stock company man — has blown his pledges to the winds and left the system to shift for itself. What an example of good faith!"

JANUARY 9. Lincoln presents petition of citizens of Sangamon and Menard Counties for state road from Petersburg in Menard County to Waverly in Morgan County. On his motion, petition is referred to select committee composed of Lincoln, Nance of Sangamon, and Harris of Macoupin. House Journal.

JANUARY 10. Mr. Zimmerman of Union introduces resolution to address Justices of Supreme Court out of office because they have held office too long. Real reason is court's recent decision retaining Whig secretary of ate, A. P. Field, in office despite appointment of Democrat to succeed him. Motion of Maus of Tazewell to table resolution fails. Lincoln votes nay. Ibid.

128

JANUARY 11. Lincoln is one of 32 members of legislature signing protest against House action in refusing to impeach Judge Pearson. After his name he writes, "True as I believe." Ibid.; Photo.

JANUARY 13. Lincoln introduces bill for act fixing times for holding circuit courts in Eighth Judicial Circuit. He votes against amendment providing local option, and votes to table new charter for State Bank of Illinois. House Journal.

JANUARY 14. Because of death of James Copeland, representative from Johnson County, no session of House is held. Ibid. Lincoln receives from David Prickett $90.08, balance of judgment, except costs, awarded Kerr & Co. Aug. 6, 1839. Photo.

JANUARY 15. Lincoln, one of seven members of joint select committee investigating state bank, is concerned with efforts of bank to divert Galena lead trade from St. Louis to Alton merchants. Committee closes its investigations Jan. 20. Illinois Reports, 1840.

JANUARY 16. Lincoln presents petition of Mrs. Sarah Martin for divorce, which is read, and on his motion referred to select committee of Lincoln, Nance of Sangamon, and Henry of Morgan. Amendment which provides for election of assessors and collectors is lost 43-37, Lincoln voting yea. House Journal. Stuart & Lincoln deposit $100 cash at Robert Irwin & Co. Irwin Ledger.

JANUARY 17. Lincoln votes seven times in favor of continuing some form of internal improvement, although it is obvious that House majority has lost faith in extensive system adopted in 1837. House Journal.

JANUARY 18. On motion to engross bill for further work on Illinois and Michigan Canal, Lincoln votes yea. Ibid.

JANUARY 20. Lincoln writes Stuart that legislature has done nothing of importance. He wants as many copies of new life of Harrison as can be spared, and everything else Stuart thinks "will be a good ‘war-club’." He declares nomination of Harrison "takes first rate." In House he introduces minor bill. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 184; House Journal.

JANUARY 21. Lincoln writes Stuart about bill changing date of congressionalelections to August, 1840. In 1839 legislature, because of census of 1840, moved 1840 election forward one year. Bill has passed House, and, he says, will pass Senate. His prediction is incorrect; Senate tables it. Lincoln is very active in legislature. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 195; House Journal.

JANUARY 22. As chairman of select committee on Illinois and Michigan Canal, Lincoln reports amendment providing continuance of work and

129

leads debate on subject. He is appointed on committee to settle problems arising from formation of Menard and Dane counties. Ibid. Stuart & Lincoln deposit $380 cash at Robert Irwin & Co., and are charged 38˘ for "merchandise." Irwin Ledger.

JANUARY 23. Lincoln favors issuing scrip to continue work on canal. He explains that people near canal also favor it and are willing to run risk. He helps table resolution authorizing suit against signers of bond executed in Springfield to obtain state house. (See Mar. 22, 1838.) House Journal.

JANUARY 24. Lincoln reports bill from finance committee authorizing purchase of house for governor. On his motion, appropriation bill is made special order of session at 7 P.M. On his motion, rule is dispensed with and bill to change name of Dane County to Christian is passed. Ibid.

JANUARY 25. Bill is reported by Lincoln, from select committee, dissolving marriage of Nathaniel B. Martin and Sarah Martin. He is appointed on committee on relief of purchasers of canal lots and lands; and on another on incorporation of Springfield. Ibid.

JANUARY 27. Lincoln votes nay on bill providing popular election of school commissioners, and yea on act concerning groceries. On his motion, House votes to meet following evening to elect treasurer of Board of Canal Commissioners. Ibid.

JANUARY 28. Act is passed repealing system of internal improvements established in 1837. Lincoln is still strong advocate of internal improvements and votes nay. He reports act to authorize collector of Ogle County to collect taxes for 1839 from citizens of Lee County, formerly part of Ogle. Ibid. Stuart & Lincoln withdraw $380 cash from firm's Irwin & Co. bank account. Irwin Ledger.

JANUARY 29. Lincoln votes against various clauses in report of joint judiciary committee appointed to examine contracts for sale of state bonds. House concurs with Senate on removal of Chicago branch of state bank to Lockport. Lincoln votes yea. House Journal. Stuart & Lincoln buy $6 worth of merchandise at Irwin & Co. Irwin Ledger.

JANUARY 30. Lincoln defends internal improvements. "He thought [them] . . . of sufficient importance to justify this last effort . . . to save something for the state, from the general wreck. . . . That after the immense debt, we have incurred . . . at least one work calculated to yield something . . . should be finished and put in operation." House Journal.

JANUARY 31. Lincoln votes yea on bill to incorporate Springfield. Ibid. Large Whig meeting is held in evening in House. Addresses are made by Gen. Thomton, O. H. Browning, E. D. Baker, Alexander P. Field, and

130

others. Lincoln does not speak but probably attends. Sangamo Journal, Feb. 7.

FEBRUARY 1. On motion to postpone adjournment from Feb. 3 to Feb. 5, Lincoln votes nay. First number of "The Old Soldier," Whig campaign newspaper, of which Lincoln is one of five editors, is published from "Sangamo Journal" office in Springfield. House Journal; Photo.

FEBRUARY 3. Legislature meets, but record does not disclose that Lincoln is present on last day of session. City of Springfield and Springfield Mechanics Union are granted charters. Lincoln draws up charter for Mechanics Union. House Journal; Illinois State Historical Library, Springfield, Illinois. — Minutes of Union. Stuart & Lincoln deposit $150 cash, and account is charged $250 when their banker pays bills for them. Irwin Ledger.

FEBRUARY 4. Whig circular written by Lincoln is mailed to leading Whigs in state about this date. On state central committee with Lincoln are A. G. Henry, R. F. Barrett, E. D. Baker, and J. F. Speed. Circular is intended to rally Whigs for Harrison and to provide for organizing state. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 201-03. Lincoln writes and files declaration in Carter v. Bennett and Ransdell. Photo. Springfield's Democratic paper denounces "secret circular of Messrs. Baker, Lincoln, & Co. . . . They prefer darkness to light, because their deeds are evil." Register, Feb. 4.

FEBRUARY 5. [Supreme Court, which convened Dec. 9, 1839, adjourns.]

FEBRUARY 6. Lincoln writes declaration in Hood v. Gray, and signs Stuart & Lincoln. Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

FEBRUARY 8. Stuart & Lincoln buy $2.62 in merchandise at Irwin & Co. Irwin Ledger. Lincoln writes notice entering himself as security for costs in Tydings and Widney v. Hathaway and Fullenwider, Sangamon Circuit Court case. File.

FEBRUARY 10. Peoria. All day Whig "Festival" closes with dinner at Clinton House. Lincoln is praised for fearlessly and eloquently exposing iniquities of subtreasury scheme in his address. Peoria Register, Feb. 15.

FEBRUARY 14. Springfield. Register publishes "refutation" of Lincoln's subtreasury speech of Dec. 26, 1839, and denounces Whig editors of "The Old Soldier," Lincoln and four others, for posing as friends of Andrew Jackson.

FEBRUARY 15. [Second number of "The Old Soldier" is published. Photo.]

FEBRUARY 16. Lincoln writes and signs bond for costs in Tydings and Widney v. Hathaway and Fullenwider. Photo.

131

FEBRUARY 17. Lincoln writes declaration in Tydings & Widney v. Hathaway & Fullenwider, and signs "Stuart & Lincoln." Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. ["Old Hickory," Democratic campaign paper, appears for first time today. Both "Old Hickory" and "The Old Soldier" continue until Nov. election. On Feb. 25, Judge Thomas C. Browne of Illinois Supreme Court wrote to Henry Eddy that "The Old Soldier" had 8,000 subscribers and that he expected 20,000.] Illinois State Historical Library, Springfield, Illinois. — Eddy Mss., transcripts.

FEBRUARY 18. Lincoln writes, for Stuart & Lincoln, declaration and praecipe in Trotter v. Lasswell and Elkin. Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

FEBRUARY 20. Lincoln writes declaration in Spear v. Camp. Ibid.

FEBRUARY 21. [Register prints Whig committee's confidential circular.]

FEBRUARY 24. [Old soldiers who served under Gen. Harrison meet in Springfield to boost Harrison campaign. John Lindsay is elected chairman and T. M. Neale secretary. Call is issued for meeting of Sangamon County old soldiers at courthouse Mar. 14th. The Old Soldier, Mar. 2.]

FEBRUARY 25. Stuart & Lincoln buy merchandise worth 75˘. Irwin Ledger.

FEBRUARY 28. [Whig committee, Lincoln, Henry, Barrett, Baker, and Speed, say they will superintend "The Old Soldier," but all good Whigs are its editors, and those who fought under Harrison are asked to write their views. Democrats object to Whigs organizing, but, says their committee, "We will meet, conquer and disperse Gen. Harrison's and the Countries enemies!" Sangamo Journal, Feb. 28.]

FEBRUARY 29. Lincoln, in letter of Mar. 1, writes Stuart: "Douglas, having chosen to consider himself insulted by something in the ‘Journal,’ undertook to cane [Simeon] Francis in the street. Francis caught him by the hair and jammed him back against a market-cart, where the matter ended by Francis being pulled away." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 206.

MARCH 1. "Whig prospects were never so bright as now," writes Lincoln to Stuart. Lincoln fears he may "not be permitted to be a candidate" for legislature, but is jubilant over subscriptions to "The Old Soldier." He lists Van Buren men who have come out for Harrison. Ibid.

MARCH 2. Sangamon Circuit Court opens for 14-day term. Lincoln represents Rhoda Hart, executrix in three cases against Penny & Co., Harrison & Co., and McIlvain & Co. All are continued. Kendall v. Hardin and Reagen is continued with summons to defendants. Bond in Tydings and Widney v. Hathaway is filed, as is affidavit written by Lincoln in Ragsdale

132

and Ashberry v. Spear that plaintiffs are unable to pay costs. Bevans v. James N. Brown et al. is dismissed by agreement at defendant's cost. Lincoln is appointed guardian, and files answer as guardian in Peter Pointdexter v. Eliza Underwood. Record; Photo. [Third issue of "The Old Soldier" is published.]

MARCH 3. Lincoln, attorney for defendant, confesses judgment for $357.43 in Billou v. Porter, and $123.31 in Logan v. Francis. Lincoln writes order of court in petition to sell real estate in Keys and Matheny, administrators of C. R. Matheny v. heirs of G. R. Matheny. Photo.

MARCH 4. Lincoln gets judgment by default for $431.92 in Elijah Iles v. White. In Nathaniel Hay v. Thomas Laswell, defendant confesses judgment for $2.50. Stuart & Lincoln are for plaintiff. They lose appeal case when court awards plaintiff $18.22 in Newton v. Hailey. Record.

MARCH 5. Lincoln, Scammon, and Judd for plaintiff in Van Wagenen v. Pearson get judgment by default for $456.20 and costs. In Carman v. Glasscock et al., jury awards plaintiff $85 against two defendants. Plaintiff's attorneys, Stuart & Lincoln, take nonsuit as to defendant John Strode; remaining three defendants recover costs. Ibid.

MARCH 6. Stuart & Lincoln win by default Trotter v. Laswell et al., and Neff, Wanton & Co. v. Stockton. Lincoln gets judgment by consent, for $200 in Hay v. Laswell and Mock. Trotter v. Laswell and Keedy v. Elkin are continued. In Vaughn v. Ransdell and Spear v. Camp, defendants file pleas and plaintiffs their joinder. Ibid. Lincoln writes two pleas in Manning v. Morgan, Sackett, and Hall. Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

MARCH 7. Jury is called in Vaughn v. Ransdell. Lincoln wins case when plaintiff is awarded $245.96 and costs. Walker, defendant's attorney, enters motion for new trial. Lincoln, Strong, and Doremus represent defendant in Crowl v. Lindsay. They win case when judgment of lower court is affirmed. Record. Lincoln writes affidavit of Stuart & Lincoln's client Isaac Cogdal in Webster & Hickox v. Cogdal; he writes replication in Spear v. Camp. Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

MARCH 9. Lincoln is appointed guardian for infant heirs of Dr. Jacob M. Early, captain of his company in Black Hawk War. Also as guardian, of William, Henry, and John Batterton, Lincoln files guardian's answer in T. M. Suiter v. Thomas W. Sparks, administrator of Henry Batterton. Lincoln's survey of land (17.72 acres) involved in case of Butler v. Tilford et al. is accepted by court, and as commissioner, Lincoln deeds land to Butler. Judge Treat had appointed Lincoln at Nov., 1839 term of Sangamon Circuit Court. Record; Deed Record, Book P. Lincoln swears affidavit in Manning v. Morgan et al. Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

133

MARCH 10. Lincoln as attorney for plaintiff in Carter v. Bennett and Ransdell, moves court for leave to amend declaration. Motion granted, and case continued. Record.

MARCH 12. Motion for new trial made by Walker, attorney for defendant in Vaughn v. Ransdell on Mar. 7, is denied. Ibid.

MARCH 13. Stuart & Lincoln, attorneys for plaintiff in Spear v. Camp, are given leave to amend declaration. Case is tried before court, and court considers. Ibid.

MARCH 14. Sangamon County Whig convention nominates for legislature. Delegates disregard Springfield Junto and vote as they choose. Lincoln and Baker are both nominated, but Lincoln believes that except for their speaking ability they would have been dropped. Ninian W. Edwards is hurt by not being nominated. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 208. Lincoln writes bill of exceptions in Manning v. Morgan et al., and gets Judge Treat's signature; he writes declaration in Kerr and Kerr v. Hill. Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. Stuart & Lincoln buy $1.25 worth of merchandise. Irwin Ledger.

MARCH 16. Springfield (and Jacksonville?). In Sangamon Circuit Court, on motion of complainant, order issued Mar. 9 appointing Lincoln guardian for infant heirs of Dr. Jacob M. Early is set aside. Richter v. Holtzman is dismissed by agreement. Lincoln is attorney for plaintiff. In Jacksonville, E. D. Baker opens three-day political debate. Probably Lincoln accompanies Baker. Record; Register, Mar. 27.

MARCH 17. Jacksonville. Josiah Lamborn replies to Baker's address. Lincoln follows Lamborn in speech at Market House. Before he has finished, he is requested to postpone balance of his speech until night. Douglas then takes stand. At court house in evening, Lincoln speaks for two hours. He reads from Treasury report list of defaulters to prove corruption in Van Buren Administration. Ibid.

MARCH 18. Springfield. Lincoln writes notices calling for election of mayor and alderman, under Springfield's new charter, and election of town trustees, plus acceptance or rejection of charter. He signs with four other trustees. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 207-08.

MARCH 20. Lincoln draws up affidavit of defendant in Ragsdale and Ashberry v. David Spear. Spear states that Ragsdale is unable to pay costs of suit and that Ashberry has become nonresident of state, and asks that plaintiffs be ruled to give security for costs. Illinois State Historical Library, Springfield, Illinois. — Photo.

MARCH 21. Writing Stuart, Lincoln says: "The Locos have no candidates on the track yet, except Dick Taylor for the Senate. Last Saturday he made a speech, and may answered him. The way may let the wind

134

out of him, was a perfect wonder. The court room was verry full, and neither you nor I ever saw a crowd in this county so near all on one side." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 208.

MARCH 24. Jacksonville. Lincoln writes petition in Barrett v. Warren, signing for Barrett and also for E. D. Baker, Barrett's attorney. He writes order waiving procedure in case, and to include in trial cases of Barrett v. William Miller and Barrett v. Horatio G. Rew. Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

MARCH 25. Springfield. Clerk of Sangamon Circuit Court gives Lincoln execution in Kendall v. Moffett, directed to sheriff of Schuyler County. Execution Docket D. (See Nov. 30, 1839.)

MARCH 26. Lincoln writes Stuart: "In relation to the Kinzie matter, I can say no more than this, that the check was taken from the Bank by you, and on the same day you made a note in our memorandum book, stating, you had sent it by mail to Kinzie." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 208. [At 7:30 P.M. William H. Herndon and Mary J. Maxcy are married. Register, Apr. 3.]

MARCH 27. [Register attacks Whig Junto as combination which, by secret and evil means, seeks to perpetuate its power.] Stuart & Lincoln buy $1.62 worth of merchandise. Irwin Ledger.

APRIL 1. [Fifth number of "The Old Soldier" is published. Photo.]

APRIL 2. [Bill of complaint written by Lincoln is filed in Circuit Court of Christian County at Taylorville in case of Baker v. Addington et al. No other evidence of Lincoln's presence in Taylorville on this date is known, and possibly bill of complaint was sent from Springfield. Record.]

APRIL 6. Carlinville. Lincoln speaks at Whig rally in court house. Democratic Register calls him "the lion of the Tribe of Sangamon . . . and judging from outward appearance, originally from Liberia." Alton Telegraph, Apr. 11; Sangamo Journal, Apr. 10. Lincoln is re-elected to Springfield Board of Trustees. Minutes of Board of Trustees.

APRIL 7. At designated hour Democratic orator fails to appear. "Sangamo Journal" comments. "The wood and the lamp were ready but the high priest came not to the sacrifice. At length the gentleman who had given the challenge appeared and gave notice there would be no debate unless Mr. Lincoln would get the crowd." Sangamo Journal, May 8.

APRIL 8. En route to Alton.

APRIL 9. Alton. "A. Lincoln, Esq. . . . one of the Presidential electors addressed the citizens of Alton at the old court room Riley's Building. . . Although not more than two or three hours previous notice could be given

135

of the intended meeting the room . . . was crowded . . . and his speech, although highly argumentative and logical, was enlivened with numerous anecdotes." Alton Telegraph, Apr. 11.

APRIL 10. En route to Belleville. ["Sangamo Journal" begins advertising "Lincoln's Speech and Tippecanoe Almanacs — To be disposed of in quantities at this office."]

APRIL 11. Belleville. Whig rally opens in court house at 10:30 A.M. It soon adjourns to public square and continues until dusk. Evening meeting in court house lasts until after midnight. Lincoln and nine other orators are heard. Missouri Republican of Apr. 13 declared Lincoln's speech lucid, forcible, and effective. Belleville Advocate thought it "weak, puerile, and feeble. . . . Poor Lincoln!"

APRIL 14. Pittsfield. Finch and Finch v. Gardner, trespass action in Pike County Circuit Court, is tried by jury, which awards plaintiff $275. Lincoln, Wheeler, and Grimshaw represent defendant; they vainly move arrest of judgment. Record.

APRIL 15. [Sixth issue of "The Old Soldier" is published. Photo.]

APRIL 16. Springfield. Lincoln attends meeting of board of trustees of town of Springfield. Judges are chosen for election of mayor and aldermen under city charter, to be held Apr. 20. Minutes of Board of Trustees.

APRIL 20. In evening Lincoln attends last meeting of Springfield board of trustees. Poll-books of election held during day are examined and following Whigs are declared elected: mayor, B. S. Clement; aldermen, James R. Gray, Joseph Klein, Washington lies, and William Prentiss. Ibid.

APRIL 21. Lincoln writes and files amended declaration in Siloam Carter v. William T. Bennett and Wharton Ransdell in Sangamon Circuit Court. He filed declaration Feb. 4. He files declaration in Ransdell v. Lightfoot and Lightfoot; and writes declaration and praecipe in Ransdell v. Calhoun. Photo; Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

APRIL 30. Lincoln as attorney for plaintiffs in J. and A. Kerr v. Constant and Francis bids in two lots in Athens, at sheriff's sale, on judgment for $440.14 won at fall term of Sangamon Circuit Court. Execution File No. 890.

MAY 1. Tremont. Spring term of Tazewell Circuit Court opens for nine-day term. Out of town lawyers attending are Lincoln, Douglas, William L. May, and J. B. Thomas. Sangamo Journal, May 15. [Seventh issue of "The Old Soldier" is published. Photo.]

136

MAY 2. Tazewell Democratic convention meets in morning. At noon court adjourns and debate between Lincoln, Douglas, May, and Thomas begins. Lincoln opens discussion with denunciation of Van Buren Administration. He relates many amusing anecdotes which convulse house with laughter and concludes with vindication of Hero of Tippecanoe. Douglas answers him. Sangamo Journal, May 15.

MAY 4. Debate begun Saturday is concluded by May and Thomas. Ibid.

MAY 5. Lincoln writes answer of complainant and interlocutory decree in Babb v. administrator and heirs of H. Blair. Photo. [Stuart & Lincoln buy $9.25 in merchandise. Irwin Ledger.]

MAY 6. Lincoln represents plaintiff in Bruner v. Houser et al., and on his motion, William B. Parker is appointed guardian for infant defendants. By default, petition for partition of land is taken as confessed. Joseph Orendorff, William Ryan,and Archy Bryant are appointed commissioners to make partition. Record. Lincoln writes answer of Parker, guardian ad litem of defendants in Bruner v. Bruner. Photo.

MAY 7. Benjamin Kellogg Jr. v. James W. Crain, action in debt, is continued on motion of defendant's attorney. Lincoln is for plaintiff. Record. For plaintiffs in Stapp and Lanier v. J. M. Shannon, administrator of J. E. Shannon, Lincoln writes and files affidavit that some defendants reside out of state. Photo.

MAY 11. [At Bloomington, spring term of McLean Circuit Court begins. Some records of McLean Circuit Court are available, but dockets and files were destroyed by fire in 1900. Thus it is impossible, except where collateral evidence is available, to determine cases in which Lincoln participated. Term closes May 14.]

MAY 15. Bloomington. In John L. Clark, executor v. Nancy Withrow et al., Lincoln is appointed guardian ad litem. Record.

MAY 18. Pontiac. Livingston County Circuit Court opens two-day term. Dockets are not available, thus it is impossible, except where collateral evidence is available, to determine cases in which Lincoln participated. Lincoln writes and files plea in Popejoy v. Wilson, trespass. He represents Popejoy. He writes letter for Anson L. Dean to Garrett M. Blue. Photo.

MAY 19. In Popejoy v. Wilson, Lincoln asks clerk to issue summons returnable next term. Ibid.

MAY 20. En route to Clinton.

137

MAY 21. Clinton? [Dewitt County Court convenes for three-day term. Records of court for 1840's are available but absence of dockets makes it impossible to determine Lincoln's cases when his name does not appear on record.] Scott v. Troxell is dismissed by agreement at plaintiff's cost. Record.

MAY 22 Clinton. In ex parte Frink and Walker, administrators of estate of John McGee, petition to sell real estate, Lincoln is appointed guardian ad litem for infant McGee. He files answer, "knowing no reason why the petition should not be granted." Lincoln, Douglas, and Benedict represent Spencer Turner who is indicted for murder of Matthew K. Martin. Lincoln writes and files plea in Pratt v. Lowry. Case is tried by court, which finds for plaintiff. Record; Photo.

MAY 23. Jury is called in People v. Spencer Turner, indicted for murder. Lincoln enters plea of not guilty. His argument brings verdict of not guilty. Lincoln receives 90-day note for $200 for his fee. Record.

MAY 25. Decatur. Lincoln writes and files pleas in Young v. Cox, signing "Lincoln p.d." Photo. ["Mr. Lincoln, one of the presidential electors for the state, is ‘going it with a perfect rush’ in some of the interior counties. Thus far the Locofocos have not been able to start a man that can hold a candle to him in political debate. All their crack nags . . . have come off the field crippled or broken down. He is wending his way north." Quincy Whig, May 25.]

MAY 26. Young v. Cox, action to collect on note, Lincoln for defendant, is lost when plaintiff is awarded $154.99, plus costs, after defendant withdraws pleas. Record. Lincoln signs answer (written in another hand) as guardian of Elizabeth Finley, infant heir of Alvin Finley, in ex parte Hannah, administrator, and Jacob Black, Jr., petition to sell real estate. Petition granted. Photo. [Ninth issue of "The Old Soldier" is published. Photo.]

MAY 27. Lincoln writes and files pleas in Prather & Co. v. Nesbitt and Nesbitt, suit to recover $87.27. He signs "Lincoln p.d." Photo.

MAY 30. Springfield. Lincoln writes assignment of errors in James and Leonard v. Hughill, appeal from Tazewell County. He files assignment and transcript of record with Supreme Court clerk. Photo.

JUNE 1. Taylorville. Dane County (Christian) Circuit Court holds one-day session. Defendants default in Baker v. Addington et al., and James G. Conkling is appointed guardian ad litem. Court examines complainant's exhibits and appoints Levi W. Goodan commissioner to convey land described in complainant's bill. Lincoln filed bill Apr. 2. Commissioner's report is approved June 2, 1842. Record.

138

JUNE 2. Springfield. Delegations from all over state begin arriving for Young Men's Whig convention. "The spectator who looked on and saw the long lines of wagons, canoes, etc., filled with men and the hundreds on horseback, might well have supposed that the whole sucker state had broken loose." Illinois State Historical Library, Springfield, Illinois. — Trans., 1914, 160.

JUNE 3. Convention organizes at Pavilion at 8 A.M. At 10 grand procession begins. First come soldiers of Revolution, War of 1812, then delegations from Missouri, Indiana, and Iowa, followed by delegations from 59 counties. Cook County takes lead with band and miniature brig 30 feet long. Ibid.

JUNE 4. After excitement of previous day — barbecue and afternoon and evening of continuous speaking — today's business meeting is tame, enlivened only by noisy departures of delegations. Ibid. "Humbug," says Democratic "Register," pointing out that Whigs convened on birthday of George Ill. Register, June 5.

JUNE 5. Lincoln writes and files in County Commissioner's Court Thomas Suddeth's affidavit re road. Photo. He writes declaration in Waggoner v. Porter, signing "Stuart & Lincoln." Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

JUNE 6. Lincoln replaces William Brown as attorney for defendant in error in Supreme Court case of Jesse B. Thomas v. heirs of Baxter Broadwell, appeal from Morgan County, and renews Brown's motion to have case stricken from docket. Court grants motion. Record.

JUNE 8. Petersburg. Menard Circuit Court opens two-day term. In Sears et al. v. Summers et al., land title petition, Lincoln for complainant moves that David H. Rutledge (brother of Ann Rutledge) be appointed guardian ad litem for Melvina and Levi Summers. In Northern v. May, appeal, Lincoln, defendant's attorney, wins jury verdict. Record.

JUNE 9. In Sears et al. v. Summers et al., Judge orders land transferred in accordance with complainants' bill, complainants to pay costs. This case, commenced Nov. 11, 1839, had been continued on Lincoln's motion to this term. Lincoln writes court decree and answer of David H. Rutledge, guardian. Ibid.; Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

JUNE 10. Springfield. On motion of Giles Spring, attorney for plaintiff in error in Scammon v. Cline, defendant is ruled to join in error. Lincoln appears for defendant in error, considered Lincoln's first appearance in Supreme Court; apparently, however, he was attorney in Thomas v. heirs of Baxter Broadwell June 6. Record.

JUNE 11. In U.S. Circuit Court Stuart & Lincoln, attorneys for plaintiffs, file declaration in Atwood & Jones v. Links. Plaintiffs, Pennsylvania firm,

139

are suing to collect on note for $1,269.25. After hearing evidence. Judges McLean and Pope award plaintiff $1,643.76 damages. Ibid. Stuart & Lincoln withdraw $20 cash from Robert Irwin & Co. Irwin Ledger.

JUNE 12. [Summer term of U.S. District and Circuit courts end. Sangamo Journal, June 19.] Lincoln writes power of attorney to S. T. Logan for signature of Garrett Elkin and John Constant, re Peter v. Elkin and Constant. Filed July 14, 1840. Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

JUNE 13. [Lincoln is busy as member of Whig state central committee preparing address to people to silence clamour against Harrison on abolition and slavery. This is published in "The Old Soldier" and as pamphlet. The Abraham Lincoln Association, Springfield, Illinois. [Files and records on deposit at Illinois State Historical Library, Springfield, Illinois.] — A. G. Henry to J. C. Howell, June 13, Photo; The Abraham Lincoln Association, Springfield, Illinois. [Files and records on deposit at Illinois State Historical Library, Springfield, Illinois.] — File.]

JUNE 15. [Tenth issue of "The Old Soldier" is published. Photo.]

JUNE 16. Lincoln writes Jonathan G. Randall of Rushville of loss suffered by Randall's son Richard in Springfield. "The rascally Whigs, through a mistake, took his trunk containing all his clothes off to Chicago, and his heart is almost broken. Make him up some new ones just as you know he needs and make his heart glad." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 210.

JUNE 17. Lincoln draws agreement between Reuben Radford and James F. Reed regarding division of $1000 involved in lawsuit of John L. Roberts v. Radford. Lincoln receives $50 attorney fees from John Hogan, former commissioner of Board of Public Works. Photo.

JUNE 18. Lincoln makes his first argument in Supreme Court when he appears for defendant in Scammon v. Cline. Lincoln argues that appeal from justice of peace should have been taken to circuit court of Jo Daviess County instead of Boone County, as held by latter court. He loses case when Supreme Court on Feb. 24, 1841 reverses decision of Boone Circuit Court. Record; 3 Ill. 456.

JUNE 19. Lincoln writes and signs assignment of errors in James and Leonard v. Hughill. File.

JUNE 22. Lincoln draws draft for $35.93 on Simeon B. Williams of St. Louis, payable in ten days "at the counting room of H. N. Davis & Co., at St. Louis." He endorses it to Robert Irwin & Co., Springfield. Copy Book, Robert Irwin & Co., owned by Springfield Marine Bank.

JUNE 24. [Stuart, in name of Stuart & Lincoln, asks clerk of Sangamon Circuit Court to issue summons in Thomas Simpson v. Samuel L. Hesser, suit to collect debt of $200 and damages of $150. Photo.]

140

JUNE 27. Shelbyville. "We had a very able address delivered us by General [W. L. D.] Ewing; he was followed by Lincoln, but Mr. Lincoln had but a thin audience." Register, July 10.

JUNE 30. Springfield. Stuart & Lincoln deposit $35.93 cash, and buy $15.93 in "sundries." Irwin Ledger.

JULY 1. Lincoln files amended bill of complaint in Homsby v. Ragsdale et al. in Sangamon Circuit Court. Record. He writes declaration and praecipe in Trotter v. Thomas. Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

JULY 2. Lincoln files declaration in E. Iles v. Lyman in Sangamon Circuit Court. Iles is seeking to collect note for $ 120 given by Lyman to Eddin Lewis and taken over by Iles in Jan. 1840. Lincoln writes declarations in two other cases: Short v. Ditson et al., and Stockton v. Folly. Photo; Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. [Eleventh issue of "The Old Soldier" appears. Photo.]

JULY 13. Sangamon Circuit Court opens term of three weeks. On motion of Stuart & Lincoln, attorneys for plaintiff, trespass case Keedy v. Elkin is dismissed. Record.

JULY 14. In Kendall v. Hardin and Reagen, continued from March, plaintiff is awarded $189.76 damages and costs when defendants default. Stuart & Lincoln are attorneys for plaintiff. Ibid. Lincoln writes declaration in Peter v. Elkin and Constant. Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

JULY 15. On motion of Stuart & Lincoln, attorneys for plaintiff, Keedy v. Elkin, assumpsit, is dismissed at plaintiff's cost. Record. [Twelfth issue of "The Old Soldier" is published. Photo.]

JULY 16. In Braucher v. heirs of James Sales, petition for partition of real estate is granted and three commissioners appointed. Lincoln writes order of court. He writes and signs affidavit that Jemima Sales, a defendant, resides out of state. On motion of plaintiff in Ransdell v. Calhoun, writ of inquiry is awarded. Stuart & Lincoln represent plaintiffs in both cases. Record; Photo.

JULY 17. Judgment by default is ordered in Short v. Ditson and Ralston, Hornsby v. Elkins and Spear, Ditson v. McMurry, and Dunham v. Laswell. Stuart & Lincoln appear for plaintiffs in all four cases. Record. Lincoln writes praecipe in first, declarations in second and third cases. Photo. "Mr. Lincoln desires to address the people at the court house in this place on Monday next, at 1 o'clock P.M." Sangamo Journal, July 17.

JULY 18. Lincoln asks that Trotter v. Thomas be continued for failure to serve process in time. He gets judgment by default for $200 in Simpson v. Hesser. In Rucker v. heirs of Jacob M. Early, he is appointed guardian

141

ad litem for George N. Early and Jacob M. Early, infant defendants Record.

JULY 20. Lincoln in Circuit Court wins two cases by default, loses one, and in fourth case, court takes time. Record. He writes Thomas Lasswell's affidavit, filed July 22, in Mock v. Lasswell. Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. In afternoon political debate takes place in court room between Lincoln and Jesse B. Thomas. Thomas charges Lincoln with authorship of series of letters criticizing Thomas' political activities that appeared in "Sangamo Journal" signed "A Conservative." Register, July 24.

JULY 21. Ransdell v. Lightfoot and Lightfoot is tried by court and Judgment is awarded plaintiff, Lincoln's client. On his motion defendant is ruled to file answer in Hornsby v. Ragsdale et al. Court, in Trotter v. Arnold and Fairchild, orders land described in complainant's bill sold to pay $20.65 debt. Record. Lincoln draws up answer of defendant in David Spear v. Joseph Klein. Photo.

JULY 23. Lincoln is appointed guardian ad litem for infant defendant in partition suit of Benjamin S. Edwards v. John Cook, and files answer as guardian. Defendant is 15-year-old son of Daniel Pope Cook, early congressman from Illinois. He is commissioned Brig.-Gen. by President Lincoln in 1862. Jury is called in Ransdell v. Calhoun, and awards plaintiff $245.95. Stuart & Lincoln represent plaintiff. Record.

JULY 25. Carlinville. Whigs hold Log Cabin and Hard Cider rally, with visiting delegations. Lincoln was in Carlinville this summer, possibly at this time. Missouri Republican, July 10.

JULY 26. ["The Old Soldier" issues extra number. "Old Hickory," its Democratic rival, accuses Whigs of failure to circulate "The Old Soldier" near Springfield "where its lies could have been branded."]

JULY 27. Springfield. On Lincoln's motion, leave is granted him by court to amend bill in Hornsby v. Ragsdale et al., and case is continued. Record.

JULY 28. Lincoln writes plea and notice to prove account of defendant in Mock v. Lasswell, signing "Baker & Strong." Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. [Thirteenth number of "The Old Soldier" is published. Photo.]

JULY 29. Lincoln as guardian ad litem for infant defendants in Rucker v. heirs of Jacob M. Early is present when deposition of Peter Rickard is taken. Rickard states that Early, dying, said land described in complainant's bill should be deeded back to Rucker. Rucker, moving to Iowa, had deeded land to Early to hold in trust until prices improved. Record.

JULY 31. In Spear v. Newton, defendant files demurrer to supplemental bill of complainant. After hearing argument, court overrules demurrer.

142

Logan, Lincoln, and Stuart are for complainant and Strong and Doremus for defendant. Ibid. Lincoln writes report in Matheny and Keyes v. Matheny heirs. Photo.

AUGUST 1. Defendant in Spear v. Newton files his reasons and enters motion to dismiss complainant's supplemental bill. Court overrules, to which opinion defendant excepts, and bill of exceptions is made part of record. Logan, Lincoln, and Stuart are for complainant. Record.

AUGUST 3. Election day. Five Whigs are elected to lower house of Eleventh General Assembly. Lincoln votes for four Whigs and J. M. Barrett, Democrat. His vote helps elect E. D. Baker to Illinois Senate. Darneille, Brown, Bradford, and Francis are elected with Lincoln to House. Lincoln polls smaIlest vote of elected candidates. His total is almost 600 more than that of leading Democrat. Election Returns.

AUGUST 4. [Declaration written by Lincoln is filed in Circuit Court of Livingston County at Pontiac in Popejoy v. Wilson. Popejoy is seeking $2,000 damages for defamation of character. No other evidence of Lincoln's presence in Pontiac on this date is known, and it is possible declaration was sent from Springfield by mail or messenger.]

AUGUST 6. William F. Elkin gives $10,000 bond as sheriff of Sangamon County. Bond is signed by Elkin, John Williams, Benjamin Talbott, Robert Irwin, John Constant, and Lincoln. Record.

AUGUST 13. Lincoln files complainant's amended bill in Hornsby v. Ragsdale et al., in Sangamon Circuit Court. Ibid.

AUGUST 17. ["Ed. Baker, Lincoln, Governor Duncan and myself, are going to spend all our time in the southern counties, discussing the principles of our party . . . and challenge these men to a fair discussion of this administration, organize our friends, circulate documents amongst them and in this way, my word for it, we must succeed." Illinois State Historical Library, Springfield, Illinois. — Eddy MSS, A. P. Field to H. Eddy, Aug. 17.]

AUGUST 18. Springfield and en route. Lincoln signs bond of Tilman Horn-buckle to Levi Summers, administrator of Alfred Summers, filed in probate court, then starts on campaign trip. (Writing to Henry Eddy Aug. 17; A. P. Field states: "Tomorrow Lincoln and myself leave for Belleville." Ibid.) Register comments: "The Junto have determined in secret conclave to revolutionize the southern part of the State, and have appointed A. P. Field and A. Lincoln missionaries to . . . the benighted region." Register, Aug. 21; Photo. [In Rushville, publicized case of Wright v. Adams is continued by agreement, which Lincoln wrote and evidently mailed. Douglas is now acting for defendant. Photo.]

143

AUGUST 19. En route. [Lincoln's whereabouts Aug. 18 to 22 have not been ascertained, but it is reasonable to believe that he and Field are meeting Whig leaders in county seats south and southwest of Springfield.]

AUGUST 22. Belleville? [Although no evidence of Lincoln's presence in Belleville on this day has been found, Field's letter of Aug. 17 indicates that it was his and Lincoln's immediate destination. Distance from Springfield — approximately 100 miles — could have been covered easily in four days.]

AUGUST 23. Waterloo. "The traveling missionaries, Lincoln and Field, reached Waterloo on Sunday." Register, Sept. 4.

AUGUST 24. Notice is posted at court house Monday morning that Lincoln will address people on Tuesday. Ibid.

AUGUST 25. Large crowd hears Lincoln. Adam Snyder, Democratic presidential elector, replies to Lincoln's two-hour address with one of equal length. Lincoln "seemed like a man traveling over unknown ground," declares "Register." Ibid., Belleville Advocate, Aug. 29.

AUGUST 26. En route to Mount Vernon? Exact day of Lincoln's speech in Mount Vernon has not been determined, but it is assumed that today and tomorrow are spent in making 80-mile trip from Waterloo to Mount Vernon.

AUGUST 28. Mount Vernon? On or about this date Lincoln and John A. McClernand, Whig and Democratic electoral candidates, debate in Methodist Church. Susannah Johnson, Recollections of Rev. John Johnson, 259.

AUGUST 31. [Lincoln does not vote, being out of town, in special election for county surveyor. Political debate between John T. Stuart, S. A. Douglas, and E. D. Baker attracts large crowd in Springfield. Register, Sept. 4.]

SEPTEMBER 1. Carmi. Lincoln attends Whig barbecue in Carmi. Following parade and flag pole raising he speaks in park. He is guest of Edwin B. Webb, also Whig presidential elector. George W. Smith, When Lincoln Came to Egypt, 60-2.

SEPTEMBER 2. [Lincoln and Webb drive to Mt. Carmel in one-seated buggy. Webb's daughter Patty, who sits on Lincoln's lap during journey, is to enter seminary at Mt. Carmel. Ibid.]

SEPTEMBER 3. [Lincoln probably speaks at Mt. Carmel. Ibid.]

SEPTEMBER 5. Shawneetown. Political debate between Lincoln and John A. McClemand is held. Register, Sept. 25.

SEPTEMBER 7. Equality. Lincoln debates Josiah Lamborn. "On Monday . . . . Circuit Court commenced in Equality. . . . Here Mr. Lincoln in

144

persuance to the duty assigned him, again ‘talked to’ our deluded sovereigns. His speeches were ingenious, and well calculated to command attention, and he was listened to, with so much patience, that the Whigs were in extacies." Register, Oct. 16. Lincoln and Lambom also debate again at Shawneetown, apparently before they trade blows at Equality.

SEPTEMBER 8. [Tradition states that Lincoln spoke in Morganfield, Kentucky, 15 miles from Shawneetown, in campaign of 1840. He was accompanied by delegation from Shawneetown. While in Morganfield delegation was guest at best hotel at expense of George W. Riddell.]

SEPTEMBER 10. [Sixteenth number of "The Old Soldier" is published. Photo.]

SEPTEMBER 16. Equality. Lincoln hears Josiah Lambom's speech. Register, Sept. 25, Oct. 2.

SEPTEMBER 17. Lincoln replies to Lamborn's speech. Ibid.

SEPTEMBER 19. [According to tradition, Lincoln speaks in Marshall in afternoon and Casey in evening about this date in September. The Abraham Lincoln Association, Springfield, Illinois. [Files and records on deposit at Illinois State Historical Library, Springfield, Illinois.] — George W. Smith to H. E. Pratt, Sept. 5, 1939.]

SEPTEMBER 21. [Lincoln is still stumping lower part of state. McClernand has called on Lamborn to come and help him in debates. "Lamborn," comments "Journal," "though well disposed to earn something in laboring for the party, has succeeded little better than his friend McClernand. Nothing has been heard from Mr. Snyder since his Waterloo defeat." Sangamo Journal, Sept. 25.]

Lincoln speaks this week at Salem and Mount Vernon. At Salem, according to "Patriot," political reporter, he "was completely done up, even his anecdotes failed to command attention; and after a speech of one hour, he gave way to McClernand." The same witness wrote that at Mt. Vernon "Mr. Lincoln . . . was listened to with attention; possessing much urbanity and suavity of manner, he is well calculated for a public debater; as he seldom loses his temper, and always replies jocosely and in good humor, — the evident marks of dissapprobation which greet many of his assertions, do not discompose him, and he is therefore hard to foil." Register, Oct. 16.

SEPTEMBER 23. [Seventeenth number of "The Old Soldier" is published. Photo.]

SEPTEMBER 24. [Tazewell Circuit Court opens for eight-day term.]

SEPTEMBER 30. Tremont. Kellogg v. Grain, action in debt, dismissed on 25th for want of prosecution, is reinstated on motion of plaintiff, and continued. Stuart & Lincoln are attorneys for plaintiff. Record. [Eight-tenth

145

issue of "The Old Soldier" is published, numbered 17 by mistake. Photo.]

OCTOBER 5. Springfield. Stuart & Lincoln withdraw $5 cash. Irwin Ledger.

OCTOBER 12. [Livingston Circuit Court convenes at Pontiac.]

OCTOBER 15. [DeWitt County Circuit Court convenes at Clinton.]

OCTOBER 16. Clinton? Ex parte Frink and Walker, petition to sell real estate for which Lincoln is guardian of infant heirs of John McGee, is continued. Record.

OCTOBER 19. [Macon Circuit Court opens three-day term at Decatur.]

OCTOBER 20. [Lincoln and Isaac P. Walker, Democrat, debate in "mid-autumn" in Albion, Illinois. On morning of debate, Lincoln borrows copy of Byron's poems from log school house. Gibson W. Harris, "My Recollections of Abraham Lincoln," Farm & Fireside, Dec. 1, 1904.]

OCTOBER 21. [Lincoln spends night at home of William Verden in southeast corner of Wayne County, some five miles west of Albion. This visit is probably made day after his address at Albion. Verden and Lincoln reminisce on their experiences, former in War of 1812, latter in Black Hawk War. Illinois State Historical Library, Springfield, Illinois. — Journal, VIII, 518.]

OCTOBER 23. ["The "Register" publishes a letter from one of our southern counties in which it is stated that John A. McClernand is using up A. Lincoln in his addresses to the people. This is too simple a lie to tell here. Even the Locos are ashamed of it. Abraham Lincoln used up by John A. McClernand, Bah!" Sangamo Journal, Oct. 23.]

OCTOBER 26. [Christian County Circuit Court convenes for three-day term.]

OCTOBER 29. [Logan Circuit Court is scheduled to open at Postville. Records, dockets and files of this court were destroyed by fire in 1857. Consequently little information is available on Lincoln's practice in Logan County prior to this date.]

OCTOBER 30. Lawrenceville. It appears from Lincoln's letter of Oct. 31 that he is in Lawrenceville on this day. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 211.

OCTOBER 31. In reply to note received day before from W. G. Anderson, Lincoln denies he is aggressor in difficulty between them. His statements, he says, were made as fair set-off to those of Anderson, and he entertains no unkind feelings, and regrets altercation. Ibid.

146

NOVEMBER 2. [There is no record that Lincoln voted in presidential election.]

NOVEMBER 3. [Menard Circuit Court opens three-day term.]

NOVEMBER 5. En route to Springfield. Lincoln is selected to bring Lawrence County election returns to Springfield to be filed with secretary of state. It takes possibly two days after election on Monday to gather returns. He probably spends last three days of this week en route to Springfield. Journey probably continues Nov. 6 and 7.

NOVEMBER 9. Springfield. Fall term of Sangamon County Circuit Court begins. It closes Dec. 3. Lincoln receives $19 from state auditor for bringing election returns from Lawrence County. Photo.

NOVEMBER 10. Lincoln has four cases in circuit court, in each of which he represents plaintiff. In Ransdell v. Mills he obtains leave to amend declaration; in Gatton v. Turner and Ranson he gets judgment by default for $129.20. In Trotter v. Thomas, defendant files plea in abatement; in case of Sarah Brown, guardian, petition to sell real estate is granted. Record. He writes and files petition in Brown case. Photo.

NOVEMBER 11. Gest and Mills v. Henkle and Clarke is dismissed on motion of plaintiff's attorneys, Stuart & Lincoln. In Trotter v. Thomas, Lincoln files demurrer to defendant's plea in abatement filed yesterday. Record.

NOVEMBER 12. Stuart & Lincoln, representing complainants in Braucher v. heirs of James Sales, hear report of commissioners that real estate is not suitable to partition; court orders it sold. William F. Elkin is appointed to make sale. Ibid.

NOVEMBER 13. Funk et al. v. Taylor et al. is continued for want of service in time, and Ransdell v. Mills is continued at defendant's cost. Scammon, Logan, and Lincoln are for plaintiff in first case, and Stuart & Lincoln in second. After hearing Lincoln's demurrer to defendant's plea in abatement in Trotter v. Thomas, court orders demurrer sustained and plaintiff to recover $791.46. Ibid. In Trotter v. Thomas, Lincoln writes court order and decree, and assignment of judgment, which his client Trotter signs. He writes draft of final court decree in another case for same client. Trotter v. Arnold and Fairchild. Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

NOVEMBER 14. Isaac S. Britton, commissioner appointed by court in Spear v. Newton, files amended report. Record.

NOVEMBER 16. In Sangamon Circuit Court, David Spear, one of defendants in Hornsby v. Ragsdale et al., files answer and exhibit. Lincoln is attorney for plaintiff. Ibid.

147

NOVEMBER 17. Courier, Springfield newspaper, satirizes town politicians by pointing out that Lincoln and other Whigs are on friendly terms with Democrats in spite of mutual personal abuse during campaign.

NOVEMBER 18. Wood and Abbott v. Ross is continued by plaintiff's attorneys, Stuart & Lincoln. Record. Lincoln receives certificate of election to 12th General Assembly from N. W. Matheny, clerk of County Commissioners' Court. Photo.

NOVEMBER 23. Lincoln attends opening of called session of House of Representatives. Members meet in Methodist Church, which is wholly unsuitable. Senate meets in their unfinished chamber in state house. House has 40 Whigs and 51 Democrats, Senate 14 Whigs and 26 Democrats. Alton Telegraph, Nov. 28.

NOVEMBER 24. House elects speaker; W. L. D. Ewing receives 46 and Lincoln 36 votes. Ewing is conducted to chair by Lincoln and Ebenezer Peck. Lincoln introduces resolution to inform Senate House has met and elected officers. He is appointed one of committee of seven to prepare and report House rules. House Journal. In Sangamon County Court case, Harrison et al. v. Hart, Lincoln writes answer to bill of injunction and signs his client's name. Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

NOVEMBER 25. Lincoln votes for Newton Cloud, who is elected copyist of "House Journal." Lincoln is chosen with English of Greene and Carpenter of Hamilton to sit with two members of Senate on joint rules committee. He speaks and votes against printing 8,000 copies of governor's message. House Journal.

NOVEMBER 26. In each of three cases in Circuit Court, Barrett v. Spear, Grain v. Grubb, and Shackelford v. Shackelford, defendant confesses his indebtedness and judgment is entered against him. In each case Lincoln represents defendant. Record.

NOVEMBER 27. [Legislature is in session. Lincoln does not vote on two roll calls.]

NOVEMBER 28. Lincoln is appointed to Committees on Finance and Canal and Canal Lands. He offers resolution to refer as much of governor's message as relates to fraudulent voting to Committee on Elections. Democrats stop this Whig move by referring to joint committee. House Journal.

NOVEMBER 30. Lincoln does not attend morning session. He opposes move of Trumbull of St. Clair and other Democrats to have governor appoint sgent to take over all books and property of internal improvement system, now under Board of Public Works. Ibid.

148

DECEMBER 1. Amendment proposed by Woodson of Greene to dismiss Board of Public Works and turn its affairs over to Fund Commissioners is referred to Internal Improvements Committee by vote of 46-40, Lincoln voting with majority. Ibid.

DECEMBER 2. Lincoln offers resolution: "That the committee on education . . . inquire into the expediency of providing by law for examination as to qualifications of persons, offering themselves as school-teachers, that no teacher shall receive any part of the public school fund who shall not have successfully passed an examination." This resolution is embodied in Sec. 81 of common school code adopted at this session. Ibid.

DECEMBER 3. In Circuit Court, Harrison v. Hart et al. is submitted to Judge William Thomas of First Judicial District, by agreement. Logan and Baker represent complainant, Lincoln and Campbell defendants. In Spear v. Newton, court orders auditor to pay complainant, Lincoln's client, $820.39 and defendant $350. Record. No roll calls are taken, so it is not known if Lincoln attends legislature, where he is appointed to special committee with GiIlespie and Bissell to negotiate loan from state bank to pay interest due Jan. 1, 1841. Quincy Whig, Dec. 19.

DECEMBER 4. Norman H. Purple of Peoria petitions House, claiming seat of William J. Phelps. Lincoln moves that House take up petition at once, arguing that party feeling would be augmented by delay. He proposes that governor be authorized to issue "interest bonds" to defray interest on state debt. House Journal; The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 214-17. Stuart & Lincoln buy $30.50 worth of merchandise. Irwin Ledger.

DECEMBER 5. Whigs, eager for party reasons to prevent sine die adjournment of House, absent themselves so there will be no quorum. Lincoln, GiIlespie, and Gridley are present as observers. Over-confident, they vote on roll call. When quorum is announced they are taken by surprise, lose their heads in excitement and jump out window — all to no avail. House Journal; Sparta Democrat, Dec. 18, 25; Register, Dec. 11.

DECEMBER 7. House assembles in new state house to begin regular session of Twelfth General Assembly. Lincoln opposes placing unfinished business of last session in same order in present session. He introduces bill to provide for payment of interest on state debt, and on his motion, bill of Peck of Cook for that purpose is read second time by title. House Journal.

DECEMBER 8. On Lincoln's motion, rules are suspended and his bill to provide payment of interest on public debt is taken up. Motion to refer bill to Committee on Banks fails. He and Trumbull then add amendments designed to give fund commissioner power to hypothecate state bonds to pay interest due and cost of suits brought by state. Ibid.

149

DECEMBER 9. Act to vacate plat of town of Livingston is on Lincoln's motion referred to select committee composed of Lincoln, Gridley of McLean, and Menard of Tazewell. Ibid.

DECEMBER 10. Lincoln's and Trumbull's amendments to bill providing for payment of interest on public debt, introduced Tuesday, are taken up and passed. Hicks of Jefferson brings in bill for similar act, which, on Lincoln's motion, is referred to committee on Finance. Ibid. [Fashionable ball is held at American House.]

DECEMBER 11. Internal improvement interest bill is taken up. Amendment by Kitchell of Montgomery provides that no interest be paid on bonds sold in violation of law is voted on and passed 41-40. Lincoln votes nay. Ibid.

DECEMBER 12. Amendment of Cavarly of Greene to bill giving fund commissioner power to hypothecate bonds to pay interest due on internal improvement debt is lost 41-47, Lincoln voting yea. He reports from committee "act to vacate the town plat of the town of Livingston." Ibid.

DECEMBER 14. Bill authorizing circuit judges to appoint and remove clerks is refused second reading, Lincoln voting nay. He votes against engrossing for third reading bill of Hicks of Jefferson to provide for payment of internal improvement debt interest. Ibid. Stuart & Lincoln buys $32.06 in merchandise. Irwin Ledger.

DECEMBER 15. Lincoln votes against resolution authorizing governor to appoint three suitable persons to investigate canal commissioners. Senate bill authorizing $300,000 in bonds to be hypothecated to pay interest on internal improvement debt passes House. Lincoln votes for it. House Journal. Stuart & Lincoln deposits $59 from Jacob Forsythe & Co. Irwin Ledger.

DECEMBER 16. Resolution of Hardin of Morgan County to have citizens vote for or against constitutional convention at next General Assembly election is tabled. Lincoln votes with majority. Samuel McRoberts, Democrat, is elected to U.S. Senate over Cyrus Edwards, Whig, 77 to 50. Lincoln votes for Edwards. House Journal.

DECEMBER 17. Lincoln attends legislature. He writes to Stuart about yesterday's senatorial election, and about applicants for offices at Stuart's disposal. "This affair of appointment to office is very annoying — more so to you than to me, doubtless. I am, as you know, opposed to removals to make places for our friends." Ibid.; The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 221.

DECEMBER 18. Senate and House meet to elect attorney general. Josiah Lamborn, Democrat, is elected, 75 to 45, over David M. Woodson, Whig. Lincoln votes for Woodson. House Journal.

150

DECEMBER 19. Lincoln is appointed chairman of select committee to consider his resolution to inquire into expenditure for public printing. He votes for amendment requiring school commissioners to .keep offices at county seats. His motion to table amendment of Murphy of Cook for state-wide prohibition is adopted 75 to 8. Ibid.

DECEMBER 21. Motion of Hardin of Morgan to seat William J. Phelps as representative from Peoria is adopted, 48-33, Lincoln voting aye. He opposes bill for relief of William Dormandy. He points out that Dormandy has twice brought charred notes to state bank and has been refused payment and that refusal has been upheld by court decision. Ibid.

DECEMBER 22. Lincoln and Strong, attorneys for appellants, file record and assignment of errors in Supreme Court case Elkin et al. v. People ex rel., suit on sherrif's bond from Sangamon CountV. Logan, for appellee, joins in error. Record.

DECEMBER 23. [House of Representatives meets only in morning and no roll calls are taken so it is not certain that Lincoln attends. House Journal.]

DECEMBER 25. [A. Bielaski opens school on third floor of Delany's brick building to give instructions in "Broadsword, Bayonet and Lance. . . . Instructions at all hours of the day." It has been conjectured that Lincoln may have taken broadsword lessons, and therefore chose this weapon in "duel" with Shields in fall of 1842. Springfield Courier, Dec. 25. Bielaski was an engineer employed in railroad surveying.]

DECEMBER 26. [House of Representatives meets without quorum and adjourns.]

DECEMBER 28. [No roll call is taken in House of Representatives, so it is not possible to tell whether Lincoln attends.]

DECEMBER 29. Lincoln introduces bills to establish ferry across Illinois River, and for relief of creditors of late William Wernwag, who had contract to build bridge across Sangamon River and was heavily in debt at his death. House Journal.

DECEMBER 30. Lincoln votes aye on resolution instructing Committee on Education to report bill distributing state school fund among counties in proportion to white inhabitants under 20 years of age. He votes nay on resolutions instructing Illinois delegation to prevent repeal of Independent Treasury law and reestablishment of national bank. Ibid.

DECEMBER 31. Combination bill calling for repeal of appropriation for library of legislature and Supreme Court, and repealing premium on wolf

151

scalps, " subjected to legislative maneuvers. Second section is finally stricken out, 53 ayes to 25 nays, Lincoln voting aye. Five thousand dollars is later voted library. Ibid.

1841

JANUARY 1. Springfield. On this "fatal first of Jan. 41," Lincoln passes through an emotional crisis, the exact nature of which is unknown. One story is that he failed to appear at his own wedding; but more probably he broke his engagement with Mary Todd. Whatever the occurrence, result was acute mental anguish. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 282.

JANUARY 2. On four votes taken on bill to regulate tavern and grocery licenses, Lincoln does not vote, his only activity being two votes for adjournment. House Journal.

JANUARY 4. [Lincoln's name does not appear on eight votes. Ibid.]

JANUARY 5. Act incorporating town of Galesburg in Knox County is passed, 52-31, Lincoln voting aye. His name does not appear on three afternoon roll calls. Ibid. Lincoln writes and files bill for divorce of Ann McDaniel v. Patrick McDaniel in Sangamon Circuit Court, signing "Logan & Lincoln for Complainant." Photo.

JANUARY 6. Act providing for safekeeping and delivery of public money is read third time and rejected 41-41, Lincoln voting nay. House Journal.

JANUARY 7. Hardin moves to take up circuit court bill laid on table yesterday. Motion is agreed to 43-40, Lincoln voting aye. Ibid.

JANUARY 8. To celebrate Jackson's victory at New Orleans, House dispenses with rules, 63-19, Lincoln voting aye; and aye on vote of respect to Jackson's memory. On resolution that military fame of Andrew Jackson has been rivalled by his equally successful and distinguished services to nation as statesman and benefactor, Lincoln casts negative vote. Ibid.

JANUARY 9. Lincoln votes with majority to table resolution to instruct Judiciary Committee to inquire into expediency of reporting stay law bill, to stay proceedings on judgments and executions. Ibid.

JANUARY 11. Lincoln opposes investigation of accounts of late Board of Public Works. Ibid.

JANUARY 12. Lincoln answers two of four roll calls. Ibid.

152

JANUARY 13. Lincoln is absent from legislature because of illness. His name does not appear on roll call from Jan. 13 to 19.

JANUARY 18. Lincoln is still absent from legislature. His condition is suggested by correspondent of John J. Hardin: "We have been very much distressed, on Mr. Lincoln's account; hearing he had two Cat fits, and a Duck fit since we left. Is it true? Do let me hear soon." Chicago Historical Society, Chicago, Illinois — Hardin MSS. Martin McKee to Hardin, Jan. 22 [cited as John J. Hardin Papers, Chicago Historical Society, Chicago, Illinois].

JANUARY 19. Lincoln attends legislature for at least part of day, but he "is reduced and emanciated in appearance and seems scarcely to possess strength enough to speak above a whisper. His case at present is truly deplorable but what prospect there may be for ultimate relief I cannot pretend to say." Carl Sandburg and Paul M. Angle, Mary Lincoln, 179.

JANUARY 20. In letter to John T. Stuart in Congress, Lincoln writes urging appointment of Dr. A. G. Henry as Springfield postmaster. "I have, within the last few days, been making a most discreditable exhibition of myself in the way of hypochondriasm and thereby got an impression that Dr. Henry is necessary to my existence." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 228.

JANUARY 21. Long fight to change Supreme Court from Whig to Democratic begins. Lincoln opposes addition of five new judges. Senate bill to increase payment of bounty on wolf scalps is postponed indefinitely, Lincoln voting aye. House Journal.

JANUARY 22. Lincoln votes on morning roll call. In evening he attends meeting of friends at Butler's where he submits question of Stuart's re-election to Congress and finds all in favor. Ibid.; The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 229.

JANUARY 23. Lincoln writes Stuart that he is now "the most miserable man living. If what I feel were equally distributed to the whole human family, there would not be one cheerful face on the earth." He is considering change in his law partnership from Stuart to Logan and possibility of federal appointment. "If I could be myself, I would rather remain at home with Judge Logan." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 229-30.

JANUARY 25. House some days ago amended Senate reapportionment bill. Trumbull moves that House recede from its amendments; motion is lost, 32-54, Lincoln voting nay. House Journal.

JANUARY 26. House devotes most of morning to resolutions, amendments, and roll calls on ways and means of collecting third installment [$16,666.66] due state from Springfield citizens on $50,000 pledge toward erection of state house. Lincoln favors payment. Ibid. Lincoln writes

153

and signs declaration in Rowland, Smith & Co. v. Francis et al. Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

JANUARY 27. On Lincoln's motion, Senate bill for "act making an appropriation for work done on the State House," is read third time and passed. He introduces bill for "act authorizing certain debtors of the State to discharge their indebtedness in Illinois Internal Improvement scrip." Under this bill, passed later in session, Springfield pays debt. Lincoln speaks in favor of Hardin's resolution of Jan. 26 that House adjourn sine die Feb. 22. House Journal.

JANUARY 28. Lincoln votes for amendment to act relative to payment of auditor's warrants, and later against passage of bill. He opposes amendment to move adjournment date from Feb. 22 to Mar. 1. Ibid.

JANUARY 29. Lincoln presents petition of Sangamon citizens to authorize Richard C. Norred to erect milldam across Sangamon River. On his motion it is referred to select committee of which he is appointed chairman and Francis of Sangamon and White of Logan members. On two roll calls he opposes bill reorganizing judiciary. Ibid.

JANUARY 30. Lincoln favors act granting timber belonging to internal improvement system to county of Vermilion for building bridge on abutments erected for Northern Cross Railroad over Big Vermilion River at Danville. Bill is tabled. Ibid.

FEBRUARY 1. Lincoln votes nay on three amendments to act to establish ferry at Peoria. He reports from Committee on Finance and recommends passage of bill authorizing certain debtors to discharge indebtedness in internal improvement scrip. Bill reorganizing judiciary is passed, 45-43, Lincoln voting nay. Ibid.

FEBRUARY 2. Lincoln votes in favor of reducing size of future counties from 400 to 325 square miles. Ibid. In Supreme Court, Lincoln and Strong for appellant and Logan for appellee argue Elkin et al. v. People ex rel. (Judgment of Sangamon Circuit Court affirmed Jan. 12, 1842.) Record.Lincoln writes and signs praecipe, bond for costs, and declaration in Sangamon County Court case, Neff, Wanton & Co. v. Francis. Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

FEBRUARY 3. Lincoln's name appears on two of three roll calls. House Journal. In Supreme Court, Nichols v. Rickels, appeal from Sangamon, is argued by Logan and Lincoln for defendant. (On Jan. 26, 1842, judgment of lower court is affirmed with costs.) Record. Lincoln writes Stuart on Politics. He says he is "neither dead, nor quite crazy yet." Springfield is talking "the same everlasting subject — that of filling offices." He denounces Judiciary bill. National Archives, Washington, D.C. — Unpublished letter.

154

FEBRUARY 4. Lincoln introduces bill to supplement Springfield and Alton Turnpike Co. charter. On his motion, bill is referred to Committee on Internal Improvements. Act creating board of auditors to settle accounts of contractors on public works is passed, Lincoln voting aye. House Journal. Lincoln writes praecipe and declaration in Brown v. Thomas and Crowder, assumpsit suit. Photo.

FEBRUARY 5. Lincoln writes Stuart suggesting E. B. Webb for district attorney. "I really have my heart set upon Webb's appointment . . .; the whole party would be gratified with it." He informs Stuart of talk among Democrats of altering congressional district. In legislature, he presents remonstrance against Sangamon milldam. House Journal; The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 233.

FEBRUARY 6. Democrats table Whig resolution designed to suspend judiciary bill. Vote is 45-35, Lincoln voting nay. He votes in favor of allowing fund commissioners to give state bonds for internal improvement and canal scrip, where holders desire it. House Journal.

FEBRUARY 8. On Lincoln's motion. House resolves itself into Committee of the Whole to consider committee reports on public lands. Lincoln writes circular for Whig committee protesting judiciary act. Signers are S. H. Little, E. D. Baker, J. J. Hardin, E. B. Webb, J. GiIlespie, and Lincoln. Ibid.; The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 234-37.

FEBRUARY 9. Lincoln from select committee reports with amendments bill providing for election of public binder. Ross of Fulton from select committee reports act to divide money between counties of Cass, Menard, and Sangamon, with amendments. On Lincoln's motion, consideration is indefinitely postponed. House Journal.

FEBRUARY 10. Bill authorizing debtors to discharge indebtedness in Illinois internal improvement scrip is passed 57-33, Lincoln voting aye. His name appears on seven roll calls resulting from moves of Whig members to forestall passage of new judiciary bill, council of revision having vetoed act. Bill finally passes 46-43. Ibid.

FEBRUARY 11. Lincoln's name appears on nine roll calls. Ibid.

FEBRUARY 12. Senate resolution providing five additional Supreme Court judges is amended to provide also for president, acting commissioner, and treasurer of canal board. Lincoln votes aye on amendment. Whig bill to suspend judiciary act is referred to Committee on Finance. Ibid.

FEBRUARY 13. Amendment to election bill providing secret ballot is lost, Lincoln voting against it. House adopts Senate resolution favoring one term for President. Whigs vote against this move aimed at William Henry Harrison. Ibid.

155

FEBRUARY 15. Lincoln reports from Committee on Finance, with amendments, act supplemental to charter of Springfield and Alton Turnpike Co. On his motion, bill is tabled. Act for debtor relief is refused second reading, Lincoln voting nay. Ibid.

FEBRUARY 16. Senate bill for act regulating sale of property is referred to select committee of which Lincoln is member. House resolves itself into Committee of the Whole on apportionment bill. After various proposed amendments and parliamentary moves, bill is ordered engrossed, Lincoln voting nay. Ibid.

FEBRUARY 17. On Lincoln's motion, Springfield and Alton Turnpike Co. bill is taken from table and placed in orders of day. He moves to amend Springfield charter to allow all entitled to vote for state officers to hold office. Ibid.

FEBRUARY 18. Lincoln votes to reduce attorney general's salary from $1,500 to $1,000 but opposes similar move in respect to members of Supreme Court. I. N. Morris is elected president of board of canal commissioners. Lincoln votes for W. F. Thornton. He votes for Jacob Fry, who is elected acting commissioner of canal board. Ibid.

FEBRUARY 19. Lincoln votes for Hardin of Morgan's amendment to Cass County boundary bill. He opposes move to extend Menard County boundaries. Ibid.

FEBRUARY 20. Apportionment bill passes House 46-37, Lincoln voting aye. He is put on committee to report on payment of interest on state debt, disposition of internal improvements, and canal. Ibid.

FEBRUARY 22. On question of printing 500 copies of report on Bank of Illinois, Lincoln votes nay. He votes with majority to construct railroad from LaSalle to Dixon and to charter Illinois and Rock River Railroad Co. to construct road. Ibid.

FEBRUARY 23. Lincoln opposes all moves against Bank of Illinois. Motion by Trumbull of St. Clair to repeal bank's charter fails, 31-42. Bill providing for canal loan is refused second reading 34-36, Lincoln voting aye. Ibid.

FEBRUARY 24. Morning is devoted to consideration of state bank bill. Lincoln defends bank. In evening session he introduces amendment to bill for payment of interest on public debt, which is adopted. Attempt to stop internal improvements is opposed by Lincoln and other Whigs. Ibid.; The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 242.

FEBRUARY 25. On motion of Lincoln, bill supplemental to charter of Springfield and Alton Turnpike Co. is taken up and ordered engrossed.

156

He takes active part in bank bill discussion. It finally passes, 43 ayes and 38 nays, Lincoln voting nay. House Journal.

FEBRUARY 26. Petition of John Stuart presented by Lincoln is referred to select committee of Lincoln, Woodson of Greene, and Threlkeld of Coles. When Wickliffe Kitchell of Montgomery opposes Lincoln's canal bill amendment, Lincoln tells story of man who kept firing at squirrel in tree that turned out to be a louse on his eyebrow. Lincoln and 34 other House Whigs sign protest against judiciary reorganization. Ibid.; The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 243-49.

FEBRUARY 27. Bill for completion of Illinois and Michigan Canal passes 37-33, Lincoln voting aye. Speaker appoints standing committee on unfinished business composed of Lincoln, Leary of Cook, and Woodson of Greene. Lincoln votes to memoralize Congress to continue Cumberland Road to Mississippi. House Journal. At Robert Irwin & Co., bank and general store, account of Stuart & Lincoln is deactivated, and Lincoln opens personal account, which shows balance of $32.50 credit. Irwin Ledger.

MARCH 1. [Legislature adjourns without roll call. Supreme Court closes winter term. Court did not sit from Feb. 11 to 22 because of reorganization bill.]

MARCH 3. Lincoln as attorney for Jesse K. Dubois of Lawrenceville deeds to Virgil Hickox lot No. 13 in block 15 in Elijah Iles addition to Springfield, for $100. Deed Record, Book R. In Woods, Stacker & Co. v. Taylor, Sangamon County Court case, Lincoln writes praecipe, bond for costs, and fills in narration form, signing "Logan & Lincoln." Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

MARCH 4. Lincoln does preliminary paper work on three Sangamon Circuit Court cases (as on Mar. 3): Chamberlin v. Allen and Stone; Maxwell v. Allen and Stone; Stafford v. Whitney and Whitney. Ibid.

MARCH 5. Lincoln writes narration and praecipe in Neff, Wanton & Co. v. Allen and Stone, signing "Logan & Lincoln." He also writes bond for costs, and S. T. Logan signs. Ibid. [John T. Stuart writes to Daniel Webster, secretary of state, recommending Lincoln to be charge d'affaires at Bogota. "Stuart was evidently trying to secure a change of climate for his law partner, Lincoln, who, after the fiasco of his broken-off marriage to Mary Todd was in a mood of profound depression." C. M. Fuess, Daniel Webster, II, 94.]

MARCH 6. Lincoln completes petition for partition in Burns et al. v. Ford et al. Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

MARCH 7. [Conkling in letter to Mercy Levering says: "And L. (Lincoln) poor, hapless, simple swain who loved most true but was not loved again — I suppose he will now endeavor to drown his cares among the intricacies and perplexities of the law. No more will the merry peal of laughter ascend

157

high in the air, to greet his listening and delighted ears." Sandburg and Angle, 180.]

MARCH 8. Lincoln writes and files, for complainant, bill for divorce and summons in Mary Shelby v. Mark Shelby, Sangamon Circuit Court. Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

MARCH 9. Lincoln writes and files bill in chancery case of William B. Crane v. Samuel Grubb in Sangamon Circuit Court (separate case from that of Nov. 26, 1840). Henry E. Huntington Library, San Marino, California. — Original. He writes narration in Wilkinson v. Taylor, Breese & Co., adds two amendments, and signs "Logan & Lincoln." Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

MARCH 10. Lincoln writes narration, and signs "Logan & Lincoln," in another Sangamon Circuit Court case. Van Bergen v. Ball and Long. Ibid.

MARCH 23. Sangamon County Circuit Court opens two-week term. In Throckmorton and Everett v. Francis et al., Stuart & Lincoln obtain $674 debt and damages for plaintiff. Lincoln dismisses at plaintiff's cost Bell & Co. v. Mitchell. Webb v. Parrin is dismissed at defendant's cost. Logan & Lincoln for plaintiff appear for first time together. Record. Lincoln annotates papers in Van Bergen v. Ball and Long (collecting on promissory note of Mar. 16, 1833 for $26). Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

MARCH 24. In People v. Johnson and Johnson, damage suit for obstructing water course, jury brings in verdict of not guilty. Logan & Lincoln appear for defendant. Lincoln appears for appellee in Parsons v. Duncan. Case is tried, and lower court judgment affirmed for $3.64. Record.

MARCH 25. Lincoln represents plaintiff in two assumpsit suits. In Brown v. Thomas and Crowder, and Neff, Wanton & Co. v. Francis, defendants default and damages of $335.95 and $397.44 are awarded. Allen v. Lindsay et al. is dismissed by agreement, which Lincoln writes, acting for plaintiff. Ibid.; Photo.

MARCH 26. Lincoln has ten cases in Circuit Court. Fellows v. Allen, Stafford v. Whitney et al., and Rowland, Smith & Co. v. Francis et al., he wins by default. Logan & Lincoln also get three judgments by default. Maxwell v. Allen and Stone, and Neff, Wanton & Co. v. Allen & Stone are dismissed at defendant's cost, Logan & Lincoln for plaintiffs. Record. Lincoln writes and revises declaration in Fellows v. Allen and Stone, and two papers (joinder in demurrer and joinder in plea) in Wilkinson v. Taylor. Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

MARCH 29. Lincoln has seven cases in Circuit Court. In May v. Van Bergen he obtains leave to amend declaration. Three jury trials are won

158

by Logan & Lincoln in Hay v. Hickox, Hill v. Rague, and Ransdell v. Mills. In Woods, Stacker & Co. v. Taylor, tried by court, they get judgment for $272.01 and costs. In two chancery cases, Lincoln gets order to partition land in one case, and day of sale appointed in other. Record. He writes court order in Hay v. Bryan, and writes affidavit of Sarah Brown, guardian, explaining why she failed to sell property as ordered by court. Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

APRIL 1. Capps v. Moore, Spear v. Newton, and Whaley v. heirs of McElyea are continued. On Lincoln's motion. Diamond v. Wiles heirs is stricken from docket. In Fowler v. Kirkpatrick, defendant's motion to dissolve injunction is sustained. Stuart & Lincoln are for plaintiff. Record.

APRIL 2. Edmunds v. Simpson et al., trespass case in which Lincoln represents plaintiff, is continued. Logan & Lincoln get judgment by default in Chamberlin v. Allen and Stone. Defendant in Hornsby v. Radford is ordered to deliver possession of real estate in Springfield to Lincoln's client by Apr. 18, or attachment for contempt of court will be issued. Ibid. Lincoln writes and swears Joseph Hornsby's affidavit in Hornsby v. Ragsdale et al., and writes James Baker's affidavit in Baker v. Addington et al., Christian County case. Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

APRIL 3. On last day of term Lincoln appears with Scammon and Logan for plaintiff in Funk et al. v. Taylor, impleaded with Breese and Vance, action in debt. Court awards plaintiff $800. In Crane v. Grubb, chancery case, Lincoln represents complainant and Shields defendant. Crane is awarded lien on land involved. He gets judgment for $584.38 for complainant in Wright v. Hewett and Baker, and writes court decree. He buys $1 worth of merchandise at Robert Irwin's store. Record; Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.; Irwin Ledger.

APRIL 4. [President William H. Harrison dies in Washington. This ends Lincoln's chance to be appointed charge at Bogota, or to any other federal post, for new President is John Tyler of Virginia, anti-Jackson Democrat.]

APRIL 6. Lincoln writes narration and praecipe in Edmunds v. Simpson et al. Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

APRIL 14. [Herndon, in his Life of Lincoln, 209, says Stuart & Lincoln, formed in April, 1837, is dissolved by mutual consent. Partnership with Stephen T. Logan is said to have begun today, although Logan and Lincoln have been trying cases together for weeks.]

APRIL 15. [Tazewell County Circuit Court opens at Tremont, and remains in session until Apr. 23.]

APRIL 16. Tremont. Kellogg v. Grain, action in debt, reinstated Sept. 30, 1840, comes up for trial. Jury is called and then dismissed, and case is tried

159

by court. Court awards plaintiff, Lincoln's client, $16,000 debt and $58.02 damages, largest judgment obtained by Lincoln to this date. Record.

APRIL 21. Field v. Averill and Lowell, assumpsit to collect $300 on note and $500 damages, Holmes and Edward Jones for plaintiff, Lincoln for defendants, is argued. Plaintiff files demurrer to defendants' plea, demurrer is sustained, and Lincoln wins agreement for continuance. Ibid.

APRIL 26. [McLean County Circuit Court opens its spring term, which closes May 1.]

APRIL 27. Bloomington. Lincoln, for defendant indicted Oct. 6, 1840 for assault with intent to kill, files demurrer in People v. William Rhodes. Demurrer is sustained, and his client goes free. Ibid.

APRIL 28. Lincoln collects $25 from Ebenezer Rhodes, and gives receipt for "full of our fee. . . . People against William Rhodes. Logan & Lincoln."Photo.

MAY 1. Springfield. Lincoln deposits $25, received from A. Mills, probably his fee in Ransdell v. Mills, in his bank account. Irwin Ledger. [Piatt County Circuit Court holds its first session. Judge Treat presiding, at Monticello. Record.]

MAY 3. [Livingston County Circuit Court opens two-day term at Pontiac.]

MAY 6. [DeWitt County Circuit Court convenes for three-day term at Clinton.]

MAY 7. Clinton. Lincoln writes affidavit of Samuel Bevans, witness in Maxwell v. Harrold. Record. [Sangamo Journal carries Stuart & Lincoln "card" for last time.]

MAY 10. [Champaign Circuit Court convenes for three-day term at Urbana.]

MAY 12. Urbana. In Max et al. v. Lyons, Lincoln writes answer of James H. Lyons to plaintiffs' bill. Photo.

MAY 14. [First announcement of partnership of Logan & Lincoln appears in Sangamo Journal. Office is located "opposite Hoffman's Row," in which Stuart & Lincoln had office.]

MAY 17. Danville. Lincoln, for plaintiff in Fithian v. Cunningham, rooves defendant plead case following afternoon. So ordered. Record.

MAY 18. In Wilson v. Frazier, sheriff, Lincoln and Brown are for defendant. Case is continued; Brown moves plaintiff give bond. Ibid.

160

MAY 19. Lincoln writes and files plaintiffs demurrer in Fithian v. Cunningham. Photo.

MAY 20. Lincoln's demurrer in Fithian v. Cunningham is argued and sustained by court; court finds for his client, who is ordered to be paid $504.97, plus interest ($2,050) and costs. Defendant, granted appeal to Supreme Court, files bond. Record.

MAY 23. Danville and Charleston? Lincoln probably makes two-day journey from Danville to Charleston during this week end to attend opening of six-day term of Coles Circuit Court on Monday morning.

MAY 24. Charleston. Lincoln, acting with Ficklin in Aertson v. Ashmore and Ashmore, writes declaration. Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

MAY 26. Lincoln writes affidavit for defendant in Vest v. Williams. Ibid.

MAY 28. In Vest v. Williams, trespass, jury is called and plaintiff drops case. Lincoln appears for defendant. Record. He writes and signs pleas in Moore v. White, and writes defendant's affidavit in Ewing v. Goodman. Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

MAY 29. Ewing v. Goodman, trespass, assault, and battery, is called; attorneys agree to continuance and plaintiff is ruled to give security. Lincoln appears for defendant. He acts for plaintiff in Aertson v. Ashmore and Ashmore. Record.

JUNE 1. Taylorville? Lincoln writes answer to bill, and James Conkling, guardian in case of Baker v. Addington et al., signs. Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

JUNE 2. Springfield. Lincoln buys merchandise worth $27.50. Irwin Ledger.

JUNE 3. Lincoln endorses application of deputy surveyor of Sangamon County for position under Dr. Silas Reed, surveyor general of Illinois and Missouri. On bottom of letter of recommendation from John T. Stuart, he writes: "I most cheerfully endorse the foregoing recommendations of Col. Neale." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 252-53.

JUNE 4. Lincoln writes Col. W. H. Davidson of Carmi that he has written to President Tyier in behalf of Col. Servant, "saying all for the Col: that I could say for the best man on earth." [He is recommending Richard B. Servant of Chester, Ill., with whom he served six years in legislature; Servant appointed receiver of Kaskaskia land office in 1843.] The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 253.

JUNE 7. [U.S. Circuit Court convenes in Springfield with 200 cases on calendar. Sometime during this term Lincoln appears for plaintiff in Lincoln v. Tower, action of debt on judgment obtained in Massachusetts.

161

Edwards and Hall appear for defendant. Lincoln wins case. 2 McLean, 473. Christian County Circuit Court commences two-day term at Taylorville.]

JUNE 8. Taylorville. On motion of Lincoln, solicitor for complainant, Baker v. Addington et al. is continued with leave to commissioner to execute decree of last term. Record. He writes pleas and replication in Northcott v. White, acting with May for defendant. Photo.

JUNE 10. [Logan County Circuit Court convenes at Postville.]

JUNE 12. Springfield. Lincoln takes four notes from Josiah Francis of Athens in settlement of two judgments against Francis in court of Thomas Moffett, Sangamon County justice of peace. [See also Nov. 17, 1845.] The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 254.

JUNE 14. Petersburg. Menard Circuit Court opens two-day term. Waggoner et al. v. Eastep is continued on motion of Lincoln, solicitor for complainant. In Allen v. Patterson, defendant defaults and judgment for $328.34 is awarded plaintiff, client of Logan & Lincoln. Record.

JUNE 15. In Potter v. Bell, jury fails to agree. Urquhart and Rutledge represent plaintiff, Lincoln and Bachman defendant. Hawks v. Bell is tried by court on agreement of both parties. Defendant's attorneys, Lincoln and Bachman, move court to dismiss suit for want of jurisdiction in lower court. Court takes case under advisement. Ibid.

JUNE 16. Springfield. Lincoln returns to find Springfield wildly hunting for body of Archibald Fisher, who came to town May 31 with William and Henry Trailer, but disappeared, believed murdered by William, Henry, and Archibald Trailer. Hickox's milldam on Spring Creek was torn down on the 14th and thorough but fruitless search made in brush along creek. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 254-55.

JUNE 17. [Mary Todd writes her friend Mercy Levering that Lincoln deems me unworthy of notice, as I have not met him in the gay world for months. . . . I would that the case were different, that he would once more resume his station in Society." Sandburg and Angle, 184.]

JUNE 18. Lincoln, Logan, and Baker defend William Trailer of murdering Archibald Fisher. Case is heard in justice of peace court, and much disgust is shown by crowd when it turns out Fisher is alive. This climaxes week of search for Fisher's body in Spring Creek territory. One spectator said "it was too damned bad, to have so much trouble, and no hanging after all." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 254-58. Lincoln writes petition in Hart v. Carman et al., unpaid note suit, Logan & Lincoln for plaintiff. Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

162

JUNE 19. Lincoln writes to Joshua F. Speed on Trailer "murder" trial. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 254-58.

JUNE 20. Lincoln completes and mails letter to Speed. "I commenced this letter on yesterday, since which I received yours of the 13th. I stick to my promise to come to Louisville. Nothing new here except what I have written. I have not seen Sarah [Rickard] since my long trip, and I am going out there as soon as I mail this letter. Yours forever" Ibid.

JUNE 21. Lincoln reduces his bank balance 75˘ for "merchandise" at Irwin's store. Irwin Ledger.

JUNE 22. Lincoln writes bill in chancery for estate partition, in Preston and Preston v. Hussey & Hussey. Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. [Citizens of Springfield hold meeting and express to Archibald Trailer apologies and regrets for believing him involved in Archibald Fisher's suspected murder. Register, June 25.]

JUNE 24. Lincoln annotates papers in Waggoner and Waggoner v. Porter, Sangamon County Court case. Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

JUNE 25. Lincoln and Benjamin S. Edwards examine papers and listen to oral testimony of Harry Wilton, late U.S. marshal for Illinois, charged with using his office for political effect in taking 1840 census. Statement signed by both men shows that 54 of 76 appointments were Democrats, but they draw no conclusions from evidence. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 258-59. Lincoln and Edwards are praised by Springfield's Democratic paper for being "able and willing to do justice to a political opponent when wronged." Register, July 16.

JUNE 28. Lincoln writes and signs declaration in Hay v. Bryan. Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

JUNE 29. Lincoln writes foreclosure bill in chancery in Rogers v. J. Francis et al. Ibid.

JUNE 30. Lincoln writes and signs declaration and praecipe in West and Taylor v. Doolittle. Ibid.

JULY 3. Lincoln writes and signs declaration and praecipe in West and Taylor v. Sharp and Anderson. Ibid.

JULY 5. [Illinois Supreme Court opens summer term, which closes July 24th.]

JULY 6. Lincoln writes petition in Opdycke v. Durham and Francis, debt case, Sangamon Circuit Court. Ibid.

163

JULY 7. Lincoln and Urquhart appear in Supreme Court for plaintiff in error in England v. Clark, assumpsit action from Menard County. Lincoln writes assignment of errors. Urquhart moves that supersedeas be granted, which is allowed following morning. Record. Lincoln writes bill for divorce in Gentry v. Gentry, Sangamon Circuit Court case. Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

JULY 8. Lincoln for plaintiff and Logan for defendant argue Cannan v. Kenney, appeal from Sangamon County, for which Lincoln writes brief. Supreme Court later awards horse worth $65 to Lincoln's client. Lincoln, Lamborn, and Schuyler Strong examine and approve Josiah McRoberts and John H. Murphy as attorneys. Record; Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

JULY 9. Supreme Court orders errors assigned by Monday in Bailey v. Cromwell, appeal from Tazewell County, involving payment of note given by Bailey for slave girl. Lincoln represents Bailey, who argues that there was no proof girl was slave of Cromwell at time of attempted sale. In absence of proof presumption that she was free must prevail. Lincoln writes note for John White and John Constant, who borrow $218.17 from John Richardson. Ibid.

JULY 10. Lincoln appears (SC) for appellee in Maus v. Worthing, appeal from Tazewell County. He moves to dismiss appeal on insufficiency of appeal bond filed in case, and files his reasons. Record. He draws up mortgage for John White, to secure payment of four notes of $250 each due John Constant. Photo.

JULY 12. Lincoln argues his motion to dismiss appeal in Maus v. Worthing. Court takes time to consider. Record.

JULY 13. Supreme Court sustains Lincoln's motion and dismisses Maus v. Worthing appeal. 4 Ill. 26. Court allows supersedeas in England v. Clark. Plaintiff in error is ordered to execute $100 bond with William G. Greene, Levi Summers, and Joseph England as security. In Sangamon County Circuit Court case, Gampbell and Dabney v. Spear, Lincoln files bill of complaint. Record.

JULY 14. Lincoln writes petition in S. T. Logan v. Payne, Sangamon County Circuit Court case, signing his partner's name. Lincoln writes and signs bill in chancery in Barret v. Fulton et al. Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

JULY 16. People ex rel. Duncan v. Compton, sheriff of Coles County, and People ex rel. Duncan v. Thorn, sheriff of Lawrence County, are called by Supreme Court. Logan & Lincoln appear for defendant in first and Lincoln alone in second case. On motion of Brown, attorney for plaintiff, defendants are ruled to return fee bill and executions for costs within 20 days. Record. In Sangamon Circuit Court cases, Lincoln writes agreements between his dient Rhoda Hart and defendants in three cases. Hart v. Penny & Co., Hart,

164

executrix v. McElwain, and Hart v. Harrison and Houghton, dismissing all charges. He writes papers in three other cases: declaration in Simpson v. Stockton; narration in Porter and Durham v. Bradley and Brenholts; bill in chancery in Lewis v. Elkin et al. Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. He buys $1.75 worth of Robert Irwin's merchandise. Irwin Ledger.

JULY 17. Lincoln orders Sheriff Elkin to stay collection of judgment for $196.22 he obtained for plaintiff in Stafford v. Whitney et al. Mar. 26. Sangamon County, Execution Docket D.

JULY 19. Holdrige v. Bailey, appeal from LaSalle County, is continued by consent of parties. Record. [In Illinois Reports, 5, 124-26, Logan alone is listed as attorney for appellant. This is error as Lincoln aided in argument of appellant's case.]

JULY 20. ["Since his return from the circuit," says Alton Telegraph, "Lincoln declines being considered as a candidate for Governor."]

JULY 21. Benjamin F. James is examined by Lincoln and Albert T. Bledsoe for admittance as attorney and counsellor at law. License is granted. Record.

JULY 22. In Maus v. Worthing, Logan moves court for supersedeas, case to stand for argument tomorrow. Ibid.

JULY 23. Logan argues motion for supersedeas in Maus v. Worthing, appeal from Tazewell. Lincoln appears for appellee in this case and in Dow v. Averill and Lowell. Latter case is continued for want of return to summons issued. Bailey v. Cromwell is argued by Lincoln for plaintiff and Logan for defendant. Ibid.

JULY 24. Supersedeas is allowed in Maus v. Worthing. Lincoln enters his appearance for defendant in error and moves court for writ of certiorari. After argument, writ is granted. Ibid.

JULY 26. Lincoln and Campbell represent plaintiff in three cases on opening day of summer term, Sangamon Circuit Court. All three cases, Hart v. McIlvain, Hart v. Penny, and Hart v. Harrison are dismissed at plaintiff's costs. Record. Lincoln writes plea in People v. Nichols and Gilbreath, in which Logan & Lincoln are for defendants. Photo.

JULY 27. Logan and Lincoln have four cases, in all of which they represent plaintiff. On their motion, Allen v. Camp and Chamberlin v. Vaughn are continued. Van Bergen v. Ball & Long, and Peter v. Brinsley et al. they win by default. Record.

JULY 28. In circuit court appeal case of Allen & Co. v. Hunter and Jordan, judgment of lower court is affirmed. Logan & Lincoln represent appellant.

165

They win Hurt v. Carmon, Ruckle & Co., and Hay v. Bryan, when defendants default. Lincoln alone represents plaintiff in Edmonds v. Simpson et al., trespass suit. Jury finds for defendants. Ibid. In Vaughn et al. v. Hill, Lincoln writes Hill's account with plaintiffs, and also notice that account will be used in evidence. In Briggs v. Uhler he writes answer to plea, general replication, and rejoinder. Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

JULY 29. In Circuit Court, Logan & Lincoln, representing plaintiffs, win five suits by default, obtaining total of $965.45 in debt and damages. In Martin v. Tinsley et al. Lincoln writes plea and notice that defendant will try to prove his accounts. Record; Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. Lincoln is invited to address Springfield Mechanics Union in evening though no record of his address can be found. Minutes of Union, July 8.

JULY 30. Logan and Lincoln have four cases in Circuit Court, in each of which they represent plaintiff. Lewis v. Elkin et al. is continued by agreement; Porter and Dunham v. Bradley and Bernholts is dismissed by plaintiff. In Warne v. Thayer et al., bill of discovery is filed by defendants and case continued. Jury awards plaintiff $153.27 in Briggs v. Uhler. Record. Lincoln fills out several printed subpoena forms in Martin v. Tinsley et al. Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

JULY 31. Lincoln is engaged with Logan & Lincoln's paper work. He fills out another subpoena in Martin v. Tinsley et al. He writes plea and agreement on evidence in Mallory v. Elkin, and writes and files supersedeas bond ($100) of George and Joseph England as ordered by Supreme Court July 13, in England v. Clark. Ibid.; Photo. [Sangamon Circuit Court does not meet today or Monday.]

AUGUST 2. Lincoln is 13th voter at poll number one in Springfield precinct. He votes for Stuart for Congress, Samuel Wykoff for county commissioner, Isaac S. Britton for school commissioner, and against formation of new county of Allen out of Macoupin, Morgan, and Sangamon. Election Returns.

AUGUST 3. In Sangamon Circuit Court, May v. Van Bergen is dismissed, each party paying half of costs. Logan v. Whitney is dismissed by agreement at defendant's cost. Jury awards plaintiff $222.50 and damages in Hay v. Bryan in which defendant defaulted July 28. Logan & Lincoln represent plaintiff in all three suits. Record.

AUGUST 4. Circuit Court devotes most of day to Francis and Sandford v. January and Dunlap. Jury is called and case tried by Strong for plaintiff snd Logan & Lincoln for defendant. Jury retires and next morning brings in verdict of $2,556.72 for plaintiff. Lincoln writes answer of Philip S. Kreigh filed in Hay v. Bryan. Photo; Record.

166

AUGUST 5. Lincoln has 18 cases alone and with Logan in Circuit Court. Nine are continued and six dismissed. In McComas v. Baker, Lincoln confesses indebtedness of his friend Edward D. Baker for $158.65. Short and Short v. Blankenship and Miller is won when defendant defaults. Defendant withdraws his demurrer in Wilkinson v. Taylor, assumpsit suit in which Logan & Lincoln appear for plaintiff. Record. Lincoln writes part of W. F. Elkin's report in Wright v. Hewett and Baker. Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

AUGUST 6. In Sangamon Circuit Court, continuance of Burns v. Ford et al. is set aside, and report of commissioner appointed at previous term is approved. Lincoln is for complainant and Shields for defendants. On Lincoln's motion, defendants in Waggoner v. Porter et al. are ruled to file their answer on 30 days and case is continued. Record. Lincoln writes court order in Burns et al. v. Ford et al., and drafts part of jury instructions in Mallory v. Elkin. Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

AUGUST 7. Argument for new trial of Francis and Sandford v. January and Dunlap, decided Aug. 4, is heard in Circuit Court. Court orders Philip S. Kreigh who owes Nicholas Bryan $40.47 to pay this to Nathaniel Hay and to credit Bryan with this amount on $222.50 judgment awarded in Hay v. Bryan Aug. 3. Lincoln writes court decree. Record; Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

AUGUST 9. This is last day of summer term of Circuit Court. New trial is granted in Francis and Sandford v. January and Dunlap. By agreement, Wilkinson v. Taylor is tried by court. Plaintiff, Lincoln's client, is awarded $297.56. By consent of Stuart and Lincoln for plaintiff and Douglas and Campbell for defendant, McNair v. Adams is changed to Cass County Circuit Court. Record.

AUGUST 10. Lincoln makes affidavit to circuit clerk that Alexander Fulton and Hannah Fulton, two defendants in Barret v. Adams et al., reside out of state. He makes similar affidavit in regard to Thomas H. Gentry in divorce suit of Gentry v. Gentry. Photo. He is debited 75˘ for merchandise. Irwin Ledger.

AUGUST 11. Lincoln draws up part of nomination and report of appraisers in Oliver v. Taylor. At spring term of Sangamon Circuit Court he got judgment for plaintiff for $108.90. Town lot involved, block from public square, is valued at $25 front foot. He draws up similar papers in Woods Staker & Co. v. Taylor. Photo.

AUGUST 12. En route to Louisville? [On what date Lincoln starts on his trip to visit Joshua F. Speed at Louisville has not been determined. His business in summer term of Sangamon Circuit Court is complete and he probably sets out at once,]

167

AUGUST 18. Louisville? [If Lincoln left Springfield Aug. 11, he probably arrives in Louisville today.]

AUGUST 25. Louisville. In letter to Speed Jan. (3?) 1842, Lincoln says: "After you and I had once been at her residence, [Speed's fiancee] did you not go and take me all the way to Lexington and back, for no other purpose but to get to see her again?" The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 266. "

AUGUST 30. [At Tremont, Stephen T. Logan files petition in Thorpe v. Hinman and Hinman, and files mortgage deed on which client, Thorpe, seeks to foreclose. Photo.]

SEPTEMBER 6. Louisville. [Some time before he leaves Kentucky, Mrs. Lucy G. Speed presents Lincoln with Oxford Bible. On Oct. 3, 1861, Lincoln sent Mrs. Speed his photograph with inscription: "For Mrs. Lucy G. Speed, from whose pious hand I accepted the present of an Oxford Bible twenty years." Photo.]

SEPTEMBER 7. Louisville. En route to St. Louis. Lincoln and Speed leave Louisville at noon on steamboat Lebanon for St. Louis. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 260.

SEPTEMBER 8. En route. "Nothing of interest happened during the passage," wrote Lincoln, "except the vexatious delays occasioned by the sand bars be thought interesting." He did, however, find interest in a dozen Negroes chained together "like so many fish upon a trot-line." On Aug. 24, 1855 he wrote Joshua F. Speed: "That sight was a continual torment to me; and I see something like it every time I touch the Ohio." Ibid.; The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 320.

SEPTEMBER 11. [Wedding of James C. Conkling to Mercy A. Levering takes place at home of Lawrason Levering. Miss Levering is close friend of Mary Todd, and Conkling and Lincoln are friends. At Rushville, celebrated case of Wright v. Adams is called. Another solicitor acts for Lincoln as case is remanded to Sangamon County, judge of Fifth Judicial Circuit having been counsel in case. Record.]

SEPTEMBER 13. On steamboat Lebanon and St. Louis. In his letter to Mary Speed Sept. 27 Lincoln writes: "reached St. Louis the next monday at 8 P.M." Missouri Republican, Sept. 14; The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 260.

SEPTEMBER 14. [En route to Springfield. Two-day stage journey took Passengers from St. Louis to Springfield. Fall courts opened at Tremont "Sept. 16. It is assumed that Lincoln was anxious to attend Tazewell Court where he had a good practice and therefore came to Springfield by stage rather than by boat up Illinois River.]

SEPTEMBER 15. [Stage probably arrives late in afternoon.]

168

SEPTEMBER 16. Springfield. In letter to Mary Speed Sept. 27, Lincoln says: "When we reached Springfield, I staid but one day when I started on this tedious circuit where I now am." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 260.

SEPTEMBER 17. En route to Tremont. Journey from Springfield to Tremont requires day. Court opened yesterday for six-day term. [In Field v. Averill and Lowell, court awards plaintiff $364.50 and costs by default when Lincoln does not appear to defend. Record.]

SEPTEMBER 18. Tremont. "Do you remember," he writes Mary Speed Sept. 27th, "my going to the city while I was in Kentucky, to have a tooth extracted, and making a failure of it? Well, that same old tooth got to paining me so much, that about a week since I had it torn out, bringing with it a bit of the jaw-bone; . . . my mouth is now so sore that I can neither talk, nor eat." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 260-61.

SEPTEMBER 20. In Thorp v. Bole and Hinman, defendant enters motion to quash sheriff's return. It is sustained by court and case continued. Thorp v. Bole et al. is continued. In both cases Logan & Lincoln represent plaintiff and Jones and James defendants. Record. Lincoln writes answer of Gideon Hawley in Mather v. Hawley et al. Photo.

SEPTEMBER 21. Lincoln writes and files amendments in Chipman v. Higgins, chancery case. Photo.

SEPTEMBER 22. Lincoln draws up and files plaintiff's demurrer to defendant's pleas in Perkins v. Hall. He signs name of Jesse B. Thomas to demurrer as attorney for defendant. He writes amendment to bill in Wilson v. Alexander. Photo.

SEPTEMBER 23. Lincoln delivers and files special plea to set aside default (Sept. 17) in Field v. Averill and Lowell. Judgment is sustained and defendants allowed appeal. Record. [Woodford Circuit Court holds first session at VersaiIles. Logan & Lincoln are represented by Logan, while Lincoln apparently goes to Clinton, arriving in time to file bill in chancery (real estate) in Peter v. Martin et al. Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.]

SEPTEMBER 24. [Sunderland v. Piggott in Woodford Circuit Court is dismissed for want of jurisdiction in court below. Lincoln (in absentia) and Jones are for plaintiff and Thomas for defendant. Record.]

SEPTEMBER 26. En route to Bloomington.

SEPTEMBER 27. Bloomington. Lincoln writes Mary Speed long letter giving account of what has happened since he left Louisville Sept. 7. "Tell your mother that I have not got her ‘present’ [Oxford Bible] with me; but that I intend to read it regularly when I return home. . . . I shall be verry

169

happy to receive a line from you, . . . address it to Charleston, Coles Co. Ills as I shall be there about the time to receive it." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 259-61

SEPTEMBER 8. [McLean County Circuit Court opened yesterday, and remains in session all week.]

OCTOBER 4. [Livingston County Circuit Court convenes for two-day term at Pontiac.]

OCTOBER 7. Clinton. DeWitt Court opens two-day term. Lincoln calls up suit of his own against Spencer Turner, whom he successfully defended on murder charge, for fee of $200. Turner defaults and Lincoln gets judgment on Turner's note for $200 and damages. William Turner is to show cause at next term why he should not be made party to judgment. Record.

OCTOBER 8. In Peters v. Martin et al., Lincoln, for complainant, writes answer of Charles Emerson, guardian, and writes decree of court appointing John J. McGraw commissioner. In Maxwell v. Herrold, jury fails to reach verdict, and case is continued. Record; Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

OCTOBER 11. [Champaign Circuit Court opens two-day term at Urbana.]

OCTOBER 13. Springfield. Lincoln files in Supreme Court appellant's bond for $729 in Fields v. Averill and Lowell. Photo.

OCTOBER 15. ["Sangamo Journal" comments on editorial in "Fulton Telegraph" in which Lincoln is proposed as Whig candidate for governor. "The Fulton Telegraph pays just compliment to Mr. Lincoln." His "talents and services endear him to the Whig party but we do not believe he desires the nomination." Sangamo Journal, Oct. 15.]

OCTOBER 18. [Macon Circuit Court meets for one-day session at Decatur.]

OCTOBER 20. Springfield. Whig state central committee composed of Lincoln, A. G. Henry, J. F. Speed, E. D. Baker, and W. L. May issues call for state convention to be held in Springfield Dec. 20 to nominate candidates for governor and lieut. governor. Convention is called off Dec. 13, because Whigs are unanimously for Joseph Duncan. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 261-62; Missouri Republican, Dec. 13.

OCTOBER 25. Charleston. Lincoln purchases of his father and mother 40-acre tract in Coles County for $200. Thomas Lincoln purchased this tract Dec. 31, 1840, from his stepson John D. Johnston for $50. Thomas Lincoln and wife are to have use of land during their lifetime. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 262-63.

OCTOBER 26. Lincoln binds himself to convey tract of land he purchased to John D. Johnston or his heirs, on death of Thomas and Sarah Lincoln.

170

Ibid. [No fall term of Coles Circuit Court is held. Shelby Circuit Court opened yesterday for three-day term.]

OCTOBER 30. Springfield. Lincoln is charged $2 for merchandise. Irwin Ledger.

NOVEMBER 1. Taylorville. Lincoln has five cases in Christian County Circuit Court, which meets in one-day session. Four cases are continued and one dismissed by agreement at cost of defendant. Lincoln appears for plaintiff in one case alone, with May in one case, and in others with Logan. Record. [Lincoln's bank account at Robert Irwin & Co. is credited $62.50 "Profit & Loss." This allows him to transfer $2.93 from his account to dormant Stuart & Lincoln account. Irwin Ledger. Filed at Petersburg is Lincoln's written affidavit and praecipe in Purkapile v. Hornbuckle mailed or dispatched "by hand". Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.]

NOVEMBER 2. Springfield. Lincoln buys $1 in merchandise. Irwin Ledger.

NOVEMBER 3. Lincoln does paper work for Logan & Lincoln. In Herndon, administrator v. Cutter he writes declaration and praecipe; in Perkins v. Hall he writes and certifies transcript. Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

NOVEMBER 4. Lincoln writes in judgment docket; "Received $25. of this judgment being the amount assigned to me by the plaintiff" in Ransdell v. Mills. On Mar. 29 he obtained judgment for $363.27 for plaintiff. [Logan County Circuit Court convenes.]

NOVEMBER 5. Lincoln writes declaration in Campbell v. Smith. Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

NOVEMBER 8. Petersburg. Menard Circuit Court opens three-day session. Logan and Lincoln represent plaintiff in Purkapile v. Hornbuckel, replevin suit concerning gelding. Case is continued. Lincoln obtains leave to amend transcript in Trent v. Taylor. In Elmore v. Bale, Lincoln as attorney for plaintiff asks court to issue attachment against Mentor Graham for contempt in failing to attend as witness. Record.

NOVEMBER 9. Trent v. Taylor, case involving right of property, is tried by jury. Jury awards property to complainant, Lincoln's client. Ibid. Lincoln annotates bond of Jacob Bale in Bale v. Elmore, appeal from justice court. Photo.

NOVEMBER 10. Trespass case, Potter v. Bell, is referred to three arbitrators whose award parties agree to accept. Arbitrators find that cause of dispute was "brown mare" which Bell stole from Potter, but which Potter has recovered. Potter is awarded one cent damages, Bell to pay costs. Urquhart

171

and Rutledge represent plaintiff, Lincoln and Bachman defendant. Lincoln wins his two other cases. Record. He writes receipt for $174.42 on back of execution in Blankenship v. Short and Short, as plaintiff's attorney. "Lincoln solicitor for Replyant" writes replication in Waggoner et al. v. Eastep. Photo.

NOVEMBER 12. [Sangamo Journal announces that Lincoln declines being candidate for governor.]

NOVEMBER 13. Springfield. Lincoln purchases merchandise (38˘). Irwin Ledger.

NOVEMBER 15. Sangamon Circuit Court begins three-week term. Logan & Lincoln appear for complainant in Susan Wallace v. James Wallace, divorce case referred to master in chancery for his report. Record. Lincoln writes declaration for Logan & Lincoln in Lewis v. Goodan. Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

NOVEMBER 16. In Edmunds v. Simpson et al., plaintiff is ruled to show cause why security for costs should not be given. Lincoln represents plaintiff. Defendant enters motion for injunction in Norris v. Simpson; in Whitney v. Henry et al., defendants, by Lamborn their attorney, enter motion to dissolve injunction. Logan & Lincoln represents plaintiff in both cases. Robbins is associated with them in last-mentioned case. Record.

NOVEMBER 17. Logan & Lincoln have 11 cases in court. Six they win by default, obtaining total damages of $2,386.72 for their clients. Two cases are continued and one dismissed. On Lincoln's motion, defendant in Campbell v. Smith is ruled to plead tomorrow. Ibid. Lincoln draws from auditor $156.90 due to Jesse K. Dubois for making abstract of lands entered at Palestine, Ill. from Sept. 1, 1836 to Jan. 1, 1841. Auditor's Warrant.

NOVEMBER 18. Logan & Lincoln obtain judgment by default in four cases: Bennett v. Hart; Campbell v. Smith; Lewis v. Goodan; and Trailer and Myers v. Saunders. In Warne v. Thayer et al., defendant withdraws plea and Lincoln's client is awarded $450.08; Kane v. May and Eastham is continued. Mains v. Braucher is argued before jury by Lincoln for plaintiff. Record.

NOVEMBER 19. Throckmorton and Everett v. Dockum, ejectment suit, is tried. Court finds defendant guilty of withholding possession of premises and awards estate in fee simple. Logan & Lincoln also win Mains v. Braucher when jury awards plaintiff damages of $186. Master in chancery reports allegations true in petition of Wallace v. Wallace. Divorce granted. Ibid.

NOVEMBER 20. On motion of Lincoln, attorney for plaintiff, Edmunds v. Simpson is dismissed. Ibid. Lincoln writes receipt, which his client Mains signs, for $36 for fees in Mains v. Braucher. Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

172

NOVEMBER 22. Logan & Lincoln get judgments by confession for $476.26 in Blankenship & Co. v. Rockwell & Co., and $337.30 in Brookie v. Boardman et al. Record. Sangamon County Whig convention meets and comittee of Lincoln, S. Francis, and William Porter drafts resolution endorsing Duncan for governor and Harlan for lieutenant-governor. Lincoln is one of five delegates appointed to state convention. Sangamo Journal, Nov. 26.

NOVEMBER 23. Judge Treat overrules Lamborn's motion, made on 16th and argued Monday, to dissolve injunction in Whitney v. Henry et al. Record.

NOVEMBER 24. Logan & Lincoln win by default cases of Logan v. Grubb and Wilson and Brother v. Grubb. Waldo v. Maters et al. is continued on plaintiff's motion. In Bell and Speed v. Nesbitt, jury awards plaintiff $60 damages. Logan and Lincoln represent plaintiffs in all four cases. Ibid.

NOVEMBER 25. Lincoln writes and files replication to defendant's plea in Herndon v. Cutter. In Throckmorton and Everett v. Dockum, ejectment suit, defendant files bill of exceptions. Appeal to Supreme Court is granted defendant, either party to be permitted to file record at ensuing term of Supreme Court. Ibid.; Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.; The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 283.

NOVEMBER 26. Logan & Lincoln for plaintiff and Strong and Doremus for defendant try Norris v. Simpson before jury. Jury awards defendant $62 and costs. Court sustains Lincoln's demurrer to defendant's pleas in Spear, administrator v. Newton and LeWis. Record. Lincoln writes pleas in Primm and Lindsay v. Abbott. Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

NOVEMBER 27. Lincoln writes affidavit in Norris v. Simpson, and has it certified by Marvellous Eastham, clerk of Sangamon Circuit Court. Ibid. He buys 19 ˘ worth of merchandise. Irwin Ledger.

NOVEMBER 29. On Lincoln's motion, defendant is ruled to answer Tuesday in chancery suit of Miller v. Freeman and Freeman. Record. He deposits $40 cash in his bank account. Irwin Ledger.

NOVEMBER 30. Spear, administrator v. Newton and Lewis is tried by court. Court awards plaintiff $75 and grants appeal to Supreme Court. Three cases are continued. Appeal to Supreme Court is granted in Mains v. Braucher. Lincoln represents plaintiff in each case. Record.

DECEMBER 1. Shields and Conkling represent plaintiff and Logan & Lincoln defendants in Kane v. May and Eastham. Court orders plaintiff to have judgment for damages listed in declaration. Ibid.

DECEMBER 2. Campbell and Dabney v. Spear is continued and Spear v. Newton is stricken from docket. Logan & Lincoln represent plaintiffs in first case, and Stuart, Logan, and Lincoln plaintiff in latter. Ibid.

173

DECEMBER 3. Six cases are won by default by Logan & Lincoln on last day of term. Whitney v. Henry et al. comes up for fifth time this terra. By agreeinent, injunction is made perpetual and defendant is to pay costs. Court awards Matthew Rogers, Lincoln's client, land in payment of notes held of Francis and Sandford in uncontested case of Rogers v. Francis. Ibid.

DECEMBER 6. Logan and Lincoln file declaration in Walker and Hack v. McCoy in U.S. Circuit Court. Record. Lincoln gives receipt to A. H. Kellar for $12.50 — "for one half of which I am to account to Stuart." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 264.

DECEMBER 7. N. H. Purple, attorney for defendant in Walker and Hack v. McCoy, assumpsit, files plea in U.S. Circuit Court. Logan & Lincoln are attorneys for plaintiff. Record.

DECEMBER 8. Lincoln is handed by clerk of Sangamon Circuit Court execution directed to sheriff of Macoupin County, in West and Taylor v. Sharp and Anderson. Lincoln got judgment for $159.70 for plaintiff July 29. Execution Docket, D. He deposits $65 cash at Robert Irwin & Co. Irwin Ledger.

DECEMBER 9. Lincoln puts $70 cash in his account. Ibid.

DECEMBER 13. Urquhart, attorney for plaintiff in error in England v. Clark (SC), moves that defendant be ruled to join in error Dec. 20. Record. Lincoln reduces his bank balance 38˘, for merchandise. Irwin Ledger.

DECEMBER 14. In People ex rel. Duncan v. Compton, sheriff of Coles County (SC), Lincoln moves to discharge rule made July 16 that defendant return certain fee bills and executions for costs. In U.S. Circuit Court Lincoln files his power of attorney and plea of confession in Montelius and Fuller v. Blankenship. Record.

DECEMBER 15. Lincoln argues motion made Tuesday in People ex rel. Duncan v. Compton. Court takes time to consider. Ibid. He does paper work on five cases: writing and signing reply to errors in Hall v. Perkins; bill of error in Abrams and Klein v. Camp; reply to petition in Ballentine v. Beale, administrator; reply to petition in Benedict v. Dillehunt; and files transcript in Averill and Lowell v. Field. Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

DECEMBER 16. Lincoln wins People ex rel. Duncan v. Compton when court approves his motion of 14th. In U.S. Circuit Court in Brown et al. v. Little, plaintiff, Logan & Lincoln's client, gets judgment for $2,196.54. court awards plaintiff $604 in Montelius and Fuller v. Blankenship. Record.

174

DECEMBER 17. Lincoln's motion to dismiss Dow v. Averill and Lowell (SC) for nonassignment of error is granted. Lincoln and Emmerson, attorneys for appellee, move to dismiss appeal in Benedict v. Dillehunt. In Wilson v. Alexander, record is filed and case placed on docket. Lincoln appears for plaintiff and Jesse B. Thomas for defendant in error. Ibid.

DECEMBER 18. Motion to dismiss appeal in Benedict v. Dillehunt is argued by Emmerson and resisted by Trumbull and Lamborn. Court considers. Appellant is ruled to assign errors by Dec. 21 in Averill and Lowell v. Field, assumpsit action from Tazewell County in which Logan & Lincoln appear for appellant and Baker & Bledsoe for appellee. Ibid.

DECEMBER 20. Motion for supersedeas in Hall v. Perkins is argued by Bledsoe for appellant and resisted by Lincoln and J. B. Thomas. In Averill and Lowell v. Field, Lincoln suggests diminution of record, files his affidavit, and moves writ of certiorari. Motion of Lincoln and Emmerson, attorneys for appellee in Benedict v. Dillehunt, made Dec. 18, is overruled. Record.

DECEMBER 21. Lincoln argues his motion of yesterday for writ of certiorari in Averill and Lowell v. Field. Court considers. Supersedeas is allowed in Hall v. Perkins. Ibid.

DECEMBER 22. Lincoln's motion for writ of certiorari is allowed in Averill and Lowell v. Field. Ibid.

DECEMBER 27. Holdridge v. Bailey is set for argument Dec. 29. Lincoln writes and files declaration in Landy v. Cagle, replevin from Christian County involving alleged theft of carpenter's tools by Cagle. Case continued. Ibid. Lincoln is debited $6 for merchandise. Irwin Ledger.

DECEMBER 28. Urquhart concludes argument in England v. Clark and court considers. Lincoln and Urquhart appear for plaintiff and Edwards and Bledsoe for defendant in error. Record.

DECEMBER 29. Maus v. Worthing is dismissed by consent of Logan for apellant and Lincoln for appellee with costs against appellant. Leave is given appellant to assign additional errors in Hall v. Perkins. Ibid.

DECEMBER 30. Lincoln writes abstract and fills out certiorari form commanding transcript in Averill and Lowell v. Field. Paper work boredom is relieved when Catherine Bobbit of Christian County repairs to his office. Mrs. Bobbit is under judgment for $100 and costs for assault on Elizabeth Berry, levied by justice court of Aquilla Council. Lincoln's client claims she was defending her daughter from attack. She has Lincoln write writ of certiorari appealing unjust judgment, and signs "Catherine Bobbit (her mark)." Lincoln has client certify before mayor W. L. May. Judge Treat grants appeal. Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.; Photo.

DECEMBER 31. Holdridge v. Bailey is continued by consent. Record.

175

1842

JANUARY 1. Springfield. Lincoln writes affidavit for Solomon Goodman, who makes his mark, and swears it before William Lavely, justice of peace. He writes bill of divorce in Goodman v. Goodman. His year-end bank balance is $119.81, after charge of $2.50 for "Profit & Loss." He deposits $15 cash. Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.; Irwin Ledger.

JANUARY 3. Lincoln writes parting letter to Joshua F. Speed, who is about to move to Kentucky. Knowing that Speed is tormented by doubts about his coming marriage, Lincoln gives him encouragement and begs him to forget "reason" and let love have free rein. "Candidly," he writes, "were not those heavenly black eyes, the whole basis of all your early reasoning on the subject?" The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 265-66.

JANUARY 4. Ballentine et al. v. Beall (SC), creditor's bill in which Lincoln appears for appellant and E. B. Webb for appellee, is submitted on written briefs and argument and court considers. (In 4 Ill. 203, attorneys are shown on opposite sides to that of original court record.) Record.

JANUARY 5. Appellant in Grubb v. Crane (SC), bill of review, is ruled to give security for costs by Jan. 8. Shields & Conkling appear for appellant and Lincoln & Logan for appellee. They lose case when court affirms lower court judgment. Record; 4 Ill. 203.

JANUARY 8. Jesse B. Thomas appears for plaintiff in error in Bruce v. Truett (SC). He files record and moves writ of error be made supersedeas. Court considers. Logan & Lincoln are attorneys for defendant. Record.

JANUARY 10. At meeting of bar members in Supreme Court room, Lincoln announces death of William J. Gatewood. On his motion, Henry Eddy is chosen chairman. James Shields addresses meeting and offers resolutions of condolence. On motion of Lincoln, meeting adjourns. Sangamo Journal, Jan. 14.

JANUARY 11. Motion for supersedeas in Bruce v. Truett is denied. Record.

JANUARY 12. Lincoln writes and files complaint and praecipe in Bell & Co. v. Walters. Joshua Speed was partner in trading firm of Bell & Co., plaintiff. Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

JANUARY 13. Lincoln buys $6 worth of merchandise. Irwin Ledger.

JANUARY 14. On motion of Lincoln and Emmerson, attorneys for appellee in Benedict v. Dillehunt (SC), plaintiff is ruled to file abstracts. Record.

176

JANUARY 15. Lincoln & Logan for plaintiff and Strong and Lamborn tor defendant argue Abrams v. Camp (SC). On Jan. 26 court reverses lower court judgment. Ibid., 4 Ill. 290.

JANUARY 17. Benedict v. Dillehunt is argued by Lamborn for appellant and Lincoln for appellee. Court affirms judgment of lower court. In Hawks v. Landes, appeal from McLean, Jesse B. Thomas, attorney for defendant in error, moves appeal be dismissed, appellant having failed to file record. Lincoln appears for plaintiff in error. Record.

JANUARY 18. Supreme Court dismisses appeal in Hawks v. Landes and orders that procedendo issue to Circuit Court-appellee is to recover $20.95, which is 5 per cent damages on judgment appealed from, as well as costs. Ibid.

JANUARY 21. Lincoln writes for George Trotter assignment to Seth Weatherby of three judgments ($880.53) obtained in Sangamon Circuit Court. Photo.

JANUARY 22. Lincoln writes reply to petition in Grable v. Margrave (SC). Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

JANUARY 24. Lincoln draws $71.70, balance of Stuart & Lincoln's deposit in bank, and deposits $60.41 to credit of Logan & Lincoln. After explaining what he has done with part of money, he continues: "The remaining $11.29 . . . I have put in my pocket, holding myself responsible to whomever may hereafter prove to be the owner." Privately Owned; The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 267.

JANUARY 25. Lincoln writes petition to review in McGoon v. Little et al. (SC). Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

JANUARY 26. Grubb v. Crane, argued Jan. 17, Shields for plaintiff and Logan for defendant, is taken under advisement by Supreme Court. (In opinion written by Douglas, lower court decree is affirmed Mar. 3, 1843.) Supreme Court adjourns. Record; 5 Ill. 153.

FEBRUARY 1. Lincoln mails to clerk of Circuit Court of Menard County declaration, praecipe, note, and bond for costs in Plummer and Wilson v. Hoey and Hoey. Plaintiff is seeking to collect note for $138.87 given by defendants in Baltimore Mar. 10, 1837. Photo. He files petition for divorce of Solomon Goodman against Nancy Goodman and asks that summons be issued to defendant. Sangamo Journal, Feb. 4.

FEBRUARY 2. Lincoln files petition for divorce of Ann McDaniel against Patrick McDaniel and asks summons returnable to March term of Sangamon Circuit Court. Ibid.

177

FEBRUARY 3. Lincoln writes Speed that Speed's anxiety about his fiancee's health "will forever banish those horid doubts" of his affection for her. He hopes that her improving health will make Speed forget "the sorrows of the past, in the enjoyments of the present. . . . I have been quite clear of hypo since you left, — even better than I was along in the fall." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 267-68.

FEBRUARY 8. Before fellow Washington Temperance Society members, Lincoln delivers short eulogy on Benjamin Ferguson who died Feb. 3. He laments that Ferguson was not longer spared to carry on temperance work. "In very truth he was, the noblest work of God — an honest man." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 268-69.

FERBUARY 10. Logan & Lincoln give notice to defendant that writ of attachment has been sued out in Sangamon Circuit Court in Beebe v. Dunn. Several lots in Athens, Illinois are described in attachment. Sangamo Journal, Feb. 10.

FEBRUARY 11. Lincoln writes part of declaration in Dormady v. Bradford, and declaration in Thurman v. Taylor. Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

FEBRUARY 13. Lincoln writes to Speed: "When this shall reach you, you will have been Fanny's husband several days. . . . I am now fully convinced, that you love her as ardently as you are capable of loving. . . . If you went through the ceremony calmly . . . you are safe, beyond question, and in two or three months, to say the most, will be the happiest of men." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 269-70. [Bowling Green, Lincoln's close friend of New Salem years, dies.]

FEBRUARY 15. New Salem. Bowling Green's funeral is probably held today. Lincoln attends, and at Mrs. Green's request, tries to say something at grave. Accounts of what he says are conflicting, some stating that his remarks are beautiful, others saying he is choked with emotion. Sangamo Journal, Feb. 18. Lincoln deposits $27.50 cash. Irwin Ledger. [Joshua F. Speed and Fanny Henning are married near Louisville. Joshua F. Speed, Reminiscences of A. Lincoln, 5.]

FEBRUARY 16. Springfield. Lincoln instructs G. B. Shelledy, lawyer of Paris, Illinois, how to prepare papers in cases Shelledy wants Logan & Lincoln to handle in U.S. Circuit Court. Lincoln agrees to attend to them for $10 each when there is no opposition. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 270-71.

FEBRUARY 17. Lincoln is charged $37.81 for merchandise. Irwin Ledger.

FEBRUARY 21. [Sangamo Journal announces that Judge Pope's "Bankrupt Court" opens in Springfield to hear cases under new bankrupt law.]

178

FEBRUARY 22. At noon. In Second Presbyterian Church, Lincoln addresses Washington Temperance Society, declaring that recent progress of temperance is due to efforts of reformed drunkards and not to warfare of denunciation waged by preachers, lawyers, and hired agents. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 271-79. Lincoln's account is charged $1.50 for "Profit & Loss." Irwin Ledger.

FEBRUARY 24. Lincoln writes promissory note for retainer in bankruptcy case. James Gambrel signs, promising to pay "twenty dollars in good fire wood." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 279.

FEBRUARY 25. Lincoln writes two letters to Speed, one for Speed's eyes alone, and one to show his wife. Announcement of his friend's marriage gives Lincoln great happiness. He expresses sorrow over Speed's decision not to return to Illinois, but sends greetings to people he met on his visit to Kentucky in 1841. To Speed he says: "If you make a bad bargain, hug it the tighter." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 280-81. Lincoln writes praecipe and bond in Langley v. Goode. He agrees to pay costs in case, gets John W. Wheat to sign bond, and mails to Jesse Langley at Taylorville Feb. 28. Record.

FEBRUARY 28. Lincoln draws indenture between Francis Webster and William Butler transferring land in Springfield. Photo. Lincoln withdraws $50 of the $60.41 deposited Jan. 24 and lends it to Noah Rickard with Noah Matheny as surety. Privately Owned. [Federal Court opens in Springfield. Newspaper terms it "Bankruptcy Court." Sangamo Journal, Feb. 25.]

MARCH 1. Lincoln is admitted to practice in U.S. District Court, on payment of $2 fee for certificate. Bankruptcy law enacted last year by Congress goes into effect today. Henry E. Huntington Library, San Marino, California. — William H. Herndon Papers, Henry E. Huntington Library, San Marino, California, Wm. H. Bradley to Herndon; Sangamo Journal, Oct. 15, 1841.

MARCH 2. [Logan & Lincoln file complainants' bill and give notice to defendants in Goldsmith v. Cowardin et al. Defendants are to appear at June term of Logan Circuit Court at Postville. Sangamo Journal, Mar. 4]

MARCH 4. Logan & Lincoln file petition in bankruptcy, property inventory, and creditors list of Henry Dishon of Union County in U.S. District Court. Record. Logan & Lincoln are attorneys for William Rankin of Logan County, petitioner in bankruptcy, whose hearing is announced for today. Register, Feb. 18. Lincoln writes declaration in Goodell & Co. v. Duff & Co., Sangamon Circuit Court case. Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

MARCH 5. Logan & Lincoln appear before Judge Pope in U.S. District Court in petition of Joseph Crowie, John Hammer, and Joseph Torrey of Sangamon County to be declared bankrupt, first of approximately 50 cases they handle in "bankrupt court" during year. Record; Register, Feb. 18.

179

MARCH 8. Logan & Lincoln file petition in bankruptcy, inventory, list of creditors, and notice to creditors of Edmund G. Johns of Springfield in U.S. District Court. Record.

MARCH 11. Lincoln buys $15.56 worth of merchandise. Irwin Ledger. [In long article on Washington Temperance Society, "Register" concludes: "does any rational man believe for a moment that Abraham Lincoln, B. S. Clement and Edward D. Baker have joined the Washingtonian Society from any other than political motives. Would they have joined it if it had been exceedingly unpopular?" Register, Mar. 11.]

MARCH 14. Lincoln deposits $91 cash in his account, and withdraws $100 cash. Irwin Ledger.

MARCH 17. Logan & Lincoln purchase of Ninian W. Edwards "east half of the west half of lot six, block fourteen, in the town, now city of Springfield" for $400. Record; The Abraham Lincoln Association, Springfield, Illinois. [Files and records on deposit at Illinois State Historical Library, Springfield, Illinois.] — Bulletin, No. 16. Lincoln files petition for dower and partition in Crow and Crow v. Crow et al. in Sangamon Circuit Court. Record.

MARCH 18. Logan & Lincoln appear in U.S. District Court as solicitors for James Gambrel and James T. Dunlap of Sangamon County and Nathan Reed of Coles County in their petition to be declared bankrupts. Ibid. Lincoln writes and signs for Logan & Lincoln declarations in three Sangamon Circuit Court cases: Hill and McGraw v. McPherson et al.; Lewis v. Stapleford; Barret v. Saunders. Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

MARCH 19. Lincoln deposits $30 cash. Irwin Ledger.

MARCH 21. Logan & Lincoln represent Rueben Buck of Macon County in petition to be declared bankrupt in U.S. District Court. Record.

MARCH 22. Lincoln writes Speed Mar. 27 that Mary Todd went with party to Jacksonville Mar. 21, and "on her return, spoke, so that I heard of it, of having enjoyed the trip exceedingly. God be praised for that." Because of train schedules on Northern Cross Railroad, party could not return Until today. Thus Lincoln is evidently in Springfield. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 282

MARCH 24. In letter to Speed Mar. 27, Lincoln says: "Yours of the 10th. Inst. was received three or four days since." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 214.

MARCH 25. ["Register" mentions several recent meetings of Springfield Junto to decide who may be candidates for legislature, deciding on William Butler, Ninian W. Edwards, John Dawson, and Lincoln. "Mr. Lincoln, Perhaps, will not accept the nomination, though urged by Baker, who thinks Mr. Lincoln's influence in the Legislature would elect Baker, U.S. Senator." Register, Mar. 25.]

180

MARCH 26. Logan & Lincoln appear in U.S. District Court as solicitors for Leonard S. Sears of Boone County and Henry Smith of Macon County who wish to be declared bankrupts. Record. Lincoln buys $12.50 worth of merchandise. Irwin Ledger.

MARCH 27. Lincoln writes Speed: "It can not be told, how it now thrills me with joy, to hear you say you are ‘far happier than you ever expected to be.’ That much I know is enough. I know you too well to suppose your expectations were not, at least sometimes, extravagant; and if the reality exceeds them all, I say, enough, dear Lord." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 282.

MARCH 28. On opening day of Sangamon Circuit Court, Logan & Lincoln have three cases continued; they obtain judgment for $704.77 in Maguire v. Coflin, and $312.09 in James Bell & Co. v. Lockridge. They secure divorce for Solomon Goodman from Nancy Goodman. They represent Lincoln's old friend John C. Roll in Roll v. Hill, chancery suit. By agreement Francis and Sandford v. January and Dunlap is set for hearing Thursday. Record. Lincoln's bank balance shrinks $9.25 for merchandise. Irwin Ledger.

MARCH 29. Logan & Lincoln represent plaintiffs in six cases. In one they get judgment for $630.84, two are dismissed at defendants' cost, one is set for Monday. Defendant files plea in one case, and in Sparks v. Bird and Bird, ejectment suit, defendant is ruled to plea within 20 days. Lincoln writes demurrer in Jones v. Maxey. Record; Photo.

MARCH 30. Blaine, Tompkins, and Barrett v. Lewis is dismissed by agreement at cost of defendant. Judgment for $126.48 is awarded plaintiff in Owen v. Ferrin. On Lincoln's motion, writ of inquiry is awarded in Goodell & Co. v. Duff & Co. In each case Logan & Lincoln represent plaintiff. Record. Lincoln writes, swears, and files change of venue petition in People v. Charles. Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

MARCH 31. Logan & Lincoln have two cases continued, and in two others, Allen v. Ash and Gampbell, and Lewis v. Barrows, they get damages for $324.19 and $153.22. Benjamin S. Edwards, defendant's attorney in Trailer and Myers v. Saunders, enters motion to dismiss garnishee. Logan & Lincoln appear for plaintiff. Record.

APRIL 1. By agreement of Logan & Lincoln for plaintiff and Baker & Bledsoe for defendant, McCutcheon v. Allen is dismissed at defendant's cost. Logan & Lincoln win important case when Francis and Sandford v. January and Dunlap is dismissed. Ibid.

APRIL 2. Lincoln is given leave to take deposition of William Porter, defendant in Waggoner v. Porter et al. Logan & Lincoln appear for Henry Bishop of Union County in petition for bankruptcy in U.S. District Court.

181

Ibid. Lincoln writes petition to Gov. Carlin asking clemency for Michael Hill of Sangamon County, convicted of manslaughter, and signs with 146 others. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 283-84.

APRIL 4. Whig meeting at "Sangamo Journal" reading room elects delegates to county convention. After long series of legal maneuvers in Thurman v. Taylor, jury is called. Case is tried, and jury retires. Court overrules motion made Mar. 31 to dismiss garnishee in Trailer and Myers v. Saunders. Record.

APRIL 5. In Circuit Court, Logan & Lincoln lose case when jury finds for defendant in Thurman v. Taylor. They obtain divorce for Ann McDaniel from Patrick McDaniel. They appear for Edmund G. Johns in bankruptcy petition in U.S. District Court. Lincoln writes and files answer in Trailer v. Hill, chancery. He writes petition in Henry v. heirs of Whitwell. Record; Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

APRIL 6. Logan and Lincoln file answer of garnishee in Trailer and Myers v. Saunders. They get judgment for $573.92 debt and one cent damages in Goodell & Co. v. Duff & Co. Logan & Lincoln represent Samuel Gunn of Richland County in "bankruptcy court" of Judge Pope. Record. Lincoln withdraws $6 cash. Irwin Ledger.

APRIL 7. Court overrules motion of John Duff to set aside judgment entered against him in Goodell & Co. v. Duff & Co. Defendant files plea in Sparks v. Bird and Bird and case is continued. Record.

APRIL 8. Jury of six awards plaintiff $475 and costs in Herndon v. Cutter. Schemerhorn and March v. Taylor is dismissed by plaintiff. Court is asked to dissolve injunction in Roll v. Hill. Defendant files plea in North and Bassett v. State Bank. Logan & Lincoln represent plaintiffs. They appear in four bankrupt cases in U.S. District Court. Ibid.

APRIL 9. Sangamon County Whigs convene in Christian Church to nominate candidates for legislature and sheriff. Sangamo Journal, Apr. 15. Logan & Lincoln get one cent damages in Barrett v. Saunders, replevin suit. Jury awards plaintiff, Lincoln's client, $164.70 in Jackson v. Stafford. On Lincoln's motion, Jesse B. Thomas is appointed guardian for infant heirs of G. B. Crow. Record.

APRIL 11. Logan and Lincoln have five chancery cases in Circuit Court. In Herndon v. Elkin et al. they get judgment for complainant, A. G. Herndon, father of William H. Herndon. They take nonsuit in North and Bassett v. State Bank. Lincoln corrects permanent record, revising court order in Crow and Crow v. heirs of Robert Crow. Ibid.

APRIL 12. In Campbell and Dabney v. David Spear, court rules conveyance from Isaac P. Spear to defendant void and lands subject to sale

182

Logan & Lincoln represent plaintiff in this case and in Miller v. Freeman and Freeman, chancery case, which is submitted to court by agreement, This is last day of Circuit Court spring term. Ibid.

APRIL 13. En route to Tremont.

APRIL 14, Tremont. Tazewell Circuit Court convenes for seven-day term. Two cases. Thorp v. Bole and Hinman and Thorp v. Bole et al., are called. Action is same in each case. Defendants' motion to dismiss suits for want of security for costs is sustained, and costs are granted defendant. Logan & Lincoln appear for plaintiffs and Jones and James for defendants. Ibid.

APRIL 15. Springfield. Lincoln and E. B. Herndon swear before James F. Owings, clerk of U.S. District Court, that notices have been sent to out-of-state creditors of E. G. Jones to appear at final hearing July 9. Ibid. Lincoln is charged $6.75 for merchandise. Irivin Ledger.

APRIL 18. Lincoln, signing firm name "Logan & Lincoln," writes to G. W. Hawley, explaining what has been done in bankruptcy suit. He explains how client's $20 has been spent. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 285.

APRIL 19. Lincoln withdraws $30 cash. Irwin Ledger.

APRIL 21. Lincoln writes to Frederick A. Thomas, Lawrence County attorney, explaining how he will handle Thomas' case in U.S. District Court in Springfield. "The whole cost," he says, "exclusive of lawyer's fees, will be, as we think, about $20. in something at least as good as Shawnee." In postscript he adds, "Tell J. K. Dubois he must come to the Legislature again." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 285-86.

APRIL 22. Logan & Lincoln, representing plaintiffs in Fasset et al. v. Blackwell, file summons against defendant in U.S. District Court. They ask $5,000 damages for their clients. Record. [Woodford Circuit Court is in session today and tomorrow.]

APRIL 23. James Goldsby, clerk of Menard County Commissioner's Court, files delinquent tax list for 1841. Lincoln has not paid on lot seven, block 11, town of Huron. Lot is valued at $2, tax due 1˘. Register, April 29.]

APRIL 25. Lincoln writes and files indentures of Peter Rickard, whose age he does not know, to William Butler and Philip C. Latham. He witnesses note of Rickard to Butler and Latham for $516, due in 18 months, carrying 10 per cent interest. Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. [McLean County Circuit Court opens four-day term in Bloomington. Lincoln in letter to Joshua F.

183

Speed July 4, 1842 says he was on circuit "five or six weeks" in spring. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 288.

APRIL 26. Bloomington. Lincoln appears for complainant in Harkness v. Davis, default case. Defendants ordered to answer, and case continued. Record.

APRIL 27. Springfield. Lincoln draws up agreement between F. L. King, Thomas Moffett, and William Butler for paying debts of J. Torrey & Co. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 286-87.

APRIL 28. [Lincoln is probably one of attorneys in two cases of Wood and Abbott v. Cheney Thomas, Jesse W. Fell et al., tried before Judge Treat. Lincoln pays clerk's fee Sept. 20, 1843, but he is not at trial. Fee Book and Record.]

MAY 2. [Circuit Court of Livingston County convenes at Pontiac; session lasts one day.]

MAY 5. Clinton. DeWitt Circuit Court convenes for two-day term. Lincoln is his own lawyer in Lincoln v. Spencer Turner and William Turner. He is attempting to collect $200 legal fee. Case is continued on his motion. Record.

MAY 6. Lincoln, for complainant in Peters v. Martin, moves continuance with leave for commissioner to execute decree. Ibid.

MAY 9. Paris? Champaign Circuit Court begins two-day session. Lincoln's name is listed on judge's docket as attorney for complainant in Brownfield et al. v. heirs of J. Brownfield. Court record shows, however, that Brown appears as complainants' attorney. Record. Lincoln is evidently at Paris where Edgar Court opens six-day term.

MAY 10. Paris. Lincoln files defendant's demurrer in Hunter v. Nolan in Edgar Circuit Court. Photo.

MAY 11. Lincoln withdraws demurrer in Hunter v. Nolan, and files plea bar, to which plaintiff demurs. Court sustains plaintiff's demurrer and case is argued before jury. Record.

MAY 13. Hunter v. Nolan is reargued before jury by Lincoln, McRobert S. French, and Pearson. Ibid. [Springfield Washington Temperance Society, to which Lincoln belongs, announces it has 700 members. Sangamo Journal, May 13.]

MAY 14. Jury returns verdict against defendant in Hunter v. Nolan, and assesses damages at $512.92 1/4. Defendant's motion for new trial is overruled. Record.

184

MAY 16. Danville. Lincoln for defendant in Cunningham v. Fithian wins court order to open deposition on file. Ibid.

MAY 17. Lincoln, for defendant, writes and files plea in Cast v. Van Meter. Photo.

MAY 18. In Cameron v. Williams, chancery, Lincoln writes and files defendant's answer to bill, and supporting answers of five witnesses. Photo.

MAY 19. In Wilson v. Frazier, sheriff, Lincoln and Brown are listed for defendant. Record.

MAY 20. Lincoln wins Fithian v. Walker when defendant confesses, and court orders payment of $100 damages and costs. He loses Cast v. Van Meter when defendant defaults; court awards $804, plus $87.10 damages and costs. Ibid.

MAY 21. Two cases in which Lincoln defends his friend Dr. William. Fithian, Cunningham v. Fithian and McDonald v. Fithian, are continued. Ibid. [In Springfield, $2 worth of merchandise is charged to Lincoln's account. Irwin Ledger.]

MAY 23. Charleston? [Shelby Circuit Court opens at Shelbyville for five-day term, and Coles County Circuit Court opens six-day term. Lincoln attends Coles Court, though it is not in Eighth Judicial Circuit.]

MAY 24. Charleston. Ewing v. Goodman, tresspass, assault and battery, is dismissed at defendant's cost. Lincoln is attorney for defendant. Lincoln writes and signs notice and plea in Pearson and Anderson v. Monroe and Eastin. Patterson v. Winkler is dismissed. Lincoln is connected with this case but lack of judge's docket makes it difficult to trace in detail his Coles County practice. Record; Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

MAY 25. In Patterson v. Winkler, probate case, Lincoln writes agreement between Young and Winkler and John W. Trower, probate justice of peace. Ibid.

MAY 26. In Moore v. White, plaintiff moves court to continue case; motion is sustained. On motion of Lincoln, defendant's attorney, plaintiff is ruled to enter bond for costs within 90 days. Record.

MAY 27. Pearson v. Monroe, assumpsit suit in which Lincoln appears for defendant, is argued, and court takes it under advisement. Ibid.

MAY 28. Morris v. Jones et al., trespass case in which Lincoln appears for plaintiff, is tried by court. Plaintiff is awarded $290.40. On motion of Linder, attorney for defendant, Tumey v. Craig is continued. Ibid.

185

MAY 30. Springfield. Logan & Lincoln publish notice in Harper et al. v. Varian et al. Defendants are to appear at July term of Sangamon Circuit Court. Complainants claim defendants are indebted to them for $1,500. Sangamo Journal, June 3.

JUNE 1. Lincoln pays $80.00 to Siter Price & Co. on judgment, and his bank account is debited $10.92 for "Profit & Loss." Irwin Ledger.

JUNE 2. Lincoln buys 37˘ worth of merchandise. Ibid.

JUNE 3. Lincoln deposits $120 cash. Ibid.

JUNE 4. Lincoln draws affiidavit of Philip Clark, defendant in Shoup v. Clark, stating that Charles Trumbull of Madison County is material witness and that defendant wishes to take Trumbull's deposition to be read in evidence. Photo.

JUNE 6. Taylorville. Lincoln writes report of commissioner for H. M. Vandeveer in Baker v. Addington et al., Christian County Circuit Court case. He writes and files bill of interpleading in Grigg v. Masterson. Six cases of Logan & Lincoln are continued. Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.; Record. [In U.S. District Court, Logan & Lincoln have eight bankruptcy cases. Ibid.]

JUNE 7. [In U.S. Circuit Court during June term, Logan & Lincoln represent plaintiff in January v. Duncan, action on note for $4,000 given by W. B. Archer to Joseph Duncan and assigned by him to plaintiff. Defendant's demurrer is sustained, but plaintiff is given leave to amend declaration. 3 McLean 19.]

JUNE 9. [Logan Circuit Court convenes. Logan & Lincoln represent complainants in Goldsmith v. Cowardin et al., chancery case, some time during three-day term.]

JUNE 13. Petersburg. Menard Circuit Court opens three-day term. Lincoln, attorney for appellee, moves to dismiss appeal in Cleaveland v. Meadows. Defendant files plea in John Allen v. Samuel Hill. Logan & Lincoln represent plaintiff and Baker and Thomas defendant. Record.

JUNE 14. Jury finds defendant guilty in Allenv. Hill and assesses plaintiff's damages at $20. Appellee's motion to dismiss appeal in Cleaveland v. Meadows is sustained. Three cases are dismissed and two other continued. Jury finds for defendant in Barnett v. Cogdale, appeal case. Bachman is for plaintiff and Lincoln for defendant. Ibid.

JUNE 15. By agreement. Miles and McCoy v. Miles is tried by court. Court orders appellant, Lincoln's client, to recover $26.25. Trespass case of Taylor v. Eaton is continued by plaintiff's attorney, Harris; Lincoln is for defendant. Logan & Lincoln lose replevin suit, Purkapile v.

186

Hombuckel, when jury awards property to defendant. Lincoln represents defendant in Pillsbury v. Bennett et al., which is continued. Ibid.

JUNE 16. Springfield and Rochester. Logan and Lincoln have two bankruptcy cases in U.S. District Court. Ibid. Lincoln goes with reception committee, composed largely of Democrats, to Rochester, five miles east of Springfield, to meet ex-President Martin Van Buren. Evening is spent in Rochester at home of Mr. Doty. Lincoln's humorous stories entertain Van Buren. Register, Jan. 24.

JUNE 17. Rochester and Springfield. Lincoln accompanies Van Buren to Springfield. Sangamon Guards, commanded by E. D. Baker, meet party mile east of town. Springfield Artillery fires salute of 13 guns and mayor Campbell gives address of welcome at state house. Van Buren replies, and attends reception. Party in his honor is given in evening at American House. Ibid.

JUNE 18. Springfield. Van Buren's party makes tour of state house. Ibid. In U.S. Circuit Court, Logan & Lincoln appear for John C. Snider. He is declared bankrupt by Judge Pope and Oct. 1 is set for final hearing. Record. Lincoln is charged $3.37 for merchandise. Irwin Ledger.

JUNE 22. Logan & Lincoln file notice to creditors of John C. Snider of McDonough County to appear at final hearing in bankruptcy Oct. 1 in U.S. District Court. Record.

JUNE 29. Logan & Lincoln file petition, written by Lincoln, for partition of land in Merryman v. Merryman et al. in Sangamon Circuit Court. Record; Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

JUNE 30. Lincoln files record in Watkins v. White with Supreme Court clerk. Record.

JULY 2. Lincoln "signs" confidential circular addressed to Henry Enoch Dummer and others in Cass and Scott senatorial district, urging them to run Whig for state Senate. Some trouble has arisen under new apportionment bill and they do not wish to fail in getting Whig into office if possible. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 287-88. Lincoln writes memorandum in Carpenter v. Mallory, Wash, and Latham, and signs for his client, Milton H. Wash. Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

JULY 4. Writing to Speed, Lincoln thanks him for his advice about his love affair with Mary Todd, which has been troubling him since Jan. 1, 1841. "I believe," he writes, "God made me one of the instruments of bringing your Fanny and you together, which union, I have no doubt He had fore-ordained. Whatever he designs, he will do for me yet." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 288-90.

187

JULY 5. Robert and Jane E. Allen convey to Lincoln 200 acres in Christian County, on which Edinburg now stands, in trust to secure payment on note of $900 made in Springfield Jan. 1, 1842 by Robert Allen to James Bell & Co. Note bearing 12 per cent interest belongs to and is held for use and benefit of Joshua F. Speed. Christian County Deed Book, I, 336.

JULY 6. Lincoln writes and signs reply to assignment of error in Mason v. Park (SC). Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

JULY 7. In People ex rel. Duncan v. Thorn, sheriff of Lawrence County (SC), Lincoln files answer to rule made July 16, 1841, to return fee bills and executions for cost mentioned in plaintiff's affidavit, and case is submitted. Record.

JULY 8. In People ex rel. Duncan v. Thorn, court orders attachment for one fee bill. John Milligan, administrator of William Coine, is to be discharged on payment of costs. Logan & Lincoln file petitions in bankruptcy of Henry A. Crow and Charles F. Wilmans, of Carmi, in U.S. District Court. Ibid.

JULY 9. Lincoln appears before James F. Owings, clerk of U.S. District Court, and swears that notice of final hearing in bankruptcy of Edmund G. Johns has been given more than 40 days before final hearing. Ibid. Lincoln withdraws $115 cash from his account. Irwin Ledger.

JULY 11. Lincoln writes Frederick A. Thomas and sends his license as attorney. He explains that court clerk requires $1 fee, which he has promised will be paid within month. "I therefore wish you to send me the money. It will take two dollars of State Bank or Shawneetown." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 290.

JULY 12. B. S. Edwards appears for plaintiff and Lincoln for defendant in Mason v. Park (SC), appeal from Richland County. Plaintiff is ruled to file abstracts by tomorrow and case submitted without argument. Record. Logan & Lincoln give notice they will take deposition of William Porter on July 22, in office of Justice of Peace Thomas Moffett. Photo. Lincoln writes and files, for complainant, notice to take deposition in Waggoner v. Jackson et al. He writes and signs bond for security in Blaine, Tompkins, and Barrett v. Allen and Blankenship. Photo.

JULY 13. Grable v. Margrave is argued before Supreme Court by Shields and Conkling for plaintiff and Lincoln for defendant. Lincoln appears for appellant in Cushman v. Dement. No counsel appearing for appellee, case is continued. Mason v. Park is argued by Edwards for plaintiff and Lincoln for defendant. Record. Lincoln does paper work in Circuit Court cases, writing and filing affidavit and praecipe in Dormady v. Kavana, Sangamon County. He writes application for injunction for

188

Macon County case, Crissey v. Brooks, filed Oct. 12, 1842. Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.; Photo. Evening Whig meeting organizes "Clay Club," aim of which, says opposition "Register," is "to drive the independent Whigs in this county into the support of the humbug nominees. Messengers are to be sent into all the precincts to whip the Farmers into their ranks. Logan, Lincoln, and Baker denounced the cry of no party . . . as hypocritical." Register, July 13, 15.

JULY 14. Lincoln writes Samuel D. Marshall of Shawneetown that Supreme Court has affirmed judgment of lower court in Grable v. Margrave. He will take, for his fee, five dollars in good money and two years subscription to Marshall's paper, "Illinois Republican." Logan & Lincoln appear for James McBride in bankruptcy petition in U.S. District Court. Record; The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 290-91.

JULY 15. Lincoln writes and files praecipe in Hay v. Bryan et al., in Sangamon Circuit Court, trespass case in which plaintiff asks $600 damages. Privately owned. He writes declaration, for plaintiff in Johnson v. Grubb and Dormady, promissory note case. Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

JULY 20. Lincoln draws up affidavit of Nathaniel Hay, who is suing Bryan to collect on promissory note for $161, but cannot find original note. Photo. Lincoln attends Whig evening meeting at state house to organize Clay Club. Speeches are made by Lincoln, Logan, Baker, and A. Williams. N. W. Edwards, presiding, appoints Lincoln to executive committee. Sangamo Journal, July 22.

JULY 22. Lincoln is present at taking of deposition of William Porter in office of Thomas Moffett. Logan & Lincoln are solicitors for defendant in Waggoner v. Jackson et al., where deposition is to be used as evidence. Record. Lincoln fills out summons form in Miller v. Freeman and Freeman. Thomas Moffett signs. Photo. Lincoln buys $7.37 worth of merchandise. Irwin Ledger.

JULY 25. Sangamon Circuit Court opens six-day term. Logan & Lincoln have one case dismissed and two continued. Court grants Lincoln's petition for partition of lands in Merryman v. Merryman et al. On Apr. 2, 1842 Lincoln got judgment for $1,221.87 against John Lockridge. Today in Foster v. Bridges defendant is made party to judgment against Lockridge. Record. In Constant et al. v. Merryman et al. he writes court order and makes copy attested by James H. Matheny, clerk. Photo.

JULY 26. Trustees of Illinois College v. King is continued. Plaintiffs motion to dismiss writ of certiorari in Shoup v. Clark is overruled. Logan & Lincoln represent defendant in these two cases and plaintiff in Simpson v. McNeil in which they obtain judgment by default for $392.02. Lincoln

189

files plea in Richardson v. Rickard. Two other cases are continued. Record.

JULY 27. Richardson v. Rickard is tried by jury, which finds property belongs to defendant, Lincoln's client. Commissioners appointed July 25 in Merryman v. Merryman et al. report land cannot be equitably divided; court orders it sold. In Constant et al. v. Merryman et al., Lincoln writes report of commissioners. Logan & Lincoln win attachment suit, Greely, Keith and Ray v. King. Two cases are continued. Carpenter v. Wash is filed. Ibid.; Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

JULY 28. Logan & Lincoln have ten cases in court. Five are continued, and in one they get judgment for $171.28. Record. Lincoln writes bill of complaint filed in Nathaniel Hay v. Nicholas Bryan. Logan & Lincoln are for defendant. Photo.

JULY 29. Dormady v. Bradford, slander suit wherein defendant is accused of calling plaintiff "damned rogue," is tried. Logan & Lincoln fail to convince Judge Treat of slander. They win Yates v. Payne when they get judgment for $442.40. They agree that Waggoner v. Porter et al. be tried and decided in vacation. One case is continued, three dismissed. Record.

JULY 30. Logan & Lincoln win two important cases, Hallowell, Walton & Co. v. Payne, and Rankin v. Prickett. In first, they get judgment for $500, in latter $1,248.66. Two cases are dismissed. Ibid.

AUGUST 1. Lincoln votes for Joseph Duncan for governor, S. T. Logan, J. N. Brown, W. Hickman, and W. Caldwell for representatives, W. F. Elkin for sheriff, and Jechoniah Langston for coroner. Election Returns.

AUGUST 2. Lincoln deposits $15 cash. Irwin Ledger.

AUGUST 4. Lincoln draws up affidavit and praecipe and requests clerk of Sangamon Circuit Court to issue summons in Norris v. Bunn. Norris charges that Bunn has accused him of forging note in New Jersey which Bunn paid. Lincoln represents plaintiff in court Mar. 21, 1843, and case is dismissed by agreement. Record.

AUGUST 6. Logan & Lincoln file petition in bankruptcy of William S. Wilmans of Grayville in U.S. District Court. Judge Pope sets Oct. 1, 1842 for preliminary hearing. Ibid. Lincoln files declaration and enters himself security for costs in Justice and Justice v. Garth, trespass case in Tazewell County. Photo.

AUGUST 12. According to "Register," Lincoln learns that Joseph Duncan, Whig, has been defeated for governor. "The tears fairly came into Lincoln's eyes when the news arrived." Reporter adds: "We understand that Maj. [E. D.] Baker is anxious to sell his claims to a seat in the U.S. Senate,

190

for a place in the U.S. House of Representatives. Lincoln won't trade with him." Register, Aug. 26.

AUGUST 15. Lincoln writes "Friend Walker" enclosing court order "allowing your assignee to sell your property on a credit . . . take their bonds and security . . . and in the final settlement . . . set off their dividends against those bonds" The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 291. Lincoln for complainant and S. Strong for defendants sign agreement allowing complainant's withdrawal of notes and mortgages sued on in Ware v. Hobbs and Jones. Photo.; Christian County File.

AUGUST 19. [First "Rebecca letter" appears in Sangamo Journal, provoking Whig laughter at expense of James Shields, auditor.]

AUGUST 23. Lincoln, John Williams, Robert Irwin, and Benjamin Talbot sign William F. Elkin's bond for $10,000 as sheriff of Sangamon County. Record.

AUGUST 25. Lincoln writes, swears, and files affidavit and petition for writ of attachment, signed by his client William Dormady, in Dormady v. Kavana. Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

AUGUST 27. Lincoln writes (or completes) 2,500-word essay in series of pseudonymous attacks on James Shields in "Sangamo Journal," signs himself "Rebecca —," and delivers it to newspaper. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 291-97.

AUGUST 29. Henry Clay is invited to visit Springfield in letter from executive committee of "Clay Club," of which Lincoln is member. Clay, Sept. 6, 1842, declines with thanks. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 297. Lincoln writes bill of injunction, which his client Peter Van Bergen signs and swears before Judge Treat, in Van Bergen v. Witmer et al. Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

SEPTEMBER 1. Lincoln takes $27.75 cash from his account. Irwin Ledger.

SEPTEMBER 2. Sangamo Journal publishes Lincoln's anonymous essay as "Letter From the Lost Townships."

SEPTEMBER 3. Petersburg. Lincoln and Rev. Francis A. McNeill are speakers at memorial service for Bowling Green, conducted by Springfield Masonic Lodge No. 4. July 18 committee of five — John Bennett, Martin S. Morris, John Uhler, Edward Jones, and John Zwisler — was appointed to make arrangements "for the day of procession." Henry E. Huntington Library, San Marino, California. — William H. Herndon Papers, Henry E. Huntington Library, San Marino, California; Sangamo Journal, Aug. 20.

SEPTEMBER 7. Springfield. Lincoln writes bill in chancery asking that land purchase contract be made null and void in Pickrell and Cantrall v. Smith et al., Sangamon Circuit Court. Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

191

SEPTEMBER 8. [Third and fourth of series of letters signed Rebecca, written in backwoods dialect, and poking fun at James Shields and Democrat policies are dated today, and appear in Sangamo Journal, Sept. 9.]

SEPTEMBER 9. Lincoln writes list of all candidates for the legislature from time he first ran, to his last candidacy, with votes cast. This statement Lincoln has certified by Noah Matheny, clerk of County Commissioners' Court. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 297-98.

SEPTEMBER 10. Logan & Lincoln, complainant's solicitors in Pickrell and Cantrall v. Smith et al., file notice and ask clerk to issue summons to Nov. term of Sangamon Circuit Court. Several defendants live out of state. Sangamo Journal, Sept. 16.

SEPTEMBER 15. Lincoln, preparing to leave on circuit, makes purchases worth $26.56. Irwin Ledger. [Tazewell County Circuit Court convenes for fall term lasting seven days. Docket does not show that Lincoln has any cases on first day.]

SEPTEMBER 16. Tremont. Logan & Lincoln win by default Bell & Co. v. Hall, in which they obtain judgment for $149.65. Defendant in Justice and Justice v. Garth moves continuance. Court overrules motion and leave is granted plaintiff to amend title of suit in praecipe and writ. Lincoln writes defendant's plea in Walker & Co. v. Hall, in which he is associated with William L. May, whose name he signs. Record; Photo.

SEPTEMBER 17. Logan & Lincoln get judgment for $277.35 in Justice and Justice v. Garth. Record. Lincoln receives note from James Shields who has come to Tremont to get satisfaction re "Rebecca" letters. Lincoln replies that Shields' note is too general. Shields' second note asks if Lincoln is author of article in "Journal" of Sept. 2, headed "The Lost Townships" and signed "Becca." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 299-300.

SEPTEMBER 19. Tremont and Springfield. Lincoln refuses to accept Shields' reply to his note until Shields withdraws his first note. Gen. Whiteside, Shields' second, and Dr. E. H. Merryman, Lincoln's second, fail to arrive at amicable settlement and duel is proposed. Lincoln, Whiteside, and Merryman return to Springfield. Sangamo Journal, Oct. 14.

SEPTEMBER 20. Springfield and Jacksonville. Lincoln draws up instructions for Merryman in case his opponent should wish to have matter settled. In case no settlement is made, he selects as weapons cavalry broadswords of largest size, and outlines other duel preliminaries. Fearing arrest, Lincoln waves for Jacksonville early to await his second and friends. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 300-02.

SEPTEMBER 21. Jacksonville and en route to Alton. Merryman, Butler,

192

and Bledsoe join Lincoln around midnight Tuesday. Broadswords are procured and party sets out for Alton. Sangamo Journal, Oct. 14.

SEPTEMBER 22. Alton. Arriving in Alton at 11 A.M., Lincoln and friends cross Mississippi to duelling ground. Shields and party follow. Without Shields' knowledge, "his friends withdraw his first note to Lincoln, whose friends then read Lincoln's apology, and the duel is called off." Ibid.; Beveridge, I, 352; Missouri Republican, Oct. 3; Register, Nov. 4

SEPTEMBER 23. En route to Springfield. [Woodford Circuit Court is in session today and tomorrow].

SEPTEMBER 26. [McLean Circuit Court convenes at Bloomington for four-day term.]

SEPTEMBER 28. Bloomington. Harkness v. Davis is called. Defendant's demurrer is argued and sustained. Lincoln is given leave by court to file amended bill, and case continued. Record.

OCTOBER 1. Springfield. Logan & Lincoln have 13 bankrupt petitions in U.S. District Court. Several are not heard until Monday. Record.

OCTOBER 3. Duelling spirit aroused by Lincoln-Shields affair brings challenge from Shields to William Butler. Butler accepts and selects rifles at 100 yards in Robert Allen's pasture Tuesday morning. To this Whiteside, Shields' second, will not agree and it is called off. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 302-04.

OCTOBER 4. Gen. Whiteside sends quasi-challenge to Dr. Merryman to meet him at Planters House, St. Louis, Friday. Merryman appoints Lincoln his second. Lincoln acts as messenger. Affairs resolves itself into quibbles about notes. High excitement prevails in Springfield. Sangamo Journal, Oct. 14; The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 302-04.

OCTOBER 5. Lincoln writes Speed news of "the duelling business" and inquires how Speed feels about his marriage: "That you are happier now than you were the day you married her I well know. . . . But I want to ask a closer question — ‘Are you now, in feeling as well as judgement, glad you are married as you are?’ . . . Please answer it quickly as I feel impatient to know." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 303.

OCTOBER 6. Lincoln, for defendants, signs notice in Bryan v. Wash et al. Photo. [DeWitt Circuit Court convenes for two-day term.]

OCTOBER 7. Clinton. On his motion, Lincoln is awarded summons to William Turner in Lincoln v. Turner and Turner and case is continued. Record.

193

OCTOBER 10. Urbana. Champaign Circuit Court meets today and tomorrow. Lincoln represents plaintiff in State Bank v. Mitchell et al. Defendant defaults and court orders mortgage foreclosed. Defendant is ordered to pay $1,499. In default thereof, property is to be appraised and sold. Ibid.

OCTOBER 17. Danville. Wilson v. Frazier, sheriff, is dismissed when Lincoln, for defendant, reports that plaintiff has died. In two other cases, Cunningham v. Frazier and McDonald v. Fithian, Lincoln moves and court orders that complainants plead in two days. Ibid.

OCTOBER 18. Lincoln's report of death of John M. Wilson proves premature, and case is reinstated. On Lincoln's motion, court orders that plaintiff give additional security for costs and plead in two days or have case dismissed. Ibid.

OCTOBER 19. Counsel argues in Wilson v. Frazier, sheriff. Court sets aside order of Tuesday. Ibid.

OCTOBER 23. [Rev. T. O. Prescott of Cincinnati delivers lecture at Christian Church on "Second Coming of the Lord." This may have been occasion for Lincoln's story: "It is my private opinion that, if the Lord has been in Springfield once, he will never come the second time." Register, Oct. 21.]

OCTOBER 24. [Shelby County Circuit Court convenes for three-day term at Shelbyville.]

OCTOBER 25. Charleston. Coles County Circuit Court convenes at Charleston for five-day term. Pearson v. Monroe, debt case, argued May 27, is dismissed at defendant's cost. Record.

OCTOBER 29. Linder and Walker, attorneys for defendant in Benjamin D. Turney v. Archalaus Craig, file plea. Jury is called and case argued by Ficklin and Lincoln for plaintiff. Jury finds defendant guilty and assesses damages of $300 and costs. Ibid.

NOVEMBER 2. Springfield. Lincoln writes James S. Irwin that "Logan & myself are willing to attend to any business in the Supreme Court you may send us. As to fees . . . we believe we are never accused of being very unreasonable in this particular." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 304.

NOVEMBER 3. Logan & Lincoln, attorneys for complainant in Ainslee v. Sattley et al., file bill for conveyance of land from heirs of Robert Sattley to complainant. Record.

NOVEMBER 4. Lincoln and Mary Todd are married in evening at home

194

of Ninian W. Edwards. Rev. Charles Dresser, minister of Episcopal Church, performs ceremony. Beveridge, I, 355; Sangamo Journal, Nov. 11.

NOVEMBER 5. Mr. and Mrs. Lincoln take up residence at Globe Tavern paying $4 a week for board and room. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 325.

NOVEMBER 7. Taylorville. Logan & Lincoln have nine cases called in one-day term of Christian County Court. Five cases are dismissed, two continued, and they obtain small judgments in two others. Rountree and Lincoln defend Jesse Langley and others in two indictments for riot. On motion of State's Attorney Conkling, capias is awarded to next term and sheriff takes bail of defendants for $100 each. Record.

NOVEMBER 9. Springfield. Lincoln is busy in his office. He signs bond of John Galhoun in Schemerhorn et al. v. Taylor, and agrees to pay all costs in Weber v. Weber, suit involving collection of note for $250, and writes petition asking judgment for debt and damages in Richardson v. White and Constant. Logan & Lincoln got judgment for plaintiff for amount of note and $102.16 damages Nov. 24, 1841. Photo; Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

NOVEMBER 10. [Logan Circuit Court convenes.]

NOVEMBER 11. Lincoln writes Samuel D. Marshall: "I have looked into the Dorman & Lane case, till I believe I understand the facts of it; and I also believe we can reverse it." (Supreme Court later reverses lower court.) He closes with: "Nothing new here, except my marrying, which to me, is matter of profound wonder." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 305. He fills out numerous legal papers in Condell, Jones & Co. v. State Bank of Illinois. Record; Photo.

NOVEMBER 14. Petersburg. Menard Circuit Court opens two-day term. Lincoln loses Taylor v. Eaton when court awards plaintiff $220.40. On his motion, two cases are continued and one dismissed. Strong and Lincoln file their replication to defendant's answer in Dresser v. Miles. Logan & Lincoln file petition of bankruptcy, inventory, and list of creditors of Henry Arnold of Newton, Ill., in U.S. District Court. He writes and files, for defendant, plea and demurrer in Gaines v. West. Record.

NOVEMBER 15. Bledsoe and Lincoln win Dresser v. Miles when jury awards plaintiff $348.80. Appeal to Supreme Court is granted. Lincoln confesses judgment against George U. Miles and court awards plaintiff $103.37 in Chouteau et al. v. Miles and McCoy. Ibid.

NOVEMBER 18. [Mason Circuit Court opens for two-day term.]

NOVEMBER 19. Springfield. Logan and Lincoln file notice to creditors ot Henry Arnold of preliminary hearing Dec. 9th in Judge Pope's "bankrupt court" in Springfield. Record.

195

NOVEMBER 21. Circuit Court opens for 11-day term. Eight cases of Logan & Lincoln are called on opening day. One is continued and four dismissed. Sparks v. Bird and Bird is set for hearing Thusday. They file defendant's plea in Lazell v. Francis. Defendant files plea in Herndon v. Cutter. Logan & Lincoln appear for plaintiff. Ibid.

NOVEMBER 22. Logan & Lincoln have 17 case; in court. On their motion, three are dismissed and five continued; in six cases they get judgments totaling $4,410.18. Shoup v. Clark is tried by jury Langford v. Johnson, for which Lincoln writes narration, is referred to three arbitrators. Land described in complainant's bill in Ainslee v. Sattley et al. is awarded plaintiff, Lincoln's client; he writes court's order. Ibid.; Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

NOVEMBER 23. Logan & Lincoln appear for defendant in Shoup v. Clark in which jury awards plaintiff $15. They obtain divorce for John Jackson from Maria Jackson; another suit is dismissed on their motion. Judgment for $260.51 is awarded plaintiff, their client, in Irwin & Co. v. Penny. Four other cases are called, in three of which they appear for plaintiff, and Bledsoe and Lincoln in fourth. Record.

NOVEMBER 24. Logan & Lincoln have two cases dismissed and obtain judgment by default in five more. Defendants are ordered to file their answers tomorrow in Van Bergen v. Walters, in which they appear for Van Bergen. In Lazell v. Francis, attorney for plaintiff files demurrer to defendant's plea. After argument, court orders demurrer overruled. Ibid.

NOVEMBER 25. By agreement of Logan . Lincoln for plaintiff and Baker and Bledsoe for defendant, order of continuanse in Porter v. Patterson is set aside and case dismissed, each side paying half of costs. Logan & Lincoln have three other cases. One is contnued, in another they get verdict, and third is set for hearing Monday. Ibid.

NOVEMBER 26. On Lincoln's motion, divorce suit of Robert Goss v. Mary Goss is continued. Edwards, attorney for defendant, withdraws his plea in replevin suit, Freeman and Freeman v. Miller. Court then orders that plaintiff have one cent damages and costs. Logan & Lincoln get judgment for $1,155 in Van Bergen v. Walters, and Lincoln writes court order. Ibid.

NOVEMBER 28. Lincoln's motion to amend record is granted in Crow and Crow v. Crow et al. Waldo v. Masters et al. is continued. Jury awards Plaintiff, Lincoln's client, $286.68 in Henry v. Spear. Court awards plaintiff $8,200 in Condell, Jones & Co. v. State Benk. Bledsoe and Lincoln appear for plaintiff and Thomas for defendant. Ibid.

NOVEMBER 29. On motion of Logan & Lincoln, defendant in McConnell et al. v. Rape is ruled to file his answer in 50 day, and on filing replication,

196

leave is granted either party to take depositions. Defendant files his plea in North and Bassett v. State Bank. Logan & Lincoln appear for plaintiffs and Thomas for defendant. They win Lazell v. Francis. Ibid; Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

NOVEMBER 30. Irwin v. Ferguson and Van Bergen v. Witmer et al. are continued. North and Bassett v. State Bank is tried by court and plaintiff's, Logan & Lincoln's clients, are awarded $2,714.83 and costs. Appeal to Supreme Court is granted defendant. Lincoln files report of arbitrators awarding plaintiff, his client, $54.87 in Langford v. Johnson. In Trailer v. Hill Lincoln writes and files amended answer, which Hill swears and signs. Record; Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

DECEMBER 1. Logan & Lincoln have ten cases continued, and two are dismissed on their motion. He writes report of commissioners in Crow and Crow v. Crow et al. Ibid.

DECEMBER 2. Commissioners report in Crow and Crow v. Grow et al. is approved and costs are paid by all parties in proportion to property awarded. Lincoln writes petition for dower and partition, and court order. In Jackson v. Applegate, defendant files amended answer and complainant is ruled to file his replication in 30 days. Logan & Lincoln appear for plaintiff in both cases. Record.

DECEMBER 3. Logan & Lincoln appear in U.S. District Court as solicitors of William S. Wilmans. Judge Pope grants bankruptcy petition and sets Mar. 6, 1843 for final hearing. Ibid.

DECEMBER 5. Logan & Lincoln file notice with clerk of U.S. District Court for creditors of William S. Wilmans of White County and Thomas M. Hope of Madison County to appear at final hearing in bankruptcy at Kaskaskia Mar. 6, 1843. Ibid.

DECEMBER 7. Logan & Lincoln file petition, inventory, and list of creditors of George Legur of Wabash County. On their motion, Judge Pope sets Feb. 1, 1843 for preliminary hearing in bankruptcy. Ibid.

DECEMBER 8. Lincoln writes and signs assignment of errors in Donnan and wife v. Lane, administrator (SC). Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

DECEMBER 9. Logan & Lincoln appear for Henry Arnold in preliminary hearing in bankruptcy before Judge Pope in U.S. District Court. Record.

DECEMBER 10. Logan & Lincoln, attorneys for plaintiffs in Wilson et al. v. Palmer et al. win judgment by default in U.S. Circuit Court. Court awards $1,158.59 damages and $23.52 costs. Ibid.

197

DECEMBER 12. In U.S. Circuit Court, Logan & Lincoln file declaration in Moore v. Nelson and Ashworth, ejection suit from Fulton County. Ibid. [Supreme Court begins long term, closing Mar. 6, 1843.] Lincoln buys at Robert Irwin's store pair of martingales (harness) for $2. Irwin Ledger.

DECEMBER 14. Appellants in Schleneker et al. v. Risley (SC), action of trespass for false imprisonment, and Robinson v. Chesseldine et al., are ruled to assign errors by Friday. Lincoln appears alone for appellee in first case, writing reply to assignment of errors, and with Logan for appellant in latter. Record. Robinson v. Martin is settled by agreement in U.S. Court. Contract is rescinded and plaintiff recovers land. Ibid. Lincoln writes and signs reply to petition in Greathouse and Chestnut v. Smith. In Pentecost and Pickering v. Maghee he writes and signs reply to assignment of errors. Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

DECEMBER 15. Logan & Lincoln appear for two petitioners in bankruptcy, Otis Caswell of Boone County, and Jacob Miller of Coles County in U.S. District Court. Record.

DECEMBER 16. Averill v. Field is argued before Supreme Court by Lincoln for plaintiff and Bledsoe for defendant. In Greathouse et al. v. Smith, appeal from Macoupin, appellant is ruled to file abstract by Dec. 19. Brayman represents appellant and Lincoln appellee. Ibid.

DECEMBER 19. Logan & Lincoln file notices in Clark v. Clark, divorce petition, and Barrett v. Fulton et al., chancery case, for defendants who reside out of state, to appear at next term of Sangamon Circuit Court. Ibid.

DECEMBER 21. Benjamin R. Hampton, applicant for admission to bar, is examined by GiIlespie, Lincoln, and J. Y. Scammon and admitted to practice. Ibid.

DECEMBER 22. Logan & Lincoln represent petitioners in three bankrupt cases in U.S. District Court. Ibid.

DECEMBER 24. In House of Representatives, McDonald of Jo Daviess presents petition of four members of Galena bar praying removal of Thomas C. Browne, judge of Sixth Judicial Circuit, for want of capacity to discharge duties of his office. Petition is referred to committee composed of McDonald, Graves, Koerner, Browning, and Ames. Lincoln is Browne's attorney. House Journal.

DECEMBER 26. Wilson v. Alexander (SC), case from Tazewell County involving forged note, is argued by Lincoln for appellant and Thomas for appellee. On Dec. 29 judgment is reversed with costs and case remanded for another hearing consistent with Justice Treat's opinion. Record. He writes reply to petition in Alexander et al. v. Frazier et al. Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

198

DECEMBER 27. Ficklin, attorney for plaintiff in Alexander et al. v. Frazier et al. (SC), argues his motion that writ of error be made supersedeas. Lincoln appears for defendant in error. Schleneker et al. v. Risley is set for argument Jan. 16. Logan & Lincoln file notice for creditors of George Legur to appear Feb. 1, 1843 before Judge Pope for preliminary hearing. Record. Lincoln writes part of answer of John B. Broadwell in D. Broadwell et al. v. J. B. Broadwell et al. Photo.

DECEMBER 28. Motion for supersedeas in Alexander et al. v. Frazier et al. is allowed. Record.

DECEMBER 30. Lincoln writes order of court and order for execution of lien in Dresser v. Miles, Menard County case won Nov. 15. Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

DECEMBER 31. Lincoln, attorney for Judge Thomas C. Browne, draws up preamble and resolutions which are presented by O. H. Browning to House for adoption. He asks petitioners to set down in writing and file with clerk of House, before Monday noon, all decisions, judicial acts and omissions which they intend proving, and that Browne be furnished copy. House Journal. Lincoln writes, swears, and signs "Logan & Lincoln" to answer in Carpenter v. Mallory et al. Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. He deposits $16.98 in his bank account, and is credited with $63 "Profit & Loss." Irwin Ledger.

1843

JANUARY 1. Springfield. [Joseph Smith, Mormon leader, arrived Saturday and is today's sensation in Springfield. He has been arrested on warrant issued by Gov. Ford and hearing before Judge Pope in U.S. District Court is set for tomorrow. Smith is present at ball held Saturday evening at American House in honor of election of Sidney Breese to U.S. Senate.]

JANUARY 2. Members of Galena bar file specification of charges against Judge Thomas G. Browne. "The only charge which we call upon the House to notice, involves nothing derogatory to his character, as a man of integrity, but is founded on the natural infirmity and feebleness of his intellect, and over which he has no control." House Journal; The Abraham Lincoln Association, Springfield, Illinois. [Files and records on deposit at Illinois State Historical Library, Springfield, Illinois.] — Bulletin, No. 56.

JANUARY 3. Before Committee of Whole, trial of Thomas G. Browne begins. By permission. Judge Browne and Lincoln, his counsel, T. Drummond, C. Hempstead, A. L. Holmes, and T. S. Campbell, members of Galena bar who brought charges, with their attorneys Lamborn and Spring, take seats in House. Ibid.

199

JANUARY 4. Browne trial continues. Doorkeepers have difficulty keeping order and quiet. After some time, committee appointed to conduct trial asks to be discharged, which is denied. Ibid.

JANUARY 5. Trial of Judge Browne occupies House until late afternoon when committee asks to be discharged from further consideration of complaint, which is granted by House, ending case. Ibid.

JANUARY 14. Lincoln writes and files bill in Hill v. Thatcher. Photo.

JANUARY 16. Schleneker et al. v. Risley (SC), is argued before court by Ficklin for appellants and Lincoln for appellee. Judgment of trial court is affirmed Jan. 27. Record.

JANUARY 17. James A. McDougall, attorney general, moves peremptory mandamus in People ex rel. Magone et al v. Thomas C. Browne (SC). Lincoln and Scammon appear for Browne. Ibid.

JANUARY 18. Lincoln, attorney for appellee in McDaniel v. Guy (SC), appeal from Macoupin County, files copy of record of Circuit Court and moves to dismiss appeal as appellant has failed to file. Appeal is dismissed. In People ex rel. Magone et al. v. Browne, motion for peremptory mandamus is argued by Campbell for relator and Scammon for defendant. Ibid.

JANUARY 20. In People ex rel. Magone et al. v. Browne, defendant is given until Monday to make return to alternative mandamus. Ibid.

JANUARY 24. Mason v. Parke (SC), appeal from Richland, is argued before court by Ficklin for plaintiff and Lincoln for defendant, and case submitted. On Feb. 11th case is remanded to Circuit Court with costs against appellee. Record. Lincoln attends evening meeting of people interested in temperance. Photo.

JANUARY 25. Lincoln, representing defendants, obtains leave to file amended record in Metz et al. v. Wolff et al. (SC), appeal from Macon County. Record. Lincoln, Josiah Lamborn, and J. Dougherty, committee appointed at temperance meeting, address letter to House of Representatives asking use of hall for temperance lecture by Mr. Fairchild this evening. Photo.

JANUARY 26. Lincoln accompanies sheriff and his clients Condell & Jones to State Bank where they collect $8,200 in specie. At previous term of Sangamon Circuit Court he secured judgment against bank for this amount. Joliet Courier, Feb. 1. In Supreme Court Lincoln appears for defendant in Ryder et al. v. Stephenson, appeal from Madison. Record.

JANUARY 27. Motion to dismiss appeal because of insufficiency of bond

200

in Ryder et al. v. Stephenson, argued yesterday by Chickering for plaintiffs and Lincoln for defendant, is allowed. Argument is begun in Fitch et al. v. Pritchard et al. (SC), action of ejectment appealed from Madison County. Lincoln and Chickering represent defendants in error. Ibid.

JANUARY 28. Martin, for plaintiffs, continues argument in Fitch et al. v. Pritchard et al. Ibid.

JANUARY 30. Argument in Fitch et al. v. Pritchard et al. is continued by Martin for plaintiffs and Lincoln and Chickering for defendants. State Bank v. Condell et al., appeal from Sangamon, is submitted on agreed case by Thomas for plaintiff and Logan, Lincoln, Baker, and Bledsoe for defendants. Ibid.

JANUARY 31. Argument is continued in Fitch et al. v. Pritchard et al. by Hall and N. D. Strong for plaintiffs and Hardin for defendants. Ibid.

FEBRUARY 1. Lincoln files certificate of White County Circuit Court clerk in Gatewood v. McGahee (SC) and moves writ of error be dismissed for want of prosecution. Motion is allowed. Argument is concluded by N. D. Strong in Fitch et al. v. Pritchard et al., and case submitted. Judgment is affirmed Feb. 9. Ibid.

FEBRUARY 3. Holdridge v. Bailey (SC), appeal from LaSalle County, is argued by Lincoln for plaintiff and Peters for defendant. Case is submitted. Ibid.

FEBRUARY 4. Alexander et al. v. Frazier et al. (SC), appeal from Vermilion, is submitted to court by Ficklin for plaintiff and Lincoln for defendant, without argument. On Feb. 7, judgment is reversed and case remanded to lower court. In State Bank v. Condell et al. (SC), J. B. Thomas files plaintiff's bill and asks court to grant injunction. Ibid.

FEBRUARY 7. On motion of Lincoln, attorney for appellee in Pentecost et al. v. McGahee (SC), appellants are ruled to assign errors by Feb. 11. Ibid. Lincoln writes declaration in Wallace v. Francis and Sanford, promissory note action for $166.48. Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

FEBRUARY 8. Argument is begun in Edwards v. Helm (SC), suit to foreclose mortgage, from Madison County, by N. D. Strong for plaintiff. Lincoln and Junius Hall also represent plaintiff and William Martin and B. S. Edwards defendant. Record. [Semple, Douglas, and Linder speak on Oregon question in evening at state house. Alton Telegraph, Feb. 18.]

FEBRUARY 9. Strong continues argument in Edwards v. Helm. Record. [Meeting on Oregon question continues this evening. Hardin, Baker, and Matheny express opposition to annexation of Oregon. Alton Telegraph, Feb. 18.]

FEBRUARY 10. Martin and B. S. Edwards, attorneys for defendant, continue argument in Edwards v. Helm. Record.

FEBRUARY 11. Lincoln concludes argument begun Wednesday in Edwards v. Helm, and case is submitted. Ibid. (Decree of lower court is reversed and case remanded Feb. 27. 5 Ill. 142.) Lincoln writes affidavit for William L. May, for case of May v. Green and Loose. Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

FEBRUARY 13. Watkins v. White (SC), replevin action, appeal from Sangamon, is submitted to court by Lincoln for appellant and Bledsoe for appellee without argument. (Judgment reversed Feb. 25. 4 Ill. 549.) J. B. Thomas argues his application for injunction in State Bank v. Condell et al. (SC). Application is resisted by Lincoln and Bledsoe. Record. Lincoln files May's affidavit, in May v. Green and Loose, and writes bill in chancery. Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

FEBRUARY 14. Lincoln writes Alden Hull of Tazewell County, colleague in legislature 1839-1841, saying he wishes to be elected to Congress and requesting his aid, if Tazewell and Sangamon are put in same congressional district. To Richard S. Thomas he writes: "Now if you should hear any one say that Lincoln don't want to go to Congress, . . . tell him . . . he is mistaken." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 306-07.

FEBRUARY 15. Greathouse et al. v. Smith (SC), action of debt from Macoupin County, is submitted to court by Brayman for appellant and Lincoln for appellee without argument. Record. (On Feb. 18 Judgment of trial court is affirmed. 4 Ill. 541.)

FEBRUARY 16. Frisby et al. v. Ballance et al. (SC), ejectment suit involving title to land in Peoria County, is submitted to court on written arguments. Lincoln is attorney for plaintiffs in error, and Justin Butterfield appears for defendants in error. Record.

FEBRUARY 17. Supreme Court refuses to take jurisdiction of plaintiffs application for injunction in State Bank v. Condell et al. Ibid.

FEBRUARY 18. Lincoln writes and signs praecipe and bond for costs in Wm. P. Speed v. Boice, surviving partner in Bell & Boice. He writes agreement filed in State Bank v. Elkin et al., signing for codefendant and their attorneys, "Baker & Bledsoe & Logan & Lincoln." Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.; Photo.

FEBRUARY 20. Lincoln writes affidavit of Thomas Rudder in Rudder v. Hudder, who swears it before John Calhoun, clerk of Sangamon Circuit Court. Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. [Gen. William F. Thomton gives party at Globe Tavern, Lincoln's residence, for legislators and friends, moving reporter to write: "There was a sound of revelry by night, and Springfield's capital

202

had gathered then, Her beauty and her chivalry, and bright — The lamps shone oe'r fair women and brave men —" Peoria Democratic Press, Mar. 1.]

FEBRUARY 22. [Washington's birthday is celebrated in Hall of Representatives. Masons, Legislative Temperance Society of 60 members, and Springfield Cadets attend. Addresses are given by Hon. A. Jonas, Past M.W.G.M. of Illinois Grand Lodge, and John Dougherty of Jonesboro. Sangamo Journal.]

FEBRUARY 24. Supreme Court reverses judgment of trial court in Holdridge v. Bailey, argued Feb. 1. Record.

FEBRUARY 25. Scammon moves rehearing in Holdridge v. Bailey (SC); motion denied on 27th. Ibid.

FEBRUARY 27. Dorman v. Lane (SC) is argued by Lincoln for plaintiff and Trumbull for defendant. Case was started by defendant in error, as administrator, in Gallatin Circuit Court for sale of real estate to satisfy debts against decedent's estate. Ibid.

FEBRUARY 28. Lincoln concludes argument in Dorman v. Lane. Ibid.

MARCH 1. Whigs meet in Hall of Representatives. William H. Davidson, senator from White County, is elected chairman. Lincoln states object of meeting and offers resolutions favoring tariff, national bank, distribution of public lands proceeds, and district conventions. Addresses are given by Lincoln, Henderson, Browning, and Baker. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 307-08.

MARCH 2. Lincoln makes move toward Congress by suggesting to Richard S. Thomas that he become one of two Cass County delegates to Whig district convention. He concludes letter with news of Whig meeting held Wednesday evening. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 309. In Supreme Court, on Lincoln's motion, plaintiffs are ruled to file abstracts by tomorrow in Pentecost et al. v. McGahee et al. Record.

MARCH 3. Supreme Court orders reargument of England v. Clark. Ibid.

MARCH 4. Lincoln, Logan, and BIedsoe, committee appointed Mar. 1, issue address to people. Resolutions are elaborated; Whig success they say will come only if all vote unitedly. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 309-18. Supreme Court takes under advisement Dorman et ux. v. Lane and Frisby et al. v. Ballance et al. (On Jan. 2, 1844, judgment is reversed in latter case. Record; 7 Ill. 141.)

MARCH 6. Springfield Whigs, including Lincoln, meet and agree to hold district convention at Tremont. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 318-19.

MARCH 7. In letter to John Bennett, Lincoln urges that Menard County

203

Whigs adopt convention plan for nominating candidates and meet and appoint delegates to district convention to be held at Tremont Apr. 5. Ibid.

MARCH 9. Lincoln writes declaration in Mallory v. Carpenter et al., signing "Logan and Lincoln." Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D. C.

MARCH 16. Lincoln writes affidavit of Stacey B. Opdycke in Opdycke v. Johnson and Johnson, Tazewell Circuit Court case, and mails to Tremont, where it is filed Mar. 21. Photo. [State central committee postpones district convention until first Monday in May. They do this, they say, because John J. Hardin, now in Kentucky, understood this was the time, and also to secure party harmony. Sangamo Journal, Mar. 16.]

MARCH 17. Register reports: "Our ears are stunned here, just now, by the din of the Whigs, concerning Lincoln and Baker, as to which shall go to Congress from this district. . . .

"The Junto are organized here — they have their secret agents ready to visit the several counties. . . . They will choke down the throats of the Whigs of Tazewell, Morgan, Scott, . . . whatever candidate they please. . . .

"Next Monday . . . the Whigs of Sangamon are to make choice between Lincoln and Baker. Whichever candidate is defeated, is to withdraw. . . This is done in order to give Sangamon the candidate. . . . Lincoln, Baker, and Logan, have all to be satisfied in turn, before any other county can get even a slice. Poor Stuart! he is tetotally forgotten."

MARCH 18. Lincoln draws up bill of complaint and affidavit for injunction for Samuel Renshaw against Hezekiah Thatcher and James Barth. Photo.

MARCH 20. Sangamon County Whigs convene in state house to select delegates to seventh congressional district convention, and to select candidate for Congress. After several ballots, Lincoln withdraws and Baker is chosen. Lincoln is chosen one of eight delegates. He writes Speed that in getting Baker the nomination, he will be like groomsman to man who has cut him out. Register, Mar. 24; The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 319.

MARCH 21. Sangamon Circuit Court opens for term of ten days. Logan & Lincoln have three cases continued and two dismissed. Defendant enters his appearance in Hill v. Warner. Logan & Lincoln appear for plaintiff and Strong for defendant. Record.

MARCH 22. Logan & Lincoln have 17 cases called. Three are continued, three dismissed, and two set for hearing tomorrow. They obtain judgment in five cases and file pleas in two others. In Mallory v. Maxey et al., plaintiff, their client, is ruled to show cause why he should not give security for costs. Wm. H. Herndon v. J. C. Crowder is dismissed at defendant's cost.

204

Lincoln appears for Herndon, his future law partner. Ibid. Lincoln writes, signs, and files, for defendant, plea in Urquhart v. Gray. Photo.

MARCH 23. Judgment for $1,056.39 is awarded plaintiff in Speed v. Boice. Logan & Lincoln appear for plaintiff and Baker and Bledsoe for defendant On Lincoln's motion, plaintiff is ruled to file declaration by Monday morning in Davis v. Hanson. Record. Lincoln writes bond for costs in Mallory v. Carpenter et al. Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

MARCH 24. Logan & Lincoln win two divorce suits, and Brown v. Broadwell in which they appear for defendant. Frink, Walker & Co. v. De Camp is argued before jury; plaintiff takes nonsuit. Hill v. Thatcher et al. is dismissed; Miller v. Freeman et al. is argued and jury retires. They obtain leave to amend plea in Urquhart v. Gray. They represent plaintiffs in last three cases, defendants in others. Record. Lincoln writes to Speed on business and politics. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 319.

MARCH 25. Logan & Lincoln win Miller v. Freeman & Co. when jury returns verdict for defendant. Robbins, attorney for plaintiff, enters motion for new trial and files reasons. Record.

MARCH 26. Lincoln replies to letter received yesterday from Martin S. Morris, friend of New Salem days. He explains reason Baker was endorsed for Congress by Sangamon County Whigs. News that Menard County may instruct its district convention delegates for Lincoln is very pleasing and he urges it be done. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 319-21.

MARCH 27. In Sangamon Circuit Court 14 chancery cases and one trespass case are continued on motion of Logan & Lincoln and four cases are dismissed. They win Klein v. Garrigan in which they appear for plaintiff and Baker and Bledsoe for defendant. Record.

MARCH 28. On motion of Logan & Lincoln, attorneys for plaintiff, Dormady v. Cavanaugh, assumpsit suit, is dismissed at cost of their client. Ibid.

MARCH 29. Jackson v. Applegate, chancery case, is continued. Plaintiff files his replication in Urquhart v. Gray, assumpsit suit. Logan & Lincoln appear for plaintiff and defendant, respectively. Ibid.

MARCH 30. Barrett v. Fulton et al., suit involving ownership of lots in Springfield, is won by plaintiff, Logan & Lincoln's client. They lose Urquhart v. Gray when jury awards plaintiff $50. Three cases are continued. Ibid. Lincoln writes court decree in Barrett v. Fulton et al. He writes and files affidavit in Trailer v. Hill, which Hill swears, and writes bill of divorce in Rudder v. Rudder for petitioner. Photo.; Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

205

MARCH 31. Williams v. Reeves, only case called for Logan & Lincoln, is continued. Record.

APRIL 1. [Menard County Whig convention at Petersburg instructs its two delegates, Martin S. Morris and George U. Miles, to vote first for Lincoln and second for Hardin at district convention. Sangamo Journal, Apr. 13.]

APRIL 5. Tremont. In Tazewell Circuit Court, W. L. May v. L. M. Greene and J. B. Loose is continued. Logan & Lincoln appear for May, former Whig leader in Springfield, now operating ferry at Peoria. Greene is brother of William G. Greene, clerk with Lincoln in Offutt store at New Salem. Suit involves ownership of strip of land along river patented by defendants and claimed by May as included in his prior patent. Record.

APRIL 7. Lincoln writes, and mails to Pekin, bill for $1,610 for John H. Harris, re pork packing business. Bill is filed in Probate Court in estate papers of Harlan Hatch. Photo.

APRIL 10. Lincoln writes and files defendant's affidavit in Scott v. Davenport. Photo.

APRIL 12. En route to VersaiIles.

APRIL 13. VersaiIles. On opening day of two-day term of Woodford Circuit Court, Lincoln appears for plaintiff and Gridley for defendant in Rathbone v. Boggs. Court orders judgment of court below affirmed for $20. Record. At evening Whig meeting, delegate to district convention is instructed to vote for Hardin for Congress. Chicago Historical Society, Chicago, Illinois — John J. Hardin Papers, Chicago Historical Society, Chicago, Illinois, Hardin to James Berdan, Apr. 15.

APRIL 14. Tucker v. Williams is dismissed by agreement. Lincoln appears for defendant. He draws up affidavit of defendant in Wilkins v. Tucker. He writes Martin S. Morris that he has heard E. D. Baker has been trying to get Menard delegates, instructed for Lincoln, to vote for him. Record; The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 321-22.

APRIL 15. James C. Conkling, in letter to his wife from Bloomington on 18th, says he reached Bloomington Monday afternoon, Apr. 17 and "found Lincoln desperately homesick and turning his head frequently towards the south." Evidently he remains away from Springfield over week end. The Abraham Lincoln Association, Springfield, Illinois. [Files and records on deposit at Illinois State Historical Library, Springfield, Illinois.] — Conkling Mss.

APRIL 16. En route VersaiIles to Bloomington. [Trip to Bloomington from VersaiIles, approximately 40 miles, is probably made Sunday.]

APRIL 17. Bloomington. Lincoln attends opening of six-day term of McLean Court. [Springfield elects Whig mayor and aldermen pledged to

206

pay third installment of $16,666.66 due state on $50,000 promised in 1837 when capital was moved to Springfield. Alton Telegraph, Apr. 22.

APRIL 18. In Scott v. Davenport, Lincoln writes oath taken by three arbitrators, and writes affidavit of Bailey H. Coffey, justice of peace, that he has administered oath. Photo.

APRIL 21. In Harkness v. Davis, court gives leave to file depositions, and case is continued. Record.

APRIL 24. [Livingston County Circuit Court holds one-day session.]

APRIL 27. Clinton. DeWitt Circuit Court opens two-day session. On motion of plaintiff, scire facias is awarded and case continued in A. Lincoln v. Spencer and William Turner. Record.

APRIL 28. On motion of Lincoln, complainant's attorney, Peters v. Martin is continued. Ibid.

MAY 1. Pekin. Whig convention of seventh congressional district meets. Lincoln, one of eight delegates from Sangamon, takes active part. As delegation chairman, he withdraws E. D. Baker's name as candidate when it appears certain Hardin is to be nominee. Lincoln moves that delegates, as individuals, favor Baker as candidate for Congress in 1844. Lacon Illinois Gazette, May 6. He meets Dr. Robert Boal of Lacon at convention. Illinois State Historical Library, Springfield, Illinois. — Trans., 1904, 378-83.

MAY 2. [Champaign County Circuit Court met yesterday, and closes its spring term today at Urbana.]

MAY 4. [Piatt Circuit Court convenes at Monticello.]

MAY 5. Springfield. In U.S. Circuit Court, Logan & Lincoln, representing plaintiff in Larkin v. Doyle, file their declaration and ask summons. Record.

MAY 8. Lincoln buys $2 in merchandise. Irwin Ledger. [Macon County Circuit Court holds one-day session at Decatur.]

MAY 11. Lincoln writes Hardin that Sangamon County Whigs will give their whole-hearted support to his campaign for Congress. "We propose, upon pain of losing a Barbecue, to give you twice as great a majority in this county as you shall receive in your own. I got up the proposal. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 322-23. [Moultrie Circuit Court convenes at Sullivan.]

MAY 13. Lincoln writes bill in chancery in Runyon v. Dresser, asking real estate conveyance. Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

207

MAY 15. [Coles County Circuit Court convenes, and Shelby Circuit Court opens for four-day term.]

MAY 16. Lincoln pays for suit. Five yards of material cost $32.50; "trimmings" come to $3.87. He pays Benjamin R. Biddle, tailor, $9. Total cost: $45.37. He also buys $48.87 worth of merchandise. Irwin Ledger and Journal.

MAY 18. In gossipy letter to Speed, Lincoln assures him that all will be harmony among Whigs in electing Hardin to Congress. He invites Speed to come to Springfield. A room at Globe Tavern, where Lincolns are residing, will be arranged for him. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 323-25.

MAY 19. Lincoln pays $1.50 for "Leghorn" (straw) hat. Irwin Ledger.

MAY 20. [Col. R. M. Johnson, Vice-President 1837-1841, arrives in Springfield Friday evening. Following parade, reception is held in Representatives Hall. Democratic Association presents hickory cane. On Sunday he attends Methodist church in morning and Baptist church in afternoon. Register, May 26; Illinois State Historical Library, Springfield, Illinois. — Journal, XIII, 192-209.]

MAY 22. Taylorvllle. Logan & Lincoln have three cases dismissed and one continued at one-day term of Christian Circuit Court. Rountree and Lincoln have one case continued. In People v. Langley et al., two indictments for riot, state's attorney drops one and gets jury verdict in other. Court fines Langley $20 and each of three other defendants $5. Rountree and Lincoln appear for defendants. Record.

MAY 24. [John H. Murphy, attorney in Strong et al. v. Thomas et al., swears affidavit of nonresidence of Marshall Lander, one of defendants, before T. R. Webber, clerk of Champaign County Circuit Court in Urbana. Lincoln wrote affidavit for Murphy, and evidently mailed it. Photo.]

MAY 25. [Logan Circuit Court convenes.]

MAY 29. Lincoln pays $2 for "Sattin Stock" (neckwear). Irwin Ledger and Journal.

MAY 31. Lincoln buys toothbrush (25˘) and third-yard of serge (50˘) for his tailor Biddle, who is evidently making alterations. Ibid.

JUNE 1. Lincoln buys merchandise (75˘). Ibid.

JUNE 5. Petersburg. Menard Circuit Court opens two-day term. Lincoln, attorney for defendants, moves to dismiss appeal in Bale v. Beekman & Spears, and Short v. Short, and similar motion for plaintiff in Walker v.

208

Estill. Waggoner et al. v. Eastep is continued. In Lesure and Bliss v. Menard County, change of venue to Sangamon is granted. Lincoln appears for plaintiff in former and for defendant in latter. Record.

JUNE 6. Lincoln's motion of yesterday in Bale v. Beekman and Spears is overruled. Beekman turns bay mare over to plaintiff and Lincoln draws up agreement to call off suit. His motion of yesterday in Short v. Short is sustained. Defendant is to have his costs in both courts. Walker v. Estill is dismissed by mutual agreement. He loses appeal case, Lukins v. Moon, and wins Pollard v. Backinstos et al. Ibid. In Plunkett administrator v. heirs of Samuel Combs, Lincoln writes and signs petition, answer of guardian, and court decree. He acts for plaintiff, with Harris, in Cabot v. Regnier, which is continued. Photo.

JUNE 8. [Mason County Circuit Court convenes at Havana for two-day term.]

JUNE 9. Springfield. Meeting of Whigs from all over state is held in evening in state house. Capt. H. H. Gear of Galena is chairman, and James H. Matheny of Springfield secretary. Meeting is addressed by Baker, Hardin, and J. H. Brown of Vermilion County. Sangamo Journal, June 15.

JUNE 10. Whig convention continues. Lincoln speaks "in his usual forcible manner" and concludes by offering four resolutions, which are adopted. One resolution calls for state Whig convention, to be held in Springfield in Dec. to choose Whig electoral ticket for 1844. Other important resolution challenges Democrats to nightly debate in state house. Ibid.

JUNE 12. U.S. Circuit Court convenes for summer term. Justices McLean and Pope on bench. Moore v. Nelson and Ashworth, in which Logan & Lincoln appear for plaintiff, is continued. Sangamo Journal, June 15; Record.

JUNE 16. Lincoln writes brief, bill in chancery, and bond for his father-in-law in Todd v. Ware, suit to compel defendant to accept Bank of Illinois money in payment of notes. Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

JUNE 17. Lincoln draws up motion to amend his return on execution in case of Gould et al. v. Robert Allen in Sangamon Circuit Court. Photo.

JUNE 19. Samuel Wyckoff and Dennis Forrest, owners of adjoining tracts of land in Sangamon County, dispute small strip. They submit question to Lincoln and sign agreement, which he draws up, to abide by his decision. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 326-27.

JUNE 21. Lincoln deposits $175 in his bank account. Irwin Ledger.

209

JUNE 23. Lincoln writes and signs declaration in Ball v. Field. Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

JUNE 24. Lincoln writes petition in Chandler v. Williams. Logan & Lincoln, for defendants in Bryan v. Tinsley et al., chancery, are ordered by court to take depositions on and after June 24, at office of complainants' attorney. Lincoln writes and signs deposition notice. He writes another such notice in Thomas E. Jackson v. Jacob Applegate, and signs for plaintiff. Logan & Lincoln's petition for partition in Vanderen et al. v. Vanderen et al. is filed in Sangamon County Circuit Court. Record; Photo [Lincoln enters himself as security for costs in Chandler v. Williams in Christian Circuit Court. Photo.]

JUNE 27. [Lincoln's petition in Chandler v. Williams is filed. Photo.]

JUNE 30. Logan & Lincoln file notice to creditors of George Legur, bankrupt from Wabash County, to appear at U.S. District Court at Kaskaskia Sept. 21, 1843, to show cause why bankrupt should not receive certificate and be discharged from his debts. Record.

JULY 1. Lincoln, Stephen J. Iankiewicz, and Norman H. Purple, committee of arbitrators appointed yesterday by Gov. Ford, begin examining A. G. Henry's accounts as state house commissioner. Their work continues 12 days. Photo.

JULY 3. Acting as arbitrator between Samuel Wyckoff and Dennis Forrest in dispute over strip of land, Lincoln awards land to Wyckoff and designates dividing line between their holdings. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 326-27.

JULY 4. Lincoln, Iankiewicz, and Purple continue investigation all week.

JULY 5. Lincoln takes depositions of three witnesses, at Thomas Moffett's office, in Jackson v. Applegate. Photo.

JULY 10. Lincoln, lankiewicz, and Purple continue their investigation of state house accounts until Friday. Logan & Lincoln take deposition of Thomas P. Pettus at office of Thomas Moffett, for use in George Bryan v. Seth M. Tinsley et al. Photo.

JULY 14. Lincoln, lankiewicz, and Purple complete investigation of accounts of Anson G. Henry, late state house commissioner. They award state $271. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 327.

JULY 15. Hillsboro. Lincoln stumps for Whig congressional ticket, delivering amusing speech. Ibid.

JULY 21. Springfield. In U.S. Circuit Court, Logan & Lincoln file plaintiff's affidavit in Vance v. Kilgore et al. to hold defendants to bail. Record.

210

JULY 24. To Robert S. Blackwell Lincoln writes: "Yours of the 18th. inclosing your license is received. I have had it perfected and herewith return it to you." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 338.

JULY 26. Lincoln writes to Speed on business matters, adding: "Your Fanny can not be more anxious to see my Molly than the latter is to see her; nor as much so as I am. Don't fail to come. We are but two, as yet." Ibid.

JULY 27. [Sangamo Journal of today is first issue available showing removal of Logan & Lincoln to third floor of building at south west corner of Sixth and Adams streets, over Post Office. Last extant issue showing their office "opposite Hoffman's Row" is Feb. 23, 1843. Logan & Lincoln remain in new location until partnership is dissolved.

JULY 31. Lincoln writes to unknown correspondent in Tremont concerning removal of county seat. He says he has consulted with Logan and believes that land will revert to donor if county seat is moved to Pekin. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 329.

AUGUST 1. Robert Todd Lincoln, first child of Abraham and Mary Lincoln, is born at Globe Tavern. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 304.

AUGUST 7. Election Day. In letter to Speed May 18 Lincoln said he intended to support party nominee for Congress, but at polls he does not vote for Hardin for Congress, or for or against Whig candidates for county offices. His only votes are for constable and justice of peace. Election Returns.

AUGUST 10. Lincoln signs bond of Strother G. Jones, constable. Photo.

AUGUST 19. Sangamon Whigs open campaign of 1844 with convention in Springfield. They resolve to fight until they secure Whig legislature, Whig senator, together with majority of Whig congressmen — and pledge themselves to give Henry Clay majority of 850 votes in 1844. Lincoln, Baker, and A. G. Henry address convention. Quincy Whig, Aug. 30.

AUGUST 30. Lincoln makes affidavit before John Calhoun, clerk of Sangamon Circuit Court, that Richard J. Hamilton and Benjamin F. Fridley are material witnesses for defense in Johnson v. Strode. Defendant desires to take their testimony by deposition. Photo.

SEPTEMBER 2. Obed Lewis' carriage shop repairs tire and floor of Lincoln's buggy ($1.25). Obed Lewis Account Books.

SEPTEMBER 6. Tremont. In Tazewell Circuit Court, Lincoln, representing defendants in Davis v. Frazer and Wilson, moves to quash scire facias. Record.

211

SEPTEMBER 7. Lincoln appears for defendants in Cromwell and McNaughton v. Hewitt and Davenport. On motion of Leonard attorney for complainant, case is continued. He appears for plaintiff in Williams v. Hughes and gets judgment by default for $455.54. Ibid.

SEPTEMBER 8. Leonard, attorney for complainants in Cromwell and McNaughton v. Baker and County of Tazewell, moves defendants be ruled to file their answer by tomorrow. Logan and Lincoln appear for defendants. Ibid.

SEPTEMBER 9. On motion of plaintiff's attorneys, Logan & Lincoln, May v. Greene and Loose is continued. Ibid. Lincoln's answer of arbitrator's in Scott v. Davenport, written Apr. 18, 1843, is filed in Tazewell Circuit Court. Photo.

SEPTEMBER 12. Defendants default in Cromwell and McNaughton v. Baker and County of Tazewell; plaintiff is awarded $2,123.23. Leonard is attorney for plaintiff, Logan & Lincoln for defendant. Record.

SEPTEMBER 13. En route to Hanover.

SEPTEMBER 14. Hanover. Woodford Circuit Court opens for two-day term. Robinson v. Gassel is argued before jury. Holland appears for plaintiff and Lincoln for defendant. Ibid.

SEPTEMBER 18. Bloomington? [McLean County Circuit Court convenes for six-day term.]

SEPTEMBER 20. Bloomington. Lincoln pays clerk's fees in two cases of Wood and Abbott v. Thomas and Fell et al. Fee Book.

SEPTEMBER 25. [Livingston County Circuit Court holds one-day session at Pontiac.]

SEPTEMBER 26. Springfield. Lincoln writes and swears before John Calhoun affidavit of James D. Smith for McDowell v. Humphries, DeWitt County case. Photo.

SEPTEMBER 28. Clinton. DeWitt County Circuit Court convenes for two-day term. Abraham Lincoln v. Spencer Turner and William Turner is continued. Lincoln appears for petitioner in Henrietta L. McDowall v. Jane L. Duncan et al., and on his motion, Clifton H. Moore, Clinton attorney, is appointed guardian ad litem for infant defendants. On motion of Lincoln, complainant's lawyer, Peters v. Martin is continued. For defendant with Clifton H. Moore of Clinton, Lincoln writes demurrer and agreement in Johnstone v. Weedman. Record.

212

SEPTEMBER 29. Lincoln appears again in McDowall v. Duncan et al. Court orders that petitioner recover dower out of property of late David Duncan, husband of petitioner. Ibid. James D. Smith's affidavit in McDowell v. Humphries is filed. He writes and files petition for dower in case. He writes and signs Clifton H. Moore's name to Moore's answer of guardian of minor defendants. Photo.

OCTOBER 2. Urbana. Champaign Circuit Court convenes for three-day term. In People v. Spurgeon et al., assault, Lincoln enters plea of not guilty and argues case before jury, which finds Eli, Nancy, and Mary Spurgeon not guilty and Joseph and Nathan Spurgeon guilty. Record; Photo.

OCTOBER 3. Lincoln argues his motion for new trial in People v. Joseph and Nathan Spurgeon. Court overrules motion as to Joseph, and sustains it as to Nathan. Joseph is fined $20 and costs. Lincoln appears for plaintiff in State Bank v. Mitchell et al., and moves court set aside sale of real estate. Record; Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

OCTOBER 5. [Piatt Circuit Court convenes at Monticello.]

OCTOBER 6. Jacksonville. Morgan County Whigs pay election bet to Sangamon and other Whigs at barbecue in Jacksonville. Sangamon gave Hardin twice as great a majority as Morgan in congressional election. They thus won proposal made by Lincoln to Hardin May 11. Speeches are made by Lincoln, Baker, and Matheny of Sangamon, Hardin and Yates of Morgan, Hay of Pike, and Blackwell of Schuyler. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 329-30. "Register" reports: "Yesterday came off the long expected Coon jubilee; and if there ever was a failure, I think that will be conceded to have been one. . . , [Baker] was succeeded in the evening by himself and another valiant man [Lincoln], who once attempted to frighten an Irishman with a broadsword, and who, when he found that impracticable, procured his friends to manage ‘an amicable adjustment’." Register, Oct. 20. A Chicago Democratic paper takes another tack. "Many ‘reformed drunkards,’ Washingtonians, were present; and it being a party affair, all got gloriously drunk together. . . . It was unquestionably the most disgraceful affair that ever happened in our state." Chicago Democrat, in Register, Nov. 3.

OCTOBER 9. [Macon County Circuit Court convenes for one-day term.]

OCTOBER 11. Springfield. Lincoln receipts on warrant register in auditor's office for $75, salary of A. Kitchell, state's attorney for Fourth Judicial Circuit for quarter ending Sept. 30, 1843. He probably delivers money to Kitchell at Charleston.

OCTOBER 12. Lincoln pays Obed Lewis $1.25 for carriage repairs. Obed Lewis Account Books. [Moultrie Circuit Court convenes at Sullivan.]

213

OCTOBER 16. Charleston. Coles County Circuit Court begins fall term. Bagley v. Van Meter, slander, is tried before jury by Lincoln and Linder. Jury awards plaintiff $80 damages. By agreement, Lincoln is to have $30 of judgment as fee, Linder $20. Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. [Mrs. Lincoln's hired girl buys pair of shoes for $1 at Robert Irwin's store. Irwin Ledger. Shelby Circuit Court convenes for three-day term.]

OCTOBER 18. Lincoln, for complainant in Taylor v. Wright, Menard County case, writes bill to foreclose mortgage and evidently mails it to Petersburg. Photo.

OCTOBER 19. [Springfield Whigs hold "love feast" in evening over party success in recent elections in Georgia. Chicago Historical Society, Chicago, Illinois — John J. Hardin Papers, Chicago Historical Society, Chicago, Illinois, Simeon Francis to John J. Hardin, Oct. 19.]

OCTOBER 20. Mrs. Lincoln buys dress material and pair of hose for $2.31. Irwin Ledger.

OCTOBER 21. Danville. Lincoln wins McDonaId v. Fithian when court dismisses complainant's bill and awards defendant $18.40 and costs. In Cunningham v. Fithian, court awards defendant, Lincoln's client, $25.54, each party paying costs, with appeal to Supreme Court granted. Record. [Mrs. Lincoln buys $3.94 worth of merchandise. Irwin Ledger.]

OCTOBER 23. Taylorville. Christian Circuit Court meets. Young v. Archer and Lindsley v. Kilbourne and Archer are continued. Chandler v. Williams is tried by court, and plaintiff is awarded $176.19 1/2 and costs. Logan & Lincoln appear for defendant in first two cases and for plaintiff in latter. Rountree and Lincoln appear for plaintiff in Gilbert v. Ralston, which is continued. Record. [Mrs. Lincoln buys domestic (cloth) and spool of cotton thread for 50˘. Irwin Ledger.]

OCTOBER 24. Springfield. Logan & Lincoln acknowledge receipt in full of judgment obtained Dec. 10, 1842 in Wilson et al. v. Palmer et al. in U.S. Circuit Court. Execution Docket, 196. [In Petersburg, Lincoln's petition and summons written for plaintiff in Miles v. Webb and Rogers is filed. Photo.]

OCTOBER 26. [Logan County Circuit Court convenes at Postville.]

OCTOBER 27. [In Charleston, assignment of money is made in Bagley v. Van Meter under court order written by Lincoln. Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.]

OCTOBER 30. Lincoln's account is debited 13˘ for pair of mitts. Irwin Ledger.

NOVEMBER 1. Lincoln writes and signs bill to foreclose in Wright v. Drennan and Bradley, Sangamon Circuit Court case. Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

214

NOVEMBER 2. Mrs. Lincoln buys pair of "Ladies Walking Shoes," $1.50, and merchandise, $1.75. Irwin Ledger.

NOVEMBER 3. Lincoln writes and signs declaration in School Commissioners v. Doyle et al. Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

NOVEMBER 4. Today or Monday Lincoln receives $5 from Josiah L. James of Tremont, for taxes on Menard County land. Lincoln gives money to John McNamar Nov. 9. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 330.

NOVEMBER 6. Petersburg. Menard Circuit Court begins three-day term. Defendant defaults in Miles v. Webb and Rogers. Court gives plaintiff, Lincoln's client, judgment for $368.60. Because justice of peace had failed to send up all papers. White and Williams v. Baxter is continued until Nov. 8. Leave is given to open depositions in Waggoner et al. v. Eastep. Lincoln appears for plaintiff in last two cases. Record. [Mrs. Lincoln reduces her husband's account 25˘ for pair of gloves. Irwin Ledger.]

NOVEMBER 7. Taylor v. Wright, bill to foreclose mortgage, is continued. Logan & Lincoln represent complainant. Lincoln, Harris, and Baker lose Cabot v. Regnier when jury finds defendant not guilty. Record.

NOVEMBER 8. Jury awards plaintiff $33.70 in White and Williams v. Baxter. Jury is sworn in Mills and McCoy v. Merill, and Lincoln, attorney for plaintiffs, dismisses appeal. Petition to sell real estate in Wilcox v. Wilcox et al. is granted, and Lincoln, attorney for complainant, files his report. Injunction in Waggoner et al. v. Eastep is made perpetual in sum of $14.62, Lincoln for complainant. Lincoln writes and files five affidavits, including his own, in Cabot v. Regnier, on basis of which Baker moves for new trial, which court grants, with change of venue to Morgan County. Ibid.

NOVEMBER 9. Springfield. On or about this day Lincoln writes to John McNamar, Menard County assessor, about payment of taxes on Menard land, enclosing money. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 330. Lincoln writes and files, for plaintiff, petition and note in Tibbs v. Miller. Photo.

NOVEMBER 13. Sangamon Circuit Court is in session until Nov. 30. Three cases are dismissed and two continued for Logan & Lincoln. In Smedley v. Vredenburgh, defendant is made party to Nov. 22, 1842 judgment against Robert F. Canfield. Logan & Lincoln appear for plaintiff. Record. Lincoln writes and signs answer to plea in Ball v. Field. Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

NOVEMBER 14. Logan & Lincoln win by default Butler v. Webster and Caldwell v. Moore and Moore. Defendant in Short et al. v. Miller is made party to judgment against E. C. Blankenship. Logan & Lincoln appear

215

for complainants. They enter motion in Bosbyshell v. Moore, and take nonsuit in Mallory v. Maxey et al. Two cases are dismissed, one continued and three set for later hearing. Ibid.; Record.

NOVEMBER 15. Logan & Lincoln obtain judgments in seven suits totaling $4,499.74. Four cases are dismissed, one continued, and in two they are ruled to plead tomorrow. On motion of Lincoln, Bledsoe is appointed guardian for infant heirs in Gardner v. Johnson et al., and defendant is ruled to answer tomorrow. On Mar. 29, 1842, Hamlin Whitmore got judgment against Ervin Clark; on Lincoln's motion, writ to sell property is given. Ibid.

NOVEMBER 16. Logan & Lincoln, attorneys for defendants, file pleas in Lewis v. Broadwell, Brother v. Frink, Walker & Co., and Webster & Co. v. Kilbum & Co. Two cases are dismissed. They win six other cases, in one of which, Constant v. White, they obtain judgment for $1,200 for plaintiff. Ibid.

NOVEMBER 17. Four cases are won by Logan & Lincoln by default, including Speed v. Branson et al. Four cases are dismissed, three continued, and on their motion, E. D. Baker is appointed guardian in two chancery cases. In Robert S. Todd v. Nathaniel A. Ware, on Lincoln's motion defendant is ruled to file his answer by Monday. Plaintiff is Lincoln's father-in-law. Ibid.

NOVEMBER 18. Logan & Lincoln have seven cases in court. In three chancery cases their petitions are granted; they lose two assumpsit suits; trespass case is dismissed, and an assumpsit suit set for Monday. Ibid.

NOVEMBER 20. Erastus Wright, school commissioner, employs Logan & Lincoln in eight debt cases. On their motion all are dismissed. They obtain judgment of foreclosure in Barrett v. Crowder; two debt cases are continued on their motion. In Runyon v. Dresser, on their motion defendant is ruled to answer Tuesday. They win Lewis v. Broadwell when suit is dismissed for want of prosecution. Ibid.

NOVEMBER 21. Brother v. Frink, Walker & Co., is argued before jury. Defendant files demurrer to Lincoln's bill in Todd v. Ware. Notice of publication is filed by complainant in Mitchell v. Corneau et al. Permission to sell property is granted complainant in Dabney v. Whitney et al. Logan & Lincoln appear for plaintiff in all four cases. Ibid. Lincoln writes and files affidavit of Leroy L. Hill, who swears before John Calhoun, clerk, in Trailer v. Hill. Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. Lincoln's banker pays $5 from Lincoln's account to James Grant, evidently for firewood, and Lincoln buys wood saw and frame for $1.25. He purchases $32.50 worth of merchandise also. Irwin Ledger.

216

NOVEMBER 22. Logan & Lincoln win Brother v. Frink, Walker & Co. when jury awards plaintiff $612.50. Lesure and Bliss v. County of Menard produces legal battle between Campbell and Lincoln. Case is continued. Five other cases of Logan & Lincoln are called. Record. Lincoln buys "clothing material" for $19.98, and trimmings for coat and pants @ $5.08. Irwin Journal.

NOVEMBER 23. Court hears argument on defendant's demurrer in Todd v. Ware, and considers. Petition to partition land in Van Deren et al. v. Van Deren et al. is granted. Defendant in Runyon v. Dresser fails to comply with rule of court requiring him to answer complainant's bill and is ruled to convey lot to plaintiff. Logan & Lincoln appear for plaintiff in all three cases. Record.

NOVEMBER 24. Logan & Lincoln obtain two judgments for school commissioners and dismiss nine other cases. People v. Joseph Klein and Louisa Hosey, charged with fornication and adultery, is continued by order of state's attorney, McDougall. Logan & Lincoln appear for defendants in this case, and for plaintiffs in three others. Ibid.

NOVEMBER 25. In each of three cases of E. Wright, school commissioner v. Chatterton et al., Glynn et al., and McDonald et al., Logan & Lincoln obtain judgment for $100 debt and $17 damages. They also obtain judgment in Gardner v. Johnson et al. Court sustains defendant's demurrer in Todd v. Ware, but overrules demurrer to complainant's amended bill. Ibid.; Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

NOVEMBER 27. Judgment by default for $2042 is awarded plaintiff in Mitchell v. Corneau et al. A. T. Bledsoe is appointed guardian in Caldwell v. Foster et al. Logan & Lincoln appear for plaintiff in both cases. Record.

NOVEMBER 28. Lincoln buys six yards twill cotton for 75˘. Irwin Journal.

NOVEMBER 29. Injunction in Sparks v. Bird and Bird is made perpetual. Todd v. Ware is submitted to court on bill, amended bill, answer, replication, and exhibit to be heard during vacation. Gentry v. Gentry, petition for divorce, is dismissed. Sixteen cases are continued. Logan & Lincoln appear for plaintiff in each case. Wright et al. v. Adams, filed June 22, 1837, which led to Lincoln's argument with James Adams, is abated, defendant having died. Record.

NOVEMBER 30. Todd v. Ware is to be heard by judge Dec. 9 in chambers. Both parties MAY take depositions in Springfield. Lincoln files award of arbitrators in Wood v. Jones and moves award be judgment of court. Logan & Lincoln win two chancery cases, and get judgment of $341 for plaintiffs in Lane and Webb v. Edwards. Ibid. Voluminous paper work of Todd v. Ware is in Lincoln's hand. Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

217

DECEMBER 1. Logan & Lincoln file declaration in Vance v. Kilgore et al. in U.S. Circuit Court. Plaintiff, Joseph Vance, declares defendants are indebted to John W. Vance on two notes for $150 each and about $150 interest. Record. Lincoln writes more papers in Todd v. Ware and signs his father-in-law's name. Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

DECEMBER 4. Logan, for Logan & Lincoln for appellant, files answer in Blue v. Allen and wife (SC). Record.

DECEMBER 5. In U.S. Circuit Court, on motion of Logan & Lincoln, attorneys for plaintiff in Vance v. Kilgore et al., defendants are ruled to plead tomorrow. Ibid.

DECEMBER 6. Logan & Lincoln win Vance v. Kilgore et al. when defendants default. Plaintiff is awarded $1,765.66. Ibid.

DECEMBER 7. Moore v. Nelson and Ashworth, ejectment case begun in U.S. Circuit Court December 12, 1842, is continued. Logan & Lincoln appear for plaintiff, and Baker and Bledsoe for defendants. Ibid. Lincoln's account is charged 88˘ for seven yards of calico, bought by hired girl. Irwin Ledger.

DECEMBER 8. Lincoln is present at taking of depositions of Ninian W. Edwards and Erastus Wright in Todd v. Ware. Emanuel Hertz, Abraham Lincoln, a New Portrait, 542-43. He writes "true copy" of court order in William A. Butler et al. v. John C. Butler et al. Photo. Lincoln buys 88˘ worth of merchandise. Irwin Ledger.

DECEMBER 9. Lincoln draws up affidavit and exhibit in Todd v. Ware, chancery suit. Upon this affidavit and exhibit, in connection with pleadings, exhibits, and depositions, Logan & Lincoln for complainant move court to rule defendant to file, or produce instanter notes mentioned in pleas. Record.

DECEMBER 10. Lincoln probably spends day conferring with Whig leaders m preparation for state convention to be held Monday and Tuesday. Delegations arrive from Cook, Winnebago, Jo Daviess, Gallatin, White, Edwards, and Vermilion counties. Missouri Republican, Dec. 13.

DECEMBER 11. Whig state convention meets at noon in state house, Archibald Williams of Quincy is elected president. Lincoln is chosen one of nine Presidential electors. In evening Hall of Representatives is packed to hear speeches by Brown of Vermilion, Smith of Cook, Powers of McLean, Bond of Clinton, Linder of Coles, and Baker of Sangamon. Alton Telegraph, Dec. 16.

DECEMBER 12. Whig convention continues all day. In evening addresses

218

are made by Lincoln, Dixon, and Browning. Ibid.; Burlington (Iowa) Hawkeye, Dec. 28.

DECEMBER 13. Davenport et al. v. People, for use of Commissioners of Rock Island County (SC), is dismissed by appellants on agreement of parties. Logan & Lincoln appear for appellants. Record.

DECEMBER 14. Hall v. Perkins (SC), appeal from Tazewell, is argued before court by Baker and Bledsoe for appellant, Leonard and Brayman for appellee, and submitted. Lincoln's name is on record as one of counsel, so it is probable he is present. Record. (On Feb. 10, 1844, judgment is reversed and case remanded. 5 Ill. 548.) Lincoln writes memorandum in Todd v. Ware. Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

DECEMBER 15. In Metz et al. v. Wolff et al. (SC), appeal from Macon County, defendants are ruled to join in error by 18th. Same ruling is made in Bruce v. Truett, appeal from Jo Daviess County. Record.

DECEMBER 18. On Brayman's motion, cases of Metz et al. v. Wolff et al., and Bruce v. Truett are reversed by Supreme Court for failure of defendants to join in error as ordered. Record. Lincoln draws up affidavit and praecipe in David Spear v. William Lowry. Spear sues to recover horse, three cows, and three calves. Photo. Lincoln's account is charged 70˘ for coat binding procured by his tailor Biddle for Lincoln's suit. He deposits $35 cash, and takes home 70˘ worth of merchandise. Irwin Ledger.

DECEMBER 19. Lincoln files motion to dismiss Robinson v. Chesseldine et al. (SC), appeal from Brown County, because there was no final lower court decree. On motion of Logan, and by consent, order for reversal given Monday in Bruce v. Truett is set aside and errors joined. Record.

DECEMBER 21. Lincoln writes agreement of parties for deposition to be used as evidence in McDonald v. Fithian and Juneau (SC) and signs for latter, his clients. Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

DECEMBER 22. Favor et al. v. Marlett (SC), appeal from Kane County, involving competency of witnesses, is continued by consent. Lincoln and Dickey represent plaintiffs and Peters defendant. Record.

DECEMBER 26. On motion of plaintiff, defendant is ruled to join in error by tomorrow in Blue v. Allen et al. (SC), appeal from Livingston County. Logan & Lincoln appear for plaintiff in error. Ibid.

DECEMBER 27. Logan & Lincoln win Blue v. Allen et al. when court reverses judgment for want of joinder in error. Logan enters appearance of defendant in Lockridge v. Foster (SC), chancery case appealed from Sangamon. Ibid. Mrs. Lincoln buys "domestic" for 25˘. Irwin Ledger.

219

DECEMBER 29. [Whigs of Springfield have given up plan of electing Lincoln governor and are urging Hardin to become Whig candidate. Chicago Historical Society, Chicago, Illinois — John J. Hardin Papers, Chicago Historical Society, Chicago, Illinois, G. T. M. Davis to J. J. Hardin, Dec. 29.]

DECEMBER 30. Logan & Lincoln join in error for defendant in Lockridge v. Foster. Record. Lincoln's banker-merchant, Robert Irwin, credits him with $15 paid in by "Watts," and $10.50 for six months' interest on $175. Irwin charges his account $9.50 to pay for purchases of Biddle, tailor, in Lincoln's behalf. Irwin Ledger.

1844

JANUARY 1. Springfield. Lincoln's bank account is balanced, showing credit of $134.30. Irwin Ledger.

JANUARY 2. Lincoln writes Henry E. Dummer: "In reply to yours of the 14th ult. I say that if you can get a clear title to the 40 acres of land, together with costs, and a reasonable fee to yourself, I reckon you had better do it. Have the deed made to me." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 330.

JANUARY 3. McRoberts, attorney for appellant in McDonald v. Fithian et al. (SC), moves that deposition of J. H. Murphy taken in case pending in Circuit Court of Vermilion between Cunningham and defendant be filed and read, deposition having been read in circuit court. Motion is resisted by Lincoln & Logan for appellees. Record.

JANUARY 4. Trial of McDonald v. Fithian et al. continues. McRoberts moves for leave to file affidavit of J. J. Brown in support of his motion, made yesterday, and to file deposition of John H. Murphy. Case is set for argument tomorrow. Ibid. Sangamo Journal announces Lincoln as auditor for Illinois Senate.

JANUARY 6. Bledsoe files agreement and on his motion it is made part of record in Robinson v. Chesseldine et al. (SC). Record. Lincoln does paper work for Sangamon Circuit Court divorce case: writes acknowledgment of notice in Alger v. Alger and signs for "Baker & Bledsoe," and writes commissioner's affidavit for Charles B. Dutcher, who signs it. Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.; Photo.

JANUARY 8. McRoberts, attorney for appellant, begins argument in McDonald v. Fithian et al. Lincoln, Logan, and Baker appear for appellees. Record.

220

JANUARY 9. Argument in McDonald v. Fithian et al., is continued by McRoberts for appellant and by Lincoln and Baker for appellees. Ibid. Logan & Lincoln, complainant's attorneys, publish notice that subpoena in chancery has been issued in Dillon v. Lake, returnable to Mar. term of Sangamon Circuit Court. Sangamo Journal, Jan. 18.

JANUARY 10. J. J. Brown, for appellant, continues argument in McDonald v. Fithian et al. Record. Logan & Lincoln, for plaintiff, file notice of attachment for $142.80 in Alexander v. Alexander. Defendant is notified to appear at Mar. term of Sangamon Circuit Court "or judgment will be rendered against you Sangamo Journal, Jan. 18.

JANUARY 11. J. J. Brown concludes argument in McDonald v. Fithian et al., and case is submitted to court. (On Feb. 11, decree of lower court is affirmed. 5 Ill. 269.) Record.

JANUARY 12. Lincoln makes affidavit that Nathaniel Hay is about to commence suit in chancery in Sangamon Circuit Court against Nicholas Bryan, Sr., and that Bryan does not reside in Illinois. He writes bill in chancery in case, to have lots sold at auction. Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

JANUARY 16. Lincoln and Rev. Charles Dresser make contract for transfer to Lincoln of property now known as "Lincoln Home." Lincoln agrees to pay Dresser $ 1200 in cash and to convey lot in business section which he and S. T. Logan acquired two years earlier. Record; The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 331.

JANUARY 18. Reargument of England v. Clark (SC), assumpsit from Menard County, ordered by court Mar. 3, 1843 is begun by Urquhart for plaintiff in error. Record. Sangamo Journal announces that Lincoln, attorney for Urban Alexander, files attachment against defendant in Alexander v. Alexander.

JANUARY 19. Argument begun yesterday in England v. Clark is continued by Edwards and Bledsoe for defendant and concluded by Lincoln for plaintiff. (On Feb. 8, judgment of lower court is affirmed.) Record; 5 Ill. 486.

JANUARY 22. Robinson v. Chesseldine et al. (SC), is argued by Bledsoe for appellant and Lincoln for appellee and case is submitted. (Judgment of lower court is affirmed Jan. 30. 5 Ill. 332). Pentecost et al. v. McGahee (SC), which first came before court Feb. 7, 1843, is argued by Baker and Bledsoe for appellant and Lincoln for appellee and case submitted. (It is dismissed Jan. 24.) Record.

JANUARY 23. Spear v. Campbell (SC), bill in chancery to set aside alleged fraudulent conveyance, appealed from Sangamon County, is argued by Robbins for plaintiff and Logan & Lincoln for defendant. Ibid. (On

221

Feb. 6 court reverses judgment and case is remanded at cost of plaintiff. 5 Ill. 424.)

JANUARY 24. Lincoln draws up affidavit of Henry Dresser, contractor. Dresser swears he has done $60 worth of carpenter work for Dorthea Grant and that she has left state. Photo.; Sangamo Journal, Feb. 15. Lincoln files abstract in Edwards et al. v. Helm. Record.

JANUARY 25. [Stephen T. Logan moves in Supreme Court that John T. Stuart be enrolled as attorney and counsellor at law, and files affidavit that Stuart had been licensed in 1828 and license had been lost. Motion is allowed. Ibid.]

FEBRUARY 2. Lockridge v. Foster (SC) and Lazell v. Francis (SC) are argued by Robbins for plaintiffs and Lincoln for defendants. Ibid. (Logan and Lincoln win Lockridge v. Foster when court affirms judgment of lower court Feb. 10. 5 Ill. 569.) Lincoln's account is debited 34˘ for 5 1/2 yards calico, and $1.47 for merchandise. Irwin Ledger and Journal.

FEBRUARY 3. Wells Colton and Baker for plaintiffs and Lincoln for defendant argue case of David Davis, administrator v. Harkness before Supreme Court. Case is submitted. Record. Lincoln deposits $61.50, and borrows $588 from Robert Irwin & Co., signing note for that sum in principal and interest, which is credited to his account. Irwin Ledger.

FEBRUARY 5. Lincoln makes payment of $750 under contract of Jan. 16 with Charles Dresser. Sum is to draw 12 per cent interest until Dresser fulfills contract. Record. Money comes from Lincoln's account; he writes order to seller for $750. Irwin Ledger.

FEBRUARY 6. Supreme Court affirms judgment of justice of peace court in Lazell v. Francis, argued by Robbins for appellant and Lincoln for appellee on Feb. 2. Record. J. S. Martin pays $9.25 into Lincoln's account. Irwin Ledger.

FEBRUARY 7. Craig et al. v. Helm et al. (SC), from Madison County, is argued by Strong for plaintiffs. Johnston v. Weedman (SC), action of trover from DeWitt County, is submitted on briefs and abstracts, by Colton for plaintiff and Lincoln for defendant. Lincoln wins case when two days later judgment of lower court is affirmed. Record; 5 Ill. 495.

FEBRUARY 8. Argument begun yesterday in Craig et al. v. Helm et al. is continued by Edwards, Stuart, and Martin for defendants and concluded by Lincoln for plaintiffs. Record.

FEBRUARY 9. Robbins, attorney for plaintiff in Lazell v. Francis, argues motion to have case remanded to lower court. Judgment of justice of peace

222

court had been affirmed Feb. 6. Lincoln represents defendant. Ibid. Lincoln buys 25˘ worth of merchandise. Irwin Ledger.

FEBRUARY 10. Logan resists motion made yesterday in Lazell v. Francis. Court refuses remand, and overrules Logan's motion to amend judgment in relation to costs in Spear v. Campbell (SC). McDonald v. Fithian et al., and Davis v. Harkness, are taken under advisement. Decree of lower court is later affirmed in both cases. Record; 6 Ill. 173-269.

FEBRUARY 12. Lincoln buys pair of socks for Robert, aged six months, for 13˘. Irwin Ledger. Logan & Lincoln, for plaintiffs in Klein v. Irwin et al., and Irwin et al. v. Bell et al., file petitions for partition. Defendants are notified to appear at Mar. term of Sangamon Circuit Court. Sangamo Journal, Feb. 15. [Dr. A. G. Henry writes John J. Hardin in Washington: "We have had several Whig meetings in Springfield lately and they seem to have carried enthusiasm to its highest pitch. . . . At these ‘Clay Clubs’ we sing old songs for ‘gallant Harry’ and this with eloquent speaking from Logan, Lincoln and Baker you may well imagine the effect. We have a meeting once or twice a week and we intend to keep them up till November. I know that if you were in Morgan all would go well but I fear that the people of Morgan have lost what they are not able to replace. I know how this goes if Baker or Lincoln is missing at our meetings. It seems that something is lost." Chicago Historical Society, Chicago, Illinois — John J. Hardin Papers, Chicago Historical Society, Chicago, Illinois.]

FEBRUARY 13. Lincoln writes and files petition in Klein v. Irwin et al. Photo.

FEBRUARY 14. Lincoln writes Richard S. Thomas of Virginia that he can find only one copy of President's message in town and that in state library. "If alive and well, I am sure to be with you on the 22nd. I will meet the trio of mighty adversaries you mention, in the best manner I can." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 332.

FEBRUARY 15. "Mrs. Mosely" buys dollar's worth of nails and charges to Lincoln's account. Irwin Ledger and Journal.

FEBRUARY 16. Lincoln writes Simeon Ryder about his chancery suit against Daniel Stringer and heirs of Edward Mitchell. On Nov. 30, 1843, Logan & Lincoln obtained decree against Stringer in favor of Ryder for former's debt of $300 with interest at 7 per cent from Jan. 1, 1836. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 332. [Illustrative of feeling between Whigs and Democrats in Springfield are these lines from Register: "Lincoln, another member of the Junto . . . is our jester and mountebank. . . . We have had him appointed a candidate for Clay elector. This we hope will buy him off from being a candidate for Congress. . . . We intend to send Lincoln to Linder's county (Coles) to make speeches. Lincoln is a long-legged varmint, and great at jurnping

223

. . . out of the windows of the State House. . . . He can make a speech which is all length and height like himself, and no breadth or thickness."]

FEBRUARY 17. Lincoln draws $15 cash from his account for pocket money. Irwin Ledger.

FEBRUARY 20. Lincoln buys $100 bond of city of Springfield to finance payment of state house subscription. Bond Record Book.

FEBRUARY 21. "Baker, Lincoln, Logan and Stuart are making speeches every night at some one of the precincts in our County to crowded houses; we confidently expect to give 1000 majority in Sangamon County for Clay. . . Logan and Lincoln address a meeting at Virginia tomorrow." Chicago Historical Society, Chicago, Illinois — John J. Hardin Papers, Chicago Historical Society, Chicago, Illinois, William Butler to Hardin.

FEBRUARY 22. Virginia. Whig meeting is held in court house in afternoon. Lincoln's speech in reply to Judge Pearson, dealing mainly with currency and bank issues, is applauded. Lincoln probably attends another meeting in evening. Sangamo Journal, Mar. 28; The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 332-33. A Virginia Van Buren man described Lincoln's speech in letter to "Register": "‘Aunt Becky’ felt it her duty to deliver herself of a soul stirring harangue. She opened her wise head — ‘broke up the fountains of the great deep’ of natal depravity; and rained ‘a horrible tempest’ of billingsgate, and vulgar party vituperation on the devoted head of Van Buren." After another speech, "‘Aunt Becky’ [Lincoln's 1842 nom de plume] kindly dismissed the coons till 9 o'clock next morning, when — dear old pious soul — she would like to hold a sort of love feast with them." Register, Mar. 15.

FEBRUARY 23. "On the morning of the 23rd, addresses were received from Mr. Killpatrick and Mr. Lincoln. They portrayed the absurdities of locoism and the soundness of Whig principles." Sangamo Journal, Mar. 28.

FEBRUARY 24. Springfield. Lincoln has trunk rack of his buggy repaired ($1) at carriage shop. Obed Lewis Account Books.

FEBRUARY 28. Lincoln writes praecipe and bond filed in Johnson v. Wickersham, acting for plaintiff. Photo.

MARCH 1. Sugar Creek Meeting House, Sangamon County. Whig rally is held at early candle lighting. In his speech on tariff, Lincoln attempts to convince farmers that high tariff makes cheaper goods. Speeches are made by Dr. A. G. Henry, Edward D. Baker, and Dr. F. A. McNeil. Register, Mar. 15; The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 334.

MARCH 2. Springfield. Flag is raised over Whig cabin. At night a great assemblage of Whigs at cabin celebrates recent Whig victory in Maryland.

224

Dr. McNeil, Lincoln, and E. D. Baker speak. Whig choir sings patriotic songs. Sangamo Journal, Mar. 7.

MARCH 4. Lincoln signs "Logan & Lincoln for plff." on receipt for $131.63,execution of judgment in Walker v. Lockridge, to Sheriff William F. Elkin Photo.

MARCH 6. Lincoln writes and sends to Beardstown declaration, affidavit, praecipe, and bond in Thayer v. Farrell, signing Logan & Lincoln. Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. Lincoln deposits $9.25, his half of law fee. Irwin Ledger.

MARCH 7. Lincoln writes and files, for plaintiff, bill in Johnson v. Wickersham. Photo.

MARCH 8. Lincoln writes and mails to Petersburg bill for divorce in Miller v. Miller. Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. Lincoln pays $1.55 for repairs to his buggy shaFt. Obed Lewis Account Books.

MARCH 9. Rochester? "There will be a Whig meeting on next Saturday night, 9th. at Rochester. It is expected that Lincoln and other speakers will be there." Sangamo Journal, Mar. 7. Lincoln's bank account is charged 25˘ for pair of woolen mittens. Irwin Ledger.

MARCH 11. Lincoln writes narration in Hill v. Rague, Sangamon Circuit Court case. Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

MARCH 12. Lincoln signs receipt for $127.28, payment of debt and interest on execution in Smedley v. Canfield and Vredenburgh. Photo.

MARCH 13. Jacksonville. Lincoln arrives in Jacksonville in evening. Register, Mar. 22. En route or by mail he files petition for partition in Opdycke et al. v. Godfrey, for petitioner, at Taylorville. Photo.

MARCH 14. In Circuit Court, trial of Eliza S. Cabot v. Francis Regnier, slander suit on change of venue from Menard County, begins. Lincoln writes and files exceptions to defendant's deposition, and demurrer to amended plea. Record; Photo.

MARCH 15. Cabot v. Regnier is tried before jury, which finds for plaintiff and fixes damages at $1600. Record.

MARCH 16. Lincoln and Baker debate with Calhoun and Cavarly during last evenings of this week. Chicago Historical Society, Chicago, Illinois — John J. Hardin Papers, Chicago Historical Society, Chicago, Illinois, Simeon Francis to J. J. Hardin, Mar. 17.

MARCH 18. Springfield. Logan and Lincoln have two cases called on opening day of Sangamon Circuit Court. W. H. Herndon serves on grand jury. Series of political debates between Lincoln and Calhoun, extending

225

into next week, begins in evening. Lincoln makes strong defense of cheapness of articles protected by tariff. Record; Register, Mar. 22.

MARCH 19. Logan & Lincoln have nine cases in court. Ball v. Field is tried before jury; Webb v. Jacobs they win by default. In Irwin v. Wilbourn, justice of peace is ruled to send up papers. Three cases are continued and one dismissed. By agreement, Beidler v. Woodruff is set for bearing Thursday. They win Thayer & Co. v. Canfield, assumpsit suit. They appear for plaintiff in all except last two cases. Record.

MARCH 20. Logan & Lincoln represent complainant, Erastus Wright, school commissioner, and obtain judgments totaling $4,597.54 in ten cases. They win Simpson v. Stockton, assumpsit, when defendant confesses indebtedness. Lincoln writes and files defendant's plea and demurrer in Lesure and Bliss v. County of Menard. Eight other cases are called, two continued, and two dismissed. For plaintiff, Lincoln writes bill of complaint and declaration in Dresser v. Grant. Ibid.; Photo.

MARCH 21. Seventeen cases are called for Logan & Lincoln. In two, tried by court, court considers. They win two jury cases, Ball v. Field and Dresser v. Grant. In Beidler v. Woodruff, jury is dismissed and case continued. Reports are approved in two chancery cases and guardians appointed in three others. They win two cases by default, have two dismissed, and defendant ruled to answer on Friday in three others. Record. Lincoln fills out printed mortgage deed in transaction between John M. and William Bridges and Seth M. Tinsley, which John and William Bridges sign. Photo.

MARCH 22. Klein v. Irwin et al., petition for partition of land, is granted by court. Jackson v. Applegate is dismissed. Logan & Lincoln appear for complainant in these cases and for plaintiffs in Vaughn, Sandford & Co. v. Wetherbee et al., injunction suit. They appear for defendants in Lockridge v. School Commissioners and win case. Record. Logan & Lincoln receipt on judgment docket of Sangamon Circuit Court that judgment for $476.26, obtained Nov. 22, 1841 in Blankenship & Co. v. Rockwell & Co., has been satisfied in full. Lincoln writes replication, for plaintiff, in Hay v. Bryan. He writes separate answers of Benjamin M. Kizer, Morris Bird, and Moses Ellsworth, and files in Groves v. Garvey. Photo.

MARCH 23. Court orders complainant's exceptions sustained in Vaughn, Sandford & Co. v. Wetherbee et al. Logan & Lincoln win appeal case, thancery, and assumpsit suit. They enter demurrer and defendants are given leave to amend plea in Latham v. West and Lamb. They appear for plaintiff in Jayne v. Reed, in which defendant files plea. Record.

MARCH 25. Lincoln and Calhoun continue debate. A good crowd attends each meeting and "Journal" gives Calhoun "due praise for making the

226

most of a bad cause. The efforts of Mr. Lincoln were distinguished for ability, and in all candor we must say, that we did not discover a single position raised by Mr. Calhoun that he did not entirely demolish." Sangamo Journal, Mar. 28; The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 334-35.

MARCH 26. Logan & Lincoln appear for plaintiff in five cases. They lose Irwin v. Wilbourn when court affirms decision of lower court. Their petition for partition of land is granted in Carpenter v. Trotter et al. Defendant in Harrison and Sinnard v. Alexander renders full satisfaction of judgment against him. Defendants file their answer in Hay v. Bryan et al.; Schemerhorn and March v. Taylor is dismissed. Record.

MARCH 27. Lincoln has busy day in Circuit Court. In evening he listens to speech of John Calhoun which "Register" characterizes as "luminous convincing, and unanswerable." Lincoln answers Calhoun either this evening or tomorrow evening. Register, Mar. 29.

MARCH 28. Lincoln files plea in Lesure and Bliss v. County of Menard Jury is called in People v. Joseph Klein and Louisa Hosey. Jury fails to agree and is discharged. Logan & Lincoln appear for defendants in this case and in Taylor v. Taylor et al., assumpsit suit. Blankenship v. center is heard by court. They appear for plaintiff in this case and in People v. Sheppard et al., which is continued on their motion. Record.

MARCH 29. Three cases of Logan & Lincoln are continued and two dismissed. They file complainants' replication in Campbell and Dabney v. Spear and Spear. Commissioners' report in Carpenter v. Trotter et al. is approved. They represent complainant. Ibid. Lincoln writes answer of John T. Stuart, guardian, in petition of Edmund Taylor to sell real estate of Washington Ray. He writes petition filed in Edmund Taylor v. Elizabeth Ray, signing "Logan & Lincoln for Petitioner." Photo.

MARCH 30. Logan & Lincoln have 13 cases called. Three they argue before court and win, five are continued, one dismissed, and in three others they enter motions that defendant be ruled to plead. Court orders parties in Carpenter v. Trotter et al. to pay costs in proportion to their respective interest. Logan & Lincoln represent complainant. Record.

APRIL 1. Court orders complainant's bill dismissed in Todd v. Ware, and defendant is to have costs expended. In Stephen T. Logan v. Carter, Logan gets judgment for $373.50. If judgment is not satisfied in 60 days, master-in-chancery is to sell property. Robert Irwin v. Joshua F. Speed et al., partition suit, in which Logan & Lincoln appear for complainant, is decided in their favor. Ibid.

APRIL 2. [Claim of Logan & Lincoln for $12.50 against estate of Barton Moore for drawing up petition to sell real estate and writing deed is paid by Eli C. Blankenship. Probate Court Files.]

227

APRIL 3. Tremont. Tazewell Circuit Court convenes. David Davis, Bloomington attorney who travelled Eighth Circuit in spring of 1844 wrote: "Politics rage now hereabouts. . .. The first day of every court is occupied with political speaking, usually by an Elector on each side of politics each person generally taking some three or four hours. . . Lincoln is the best stump speaker in the State." Illinois State Historical Library, Springfield, Illinois. — David Davis MSS. [cited as David Davis Papers, Illinois State Historical Library, Springfield, Illinois].

APRIL 4. Cromwell and McNaughton v. Hewitt and Davenport is continued with alias summons against Davenport to county of Woodford. Leonard appears for plaintiff and Lincoln for defendant. Defendants default in May v. Greene and Loose and court declares patent issued to them null and void. Logan & Lincoln appear for plaintiff. Record.

APRIL 6. Tremont and Peoria. Lincoln leaves Circuit Court in afternoon, arriving in Peoria at sundown. Notice is given of his speech to Clay Club at court house at 7:30. In spite of severe rain, room is half filled to hear his two-hour address. Peoria Register, Apr. 19. [Mrs. Lincoln draws$46.50 in housekeeping money, evidently mainly for house furnishings. Irwin Ledger.]

APRIL 8. Tremont. Lincoln writes answer in Moore v. Davis; he writes and files Davis' affidavit. Photo. Lincoln, Baker, and Calhoun make two speeches each in Tazewell County before they move on to Woodford Circuit Court at Hanover. Register, Apr. 19.

APRIL 10. Order of court in Thorp v. Doolittle, written by Lincoln, is filed in Tremont. Photo.

APRIL 11. Hanover. Woodford Circuit Court opens two-day term. Arnold and Blair v. Richardson is dismissed by agreement at cost of Arnold. Jury finds for defendant in Robinson v. Cassel. Lincoln appears for plaintiff in first case and defendant in second. In Boggs v. Overton, trespass, Davis and Colton appear for plaintiff and Lincoln for defendant. Record. He writes and files pleas for Overton, rejoinder, and affidavit. Photo.

APRIL 12. Lincoln wins Boggs v. Overton when jury finds for defendant. He appears for defendants in Pillsbury and Alexander v. Baker and Sunderland. Case is continued at cost of defendants. Record.

APRIL 13. Peoria. In broadside issued in Peoria Apr. 9, Democrats announce that John Calhoun is sorry he was not present to reply to Lincoln's speech Apr. 6. Lincoln on receiving copy of broadside resolves to reply to Calhoun's speech this evening at court house. Learning that Lincoln is Present, Calhoun speaks until 11:30. Whigs call for Lincoln and he replies. Peoria Register, Apr. 19.

APRIL 14. En route to Bloomington?

228

APRIL 15. [McLean County Circuit Court opens three-day term. Lincoln's account is charged $5.25 for merchandise. Irwin Ledger.]

APRIL 16. [Lincoln's account is charged $3.75 "for balance on lamps." Mrs. Lincoln is buying furnishings for new home. Ibid

APRIL 22. Springfield. Lincoln signs for Logan & Lincoln in judgment docket, indicating that judgment of $341 in Lane and Webb v. Edwards is paid in full. ["Lincoln and Calhoun have returned from Tazewell. Our people are in the best spirits there. So far as we learnt, Lincoln never left Calhoun on any one occasion, that he did not make him hang down his under lip." Chicago Historical Society, Chicago, Illinois — John J. Hardin Papers, Chicago Historical Society, Chicago, Illinois, S. Francis to J. J. Hardin.]

APRIL 23. Lincoln & Logan and wives convey lot on Adams Street between Fourth and Fifth Streets to Charles Dresser for $300. This is part payment on Lincoln's home at Eighth and Jackson. The Abraham Lincoln Association, Springfield, Illinois. [Files and records on deposit at Illinois State Historical Library, Springfield, Illinois.] — Papers, 1925, 34.

APRIL 24. Lincoln writes Rowland, Smith & Co. concerning collections from Francis, Allen & Stone. Refusing to handle their real estate business, he recommends "Isaac S. Britton, a trust-worthy man, & one whom the Lord made on purpose for such bussiness." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 335.

APRIL 25. Clinton. Judge Treat opens two-day session of DeWitt Circuit Court. Lincoln's suit to collect on note for $200 given him in defending Spencer Turner for murder in 1840 is continued by consent. On Lincoln's motion, McDowall v. Duncan et al. is continued with leave to commissioners to execute order made Sept. 29, 1843. In Peters v. Martin, for complainant, Lincoln moves continuance with leave for commissioner to execute prior decree. Record.

APRIL 26. [Mrs. Lincoln is dressing up yard as well as house. Lincoln's account is charged 50˘ for "balance on account" and $l for spade. Irwin Ledger.]

APRIL 28. Springfield. On back of bill for divorce, Lincoln pens note to H. M. Vandeveer, clerk of Christian Circuit Court. Complainant, Andrew Jackson Wilson, charges his wife with adultery, man named Taylor named corespondent. Lincoln asks that "Taylor's Christian name" be filled in, bill filed, and subpoena issued. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 336.

APRIL 29. [Champaign Circuit Court convenes for two-day term at Urbana.]

APRIL 30. Urbana. Lincoln appears for complainant and Fell for defendant in State Bank v. Mitchell et al. After argument, report and sale of property are disapproved. Commissioners are ordered to pay back to William P. Withers purchase money and execute earlier decree. Withers presents his bill of exceptions, and case is continued. Record.

229

MAY 1. [Henry Clay is nominated by acclamation for President by Whig national convention, Baltimore.]

MAY 2. Springfield. Logan & Lincoln, representing plaintiff in Barren v. Kilbourne, file with clerk of U.S. Circuit Court mortgage on 440 acres of land in Christian County to secure payment of $500. They ask for summons to defendant returnable at June term of court. Record. [Piatt Circuit Court convenes at Monticello.]

MAY 3. Rev. Charles Dresser gives Lincoln deed to residence. Lincoln and S. T. Logan file deed conveying "the east half of the west half of lot six in block fourteen" in Springfield to Dresser. Record. Lincoln writes and mails to clerk of Christian Circuit Court petition for divorce in Andrew J. Wilson v. Susan M. Wilson. Photo.

MAY 6. Tremont. Seventh congressional district Whigs convene and nominate E. D. Baker for Congress. Delegates from Sangamon are N. W. Edwards, William Harvey, Eddin Lewis, Z.. A. Enos, J. M. Maxcy, J. H. Matheny, N. A. Garland, and B. A. Watson. Newspaper reports do not mention whether Lincoln is present. Sangamo Journal, May 23. [Macon Circuit Court is in session today and tomorrow.]

MAY 9. [Moultrie Circuit Court convenes at Sullivan.]

MAY 13. [Shelby Circuit Court convenes for four-day term at Shelbyville.]

MAY 20. [Coles County Circuit Court convenes.]

MAY 21. Springfield. Lincoln writes to Hardin to send documents to Thomas Campbell of Spring Creek. "Rob't W. Canfield, says he would like to have a document or two from you. The Locos here are in considerable trouble about Van Buren's letter on Texas." Van Buren's opposition to annexation displeased Springfield Democrats. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 336. Lincoln buys two fire screens at 50˘ each. Irwin Ledger.

MAY 22. Sangamon County citizens interested in annexation of Texas meet in evening at state house to consider letters of Clay, Van Buren, and "Benton on subject, Lincoln makes first speech, agreeing with these men that annexation on Tyler's plan is inexpedient. W. L. D. Ewing introduces resolutions favorable to President's plan. Sangamo Journal, June 6.

MAY 24. Texas meeting, adjourned Wednesday evening, is held at state louse. Lincoln's name does not appear in proceedings, but his ideas as set forth on Wednesday evening prevail. Sangamo Journal, June 6; Missouri Republican, May 30; Illinois State Historical Library, Springfield, Illinois. — Original call for convention, signed by 115 local Democrats.

230

MAY 25. Baker speaks at afternoon meeting, which Lincoln probably attends. Missouri Republican, May 30.

MAY 27. Peoria. Lincoln is one of attorneys in Aquilla Wren v. Clarissa Wren in Peoria Circuit Court. Divorce was granted Mar. 16, and defendant entered motion for new trial. Lincoln was not connected with case until today. He draws up reasons and affidavits in support of motion Record. [Christian Circuit Court convenes for two-day term.]

MAY 28. It appears from affidavits filed in Wren v. Wren that Lincoln is in Peoria until May 31. Record.

MAY 29. Lincoln writes two affidavits of testimony in Backinstos v. Samuels. He acts for defendant in "Jackass Suit," replevin concerning mule Photo.

MAY 30. Lincoln receives note for $150 from Clarissa Wren as fee in Wren v. Wren. He receipts on back of note for $20 received. The Abraham Lincoln Association, Springfield, Illinois. [Files and records on deposit at Illinois State Historical Library, Springfield, Illinois.] — Ernest E. East to H. E. Pratt, Aug. 8, 1939. [Logan Circuit Court convenes.]

MAY 31. Lincoln draws up and files agreement of attorneys in Wren v. Wren that in case new trial is granted, case "shall stand over until Monday the 17th day of June next, when both parties or either of them may appear, for the purpose of presenting the question of alimony." Record.

JUNE 1. Counsel in Wren v. Wren argue motion for new trial, which court denies, victory for Lincoln, petitioner's attorney. Record. [Lincoln does not vote in election of constable in Springfield. John M. Cabiness, Whig is elected.]

JUNE 3. Petersburg. Menard Circuit Court opens three-day term. Defendant defaults in Tibbs v. Miller; court orders him to pay $114.65 debt and damages. Logan & Lincoln appear for plaintiff and Harris for defendant. Record. Court adjourns and Calhoun and Baker debate. Lincoln speaks on tariff in evening at Menard County Whig convention. Sangamo Journal, June 13.

JUNE 4. Miller v. Miller divorce suit is continued. In People on complaint of Jane Davidson v. Bennett, jury decides defendant is father of illegitimate child. Logan & Lincoln appear for plaintiff in first and defendant in latter case. Lincoln loses Ritter and Ritter v. Waggoner when court awards plaintiff $1,453.49. Waggoner v. Lukins is opened by Baker, Matheny and Lincoln for complainant. Record. After court, E. D. Baker addresses Whig meeting at Clary's Grove, five miles southwest of Petersburg, to which Lincoln probably accompanies him. Sangamo Journal, June 13.

JUNE 5. Petersburg and Springfield. Logan and Lincoln appear for complainant in Taylor v. Wright. Court decrees that complainant recover

231

$722.48 on foreclosure of mortgage and sale of property. Judgment of lower court is reversed in Hornbuckel v. Bone. Harris appears for appellant and Lincoln for appellee. Record. Lincoln arrives home in time to nay $10 "on account" at Robert Irwin's store. Irwin Ledger.

JUNE 6. [Mason Circuit Court convenes for two-day term at Bath.]

JUNE 7. Springfield. Defendant defaults in Barrett v. Kilbourne in U.S. Circuit Court. Court orders 440 acres of land in Christian County sold to pay debt of $500 and damages and costs of $140.58. Logan & Lincoln appear for plaintiff. They get judgments for $5,242.10 and $1,051.28 in two cases of Fassett et al. v. Blackwell. Lincoln signs firm name to judgment docket attesting full payment of judgment won Nov. 22, 1843 in Alexander Brother v. Frink, Walker & Co., $612.50 damages and $22.12 costs. Record.

JUNE 10. In U.S. Circuit Court, Sturtevant v. City of Alton, case involving power of corporation, is tried during June term which began June 3. William L. Lincoln, Alton attorney, represents plaintiff and Logan, Lincoln, and Bailey defendant. Lincoln and associates lose case when Judge John M. McLean, "in a learned and perspicuous and pointed opinion," finds for plaintiff and orders Alton to pay amounts due on bonds with interest. 3 McLean 393; Springfield Times, in Peoria Democratic Press, June 19. Lincoln pays $2.56 cash on his account at Obed Lewis' carriage shop. Obed Lewis Account Books.

JUNE 12. Public meeting is held, with David J. Baker as chairman. Lincoln explains that object is to discuss fairly connection of Whig party with recent Philadelphia riots. His four resolutions are adopted. E. D. Baker makes address. Sangamo Journal, June 20; The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 337-38. Logan & Lincoln win Moore v. Nelson and Ashworth in U.S. Circuit Court when Jury awards plaintiff 160 acres. Record.

JUNE 17. Lincoln has buggy trimmed by Obed Lewis carriage shop, costing $10 for material and labor. He may have used buggy for journey to Peoria Whig rally. Illinois River is in flood, suggesting that Mary Lincoln recommended another form of transportation than river steamer. Obed Lewis Account Books; Spirit of the Times, Apr. 22, 1848, Mill Boy (St. Louis), June 22, 1844; Diary of William Sewall, 267. [Wren v. Wren comes up for hearing in Circuit Court at Peoria on bill, answer, replication, and verdict of jury. Court grants divorce and continues application of Pendant for alimony. Record.]

JUNE 18. Peoria. [Sangamon, Scott, Brown, Schuyler, and Mason County delegations to Whig Convention leave Beardstown on steamer Lebanon for all night ride to Peoria. Alton Telegraph, June 29.]

232

JUNE 19. Great Whig meeting is held in Peoria — 5,000 to 8,000 estimate, attendance. Archibald Williams of Quincy is chosen president. Speeches are made by Lincoln, Baker, Morrison, Anderson, Kilpatrick, Sweet, Bond, and Dr. McDowell and Uriel Wright of St. Louis. Lincoln is chairman of committee on resolutions. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 338-40; Sangamo Journal, June 27; Quincy Whig, June 26.

JUNE 20. [Steamer Lebanon leaves Peoria on night of 19th and arrives at Beardstown following morning. Sangamon delegation probably returns on it. Ibid.]

JUNE 25. Springfield. Lincoln buys haberdashery: stock $1.25; two-and-a-half yards tweed cloth for Biddle, tailor, and $1 .75 for coat trimming. He also buys $8 worth of merchandise. Irwin Ledger.

JULY 2. Mrs. Lincoln buys merchandise, $2.40. Ibid.

JULY 3. [Logan, for Logan & Lincoln, files bill in Hill v. McCondy et al. in Sangamon Circuit Court. Photo.] Mrs. Lincoln buys 30 yards calico, in two pieces, for $2.40. Irwin Ledger.

JULY 5. Lincoln files original bill in Sangamon Circuit Court in Gilman et al. v. Hamilton et al; case involving trust for Illinois College. This case is not completed until Supreme Court gives its decision in Feb. 1855. Lincoln appears for Hamilton et al. in both courts. Record.

JULY 7. Lincoln writes to John W. Vance of Danville concerning collection of judgment Lincoln won for him in Vance v. Kilgore Dec. 1, 1843. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 340.

JULY 11. [Meeting is held at Springfield Clay Club room to make arrangements to go to Vandalia convention. Sangamo Journal, July 11.]

JULY 15. Springfield-Hillsboro. Led by band, delegation to mass convention of Whigs at Vandalia sets out on Hillsboro road. They are escorted into Hillsboro in evening by band. Evening is given over to rally at court house. Ibid., July 25.

JULY 16. Hillsboro-Vandalia. Delegation moves on to Vandalia, arriving in afternoon. One who saw them en route remarked: "Old Sangamon, also, sent on a noble corps of choice spirits who, accompanied by an unsurpassable glee club, called forth thundering cheers as they passed. Evening is one of joy, mirth and song — and 26 salutes of cannon. Ibid; July 25, Aug. 8.

JULY 17. Vandalia. Marion delegation arrives with banner, one side of which reads: "U.S. Bank Bill — J. J. Hardin, Cashier — Abraham Lincoln,

233

president." At meeting at 2 P.M. on town square, Lincoln is appointed one of committee of five to select officers and report resolutions for Friday's convention. Anthony Thornton is chosen president and resolutions read, then speeches from Lincoln, Linder, Bledsoe, and others are heard. Ibid.

JULY 18. At morning meeting resolutions of thanks to Simeon Francis, temporary chairman, and to Thornton for good work he is to do tomorrow, are passed. They resolve to put "shoulders to the wheel." Crowd increases and it is estimated 5,000 men and 1,000 women will be on hand tomorrow. Ibid.

JULY 19. Procession forms at 11 A.M., and marches to grove west of town. Ladies march and help serve barbecue. Returning, they gather in tent on public square. Speeches are made by Lincoln, Thornton, Linder, BIedsoe, C. H. Constable, B. Bond, J. GiIlespie, and Judge Robbins. Another group of speakers holds forth that evening. Ibid.

JULY 20. Vandalia-Hillsboro. Short speeches mark departure of Sangamon, Shelby, and Macoupin delegations. When Shelby group takes road to east, they are given standard showing downfall of Polk and triumph of Clay. They reciprocate by giving "Clay and Frelinghuysen" banner to Sangamon Whigs. Lincoln addresses evening crowd at Hillsboro court house. Ibid.

JULY 21. Hillsboro-Springfield. On arrival of delegation in evening, they are met by band and escorted through principal streets to "Clay Cabin," where "animating speeches" are delivered by Lincoln and Bledsoe. Ibid.

JULY 22. Springfield. Logan & Lincoln are busy on opening day of summer term of Sangamon Circuit Court. In Vaneaton v. Vaneaton, Lincoln's motion to dismiss suit is allowed. They win judgment in Wright v. Strawbridge, lose Blankenship and Trailer v. Hough when court dismisses appeal. Latham v. West and Lamb is revived, two cases are dismissed, and seven continued. Record.

JULY 23. Vaneaton v. Vaneaton, dismissed yesterday, is by agreement put on docket. Logan & Lincoln file declaration, notice, and affidavit of service in ejectment case, Throckmorton and Everett v. Dockum. On their motion, in four cases, defendants are ruled to answer tomorrow. In eight other cases they get judgments, four cases are continued, and two dismissed. Ibid.

JULY 24. In four cases defendant defaults and judgments totaling $2548.77 are awarded Logan & Lincoln's clients. They lose trespass case when jury finds for defendant in Grubb v. Ide. WeIles, attorney for complainant in Ware v. Ball, files his replication to answer of Robbins, Logan, and Lincoln, attorneys for defendant. Ibid. Lincoln writes, in Hill v. McCondy et al.,

234

answer of James H. Matheny, guardian of Margaret McCondy, which Matheny signs. Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

JULY 25. Leave is granted Logan & Lincoln to amend bill in Dillon v. Lake chancery case. Defendant defaults in Thompson v. Stapelford; complainant's bill is taken as confessed for $463.73. Logan & Lincoln appear for complainant and WeIles for defendant. Sackett v. Miller and Miller is continued. Record.

JULY 26. Plaintiff files declaration, notice, and affidavit of service in McConnell v. Mayberry, ejectment suit. On motion of Logan & Lincoln, defendant is ruled to plead in 20 days. Defendants default in Keedy v. Thayer et al.; court orders judgment for $500 debt and $188.16 damages to Logan & Lincoln's client. Ibid.

JULY 27. Defendant does not answer summons in Hill v. McCondy; court orders property described in complainant's bill sold if debt is not paid in 30 days. Stuart and Lincoln represent complainant. Ibid.

JULY 29. On last day of term, Logan & Lincoln get judgments for their clients in four chancery cases; fifth case is continued. Record. Lincoln writes answer of James H. Matheny, guardian ad litem in Charles Broadwell v. Mary Francis et al. Photo.

AUGUST 3. Scheduled Whig rally is cancelled because of death of John Brodie and injury of William Conant, struck by fall of derrick with which they were raising Whig Liberty Pole. Quiet evening meeting is held on lawn of J. A. Corneau, with talks by Hardin and Baker. Sangamo Journal, Aug. 8.

AUGUST 5. Lincoln votes for E. D. Baker for Congress, N. W. Edwards for Illinois Senate, S. T. Logan, Job Fletcher, William D. Herndon, and Joseph Smith for House, William Harvey for sheriff, and J. M. Neale for coroner. All are elected. Election Returns.

AUGUST 6. Lincoln deposits $50 cash. Irwin Ledger.

AUGUST 7. At meeting of Clay Club, Lincoln introduces resolutions expressing grief over death of John Brodie. On motion of Dr. A. G. Henry, committee of five is appointed to inquire into cause of accident. Sangamo Journal, Aug. 8; The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 341. Jacob Lewis presents voucher at Robert Irwin's store for $7 for services, and is paid from Lincoln's account. Irwin Ledger.

AUGUST 8. Lincoln buys $7.37 in merchandise. Ibid.

AUGUST 12. Lincoln pays $50 into his bank account, his half of fee for legal services in Drennan estate. Ibid.

235

AUGUST 16. Mrs. Lincoln buys three papers of needles, 37˘. Ibid.

AUGUST 18. Lincoln's account is debited $1.50 for looking glass, 19˘ for "dressing comb," $10 for 18 yards of goods, and $13.38 for merchandise. Ibid.

AUGUST 23. Mrs.Lincoln buys cloth,whalebones, and sewing accessories for $1.19. Ibid. [Whig Liberty Pole, 214 feet 6 inches high, which caused tragedy Aug. 3, is erected. Sangamo Journal, Aug. 29.]

AUGUST 24. Springfield? Whigs raise flag at Liberty Pole. Speeches are made by Richard Yates, William I. Ferguson, J. C. Doremus, and Dr. F. A. McNeil. Ibid.

AUGUST 26. Mrs. Lincoln buys corset goods: 6 yards "Gimp," 38˘, and 1 yard corset lace, 12˘ Irwin Ledger.

SEPTEMBER 3. N. A. Ware gives Lincoln power of attorney to represent him in Ware v. Edward Jones in Tazewell Circuit Court. Photo.

SEPTEMBER 4. [Tazewell Circuit Court convenes at Tremont.]

SEPTEMBER 5. Tremont. In Cromwell and McNaughton v. Hewitt and Davenport, defendant enters motion to dismiss case for want of prosecution. Court sustains motion. Leonard appears for plaintiffs and Lincoln for defendants. Record.

SEPTEMBER 6. [Mrs. Lincoln buys five yards of goods for 37˘, and $2.10 merchandise. Irwin Ledger.]

SEPTEMBER 7. Frazer v. Boyle, appeal case, is heard by court, and continued. Lincoln represents appellant and Saltonstall appellee. Record. Lincoln writes bills of exceptions in Gamblin v. Hepperly and Shertz, and in Hepperly v. Camblin. Photo.

SEPTEMBER 10. Cromwell and McNaughton v. Baker and County of Tazewell is continued. Record. Lincoln signs narrative of suit in Prettyman v.Turner for W. L. May, defendant's attorney. Photo.

SEPTEMBER 11. En route to Metamora. [Lincoln's account is credited $5 tor his half of fee in Irwin v. Bell et al., by Robert Irwin, his client and banker. Another $5 fee is collected from client listed as "Saunders Farm." Irwin Ledger.]

SEPTEMBER 12. Metamora. Woodford Circuit Court opens for two-day term. Pillsbury and Alexander v. Baker and Sunderland, action in debt, is dismissed by plaintiffs. In Boggs v. Overton, defendant moves to quash bill of costs. After argument, court overrules motion and orders that

236

plaintiff recover his costs. Lincoln appears for defendant in each case. Record.

SEPTEMBER 13. In Rice v. Barney, trespass, Lincoln excepts to special motion filed by defendant. Exception is sustained, with leave to defendant to file amended motion and case is continued. iIbid.

SEPTEMBER 16. [McLean Circuit Court convenes for four-day term at Bloomington.]

SEPTEMBER 21. Springfield. Lincoln writes and evidently mails to Tremont amendments to narrative in Chipman v. Higgins Tazewell Circuit Court case. Photo.

SEPTEMBER 23. {Livingston Circuit Court holds one-day session.]

SEPTEMBER 26. Clinton. DeWitt Circuit Court opens two-day term. Case of A. Lincoln v. Spencer Turner and William Turner is continued. Case began Oct. 7, 1841. Record.

SEPTEMBER 27. Commissioner appointed at last term in McDowall v. Duncan et al. files his report. He finds that property can not be equitably divided and case is continued. Ibid. [Mrs. Lincoln buys tapes and buttons, 35˘. Irwin Ledger and Journal.]

SEPTEMBER 28. [Mrs. Lincoln purchases fireplace shovel and tongs, $1.25. Ibid.]

SEPTEMBER 30. [Champaign Circuit Court convenes at Urbana for one-day session. Mrs. Lincoln's hired girl buys 13˘ worth of cambric. Ibid.

OCTOBER 3. Jacksonville. Whig rally and barbecue is addressed by Lincoln, D. M. Woodson, William I. Ferguson, and others. Much enthusiasm is expressed and all appear confident of success at polls. Sangamo Journal, Oct. 10; Burlington (Iowa) Hawkeye, Oct. 26. [Piatt Circuit Court convenes at Monticello.]

OCTOBER 5. [Lincoln's account is debited 38˘ for pair of child's shoes, and $9.39 for merchandise. Irwin Ledger and Journal.]

OCTOBER 7. Virginia. Thayer v. Farrell, attachment suit, is called in Cass Circuit Court. By agreement case is moved to Sangamon County on change of venue. Logan & Lincoln appear for plaintiff and Delahay and Baker for defendant. Record. (Macon Circuit Court convenes for one-day term.]

OCTOBER 9. Springfield. Logan & Lincoln file praecipe and pray issue of summons against defendant in Napier v. Wooldrige in U.S. Circuit Court.

237

Record. Lincoln's name is among prominent Whigs advertised to attend Whig mass meeting in Decatur today. Sangamo Journal, Sept. 26.

OCTOBER 10. [Lincoln's account is charged $1.31 for cloth, pair of black hose, and tape. Irwin Journal. Moultrie Circuit Court convenes at Sullivan.]

OCTOBER 14. [Shelby Circuit Court convenes for two-day term at Shelbyville.]

OCTOBER 15. Peoria. Lincoln appears for plaintiff in Peoria Circuit Court in Spies v. Neal et al. Spies, New York merchant, got judgment by default for $1,273 debt and $52.41 damages in May, 1839. On Oct. 2, 1844, Spies purchased property levied upon at sheriff's sale. Lincoln asks court to set aside levy on execution issued on judgment. Record.

OCTOBER 16. [Sometime during 1844 Lincoln and William L. May engage in heated debate at Main Street Presbyterian Church in Peoria. Date of encounter has not been definitely determined, but some evidence indicates that it was three-day debate commencing Oct. 15. Peoria Transcript, April 21, 23, 1881. The Abraham Lincoln Association, Springfield, Illinois. [Files and records on deposit at Illinois State Historical Library, Springfield, Illinois.] — Ernest E. East to H. E. Pratt, July 19, 1938.]

OCTOBER 17. Peoria and Springfield. Lincoln returns home and buys 12 1/4 yards of cloth ($2.95), 6 yards white flannel ($4.50), and a dozen pearl buttons, for winter underwear. Irwin Journal and Ledger.

OCTOBER 18. Springfield. Lincoln draws from auditor warrant for $150 for Judge John D. Caton, part of judge's salary for quarter ending Sept. 30th as member of Supreme Court of Illinois. Warrant Register, Auditor's Office.

OCTOBER 19. In U.S. Circuit Court Logan & Lincoln, plaintiffs' attorneys, file suit to foreclose mortgage executed by defendants in Woods et al. v. Yates et al., and ask that summons be issued. Mortgage was made Feb. 8, 1843, on 160 acres in Christian County to secure $457 to Woods, Christy & Co. of St. Louis. Record.

OCTOBER 21. Charleston. Lincoln represents defendant in Alexander v. Affleck as Coles Circuit Court convenes. Ibid.

OCTOBER 24. [It is probable that Lincoln started for Vincennes latter part of this week. He is said to have been guest of Judge Abner T. Ellis, though there is no record that he made address in Vincennes. Major William Bruce, for whom Bruceville, Indiana was named, claimed that Lincoln spoke in brick schoolhouse in Bruceville. Lincoln Lore, No. 271.]

OCTOBER 25. [There is a tradition that Lincoln gave political address in

238

Washington, Indiana, under large elm tree at Third and Main streets and engaged in law suit in Daviess County Court. Ibid.]

OCTOBER 28. [Christian Circuit Court meets for one-day term.]

OCTOBER 30. Rockport, Indiana. Lincoln speaks to large audience at court house in evening. He sets forth main arguments for protective tariff. He is followed by the friend of his youth, John Pitcher. (Rockport) Indiana Herald, Nov. I; The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 341. [Mrs. Lincoln's hired girl collects tapes at store, 13˘. Irwin Ledger.]

OCTOBER 31. [If Lincoln attended meeting of Clay Club at Evansville, Indiana Nov. 1, he spent today on road from Rockport to Evansville. Logan Circuit Court convenes at Postville. Logan & Lincoln are attorneys for plaintiff in partition suit of Drury Martin and Sarah Martin v. Thomas Lowry et al., which is heard this term.]

NOVEMBER 1. [Evening Journal of Evansville, Indiana on Oct. 31, 1844 advertised meeting of Clay Whig Club at court house today. Although it is not certain, Lincoln may have been one of speakers. Lincoln Lore, No. 271.]

NOVEMBER 2. Carlin Township, Indiana. According to Nat Grigsby, Lincoln's boyhood friend who gave his recollections to Herndon in 1865, Lincoln speaks at "Carlin township about three-quarters of a mile from the home farm," and at Rockport and Gentryville on this stumping tour. This must have been the day, if not Thursday or Friday, for Carlin Township voters. Hertz, Hidden Lincoln, 356.

NOVEMBER 4. Gentryville, Indiana. In letter to David Turnham just before his election to presidency, Lincoln wrote: "I well remember when you and I last met, after a separation of fourteen years, at the cross-road voting place, in the fall of 1844." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, IV, 130-31. [Whigs carry Springfield 1,031 to 758 and Sangamon County 1,837 to 1,371. Pease, 151. Menard Circuit Court opens three-day term at Petersburg. Reply to petition in Broadwell v. Broadwell, written by Lincoln, is filed in Supreme Court, Springfield. Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. Mrs. Lincoln buys 12˘ comb, pair of "Kid Slippers," $1.25, and $4.39 in groceries. Irwin Ledger and Journal.]

NOVEMBER 6. [Lincoln gets Lawrence County election returns and probably starts for Springfield today or tomorrow.]

NOVEMBER 7. [Mason Circuit Court convenes for two-day term at Bath.]

NOVEMBER 11. [Sangamon Circuit Court convenes for three-week term.]

NOVEMBER 12. Springfield. Jury awards plaintiff $200 in Vanecaton v. Vaneaton. Logan & Lincoln represent defendant. They win McConnell

239

v. Mayberry, ejectment suit. Plaintiff is ruled to show cause in Clements v. Cloyd why he should not give security for costs; in Chatterton v. Curran, defendant files plea. Logan & Lincoln represent plaintiff in these two cases. Six cases are continued. Record. Lincoln buys groceries: 6 3/4 pounds loaf sugar, $1.25; half-pound gunpowder tea, 75˘. Irwin Ledger and Journal.

NOVEMBER 13. Logan & Lincoln file bond for costs in Clements v. Cloyd, trover and conversion suit. Case is argued before jury and jury retires. Brayman appears for defendant. Record.

NOVEMBER 14. Lincoln draws warrant for $17.60 from auditor as compensation for bringing presidential polls from Lawrence County to Springfield. In Sangamon Circuit Court, jury disagrees in Clements v. Cloyd and case is continued. In Lesure and Bliss v. County of Menard, in which Lincoln appears for defendant, plaintiffs enter demurrer to his plea. Warrant Register, Auditor's Office; Record.

NOVEMBER 15. Lesure and Bliss v. County of Menard is argued before jury by Campbell for plaintiffs and Lincoln for defendant, whereupon plaintiffs take nonsuit and jury is discharged. Logan & Lincoln appear for defendants in People v. Klein and Hosey, and on their motion change of venue is granted to Menard County. Two cases are set for later hearing. Record.

NOVEMBER 16. Beidler v. Woodruff, appeal, is submitted to court and court considers. Defendant in Throckmorton and Everett v. Dockum is ruled to file patents for land in dispute by morning of 18th. Logan & Lincoln appear for appellee in first case and complainant in latter. Ibid.

NOVEMBER 18. Defendants in Shepherd v. Lyon et al. file their plea. Leave is given to open depositions in Thayer v. Farrell and Barrett v. Saunders and Beck. In latter case, complainant files his exceptions to depositions. Logan & Lincoln appear for plaintiff in all three cases. Record. Lincoln writes petition to sell land for William H. Herndon, administrator of James Bell. Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

NOVEMBER 19. Thayer v. Farrell is continued with consent to take and retake depositions. In Ware v. Ball, defendant is ordered to pay master-in-chancery $561.77 by Mar. 15th or land described in bill will be sold. WeIles represents plaintiff and Robbins, Logan & Lincoln defendant. Record.

NOVEMBER 20. Shepherd v. Lyons et al. is argued before jury by Logan & Lincoln for plaintiff and Robbins for defendants. Defendant in Chatterton v. Curran withdraws all pleas filed except not guilty, and plaintiff then dismisses suit at his cost. Logan & Lincoln represent plaintiff. Ibid. Lincoin writes half of bill for Bennett C. Johnson in Stringer v. Ryder. Photo.

240

NOVEMBER 21. Lincoln gets judgment by default in Ide v. Yocum. In three chancery cases in which Logan & Lincoln represent petitioners, reports are examined and approved. On Lincoln's motion, defendants in Fortune v. Garvey et al. are ruled to answer by tomorrow. Record. Lincoln is charged $1.02 for cloth, ribbon, and whalebone. Irwin Ledger and Journal.

NOVEMBER 22. Defendant Saunders in Barrett v. Saunders and Beck files his replication. Complainant's exceptions to depositions taken in this case by defendant are argued by court and court considers. Logan & Lincoln appear for plaintiff and Robbins and Smedes for defendants. Record.

NOVEMBER 23. Antrim Campbell, master-in-chancery, files report in Robert Irwin v. Joshua F. Speed et al. Report is approved in this case, and in Thompson v. Stapleford, and School Commissioners v. Crosby. Logan & Lincoln represent plaintiff's. They obtain leave to amend declaration in People v. Shepherd et al. Ibid.

NOVEMBER 25. On Lincoln's motion, Antrim Campbell is appointed guardian ad litem in Dormady v. Latham et al. Appeal to Supreme Court is granted plaintiff in Lesure and Bliss v. County of Menard. Ibid.

NOVEMBER 26. Fortune v. Garvey et al., chancery case in which Logan & Lincoln represent plaintiff, is continued. Ibid.

NOVEMBER 27. William H. Herndon, by order of Circuit Court, is given certificate of good moral character written by Lincoln. Logan & Lincoln win case of Beidler v. Woodruff, in which they appear for appellee. On Lincoln's motion, appeal to Supreme Court is granted plaintiff in Blankenship v. center. Ibid.; Photo.

NOVEMBER 28. [Sangamon Circuit Court does not meet.]

NOVEMBER 29. In Circuit Court, complainant is given leave to amend his bill in Hay v. Bryan et al. Court upholds Lincoln's exceptions to depositions taken by defendants. Case is continued. Logan & Lincoln win Dormady v. Latham et al. when defendants default. Logan & Lincoln file plaintiff's declaration in Napier v. Wooldridge in U.S. Circuit Court. Ibid.

NOVEMBER 30. Whigs caucus to select candidate for House and Senate offices. Lincoln probably attends. Illinois State Historical Library, Springfield, Illinois. — Journal, XXVIII, 249-50.

DECEMBER 1. Robert Irwin & Co. pays $5 into Lincoln's account, evidently legal fee. Irwin Ledger.

DECEMBER 2. U.S. Circuit Court convenes, David J. Baker, attorney for defendant in Napier v. Wooldridge, files plea, saying there is no judgment for $681.44 against Wooldridge in St. Louis court. Wooldridge says he paid

241

judgment before this suit began, and that plaintiff owes him $800 for goods and $900 for two Negroes. Record. Lincoln's account is debited $1.20 for 15 pounds of 8 penny nails which "Robinson," workman, collected, $5.25 for 21 pounds of feathers, and $6.70 for groceries. Irwin Ledger and Journal.

DECEMBER 4. In U.S. Circuit Court, on motion of Logan & Lincoln, attorneys for plaintiffs in Woods et al. v. Yates et al., defendants are ruled to plead by tomorrow morning. Record.

DECEMBER 5. Defendants default and court orders land sold to pay debt of $457.47 and damages of $158.81 in Woods et al. v. Yates et al. in U.S. Circuit Court. Logan & Lincoln appear for plaintiffs. Ibid.

DECEMBER 6. Lincoln writes Samuel D. Marshall, attorney at Shawneetown, explaining what action he will take in several Supreme Court cases sent to him by Marshall. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 342. Logan & Lincoln file replication, demurrer, and exceptions to defendant's plea in Napier v. Wooldridge in U.S. Circuit Court. Record.

DECEMBER 7. Logan & Lincoln enter motion to withdraw replication filed yesterday in Napier v. Wooldridge in U.S. Circuit Court. Ibid.

DECEMBER 9. In Napier v. Wooldridge, defendant withdraws his plea and plaintiff agrees to take no exceptions to defendant's notice. William H. Herndon is admitted to Sangamon County bar. In Supreme Court, Robbins, attorney for plaintiffs, files motions in Lockridge v. Foster and Lazell v. Francis. Logan & Lincoln represent defendants. Ibid.

DECEMBER 10. Plaintiff in Favor v. Marlett et al. (SC), is ruled to file abstracts by 14th. Lincoln and Dickey represent plaintiff and Peters defendant. Ibid. At Whig caucus Lincoln, Logan, and Hardin are nominated Whig candidates for U.S. Senate. On first ballot Hardin gets two-thirds of votes, and is chosen party nominee. Mrs. Lincoln acquires four yards gimp, 25˘. Irwin Journal.

DECEMBER 11. Defendant in Morgan v. Griffin (SC), by his attorneys, Lincoln, Hardin, and Smith, moves court to dismiss writ of error because plaintiff has not filed sufficient record. Record. Trial of Charles H. Chapman of Chicago for perjury under bankruptcy act begins in U.S. Circuit Court. Logan & Lincoln and Judd appear for defendant. Alton Telegraph, Dec. 21.

DECEMBER 12. McDougall, attorney for plaintiff in Morgan v. Griffin (SC) suggests dimunition of record and moves court for writ of certiorari. Record. Chapman trial continues in U.S. Circuit Court. Alton Telegraph, Dec. 21. Lincoln signs "Lincoln for Deft." to stipulation written by M.

242

Brayman, attorney for plaintiff in Charles H. Valentine & Co. v. John Delany. Photo.

DECEMBER 13. Defendant moves court for additional security on supersedeas bond filed in Kimball v. Cook (SC). Butterfield is attorney for plaintiff and Lincoln and Dickey for defendant. Record. Chapman trial continues. Newspaper reports that it has been conducted with great ability on part of Justin Butterfield, U.S. district attorney, and Logan & Lincoln. Alton Telegraph, Dec. 21.

DECEMBER 14. Logan & Lincoln lose their case when jury finds Chapman guilty of perjury. Their plea for new trial is denied. Ibid. Exact date cannot be ascertained, but partnership of Lincoln & Herndon begins soon after Herndon's admittance to bar Dec. 9. Herndon-Weik, 211-12.

DECEMBER 16. Beaumarchais, attorney for plaintiff in Kelly v. Garrett (SC), moves court for leave to withdraw transcript and to prepare abstract. Lincoln is plaintiff's other attorney, and Logan appears for defendant, which indicates their partnership has been dissolved. Record. Lincoln deposits $5, his share of fee in Hiram Penny case. Irwin Ledger.

DECEMBER 17. Lincoln writes J. J. Hardin that he wishes J. R. Diller appointed postmaster in Springfield to succeed George W. Spottswood, deceased. "I do not perceive how you can effect any thing; but if you can and will, you will oblige at least." [Diller was appointed and held office to 1849.] The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 342-43.

DECEMBER 18. Logan & Lincoln file replication to defendant's plea in Napier v. Wooldridge in U.S. Circuit Court. Record.

DECEMBER 19. Defeat of Henry Clay discourages many Springfield Whigs, including Lincoln. They hold meeting to discuss future of Whig party. Mass meeting had been held in St. Louis Nov. 25th to organize American-Republican party. Chicago Historical Society, Chicago, Illinois — John M. Palmer Papers, Illinois State Historical Library, Springfield, Illinois, John T. Stuart to John J. Hardin, Dec. 18.

DECEMBER 20. In Wren v. Moss et al. (SC), plaintiff's attorneys, Lincoln and Powell, file motion that writ of error be issued, and file affidavit of Clarissa Wren. Record.

DECEMBER 21. Lincoln argues his motion for new trial for Charles H. Chapman, convicted Dec. 14 of perjury. Butterfield resists motion. Missouri Republican, Dec. 24. Supreme Court orders Dorman et ux. v. Lane reargued. Lincoln represents plaintiff in error, and Trumbull defendant in error. Record.

DECEMBER 23. Defendant files rejoinder in Napier v. Wooldridge in U.S.Circuit Court. Plaintiff, by Logan & Lincoln, files demurrer. Record.

243

Judge Nathaniel Pope sentences Charles H. Chapman to five years in penitentiary. Logan & Lincoln fail to obtain new trial. Alton Telegraph, Dec. 28.

DECEMBER 24. Lincoln and Powell argue motion made on 20th to issue writ of error in Wren v. Moss et al. Purple and Peters resist motion. Record.

DECEMBER 26. Supreme Court accepts motion in Wren v. Moss et al., and orders defendants to appear at next term. Ibid. Lincoln's account is debited $3.50 for money paid to Biddle, tailor. Irwin Ledger.

DECEMBER 27. In U.S. Circuit Court, defendant in Napier v. Wooldridge files his rejoinder to Logan & Lincoln's replication, and affidavit for continuance. Record. Lincoln buys merchandise, $3.50. Irwin Ledger.

DECEMBER 31. Lincoln's bank account gains $13.65 by year-end balance. Ibid.

1845

JANUARY 1. Springfield. ["The night was one of great hilarity and enjoyment in Springfield. A large and very general party at the State House and a select party by Mrs. Young at the American House. Ladies of Episcopal Church also gave a supper — proceeds for religious purposes. It was one of the handsomest things I ever attended. . . . A very large number in attendance, and all expressed themselves gratified." Missouri Republican, Jan. 6.]

JANUARY 3. Dorman et ux. v. Lane is reargued before Supreme Court by Lincoln for plaintiff and Trumbull for defendant. Lincoln wins when decree of lower court is reversed (6 Ill. 143). Morgan v. Griffin, in which Lincoln represents defendant, is continued. Record. Lincoln writes and signs reply to assignment in Irwin v. Hall (SC). Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. Mr. and Mrs. Lincoln are doubtless among 400 attending party at N. W. Edwards' home. [Meeting is held in state house to form state colonization society. Sangamo Journal, Jan. 23.]

JANUARY 4. Defendant withdraws plea in Napier v. Wooldridge in U.S. Circuit Court. Court awards plaintiff $681.44 debt and $140.97 damages. record. Lincoln receipts on judgment docket full payment of money in Speed v. Branson et al. He obtained judgment in this case Nov. 17, 1843.

JANUARY 6. Lincoln writes and signs petition to review in Blankenship v. center (SC). Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. [Journal carries legal notice in case of Rhea

244

v. Foutch et al., signed Logan & Lincoln, complainant's solicitors. This notice is dated some weeks after partnership terminates.]

JANUARY 7. Graves v. Bruen (SC) is argued by Minshall for appellant and Browning for appellee. Argument is concluded by Williams for appellant. Lincoln is associated with Minshall and Williams but does not take part in argument. Record.

JANUARY 8. Martin v. Dryden et al. (SC), appeal from Madison County, is bill for injunction involving title to land. N. D. Strong and Hall argue case for appellant. Ibid. Large party for members of legislature is held in state house.

JANUARY 9. Lincoln argues Martin v. Dryden et al. for appellee and Browning concludes for appellant. Case is submitted to court. Lincoln, and Krum, who had submitted written argument, win their case when court orders complainant's bill dismissed Jan. 18. Record; Missouri Republican, Jan. 22.

JANUARY 10. Defendants in Craig et al. v. Helm et al. (SC), by Martin, their attorney, argue motion that decree of court be amended. Motion resisted by Strong and Lincoln. Record. [Journal of Jan. 16 carries legal notice of Harlan v. Renshaw and Ferrel, signed "Logan and Lincoln, plaintiff's attorneys."] Lincoln buys half-pound of tea (75˘) pair of child's shoes (63˘), and $3.55 in groceries. Irwin Ledger and Journal.

JANUARY 11. Lincoln buys yard of shirting, spool, and paper of pins for 34˘, and bunch of flowers for 25˘. Ibid.

JANUARY 13. [Lobby met each Monday evening. This group of Whigs and Democrats, with Sidney Breese as chairman, met to provide entertain ment and enliven evenings. Informal debates were feature that attracted Lincoln and probably he attends regularly.]

JANUARY 16. Lincoln appears for defendant in Broadwell et al. v. Broadwell et al. (SC) and asks leave of court to assign cross errors in case Record.

JANUARY 18. Lincoln buys two dozen pearl buttons (25˘), piece of do mestic (8˘), set of cups and saucers and two preserve dishes for $1.25 Irwin Ledger and Journal.

JANUARY 23. Favor v. Marlett et al. (SC), is argued by Dickey and Lincoln for plaintiff and Peters for defendant. Lincoln and Dickey win when court reverses lower court judgment. Record; 6 Ill. 385. Lincoln writes and signs petition for rehearing and reply to assignment of errors in Patterson and Patterson v. Edwards and Edwards. (SC). Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

245

JANUARY 24. In Stickney et al. v. Cassell (SC), from Gallatin County, plaintiff is given leave to amend his assignment of errors. W. H. Stickney appears for plaintiff, and Lincoln, who writes and signs reply to petition, for defendant. Record; Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

JANUARY 25. Lincoln is one of committee of three which petitions House of Representatives to permit use of hall for temperance lecture by T. S. Fairchild this evening. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 343.

JANUARY 27. Cases of Parker v. Smith et al (SC) and Stickney et al. v. Cassell are argued. Lincoln appears for plaintiff with Dickey in first case and alone for defendant in second. Judgment is affirmed in Morgan v. Griffin, defendant, Lincoln's client, to pay costs in Supreme Court and each party to pay respective costs in Circuit Court. Record.

JANUARY 28. Lincoln and Dickey for defendant and Butterfield for plaintiff argue Kimball v. Cook (SC), and case is submitted to court. Ibid. Lincoln writes and signs, for Hardin and Smith, plea and reply to demurrer in Morgan v. Ladd and Harlan (SC). Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

FEBRUARY 1. Lincoln, for defendant in People ex rel. Magone v. Browne (SC) writes motion that bill of exceptions signed by Browne be made part of record. He signs "Campbell & Lincoln." Ibid.

FEBRUARY 3. Mrs. Lincoln buys three yards Irish Linen ($2.63), 16 yards cotton cloth ($2), pair of side combs for 50˘, and $10.75 in groceries. Irwin Ledger and Journal.

FEBRUARY 5. Lincoln argues his motion of Jan. 16 for leave to assign cross errors in Broadwell et al. v. Broadwell et al. Record.

FEBRUARY 6. Supreme Court overrules Lincoln's motion in Broadwell et al. v. Broadwell et al. Case is argued by Smedes for plaintiffs and Lincoln and Baker for defendants, who lose when court reverses lower court decree. Ibid.

FEBRUARY 8. Hall v. Irwin et al. is continued by consent of Minshall for plaintiff and Lincoln for defendant. Case, appealed from Sangamon County, involves want of power in administrator to convey real estate and title under will. Ibid.

FEBRUARY 10. In Thomas v. Negus (SC), Lincoln for plaintiff with Martin argues demurrer to writ of error. Case is settled Jan. 10, 1846, and Lincoln's only connection with it is on this day. Ibid.; Photo; Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. Lincoln's account is charged $3.12 for trimmings taken up by Biddle, Lincoln's tailor. Irwin Ledger.

FEBRUARY 11. Lincoln buys half pound of gunpowder tea (75˘). Ibid.

246

FEBRUARY 12. Robbins, attorney for plaintiff in Lockridge v. Foster (SC), moves court to amend decree in relation to interest. Lincoln resists motion. Record. With Joseph GiIlespie, Lincoln examines Stanislaus P. LaLumiere, and recommends him for license to practice law. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 343.

FEBRUARY 13. Morgan v. Griffin (SC), case from Scott County involving procedure, is argued by Jordan and McDougall for plaintiff in error and Lincoln for defendant. Record.

FEBRUARY 14. Cook v. Hall (SC), ejectment case from Richland County, is argued by Lincoln for plaintiff and Baker for defendant. Ibid.

FEBRUARY 15. Argument is concluded by Lincoln in Cook v. Hall. At later date lower court judgment is affirmed. Field et al. v. Rawlings (SC), action of debt on surety bond, is argued by Lincoln for plaintiff and by Trumbull and McDougall for defendant. Case is submitted to court. (Lincoln wins case when judgment is reversed Feb. 24.) Ibid.; 6 Ill. 581. Lincoln buys 50˘ pair scissors. Irwin Ledger.

FEBRUARY 17. Plaintiff is ordered to file abstracts in Blankenship v. center (SC) by Feb. 24. Logan & Lincoln are attorneys for plaintiff. Rogers v. Dickey (SC), appeal from Sangamon County, is submitted to court on written arguments by Scammon for plaintiff and Lincoln for defendant. Record.

FEBRUARY 18. Appellant is ruled to assign errors by Feb. 19 in Cunningham v. Fithian et al. (SC). J. J. Brown and McRoberts represent appellant and Lincoln, Logan, and Baker appellees. Ibid. Lincoln wrote reply in case in 1844, but action was postponed. Lincoln writes reply to petition, signing "Thomas & Lincoln," in Farmers and Mechanics Insurance Co. et al. v. Young (SC). Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

FEBRUARY 19. Court overrules Robbins' motion made Feb. 12 in Lockridge v. Foster. Robbins represents plaintiff and Lincoln defendant. Record. Mrs. Lincoln buys pair "Kid slippers," $1.25. Irwin Ledger and Journal.

FEBRUARY 21. Lincoln appears in his first case from Cook County when he argues for plaintiff in Kelly v. Garrett (SC). Logan appears for defendant. Record.

FEBRUARY 22. Lincoln concludes argument in Kelly v. Garrett and case is submitted. He wins case when judgment of Circuit Court is reversed. 6 Ill. 649. Robbins, for plaintiff in Lazell v. Francis (SC), renews motion that judgment be amended so that case may be remanded. Lincoln resists; and court denies motion. Record.

247

FEBRUARY 24. William Thomas, attorney for plaintiff in Regnler v. Cabot (SC), suggests marriage of defendant with E. C. Torrey since commencement of suit and moves he be made defendant; court allows motion. Lincoln enters appearance of defendant. He resists petition for rehearing in McDonald v. Fithian et al. Ibid.

FEBRUARY 27. After decision is read in Graves v. Bruen (SC), Lincoln moves case be remanded for new trial. He writes and files petition for rehearing of Rogers v. Dickey. Appellant in Dockum v. Throckmorton and Everett (SC) having failed to file record, Lincoln moves appeal be dismissed. Motion allowed with costs against appellant. Ibid.; Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. Lincoln, with associates in Lane v. Dorman (SC), Edward Jones and Samuel D. Marshall, accepts from William Dorman and wife bond for deed worth $1,200. If they win, land covered by deed will be theirs. If they lose, they will charge reasonable fee. File.

MARCH 1. Lincoln writes to Archibald Williams about Supreme Court cases he has been handling. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 344. Supreme Court denies Lincoln's motion for rehearing of Rogers v. Dickey, and allows his motion in Graves v. Bruen, made Thursday. Record. Lincoln buys for 37˘ 1/4 pound of gunpowder tea, and $1.62 merchandise. Irwin Ledger and Journal.

MARCH 5. Lincoln buys half-pound of gunpowder tea, 75˘. Ibid.

MARCH 8. Lincoln writes bond for costs and bill in chancery in Hamilton v. White et al., signing latter "Logan & Logan and Lincoln & Herndon." Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. Lincoln has spring on buggy repaired ($1.25), and pays $5 on account at Obed Lewis' carriage shop. Obed Lewis Account Books.

MARCH 13. In U.S. Circuit Court, Peters for plaintiff in Donaldson v. Reynolds and Walker files praecipe and declaration alleging failure of defendants to pay three promissory notes in amount of $11,320. Lincoln is attorney for defendants. Record.

MARCH 17. Sangamon Circuit Court opens 13-day term. Indictment for manslaughter is read in People v. Dorman. Lincoln is attorney for defendant. In two cases of Klein v. May, plaintiff is awarded judgments by default for $86.70 and $966.05. Logan & Lincoln appear for defendant in these two cases. They have two cases continued, and Barrett v. Saunders and Beck is dismissed by agreement. Ibid.

MARCH 18. First case of firm of Lincoln & Herndon in Sangamon Circuit Court, Hope v. Beebe et al., is continued. This is action in debt with Lincoln & Herndon appearing for plaintiff and Logan for defendant. Lincoln files defendant's plea in Taylor v. May, assumpsit suit. Logan & Lincoln win Clements v. Cloyd when jury awards plaintiff $24.87 1/2. Ibid.

248

MARCH 19. Defendant in Valentine v. Delany enters his exceptions to deposition of Joseph Ormsbee. Exception is sustained and deposition excluded, whereupon plaintiff dismisses suit. Brayman appears for plaintiff and Logan & Lincoln for defendant. Clements asks Logan & Lincoln to pay James Burtle out of proceeds of judgment obtained against Cloyd. Lincoln agrees if amount is not over $10. Ibid.; The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 344. Lincoln arranges and writes two agreements. For plaintiff in Taylor v. Von Phul and McGill, assumpsit, parties agree to hearing in two days. Dispute between Andrew Elliott and John Berry will be decided by David H. Smith. Lincoln signs for Elliott, Lamborn for Berry. Record; Photo.

MARCH 20. Baker and Matheny for appellant and Lincoln for appellee argue Crouch v. Murphy before court. Judgment is awarded appellee. In Camp v. Duncan, Lincoln enters motion to dismiss appeal. Lincoln, for defendant in Crouch v. Carter, moves to dismiss. Court overrules motion, parties waive jury, court hears case and considers. Lincoln takes case of John Funderburk, indicted for assauLt. Record.

MARCH 21. Lincoln files for defendants in two larceny cases, People v. Owens, and People v. White. Ibid.

MARCH 22. In People v. Owens, accused makes $200 bond. In People v. White, Lincoln arranges $300 bond. Lincoln wins Taylor v. Von Phul and McGill, assumpsit, when he argues case before jury, which finds for plaintiff. Ibid.

MARCH 24. Divorce is granted Catherine Hampton from Samuel C. Hampton. Plaintiff in People v. Shepherd et al. is given leave to amend declaration. This case and Wood v. Jones are continued. Logan & Lincoln appear for plaintiff in first two cases and Lincoln alone for plaintiff in latter. Ibid.

MARCH 25. Lincoln loses People v. Funderburk when jury finds his client guilty of assault. Court sentences him to 30 days and fines him $1.00 Ibid.

MARCH 26. Lincoln enters plea of not guilty, files affidavit, and enters motion for change of venue to Menard County in People v. Dorman. Court orders change and defendant is placed under $500 bond. Lincoln wins two larceny cases when jury finds defendant not guilty in People v. Owens. In People v. White, prosecution drops case. Ibid.

MARCH 27. People v. Shepherd et al. is transferred to civil docket. Defendant files affidavit and enters motion for continuance. Logan & Lincoln appear for plaintiff and Robbins and Smedes for defendant. By agreement, in Camp v. Duncan, defendant is discharged and suit dismissed at cost of defendant, whom Lincoln represents. Ibid. Lincoln writes report of Aaron Vandeveer, administrator of Justus Hinkle estate, in Vandeveer v. Henkle et al. Photo.

249

MARCH 28. Springfield-Jacksonville? Taylor v. May is dismissed for failure to prosecute. On Lincoln's motion, Antrim Campbell is appointed guardian ad litem in Rhea v. heirs of James Rhea. Lincoln wins Crouch v. Carter when court finds for defendant. Dinner in honor of John J. Hardin is held in Jacksonville. Baker and Hardin are speakers. Lincoln probably attends. Record; Sangamo Journal, Apr. 10.

MARCH 29. Springfield. On motion of Brayman, attorney for defendant, appeal to Supreme Court is allowed in Clements v. Cloyd. Logan & Lincoln also represent plaintiff in Harlan v. Renshaw and Ferret, attachment suit. They get judgment by default for $114.40. Judge Treat orders sheriff to sell 80-acre tract of land to pay judgment. Record.

MARCH 31. In Beidler v. Woodruff, plaintiff asks to have judgment entered at last term corrected. Complainant's petition in Rhea v. heirs of James Rhea is granted and defendants are ordered to convey property to complainant. Logan & Lincoln appear for defendant in first and complainant in latter case. Lincoln & Herndon appear for complainant in William S. Hamilton v. John White et al. Case dismissed by complainant. Ibid. Lincoln buys two clotheslines (38˘) and 12˘ worth of nails. Irwin Ledger and Journal.

APRIL 3. On execution docket in U.S. Circuit Court in two cases of Fassett et al. v. Blackwell, Logan & Lincoln receipt in full for judgments of $5260.97 and $1051.28.

APRIL 7. Lincoln buys half-pound gunpowder tea (75˘), and $15.94 merchandise. Irwin Ledger and Journal.

APRIL 9. [Tazewell Circuit Court opens at Tremont.]

APRIL 10. Tremont. On motion of complainant's attorneys, Leonard and Lincoln, in Dobbs v. Dobbs, divorce suit, defendant is ruled to answer by tomorrow. Harris v. Dean, appeal case, is tried by jury, which finds for appellant, Lincoln's client, and assesses damages of $19.95. Defendant enters motion for new trial. Record.

APRIL 11. Meeting of members of bar of Peoria, McLean, Sangamon, and Tazewell Counties is held in court room in evening to select committee to draw up resolutions of sympathy on death of William H. Wilmot, attorney. Lincoln is chosen chairman and placed on resolutions committee. In court, Lincoln has two cases continued. Ibid.

APRIL 12. Court hears argument of defendant for new trial in Harris v. Dean. New trial is granted. Lincoln appears for appellant and Leonard for appellee. Lincoln reads resolutions deploring death of William H. Wilmot. Ibid.

250

APRIL 13. Mrs. Lincoln, preparing for spring, buys gingham ($2.44) "Neapolitan Bonnet" ($7.50), three yards of bonnet ribbon (75˘), parasol ($3.50), lamp and shade for $1. Irwin Ledger and Journal.

APRIL 15. Lincoln loses appeal case, Frazer v. Boyle, when judgment of lower court is affirmed. Cromwell and McNaughton v. Baker and County of Tazewell is continued. Record.

APRIL 16. On motion of defendant's attorney, divorce suit of Jane Dobbs v. Stephen Dobbs is continued. Defendant is ordered to pay complainant $50 to aid her in prosecution of suit. Lincoln and Leonard appear for complainant and Briggs for defendant. Ibid.

APRIL 17. Metamora. Woodford Circuit Court opens two-day term. Rice v. Barney, trespass, is dismissed by agreement, each party paying his own costs. Lincoln appears for plaintiff. Ibid.

APRIL 18. Cromwell and McNaughton v. Hewitt and Davenport is tried by court. Judgment is rendered plaintiff for $1,304.10. Leonard represents plaintiff, Lincoln and Jones defendant. Ibid.

APRIL 21. Bloomington. McLean Circuit Court convenes for five-day term. Lincoln loses assumpsit case involving himself when court dismisses Logan & Lincoln v. McClun and Harkness at plaintiffs' cost. Ibid. [Mrs. Lincoln gives note to Robert Irwin, which neighbor conveys, and fetches $6.36 worth of yard goods, and $7.92 in groceries. Irwin Ledger and Journal.]

APRIL 23. Logan & Lincoln collect from Thomas Moffett $10 as fee for services rendered Justus Hinkle, deceased. Photo. [Mrs. Lincoln's hired girl buys yard of "Lawn" (sheer cloth) for 50˘. Irwin Ledger and Journal.]

APRIL 26. Springfield. Lincoln pays $6.25 on account at carriage shop. Obed Lewis Account Books.

APRIL 28. [Livingston Circuit Court meets for one-day session at Pontiac.]

APRIL 29. Lincoln buys half-pound gunpowder tea (75˘), and 31˘ worth of whalebones, hooks and eyes. Irwin Ledger and Journal.

MAY 1. Clinton. Judge Treat convenes two-day term of DeWitt Circuit Court. Case of A. Lincoln v. Spencer and William Turner is continued. On Lincoln's motion, Watson and Lloyd v. Holsey et al. is continued for want of service in time. He appears for plaintiff in McDowall v. Duncan et al., which is continued by agreement. Record.

MAY 3. Springfield. "Register" asserts that victory of Conkling, Whig, in mayorality election over Lewis, Democrat, by only 20 votes, engendered

251

fear of impending overthrow in Springfield's Whig Junto. "Their principal leaders, Messrs. Lincoln and Baker, who were out on circuit, were sent for, and came, with other Whig lawyers. Accordingly, on Saturday morning, a desperate rush was made in each ward, by these Whig committees — Baker, Lincoln, Stuart & Co. all in the field." Register, May 9.

MAY 5. [Piatt Circuit Court convenes at Monticello.]

MAY 7. [Champaign County Circuit Court convenes for four-day term at Urbana.]

MAY 10. Urbana. Lincoln and Gridley are appointed to defend William Weaver, drunkard who shot David Hildbran with rifle for no apparent reason. Shot entered Hiltibran's right side and he died. Weaver is found guilty and sentenced to be hanged but escapes. John R. Stewart, A Standard History of Champaign County, I, 179; Record.

MAY 12. Charleston. In Coles Circuit Court, Lincoln gets judgment for about $200 for McKibben against Hart. He draws up order, which McKibben signs, assigning $35 of judgment to Lincoln. This order Lincoln — leaves with circuit clerk so that Thomas Lincoln may collect money. He also writes court decree, and receipt for $50 Hart gives to McKibben. Photo.; Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. [Vermilion Circuit Court, now part of Eighth Judicial District, convenes.]

MAY 13. Charleston and Danville. Lincoln represents defendant in Ryan v. Anderson. Arriving in Danville, he writes and files pleas, as Fithian's attorney, in Brown v. Fithian. Record; Photo.

MAY 14. Danville. Lincoln files Fithian's oath of absent witness in Brown case, which is continued to next term. Record.

MAY 15. Charleston. Lincoln writes schedule of debt in Alexander, administrator of John H. McClelland v. Affleck and Rutherford. Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

MAY 19. [Edgar County Circuit Court, now part of Eighth Judicial Circuit, is in session this week at Paris.]

MAY 20. Springfield. Lincoln buys nine yards calico for $1.69, two table cloths, $1.50, and $4.19 groceries. Irwin Ledger and Journal. Lincoln & Herndon file summons in Hope v. Beebe & Taylor. Photo.

MAY 22. Lincoln's account is debited $1 for cotton umbrella. Irwin Ledger and Journal.

MAY 26. [Spring term of Moultrie Circuit Court begins.]

252

MAY 27. Petersburg. Lincoln writes and files bill of injunction in Short v. Caldwell. Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

MAY 29. [Macon Circuit Court meets today and tomorrow at Decatur.]

JUNE 2. Tayloruille. Christian Circuit Court convenes for two days. Gilbert v. Ralston, assumpsit, in which Rountree and Lincoln appear for plaintiff, is dismissed. Kilbourn v. Archer is continued. Record. Lewis v. administrators of Broadwell is tried in U.S. Circuit Court some time during term which opens today. Logan and Lincoln appear for defendants. Case goes to U.S. Supreme Court. 3 McLean 568.

JUNE 3. Springfield. In U.S. Court which opened yesterday D. J. Baker, attorney for defendant in Napier v. Wooldridge, withdraws plea. Suit is to recover on judgment of $563.05 debt and $118.39 damages secured in circuit court of St. Louis County, Missouri. Logan & Lincoln are attorneys for plaintiff. Record.

JUNE 4. U.S. Circuit Court in Napier v. Wooldridge awards plaintiff $681.44 and damages of $140.97. On motion of Logan & Lincoln for plaintiff, leave is given to strike out second count of declaration in Walker and Hack v. McCoy. Jury finds for plaintiff and assesses damages at $172.29. Ibid.

JUNE 5. Public meeting on Oregon question is held in state house. Hardin says he is content to leave negotiations to President and he does not believe there will be war, but if there is he will fight. (This is third of three meetings, other two having been held on two preceding nights.) Sangamo Journal, June 12.

JUNE 6. [Peoria? Attorney for plaintiff in Spies v. Neal et al. withdraws motion entered Oct. 15, 1844, to set aside levy on execution. Lincoln entered motion in Oct., but it is not clear from record if Lincoln or Logan is attorney on this day. Record.] Lincoln writes and signs assignment of errors in Murphy v. Summerville (SC). Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. [Convention on internal improvements is held at state house. Sangamo Journal, June 12.]

JUNE 7. Logan & Lincoln obtain judgment for $2,904.68 for plaintiffs in Hite et al. v. Kemey in U.S. Circuit Court. Record. Thomas Ford, president of last night's meeting, appoints ten delegates to South Western Convention at Memphis: Murray McConnel, Baker, Douglas, E. D. Taylor, Hardin, John Reynolds, Lincoln, A. W. Cavarly, Wm. H. Bissell, and Mark Skinner. Sangamo Journal, June 12.

JUNE 9. Petersburg. Lincoln attends three-day term of Menard Circuit Court. Prosecution drops People v. Jacob Williams, indicted for sending challenge. Lincoln and Baker are attorneys for defendant. Leave is given

253

to open depositions in Stockwell & Co. v. Page. Lincoln acts for plaintiff in Shropshin v. McHenry, chancery. Case is delayed by incorrect first name on witness list, and continued. Record.

JUNE 10. Trespass case, Moon v. Preston, is tried by jury, which finds defendant guilty and assesses damages at $5. Judgment of Justice of Peace Court is affirmed in Stockwell & Co. v. Page. In Short v. Caldwell, injunction suit, defendant is ruled to show cause why attachment should not be issued. Lincoln appears for defendant in the first two cases and for plaintiff in latter. Lincoln, for defendants, wins People v. Klein and Hosey, indicted for adultery and fornication, when prosecution drops case. Ibid.; Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

JUNE 11. Lincoln & Herndon, in their first case in Menard County, successfully defend James Dorman, indicted for manslaughter. Baker, Matheny, and Harris argue Scott v. Busher, trespass case from Sangamon County. Lincoln and Campbell appear for defendant. Jury finds defendant guilty and assesses plaintiff's damages at $275. Court grants new trial. Lincoln appears for plaintiff in Waggoner v. Lukins. Lincoln and Harris are for defendant in People v. Pond, indicted for harboring slave. Pond is put under $300 bond to appear at next term. Record.

JUNE 18. Springfield. Lincoln writes and signs declaration and praecipe, for Logan & Lincoln, in Logan & Lincoln v. Atchison. Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

JUNE 20. Lincoln writes Samuel D. Marshall about Supreme Court cases, Dorman et ux. v. Lane, and Gatewood v. Wood and Wood. He asks Marshall to remind Henry Eddy, Shawneetown attorney, about his "little fee" in Rawlings v. Field. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 345.

JUNE 26. Lincoln is appointed to committee to arrange public commemoration of Andrew Jackson's death. Register, July 4.

JUNE 27. Lincoln & Herndon, representing defendant in People ex rel. Myenhammer v. Hinkle, administrator, lose probate case when Hinkle is ordered by court to "take nothing of the estate of Justus Hinkle which remains for distribution" and to pay costs. Record.

JUNE 28. Lincoln meets with Jackson memorial committee, which arranges ceremony for July 12. Register, July 4.

JULY 4. Fourth of July celebration begins at 3 A.M. with reveille in state house cupola followed by 13 guns. Lincoln delivers oration of day in state house at 2 P.M. Celebration closes with 28 guns at sunset. Ibid.

JULY 5. Logan & Lincoln file praecipe in their suit against James D. Smith, executor of William Traitor. Record. Lincoln deposits $10, his half of

254

fee for services to Thomas Simpson. Irwin Ledger. [South Western Convention meets in Memphis on 4th and 5th. G. T. M. Davis, William Walters, and William I. Ferguson are only Illinois delegates listed in proceedings. Sangamo Journal, July 17.]

JULY 8. Springfield. Lincoln draws up agreement to provide for allowances by both sides in Hope v. Beebe et al. in Sangamon Circuit Court, debt case continued Mar. 18. Photo.

JULY 10. Lincoln draws warrant from auditor's office for $59.18, quarterly salary of Aaron Shaw, state's attorney of Fourth Judicial District. On margin of Warrant Register, clerk writes: "Handed to Capt. Lincoln July 10, 1845." Warrant Register, Auditor's Office.

JULY 12. Lincoln is member of committee of arrangements for commemoration of death of Andrew Jackson. E. D. Baker delivers eulogy at afternoon meeting at state house. Sangamo Journal, n.d.

JULY 15. Lincoln buys 12˘ paper of tacks. Irwin Ledger.

JULY 17. Lincoln writes, signs, and files declaration in Logan & Lincoln v. Smith, suit to collect from executor of deceased client $100 fee for defending Trailer for suspected murder in 1841. Record; Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. Lincoln's bank account is debited $25 for payment on house to Charles Dresser, and credited $25 when friend repays loan. Irwin Ledger.

JULY 28. Logan & Lincoln have four cases called on first day of summer term of Sangamon Circuit Court. In Logan & Lincoln v. Atchison, defendant on motion of plaintiff is ruled to plead by tomorrow. On motion of defendant in Thayer v. Farrell, leave is given to open depositions. Williams v. Reeves and State Bank v. Harlan et al. are continued. Lincoln, for plaintiff in Merriman, administrator v. Lake, assumpsit, secures agreement for trial Saturday. Record.

JULY 29. Jury awards $100 damages to Logan & Lincoln in suit against John Atchison. Lincoln files affidavit of one complainant and moves case be continued in Brown et al. v. Harlan et al. In Foster v. Hill, appellee enters his appearance and case is continued. Lincoln appears for appellee and Robbins for appellant. Ibid.; Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

JULY 30. Jury in Beerup v. Lewis awards property in question to cornplainant. Lincoln, Herndon, and Robbins represent defendant. Lincoln writes and files defendant's plea in Beaty and wife v. Miller and wife. In two of Logan & Lincoln's cases, defendants are ruled to plead by tomorrow, and two are continued. Lincoln & Herndon get $156.46 damages in Thompson v. Rowell and Nightingale. Ibid.; Photo.

JULY 31. Report of master-in-chancery in Trailer v. Hill is approved and bill of complainant dismissed. Defendant files affidavit, and on motion it is

255

ordered that execution issue for costs. Logan & Lincoln appear for defendant. Order of continuance in Foster v. Hill is set aside, and People v. Shepherd et al. is continued. Record; Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

AUGUST 1. Lincoln & Herndon file affidavit of Jonathan Miller, defendant in Beaty and wife v. Miller and wife. Lincoln loses Foster v. Hill when jury awards property to complainant. Baker files demurrer in Yocum v. Newsom, slander case. Logan, Lincoln, and Herndon appear for plaintiff. Record.

AUGUST 2. Lincoln, attorney for complainant in Calhoun v. Warner and Gros, files bill of complaint praying injunction enjoining defendant from further prosecution of suits pending. Logan resists motion and court orders motion overruled and case continued. Merriman v. Lake is postponed to Aug. 7. Ibid.

AUGUST 4. Lincoln has his buggy repaired ($2.88). Obed Lewis Account Books.

AUGUST 5. Lincoln files answer as guardian ad litem in Latham v. Latham et al. He wins Withrow v. Hill when court affirms lower court decision. With Herndon, he appears for appellant in Short v. Ray; they lose when court finds for defendant. Lincoln appears for appellants in Vanhoff and Lewis v. Broadwell. Judgment of lower court is affirmed for $11.17, Logan for appellee. Record.

AUGUST 6. Jury finds defendant guilty in Beaty and wife v. Miller and wife, and assesses plaintiff's damages at $45. Yocum v. Newsom is argued before jury. Lincoln & Herndon appear for defendant in first case, and with Logan for plaintiff in second. On Lincoln's motion, decree of last term is vacated in Miller v. Freeman and Freeman. Ibid.

AUGUST 7. Jury fails to agree in Yocum v. Newsom. They are discharged and case continued. Lincoln loses Withrow v. Hill when court finds for complainant. He files notice of publication in Hay v. Bryan et al. On defendant's motion, new trial is granted in Beerup v. Lewis, involving ownership of stud horse named Cherokee, judgment to stand as to other property. Lincoln is for defendant. Lincoln wins Merriman v. Lake, assumpsit, despite defendant's plea and affidavit when jury finds for plaintiff and awards $369.34 damages. Ibid.

AUGUST 8. Reports are filed and approved in three chancery cases in which Logan & Lincoln represent complainant: Hill v. McCondy; Rhea v. Rhea heirs; A. G. Henry, administrator of Isaac C. Whitwell. Ibid.

AUGUST 9. Leave is given complainant to amend declaration and account in Thayer v. Farrell. Logan & Lincoln appear for plaintiff and Baker and

256

Matheny for defendant. Ibid. Lincoln writes J. McDowell of Mount Carmel, giving him, gratis, complicated legal opinion on ownership of inherited property. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 345-46.

AUGUST 11. On last day of summer term of Sangamon Circuit Court Logan & Lincoln file their replication to defendants' answer in Fortune v. Garvey et al. Motion of defendants to dissolve injunction is denied in Brown et al. v. Harlan et al. Record.

AUGUST 20. Lincoln buys merchandise, 87˘. Irwin Ledger.

AUGUST 30. Lincoln buys 87˘ cloth brush. Ibid.

SEPTEMBER 1. [In Charleston, Lincoln's declaration and praecipe in Eccles v. True et al., signed "Lincoln & Dunbar," is filed. Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.]

SEPTEMBER 2. Tremont. Lincoln is appointed guardian ad litem in Bailey v. Bailey et al., bill for relief. Judge's Docket.

SEPTEMBER 3. Tazewell Circuit Court opens seven-day term. Defendant in Dobbs v. Dobbs enters motion to overrule order to pay complainant $50 to continue suit. After hearing argument, court sustains motion. Leonard and Lincoln appear for complainant and Briggs for defendant. Record.

SEPTEMBER 4. On motion of Lincoln, attorney for appellant, Harris v. Dean is dismissed at cost of appellant. Ibid.

SEPTEMBER 5. Dobbs v. Dobbs is argued before jury, which fails to agree. Stuart v. Bailey is dismissed for want of prosecution. Lincoln is attorney for plaintiff. Ibid.

SEPTEMBER 6. [Lincoln's trip around Eighth Judicial Circuit this fall gives him opportunity to obtain pledges of support in his campaign for Congress next summer. Chicago Historical Society, Chicago, Illinois — John M. Palmer Papers, Illinois State Historical Library, Springfield, Illinois, P. H. Thompson to John J. Hardin, Jan. 12, 1846.]

SEPTEMBER 9. Defendant in divorce case of Dobbs v. Dobbs moves court to dissolve injunction granted on supplemental bill. Motion is denied and court appoints David Mark receiver of real estate. Leonard and Lincoln appear for complainant and Briggs for defendant. Record. Lincoln writes order of court in Lamb & Co. v. Hawley. Photo.

SEPTEMBER 10. [Mrs. Lincoln sends hired man to Irwin's store with note. He returns $5 worth of merchandise to store, buys $1.28 in new merchandise, plus 7/8 yard white flannel (66˘), and pockets 37˘ for himself. Irwin Ledger and Journal.]

257

SEPTEMBER 11. [Woodford Circuit Court convenes at Metamora for three-day term.]

SEPTEMBER 13. {Lincoln probably visits Hennepin and other towns in Marshall and Putnam County at this time. In letter to Williamson Durley of Hennepin from Springfield Oct. 3, he says: "When I saw you at home, it was agreed that I should write to you and your brother Madison. . . . I was glad to hear you say that you intend to attempt to bring about, at the next election in Putnam, a union of the whigs proper." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 347-48.

SEPTEMBER 15. [McLean County Circuit Court opens six-day session at Bloomington.] On or about this day, Lincoln signs, with 51 others, mostly lawyers and citizens of Bloomington, petition to Gov. Ford asking reprieve for person whose name court does not know, who is sentenced to serve one year for larceny by McLean Circuit Court at this session. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 346-47.

SEPTEMBER 22. Springfield. Lincoln draws $20 from auditor for Chief Justice William Wilson and $30 for William A. Denning as state's attorney of Third Circuit. Photo. Lincoln deposits $5, his half of fee from "Miller." Irwin Ledger. [Livingston County Circuit Court meets in Pontiac for one-day term.]

SEPTEMBER 23. Lincoln buys curry comb (25˘). Ibid.

SEPTEMBER 25. Clinton. DeWitt Circuit Court convenes for two-day term. Lincoln appears for plaintiffs Watson and Lloyd, administrators v. Holsey et al. Defendant defaults and court awards plaintiff $95, amount of note, and $25.94 damages. Lincoln appears for plaintiff in McDowall v. Duncan et al., continued on his motion. Record.

SEPTEMBER 27. [Gibson William Harris stated in "My Recollections of Abraham Lincoln" that "in September, 1845, through the kindness of our then State Senator, Mr. Charles Constable, it was arranged I should enter the law office of Lincoln & Herndon." Farm and Fireside, Dec. 1, 1904.]

SEPTEMBER 29. Springfield. Lincoln & Herndon file praecipe and declaration in Rockwell et al. v. Bradford in U.S. Circuit Court. They seek to collect $669.76 on two notes and $500 damages. Record. [Piatt Circuit Court convenes at Monticello.]

OCTOBER 1. Mrs. Lincoln buys six yards domestic ($1), 2 spools thread (13˘), and has her seamstress pick them up at Irwin's store, together with $5.72 in groceries. Irwin Ledger and Journal. [Champaign Circuit Court convenes for one-day term at Urbana.]

OCTOBER 3. Lincoln writes to Williamson Durley, Hennepin Whig, about Politics. He expresses belief that Henry Clay would have been elected

258

President in 1844 if Liberty Party had voted for him. He professes little interest in Texas question, but outlines his views on slavery. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 347-48.

OCTOBER 6. Mrs. Lincoln's seamstress, armed with note, purchases more goods ($2.06). Irwin Ledger and Journal. [Vermilion Circuit Court convenes today.]

OCTOBER 7. Charleston. Lincoln writes and files joinder of issue in Eccles v. True et al., signing "Dunbar, Linder, & Lincoln." Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. Assoiating with Marshall, Lincoln writes three pleas in Frost v. Gillinwaters signing "Marshall & Lincoln." [Mrs. Lincoln sends her seamstress to Irwin's for 2 1/4 yards flannel ($1.41). She pays a man 25˘ to fetch cook knife (50˘) and needles (37˘). Irwin Ledger and Journal.]

OCTOBER 8. Danville. On motion of Lincoln, defense attorney. Brown v. Fithian is continued owing to absence of witnesses. Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

OCTOBER 10. Lincoln write plea in civil suit, signing "Harlan & Lincoln." Photo. [Mrs. Lincoln's seamstress buys $5.22 in yard goods on Mrs. Lincoln's note, and $9.10 in merchandise. Irwin Ledger and Journal.]

OCTOBER 13. [Edgar Circuit Court opens four-day term at Paris.]

OCTOBER 15. [Lincoln's tailor. Bid die, buys cloak trimmings ($2.38), charging to Lincoln's account. Ibid.]

OCTOBER 16. [Mrs. Lincoln buys groceries, 19˘. Ibid]

OCTOBER 20. Decatur. Lincoln writes and signs request for subpoena in Williams v. Frazer. The Abraham Lincoln Association, Springfield, Illinois. [Files and records on deposit at Illinois State Historical Library, Springfield, Illinois.] — Letter of Charles Hamilton, Feb. 28, 1955. [Coles County Circuit Court and Moultrie Circuit Court convene,]

OCTOBER 23. [Macon Circuit Court is in session today and tomorrow.]

OCTOBER 24. Springfield. Lincoln gives Francis Regnler receipt for $25 and releases his rights to one-eighth of judgment he obtained as attorney for plaintiff in Cabot v. Regnier in Morgan Circuit Court in 1844. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 348. He has new shaft and singletree put on his buggy. Obed Lewis Account Books.

OCTOBER 25. Lincoln has 19˘ worth of additional repairs made on buggy — Ibid.

OCTOBER 27. Taylorville. Christian County Circuit Court holds one-day session. Lincoln, attorney for defendant in Young v. Stevens, trespass suit, files plea. Record.

OCTOBER 30. [Logan Circuit Court convenes at Camden (Postville).]

259

NOVEMBER 3. Petersburg. Menard County Circuit Court opens fall term. Lincoln stops at Irwin's store on his way north and buys pair of suspenders for $1. Irwin Ledger. Lincoln wins People v. Pond when jury finds defendant not guilty of harboring slave. Record.

NOVEMBER 4. In Nancy Green v. Mentor Graham defendant confesses indebtedness for $112.23, note and interest. Lincoln & Herndon appear for plaintiff. Lincoln, appearing for defendant in Tackett and Trent v. Mosteller, in which he writes, files, and signs plea, gets jury verdict, and also wins Adams v. Chase when court affirms judgment of lower court. Scott v. Busher, trespass case, is continued. Record; Photo. [Mrs. Lincoln buys 3/8 yard Swiss muslin for 37˘, pair of shoes (75˘), and two dozen silk buttons (63˘). Irwin Ledger and Journal.]

NOVEMBER 5. Waggoner v. Lukins is tried before jury, which disagrees and case is continued. Lincoln, Baker, and Matheny appear for complainant, Stuart and Harris for defendant. Two cases are continued. Lincoln wins Shropshin v. McHenry when case is tried by jury, which finds defendant owes $90 to Lincoln's client. Record. [Mrs. Lincoln buys 2 1/2 yards cambric (31˘). Irwin Ledger and Journal.]

NOVEMBER 6. [Lincoln is thinking of his campaign for Congress. In letter to John J. Hardin, Martin S. Morris of Petersburg says: "Mr. Lincoln was here at court and I discover from what he says that he wants to run for Congress. . . . He doesn't know but you will be his competitor. . . . I should like to see you in Congress again but I believe I would rather you | would run for Governor now." Chicago Historical Society, Chicago, Illinois — John M. Palmer Papers, Illinois State Historical Library, Springfield, Illinois]

NOVEMBER 7. Springfield. Lincoln buys dollar's worth of clothing material for Mrs. Lincoln. Irwin Ledger and Journal.

NOVEMBER 10. Sangamon Circuit Court opens 13-day session. Lincoln gets judgment for his partner when defendant defaults in Herndon v. Martin. Clerk assesses damages at $134.10. Lincoln enters motion that scire facias in State Bank v. Harlan et al. be quashed. In Thayer v. Farrell, plaintiff's attorneys, Logan & Lincoln, are given leave to withdraw bond filed. Record.

NOVEMBER 11. Lincoln files defendant's plea in Trailer v. Goodacre, replevin suit. Abram Foutch, administrator of Isaac G. Jones, is made defendant in Wood v. Jones. Lincoln is attorney for appellant. Defendant files plea in Logan & Lincoln v. Smith, executor of William Trailer. Three cases are continued. Ibid.

NOVEMBER 12. Trailer v. Goodacre is dismissed by agreement at cost of plaintiff, who retains property in question. Yocum v. Newsom is continued on motion of defendant, at his cost, and Thayer v. Farrell is set for trial

260

Monday. Logan, Lincoln & Hendon represent plaintiff in second case and Logan & Lincoln plaintiff in first and last cases listed. Ibid.

NOVEMBER 13. In Beerup v. Lewis, Logan for claimant and Lincoln, Herndon, and Robbins argue ownership of stud horse Cherokee. Jury awards horse to claimant. Lincoln & Herndon appear for defendants in People v. Tunison et al., indictment for rape. Defendants post bond for $500 each. Logan & Lincoln get $1,477.87 judgment for plaintiff in Thayer v. FarrellIbid.

NOVEMBER 14. Lincoln, appearing for defendants, wins two cases tried by court, Jewett v. Lowery, and Saunders & Co. v. Lewis and Harrison. Lincoln's motion is sustained in State Bank v. Harlan et al. Court orders defendants to recover costs from plaintiff. Case of People v. Samuel Smith, assault, opens. Lincoln represents defense. Ibid.

NOVEMBER 15. Meeting is held to discuss Springfield and Alton Railroad. Judge Treat is chairman and Levi Davis secretary. Lincoln, Logan, Treat, Calhoun, and N. W. Edwards are among 13 delegates appointed to attend general meeting in Springfield in Dec. Register, Nov. 15. In People v. Smith, Lincoln wins bail ($500) for his client. Record.

NOVEMBER 17. Lincoln writes to B. F. James that he is anxious no more newspapers follow lead of Alton paper and nominate Hardin for Congress. "Baker is certainly off of the track, and I fear Hardin intends to be on it." He writes out receipt and Josiah Francis signs it, releasing Lincoln from agreement drawn up June 12, 1841. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 348-49.

NOVEMBER 18. Lincoln writes to Henry E. Dummer that he is on track for Congress and asks Dummer not to let Beardstown paper come out for Hardin. In Circuit Court, two of Lincoln's cases are continued and one set for hearing tomorrow. Ibid., I, 350; Record. Lincoln writes demurrer for defendant, in Thompson and wife v. Broadwell et al. Photo. Mrs. Lin coin gets new pair of scissors (50˘). Irwin Ledger and Journal.

NOVEMBER 19. Logan & Lincoln v. Smith, executor of William Trailer, is tried by court, which awards plaintiffs $100 and costs. (See also May 26, 1847.) Lincoln withdraws defendant's appearance in Blankenship v. Northcut, and plaintiff dismisses case. Two cases are continued. Record.

NOVEMBER 20. In People v. Shepherd et al., action in debt, jury is sworn and dismissed when plaintiffs accept $1,802 and costs to be paid in state bank notes at par in 90 days. Lincoln & Logan are attorneys for plaintiff and Robbins for defendant. Ibid. Mrs. Lincoln buys 6˘ skein of silk, $6.89 in cloth, and $7.64 merchandise. Irwin Ledger and Journal.

NOVEMBER 21. People v. Smith is tried. Lincoln wins not guilty verdict

261

on first count, loses on second, and Smith is sentenced to fine of $10 and costs and three days in jail. Record.

NOVEMBER 22. Leave is given plaintiff to amend bill and defendant to file answer in Keedy v. Wolgamot. Logan appears for plaintiff and Lincoln & Herndon for defendant. Lincoln's motion to correct judgment in Beidler v. Woodruff, made at last term, is overruled. Ibid.

NOVEMBER 24. Lincoln writes to B. F. James that he believes nomination of Hardin for Governor, made in Pekin paper by James, may benefit Lincoln's candidacy for Congress. It may juggle Hardin out of one office into another to Lincoln's advantage. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 350-51. Mrs. Lincoln buys 69˘ worth of clothing material. Irwin Ledger.

NOVEMBER 25. Lincoln writes, and David Spear signs, report of commissioner in Clark et al. v. Trotter et al. Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

NOVEMBER 26. Lincoln, on or about this day, writes, signs, and collects 19 cosigners to petition to Gov. Thomas Ford for release of Samuel Smith from jail so that he may earn money to pay his fine and court costs. Smith is released Dec. 2. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 349.

DECEMBER 1. Alton and Springfield Railroad convention assembles in U.S. District Court. Judge Treat is elected president. Lincoln is present with 12 other Sangamon delegates. Morgan County has four delegates, headed by Hardin and Lamborn, and five have come from Madison County. Alton Telegraph, Dec. 20.

DECEMBER 2. On motion of Lincoln & Herndon, attorneys for plaintiff, Rockwell et al. v. Bradford is continued in U.S. Circuit Court. Record. Railroad convention hears report of committee appointed to call on Gov. Ford to ascertain status of Northern Cross Railroad. After discussion they adjourn until Thursday. Alton Telegraph, Dec. 20.

DECEMBER 3. Lincoln writes and signs assignment of errors in Ryslnger and Nye v. Cheney (SC). Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

DECEMBER 4. Logan reports to Railroad convention plan for concentrating efforts of Sangamon, Morgan, and Madison Counties for purchase of Northern Cross Railroad and construction of Alton and Springfield. Lincoln's name is not mentioned in proceedings, but he probably attends. Alton Telegraph, Dec. 20.

DECEMBER 5. [Either at June or Dec. term of U.S. Court, Lincoln is associate of Grant Goodrich in three cases in which Grace Lawson (Lawrence) is defendant. Cases involve fraud and misrepresentation in sale of land. Butterfield, Collins, and Baker are attorneys for defendant. "Lincoln in

262

closing the case" wrote Goodrich, "made the best jury argument I ever heard him make." Hertz, Hidden Lincoln, 330.]

DECEMBER 6. "To succeed, I must have 17 votes in convention," writes Lincoln to B. F. James. ". . . If you and other friends can secure Dr. Boal's entire senatorial district, that is, Tazewell 4, Woodford 1, and Marshall 1, it just covers the case. . . . In doing this, let nothing be said against Hardin. . . . Let the pith of the whole argument be Turn about is fair play." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 351-52. Lincoln writes and signs assignment of errors in Murphy v. Summerville (SC). Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

DECEMBER 8. [Supreme Court convenes, but lacks quorum and adjourns. Docket is not as large as usual.]

DECEMBER 9. [Justice Caton arrives, but Supreme Court lacks quorum and adjourns.] Lincoln writes and signs assignment of error in Fell v. Price and Edwards, and Simpson v. Ranlett (SC). Ibid.

DECEMBER 10. Lincoln, attorney for appellees in McCall v. Lesher et al. (SC), moves to dismiss appeal. Griggs et al. v. Gear, and Weld v. Gear, similar cases from Jo Daviess County, come on appeal and writ of error. Hardin, attorney for appellees, asks that appeal be dismissed for error in execution of appeal bond. Lincoln, for appellants, asks writ of certiorari. Record.

DECEMBER 11. Supreme Court orders defendants to join in error in Ellis v. Locke, and Ross et al. v. Nesbit. Lincoln appears for appellant in first and defendant in second. Plaintiff is ordered to assign errors and file abstracts in Simpson v. Ranlett. Lincoln and Dickey represent appellant and Peters appellee. Ibid.

DECEMBER 13. Chickering's motion for leave to file supplemental record is granted in Griggs et al. v. Gear. In Weld v. Gear, appellee is ordered to join in error by Dec. 29. Rule against defendant made July 8, 1842 in People ex rel. Duncan v. Thorn is dismissed for want of prosecution. Lincoln appears for appellant in first two cases and for defendant in latter. Ibid. Lincoln writes and files certificate of publication in Wren v. Moss et al. (SC). Photo. Mrs. Lincoln buys more clothing material ($8). Irwin Ledger and Journal.

DECEMBER 15. Lincoln for appellees moves that appeal be dismissed in McCall v. Lesher et al. (SC). After argument, motion is denied. Regnier v. Cabot et al. (SC) is argued before court by Robbins for appellant and Harris and Logan for appellees. Record.

DECEMBER 16. McCall v. Lesher et al. is argued by Logan for appellant and Lincoln for appellees. Donaldson v. Reynolds and Walker is continued

263

in U.S. Circuit Court. Lincoln represents defendants. Ibid. Mrs. Lincoln buys 1 1/2 pounds cotton batting. Irwin Ledger and Journal.

DECEMBER 17. Argument in McCall v. Lesher et al. is continued by Lincoln and Logan and case submitted to court. Record. Lincoln writes assignment of errors, signing Logan & Lincoln, in Wilson, administrator v. Alexander (SC). Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. Mrs. Lincoln purchases three yards brown Holland, and a yard "Green Barage," each costing 75˘. Irwin Ledger and Journal.

DECEMBER 18. Lincoln and Powell appear for plaintiff in Wren v. Moss et al. (SC), and argue motion made for rule on defendants to join in error. Motion is resisted by Merriman. Court considers. Judgment of lower court is affirmed in Regnier v. Cabot et al. Justice Purple delivers court opinion. Record.; 7 Ill. 34.

DECEMBER 19. Motion argued by Lincoln and Powell yesterday in Wren v. Moss et al. that defendants be ruled to join in error, is allowed. Record. Lincoln writes and signs reply to assignment in errors in Wright v. Bennett (SC), case on custody of illegitimate child. Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

DECEMBER 20. Mrs. Lincoln spends $5.43 on clothing material, charging to account, and buys $6.80 groceries. Irwin Ledger and Journal.

DECEMBER 22. Cunningham v. Fithian et al. (SC), appeal from Vermilion, is argued by J. B. Thomas and J. J. Brown for appellant and Lincoln and Logan for appellees. Record. Magone v. Little et al. (SC), error from Jo Daviess, was submitted early in term by Campbell and Lincoln, for plaintiff in error. Opinion is given by Justice Scates, reversing lower court. Sangamo Journal, Jan. 15, 1846.

DECEMBER 23. Lincoln continues argument in Cunningham v. Fithian et al. Record.

DECEMBER 24. Argument in Cunningham v. Fithian et al. is continued by J. J. Brown for appellant. Ibid. Mrs. Lincoln takes home remnant linen ($1.31) and 6˘ worth of buttons. Irwin Ledger and Journal.

DECEMBER 26. Eldridge v. Rowe (SC) is argued by Peters for appellant and Lincoln for appellee. Logan for appellee in Ellis v. Locke (SC) moves default (Dec. 17) be set aside and order of reversal for nonjoinder in error be vacated and case dismissed. J. J. Brown concludes argument in Cunningham v. Fithian et al. Record.

DECEMBER 27. Hall v. Irwin et al. (SC), is argued by Minshall for plaintiff and Lincoln and Thomas for defendants. Ibid.

264

DECEMBER 29. Lincoln appears alone for appellant in Ellis v. Locke (SC); in three other cases he is associated with McGonnel, Trumbull, and Powell Ibid.

DECEMBER 30. Lincoln writes to Samuel D. Marshall about Dorman et ux. v. Lane which he handled in Supreme Court for Marshall. He outlines his next procedure and concludes, "Dont speak of this, lest they hear it, and take the alarm." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 352.

DECEMBER 31. Defendant in Chauncey v. Jackson is ordered by Supreme Court to join in error by Jan. 2. Butterfield appears for plaintiff and Lincoln for defendant. Record. Lincoln pays into his bank account $11.99 cash, and $50 note made to him by Nathaniel Hay. Irwin Ledger.

1846

JANUARY 2. Springfield. Case of Springfield v. Hickox et al. (SC), is argued by W. I. Ferguson and Lincoln for plaintiff and by McDougall for defendant, and submitted to court. Record.

JANUARY 3. Wren v. Moss et al. is argued by Bryan, attorney for plaintiff. Lincoln is also attorney for plaintiff and Thomas for defendant. Ibid.

JANUARY 5. Hardin and Butterfield, attorneys for defendant in Griggs et al. v. Gear (SC) move to have errors stricken. Lincoln, attorney for plaintiff, moves that writ of error be made supersedeas in Rysinger v. Cheney (SC), appeal from McLean County. Ibid.

JANUARY 6. Court allows Lincoln's motion in Rysinger v. Cheney. Plaintiff is to enter into bond for double amount of judgment against him in McLean Circuit Court. Ibid.

JANUARY 7. Patterson et ux. v. Edwards et al., slander case from Mason County, is argued in Supreme Court by Minshall for plaintiff and Lincoln for defendant. Ibid. Lincoln writes to Dr. Robert Boal of Lacon about his election to Congress. He praises Hardin, but argues that "turn about is fair play." He asks Boal to send him names of Whigs with whom he should correspond. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 352-53.

JANUARY 8. Lincoln draws $62.50 from auditor, salary of A. Shaw as states attorney of Fourth Circuit for quarter ending Dec. 31, 1845. Photo. Wilson et al. v. Van Winkle (SC), appeal from Edgar County, is argued by McDougall for plaintiff and Lincoln for defendant. Judgment of lowe court is affirmed. Record.

265

JANUARY 9. Hardin and Butterfield, attorneys for defendant in Griggs et al. v. Gear, move errors assigned by plaintiffs stricken from docket. Ibid.

JANUARY 10. Jesse B. Thomas, attorney for defendant in Wren v. Moss et al., moves to have case continued because of illness of George T. Metcalf. Lincoln and Bryan, attorneys for plaintiff, resist motion. Ibid. Doctrine of "rotation in office," used by Lincoln in his campaign for Congress, appears for first time in Lacon Illinois Gazette.

JANUARY 12. Supreme Court grants continuance of Wren v. Moss et al. Argument is opened in Griggs et al. v. Gear by Chickering for plaintiffs. Record.

JANUARY 13. Argument in Griggs et al. v. Gear is continued by Butterfield and Hardin for defendant and concluded by Lincoln for plaintiffs. Record.

JANUARY 14. Lincoln is preparing to make energetic campaign for congressional nomination. He writes to B. F. James of Tremont: "When this Supreme court shall adjourn . . . it is my intention to take a quiet trip through the towns and neighbourhoods of Logan county, Delevan, Tremont, and on to & through the upper counties." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 353-54.

JANUARY 15. Lincoln writes in alarm to John Bennett of Petersburg: "Nathan Dresser is here, and speaks as though the contest between Hardin & me is to be doubtful in Menard county. . . . Dont fail to write me instantly on receiving this, telling me all — particularly the names of those who are going strong against me." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 355.

JANUARY 16. Lincoln writes John Bennett: "The enclosed letters I wrote last night, but when I went to the Post-office this morning your mail had left about half an hour. So I send them by Mr. Harris." He asks Bennett to take his letter out of package and mail rest, unless it is convenient to deliver them. Ibid. Lincoln has two cases in Supreme Court. Record. In Kincaid v. Turner, appeal from Menard County, Harris and Lincoln, for defendant in error, file agreement concerning lower court record. Photo.

JANUARY 19. Lincoln writes Hardin refusing to accept Hardin's new plan for selecting Whig candidate for Congress, and gives his reasons. "I am entirely satisfied with the old system." He promises to "keep cool." On Lincoln's motion. Supreme Court reinstates Curyea et al. v. Hayward. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 356-57; Record.

JANUARY 20. Lincoln is busy with two Supreme Court cases, Kincaid v. Turner, and Ross et al. v. Nesbitt. First case is suit for damages to property belonging to Turner resulting from prairie fire started by Kincaid. Robbins appears for appellant, Harris and Lincoln for appellee. Judgment of circuit

266

court is affirmed. In Ross et al. v. Nesbitt, Lincoln appears alone for defendant. Record.

JANUARY 21. Lincoln writes N. J. Rockwell that he is candidate for Congress and repeats his argument of "‘turn about is fair play.’ I shall be pleased if this strikes you as a sufficient argument." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 359. Smith v. Byrd and Trailer v. Hill are argued in Supreme Court. Lincoln appeal for defendant in both cases. Record.

JANUARY 22. In Patterson et ux. v. Edwards et al. (SC), action for slander from Mason County, Lincoln for defendant enters motion for special leava to file petition for re-hearing without giving notice as required by court rules. Ibid.

JANUARY 23. Lincoln wins Ross et al. v. Nesbitt, argued Jan. 20, when judgment of lower court is affirmed. Justice Koerner delivers opinion of court. Ibid.; 7 Ill. 252.

JANUARY 24. Petersburg. Lincoln spends this day and tomorrow in Petersburg campaigning for Congress. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 359.

JANUARY 25. Lincoln signs receipt with John Allen that they "have found in H. C. Gibsons Pokets ten dollars and fifteen cts in cash." Ibid.

JANUARY 26. Springfield. Lincoln wins Griggs et al. v. Gear when Supreme Court reverses decision of Jo Daviess Circuit Court. 8 Ill. 2.

JANUARY 27. Lincoln compliments B. F. James on his recent article in "Tazewell Whig" on Whig convention. He makes suggestions about selection and instruction of delegates. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 359-60.

JANUARY 28. John Doe ex dem. Ellen Frisby et al. v. Ballance et al. (SC) is argued by Powell and Lincoln for plaintiffs in error and Butterfield for defendants in error, and case submitted. Record.

JANUARY 29. Simpson v. Raulett (SC), appeal from Putnam County, is argued by Lincoln for appellant and Powell for appellee and case is submitted. Murphy v. Summerville (SC) is argued by Lincoln for plaintiff and Logan for defendant. Ibid.

JANUARY 30. Bryan et al. v. Wash et ux. (SC, bill in chancery to set aside conveyance of real estate on ground of fraud, is argued by Robbins for plaintiff and Logan and Lincoln for defendant. Lincoln and Powell win Frisby et al. v. Ballance et al., argued Jan. 28, when judgment of lower court is reversed and case remanded. Ibid.; 7 Ill. 141.

JANUARY 31. Lincoln's petition for re-hearing in Patterson et ux. v. Edwards et al. is denied. Argument in Bryan et al. v. Wash et ux. is continued

267

by Logan and Lincoln for defendants and concluded by Robbins. Record. [Whigs of Athens choose delegates to county convention, and resolve for "our friend of long standing and tried faith A. Lincoln, Esq. as most deserving the nomination." Sangamo Journal, Feb. 5.]

FEBRUARY 2. Ellis v. Locke (SC), suit to foreclose mortgage by scire facias, from Cook County, is argued by Lincoln for appellant and Logan for appellee. Judgment of lower court is later affirmed. Chase v. Debolt (SC), appeal from Peoria County, is argued by Powell for plaintiff and Lincoln for defendant. Record.

FEBRUARY 3. Court orders plaintiff to file abstracts by tomorrow in Buckmaster v. Beames et al. (SC). Trumbull and Lincoln represent plaintiff. Ibid. [John H. Momson of Tremont in letter to John J. Hardin says: "Lincoln will probably get all the vote of Tazewell County even if Hardin were a candidate. The regular succession principle has been accepted. It is Abrahams turn now." Chicago Historical Society, Chicago, Illinois — John M. Palmer Papers, Illinois State Historical Library, Springfield, Illinois.]

FEBRUARY 4. Rysinger v. Cheney (SC) is argued by Lincoln for plaintiff and Stuart and Edwards for defendant. Lincoln wins case when court reverses lower court. He appears with Trumbull for plaintiff in Buckmaster v. Beames et al., appeal from Madison, and for defendant in Wright v. Bennett (SC), appeal from Menard County. Record.

FEBRUARY 5. Lincoln for plaintiff and Brayman for defendant argue Moore v. Hamilton (SC), appeal from Hancock County. Lincoln loses when court reverses judgment. Ibid.

FEBRUARY 6. Lincoln appears before Supreme Court in Sargeant v. Kellogg and moves court to have order of reversal set aside and case again placed on docket. Ibid. He gives Johnson Whaley receipt for ten dollars, fee in Whaley v. heirs of McElyea in Sangamon Circuit Court. Hertz, Lincoln, 11, 553.

FEBRUARY 7. Lincoln writes long letter to Hardin recounting candidacies of Baker, Hardin, and himself for Congress. He resents Hardin's suggestions of double dealing. He explains how newspapers mentioned Hardin's name for governor. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 360-65. Lincoln and Fridley argue motion made by Lincoln yesterday in Sargeant v. Kellogg. Motion is resisted by Peters and court considers. Record.

FEBRUARY 9. Lincoln writes B. F. James about recent article in "Morgan (Jacksonville) Journal" that attempted to show Lincoln unwilling to have fair expression by Whigs on claims of Hardin and himself for Congress. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 365-66. Argument is concluded in Supreme Court in Sargeant v. Kellogg and court reinstates case. In Chauncey v. Jackson, Lincoln's motion that judgment of reversal be vacated is allowed, after he files deposition

268

that because of other business he neglected to notice that defendant was ordered Dec. 31, 1845 to file joinder in error. Lincoln writes and files his own affidavit in Thornton v. Jackson, appeal from Cook County. Record; Photo. Supreme Court adjourns.

FEBRUARY 10. [If Lincoln fulfils intention expressed Jan. 14 in letter to B. F. James, he leaves to canvass counties to north for nomination to Congress. Democratic state convention meets in House of Representatives. Sangamo Journal, Feb. 12.]

FEBRUARY 16. [Hardin writes public letter declining to be candidate for Congress. He publishes his plan for selecting nominee — primary in place of convention.] B. F. James in Tazewell Whig Feb. 21 prints letter and says: "We conceive it due to Mr. Lincoln, that the people of this district should pay a substantial tribute to his worth, energy and patriotic exertions in behalf of Whig principles."

FEBRUARY 21. [Springfield Whigs elect five delegates from each precinct to attend county convention on first Monday in Mar.]

FEBRUARY 23. Lincoln writes answer of Virgil Hickox, which Hickox signs, in Lamb v. Hickox et al. (filed Mar. 30). Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

FEBRUARY 24. Lincoln sends to Andrew Johnston, Quincy lawyer, first of several pieces of poetry they exchange. Poem is probably William Knox's "Mortality," which Lincoln two months later declares he would give all he was worth to have written. He asks if Johnston would like poem on which he is working. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 366-67.

FEBRUARY 25. Lincoln probably completes his poem of 24 quatrains, "My Childhood-Home I See Again." He wrote to Johnston yesterday: "I have a piece that is almost done, but I find a deal of trouble to finish it." He sends first ten stanzas to Johnston Apr. 18, remainder Sept. 6, indicating that Lincoln drafted verse, was not fully satisfied with it, and retained it while considering improvements. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 367-70.

MARCH 2. Sangamon County Whig convention meets. Nominations for county officers are made. Walter Davis, Z.. A. Enos, J. M. Smith, J. A. Pickrell, E. Lewis, A. J. Vandegrift, B. F. Dickinson, and William Carson are appointed delegates to congressional convention and instructed to vote for Lincoln. Sangamo Journal, Mar. 5.

MARCH 3. Lincoln writes to Samuel D. Marshall of Shawneetown, sending him plea in Dorman et ux. v. Lane by which he can compel Lane to pay costs to get record for proving replication. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 370-71.

MARCH 5. Lincoln writes bill of divorce in Wilson v. Wilson, for Lincoln & Herndon. Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

269

MARCH 7. Lincoln votes for William M. Farnsworth, Whig candidate for justice of peace. James W. Keyes receives 262 votes to 162 for Farnsworth. polling place is court room in new Sangamon County Court House, southeast corner of Sixth and Washington Streets. Election Returns.

MARCH 10. Edward Baker Lincoln, second child, is born to Abraham and Mary Lincoln. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 304.

MARCH 16. Lincoln has 12 cases called on first day of 12-day term of Sangamon Circuit Court. He confesses judgment for defendant in Atwood et al. v. Crosby. People v. Tunison et al., rape case in which Lincoln & Herndon represent defendants, is nolle pressed. Seven cases are continued, two dismissed, and one set for hearing later. Record.

MARCH 17. Three appeal cases are dismissed. Wood v. Jones, Brown v. Crafton, and Talbott v. Washburn. Lincoln appears alone for appellant in first, with Herndon for appellee in second, and for appellant in third. Ibid.

MARCH 18. Yocum v. Newsom, slander, is tried before jury by Logan, Lincoln & Herndon for plaintiff and Baker for defendant. Jury finds defendant not guilty. In afternoon, court orders judgment entered in morning vacated and grants new trial in Tabor v. Higginbotham, ejectment suit. Lincoln and Merriman appear for defendant. Ibid.

MARCH 19. On Lincoln's motion, Preston v. Brassfield is dismissed. He appears for plaintiff in Miles v. Lawrence and obtains leave to file replication to defendant's plea. This is assumpsit suit brought from Menard County on change of venue. Ibid. Lincoln writes answer of Josiah F. Fletcher in Garvey v. Fortune and Garvey. Photo.

MARCH 20. Lincoln withdraws defendant's answer in Kyle v. Kyle and divorce is granted to Sarah Kyle, complainant. She is given custody of two children and $100. Lincoln writes court decree. Lincoln and Herndon file defendant's demurrer in Lamb v. Hickox and Hickox. Record; Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

MARCH 21. In Andrew J. Wilson v. Susan Wilson, testimony is heard on petition and divorce granted. Lincoln & Herndon appear for complainant. Record.

MARCH 23. Lincoln & Herndon file defendant's demurrer in Newton, administrator v. Grubb and Ford. On their motion, leave is given defendant in Betts v. Frazier to take deposition of N. B. Spotswood. Two cases are continued. Ibid. Lincoln, for plaintiff; writes answer in Betts v. Frazier, signing "Logan, Lincoln, & Herndon." He writes report of Johnson Whaley, guardian, in Whaley v. heirs of McElyea, petition to sell real estate, which Whaley signs. Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.; Photo.

270

MARCH 24. Wood v. Dormady, assumpsit, is tried before jury. Jury awards $1,000 to plaintiff, client of Logan, Lincoln & Herndon. Decree of foreclosure is granted in Cooper v. Crosby and Robbins. Lincoln & Herndon appear for complainant. He writes decree of court. Record.; Photo. Lincoln writes and swears affidavit of William M. Brown in Brown et al. v. Humphreys et al. Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

MARCH 25. Brown et al. v. Harlan et al. is submitted to court. In Wood v. Dormady, plaintiff files affidavit, and on his motion, court orders that execution issue forthwith. Lincoln appears for plaintiff with Jordan and Herndon in first case and Logan and Herndon in second. Record.

MARCH 26. Lincoln appears for his partner in petition of Herndon as administrator of James Bell, to sell real estate. Logan and Lincoln as attorneys for defendant consent to judgment of $100 against their client in City of Springfield v. A. G. Herndon. Court orders injunction dissolved and complainants' bill dismissed in Brown et al. v. Harlan et al. Ibid.

MARCH 27. Lincoln files defendants' demurrer in Lamb v. Hickox and Hickox. Complainants file replications in Benz v. Elliott and Betts v. Frazier. Lincoln represents defendant alone in first case and with Logan and Herndon in latter. Ibid. Lincoln writes and swears affidavit of Nathaniel Hay in Hay v. Bryan and Bryan. Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

MARCH 28. Defendants' demurrer, filed by Lincoln Mar. 23 in Newton v. Grubb and Ford, is sustained. Plaintiff is barred from acting against defendants. Eleven chancery cases of Lincoln and Herndon are continued and 18 stricken from docket. Record.

MARCH 30. Leave is given complainants to withdraw bond filed in Brown et al. v. Harlan et al. Ibid. In Lamb v. Hickox et al., Lincoln writes and signs separate answer of Addison Hickox. Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

MARCH 31. [Lincoln makes trip to Jacksonville between close of Sangamon court Mar. 30, and opening of Tazewell court Apr. 9th. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 380.]

APRIL 6. Herndon, administrator of James Bell, pays Lincoln $5 for obtaining decree to sell real estate. Sangamon Probate File.

APRIL 9. Tremont. Lincoln attends opening day of Tazewell Circuit Court. On his motion, William and Deborah Phillips v. Jonathan Merriam, chancery, is continued. Record.

APRIL 13. On Lincoln's motion, appeal case of Herndon v. Enos and Verdin is dismissed at cost of appellant. Plaintiff files demurrer to defendant's third plea in Wellman v. Holland. Court hears argument of counsel, sustains demurrer, and orders that plaintiff recover $909.51. Jones appears for plaintiff and Lincoln, Merriman, and Powell for defendant. Ibid.

271

APRIL 14. Lincoln's associate for defendants in Stevenson and Wardwell v. Garrett and wife, H. O. Merriman, writes and files motion to arrest judgment. Photo.

APRIL 15. Stanford and Davis v. Hicks et al. is continued on motion of complainant. Jones represents complainants and Lincoln defendants. Record. [Lincoln's article describing trial of Trailer brothers for "murder" of Fisher, held in Springfield in June, 1841, is published in Quincy Whig.]

APRIL 16. Metamora. Woodford Circuit Court opens for two-day term. Lincoln and Fenn, attorneys for defendant in Smith v. Strawn, file demurrer to plaintiff's declaration. Court sustains demurrer with leave to amend declaration and plaintiff is ruled to plead in 30 days. Leave is given appellants in Hall and Edgett v. Morley to file new appeal bond and take depositions. Two other cases are continued. Record.

APRIL 18. Tremont. Lincoln writes to Andrew Johnston, enclosing poem inspired by his visit to Spencer County, Indiana, in fall of 1844. Sight of neighborhood where he was raised and where his mother and sister were buried "aroused feelings in me which were certainly poetry; though whether my expression of those feelings is poetry is quite another question." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 377-78.

APRIL 20. Bloomington. McLean Circuit Court opens four-day term. Lincoln's attendance is proved by statement in his letter to James Berdan on April 26: "I thank you for the promptness with which you answered my letter written from Bloomington." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 380.

APRIL 21. "In 1846 at the April term of the McLean Circuit Court, Lincoln represented Roswell Munsell, who kept bar in the Bloomington Hotel at Bloomington, Ill., in a suit against William H. Temple over the validity of his liquor license." William H. Townsend, Lincoln and Liquor, 104.

APRIL 23. ["Sangamo Journal" reprints Lincoln's story of Fisher murder trial from Quincy "Whig." "Whig" said, "The following narrative has been handed us for publication by a member of the bar," probably Abraham Jonas. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 371-76.]

APRIL 24. Springfield. Lincoln writes to Isaac Williams of Tazewell County suggesting B. F. James as substitute delegate to Petersburg convention if Williams cannot attend. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 379-80.

APRIL 26. Lincoln writes to James Berdan, Jacksonville lawyer, with object of smoothing hard feelings that may exist between his followers and those of Hardin. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 380.

APRIL 27. [Livingston Circuit Court meets for one day at Pontiac.]

272

APRIL 29. Lincoln writes, and evidently mails to Pekin, bill of exceptions in Stevenson and Wardwell v. Garrett and wife, petition to enforce mechanics lien. Photo.

APRIL 30. Clinton. DeWitt Circuit Court convenes for two-day term. Parties agree to dispense with jury in A. Lincoln v. Spencer and William Turner. Court hears case and awards plaintiff $213.50 and costs. Lincoln confesses that defendant in Cobb v. Clifton is indebted in sum of $319 and $1.06 damages. Lincoln appears for plaintiff, and on his motion, McDowall v. Duncan et al., is stricken. Record. Lincoln, for defendant, writes and files plea in Newcomb v. Mitchell, signing "Conkling & Lincoln." Photo.

MAY 1. Lincoln, for plaintiff, moves McDowall v. Humphreys be dismissed, and case is stricken from docket. Record.

MAY 2. Sangamo Journal (May 7) reports yesterday's Whig convention in Petersburg: "Lincoln was nominated as the Whig candidate for representative to Congress from this Congressional District. This nomination was, of course, anticipated, there being no other candidate in the field. Mr. Lincoln, we all know, is a good Whig, a good man, an able speaker and richly deserves the confidence of Whigs in District and State." Logan places Lincoln's name before convention. John G. Nicolay & John Hay, Abraham Lincoln: A History, I, 245.

MAY 4. [Piatt Circuit Court convenes at Monticello.]

MAY 6. [Champaign Circuit Court convenes at Urbana for two-day term.]

MAY 7. Springfield. Lincoln writes to James Berdan, attorney at Jacksonville, that he is morally obligated to attend Coles and Edgar courts in May, but expects to be in Morgan on fourth Monday in May and make speech. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 380-81.

MAY 11. Charleston. Apparently Lincoln is in Charleston to attend cases he mentioned in his letter to James Berdan May 7th. Ibid. [Vermilion Circuit Court convenes today.]

MAY 13. Charleston? [War with Mexico is officially declared.]

MAY 16. Danville? Defendants in Fithian v. Cunningham, Alexander, and Forbes default and plaintiff is ordered to recover debt of $3,200 and costs. Lincoln and Murphy are attorneys for plaintiff, but according to record, only Murphy appears. Record.

MAY 18. Paris. Edgar Circuit Court begins five-day session. Lincoln in letter to James Berdan May 7 says he has some cases coming up today in Edgar Circuit Court. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 380-81.

273

MAY 23. Bath? Sears v. Baxter, appeal case, comes up in Mason Circuit Court. By consent, judgment is entered for $25.65, amount of note. Appellant is to pay one third of costs, appellee remainder. Lincoln's name appears on docket as attorney for appellant, but his presence is doubtful. Record.

MAY 25. Jacksonville. In his letter to James Berdan May 7, Lincoln said he hoped to be in Jacksonville to make speech on this day. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 380-81. [Gov. Ford issues proclamation calling for 3,000 volunteers. Moultrie Circuit Court convenes at Sullivan.]

MAY 28. [Macon Circuit Court convenes for two-day term.]

MAY 29. Springfield. Lincoln writes to J. J. Hardin saying Dr. F. A. McNeil, Springfield surgeon, is desirous of going to Mexican War as surgeon. He says that Shields and Semple are coming on and expect to be made officers. "Let these conjectures of mine be confidential." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 381.

MAY 30. Large meeting of citizens is held in state house in afternoon following drill by Springfield Cadets and Berlin Independent Company. Assembly is addressed by Gov. Ford, Dr. E. H. Merryman, D. L. Gregg, T. Campbell, and Lincoln on necessity of prompt and united action to support Mexican War. Sangamo Journal, June 4.

JUNE 1. Taylorville. [U.S. Circuit Court begins its session in Springfield with Judge McLean on bench. Ibid. Donaldson v. Reynolds and Walker, Lincoln's only case of which there is record, is continued. Record.] Christian Circuit Court convenes. Lincoln & Herndon have seven cases. In Young v. Goodan et al., Lincoln writes and files David C. Goodan's answer. He writes and files answer of Ezekiel S. Young in Gulliford v. Young et al. Photo.; Record.

JUNE 4. [Logan Circuit Court convened today.]

JUNE 8. Petersburg. Menard Circuit Court opens for five-day term. Defendants, by Lincoln their attorney, move to dismiss appeal in Judson v. Killion et al. This is appeal from order of County Commissioners' Court for relocating county road. Scott v. Busher is dismissed by written agreement, costs to be divided. Lincoln and Campbell appear for Busher. Record.

JUNE 9. In People v. Page, jury finds defendant not guilty. After court hears evidence in Powell v. Worth, plaintiff dismisses suit at his cost. Jury finds Peter Parker guilty of manslaughter, but imprisons him in Menard jail for 60 days because he is under 18 years of age. Lincoln appears with Harris for defendant in first and last cases and alone for plaintiff in the other. Ibid. Lincoln writes and signs bill of divorce in Philbrick v. Philbrick

274

brick. He writes and files bond for costs in Waggoner v. Lukins. Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

JUNE 10. Court orders that plaintiff recover $7.50 and costs in Ritter et al. v. Waggoner et al. Waggoner v. Lukins is continued on motion of complainant with leave given both parties to take depositions. Lincoln appears for appellant in first case and with Baker and Matheny for complainant in last. Record.

JUNE 11. Lincoln, with Lamborn and David Logan, acts for State in People v. Denton and Denton, charged with killing Cassius Brown with ax. Logan and Harrison, for defence, enter not guilty plea. "Came a jury, unable to agree were discharged and cause continued." Record.

JUNE 12. James Denton, defendant in People v. Denton and Denton, gives $1,000 bond. Record.

JUNE 27. [Col. E. D. Baker leads his regiment of 675 men out of Springfield to Mexican War.]

JULY 18. Lacon. Lincoln arrives unannounced in Lacon, but crowds hears his speech. Tariff is his principal subject, "with which he showed himself to be thoroughly acquainted. In a most logical, argumentative effort, he demonstrated the necessity of a discriminating tariff." Illinois Gazette, July 25.

JULY 20. Near Henry. Accompanied by friends from Lacon, Lincoln crosses river to address voters in two precincts of Marshall County located west of Illinois River. He speaks in grove on Bonham Farm. Jeriah Bonham. Fifty Years Recollections, 161.

JULY 21. [Dr. Robert Boal, of Lacon, in letter to Richard Yates Aug. 25, 1860, wrote: "Cartwright sneaked through this part of the district after Lincoln, and grossly misrepresented him."] Illinois State Historical Library, Springfield, Illinois. — Richard Yates Mss. [cited as Richard Yates Papers, Illinois State Historical Library, Springfield, Illinois].

JULY 22. [C. C. Tisler, in "Lincoln's Ottawa" (Ms.) quoting John Fiske Nash, former resident of Hennepin, says Lincoln and Cartwright spoke at Hennepin during 1846 campaign. Illinois State Historical Library, Springfield, Illinois..]

JULY 24. Mackinaw. Lincoln is scheduled to address citizens of Mackinawtown this afternoon. Tazewell Whig, July 18.

JULY 25. Delavan. Lincoln is scheduled to speak at seven o'clock in evening. Ibid.

JULY 27. Springfield. In Sangamon Circuit Court, plaintiff files declaration in Hampton v. Hall and defendant is ruled to enter plea in 20 days.

275

This is ejectment suit in which Lincoln and Herndon appear for plaintiff. On motion of Logan and Lincoln, attorneys for plaintiff, leave is given to open depositions in Ryder v. Stringer. Fifteen of Lincoln's cases are continued and two stricken. Record.

JULY 28. [Summer term of Sangamon Circuit Court ends. Nelson Fry gets judgment for $810 against William H. Herndon, administrator of James Bell, deceased, and Joshua F. Speed. Herndon pays judgment out of proceeds of sale of real estate made Oct. 17, 1845 to John and Robert Irwin. Ibid.]

JULY 31. Lincoln writes to voters of his congressional district statement of his religious views. Printed as handbill, it is published in newspapers after election. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 382; Illinois Gazette, Aug. 15.

AUGUST 3. Election day. Lincoln votes Whig ticket for all other offices, and for Cartwright for Congress. He gets 919 votes to 450 for Cartwright in Springfield. Seventh district of 11 counties gives Lincoln 6,340 votes, 4,829 for Cartwright. Elihu Wolcott, Liberty party candidate, receives 249 votes. Lincoln's majority of 1,262 votes over both opponents is unprecedented. Election Returns.

AUGUST 4. [Lincoln's election as only Whig congressman from Illinois brings comment in Democratic newspapers: "We had hoped better results would have followed the nomination of Mr. Cartwright. But ‘General Apathy’ seems to have controlled the Democratic party — and wherever he is commander-in-chief defeat ensues, as a natural consequence. Better luck next time." Illinois State Gazette (Shawneetown), Aug. 20.]

AUGUST 11. Springfield. Lincoln writes to AllenFord, editor of Illinois Gazette, on campaign "infidelity" charge, enclosing his statement on subject which Ford prints Aug. 15. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 383-84.

AUGUST 22. Petersburg. Lincoln writes supplemental bill in Waggoner and Waggoner v. Eastep. Photo.

AUGUST 31. Springfield. Lincoln writes and swears answer to amended bill in Lamb v. Hickox et al. Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. Lincoln buys bucket (25˘) and 50˘ pair suspenders. Irwin Ledger and Journal. [J. B. Watson reports to Board of Visitors of Sangamon County Temperance Union that Lincoln has addressed Springfield Juvenile Society and that three have signed abstinence pledge. Illinois State Historical Library, Springfield, Illinois. — Minutes of the Sangamon County Temperance Union.]

SEPTEMBER 6. Lincoln sends Andrew Johnston second canto of poem inspired by his 1844 campaign trip to his old home in Indiana. Poem is about an old schoolmate, Mathew Gentry, who became insane at 19. He encloses another poem, of 22 quatrains, "The Bear Hunt." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 384-89.

276

SEPTEMBER 7. [Secretary of state, auditor, and treasurer, in presence of governor, canvass votes given for representatives in seven congressional districts Aug. 3. They declare Lincoln elected and issue certificate of election.]

SEPTEMBER 9. Tremont. Fall term of Tazewell Circuit Court begins. Judge Treat appoints David B. Campbell to serve as prosecuting attorney. Record.

SEPTEMBER 10. In William and Deborah Phillips v. Jonathan Merriam, court denies defendant's motion that plaintiff file bond for costs. Lincoln is attorney for plaintiff. Ibid. Lincoln writes court decree in Doolittle and Lenhart v. Jessup and Jessup, chancery. Photo.

SEPTEMBER 11. Lincoln appears as witness (guardian of Emily B. Bailey) in Dasenbury v. Bailey et al. Court finds for plaintiff. Photo.

SEPTEMBER 12. Defendant files demurrer to complainants' bill in Phillips et al. v. Merriam. Court hears argument and overrules demurrer. On Lincoln's motion, complainant is granted leave to amend bill, defendant to answer before Dec. 1. Record. Lincoln writes part of decree in Keen v. Keen. Photo.

SEPTEMBER 14. Wells v. Clark and Stanford and Davis v. Hicks et al. are continued. Lincoln gives receipt for $5 to Samuel Clark, fee for services "done at this time" in Wells v. Clark. Lincoln writes answer of Daniel Finn on defendants' answer in Caldwell v. Carlisle et al., chancery. Record; Photo.

SEPTEMBER 15. Agreement to sell real estate is made in R. H. and Thomas Snell v. John S. Snell et al., heirs of Thomas Snell. G. F. Saltonstall is to be paid $1,770 on mortgage held by him from plaintiffs, remainder of proceeds to be held subject to order of court. Jones and James are attorneys for complainant and Lincoln for defendant. Record. Lincoln writes order and decree of court in Richard and Thomas Snell v. Woolston and Snell. Photo.

SEPTEMBER 17. Metamora. Woodford Circuit Court convenes for three-day session. [Sangamon County Temperance Union lists dates of meeting of 27 Societies in Sangamon County. Lincoln is speaker at meetings in Sangamon County in 1846 and 1847.]

SEPTEMBER 18. Lincoln loses appeal case of Platt v. Sowards when jury awards property to appellant. He also loses appeal case of Hall and Edgett v. Morley. With Fenn he wins Smith v. Strawn when plaintiff submits to nonsuit. In Tabor v. Higginbotham, ejectment suit, court awards property to plaintiff, but later, on Lincoln's motion, grants defendant new trial. Record.

277

SEPTEMBER 21. Bloomitigton. McLean Circuit Court convenes for three-day term.

SEPTEMBER 23. Lincoln writes pleas, signing for Davis and Lincoln, in People v. Barnard. He appears with Davis in Duffy v. Ward. Duffy gives note for $20 each to his attorneys for services. Case continued. Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.; Photo.

SEPTEMBER 26. Springfield. Lincoln draws from auditor warrant for $280 for W. P. Willard for conveying three convicts from Jo Daviess County to Alton penitentiary. Warrant Register, Auditor's Office.

SEPTEMBER 28. [Livingston Circuit Court convenes for two-day term at Pontiac.]

OCTOBER 1. Clinton. DeWitt Circuit Court convenes for two-day term. In Bushnell v. Knapp, bill is filed showing original claimant has left state. Record.

OCTOBER 2. Lincoln writes and files bill in Bushnell et al. v. Knapp et al. He writes and files, for defendant, pleas in Slatten v. Branson. Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.; Photo.

OCTOBER 5. [Piatt Circuit Court convenes at Monticello.]

OCTOBER 7. [Champaign Circuit Court convenes at Urbana for two days.]

OCTOBER 12. Danville. Lincoln writes and signs plea for summons in Fithian v. Cunningham. Case continued. Record.

OCTOBER 14. Charleston. Coles Circuit Court convenes. Lincoln writes to William Brown Oct. 22: "I have just returned from Coles." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 389. He represents defendant in People v. Lester. Record.

OCTOBER 17. Lincoln appears for plaintiff in Pearson and Anderson v. Monroe. Ibid.

OCTOBER 21. Lincoln probably starts for Springfield.

OCTOBER 22. Springfield. Lincoln writes to Speed suggesting they renew their correspondence. "Being elected to Congress . . . has not pleased me as much as I expected." He announces birth of Edward Baker Lincoln and describes Robert's characteristics. He also writes to William Brown. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 389-91.

OCTOBER 26. [Moultrie Circuit Court convenes at Sullivan.]

OCTOBER 28. Lincoln's account is debited $1.66 for clothing materials. Irwin Ledger.

278

OCTOBER 29. [Macon Circuit Court convenes for three-day term at Decatur.]

NOVEMBER 2. Taylorville. Christian Circuit Court holds one-day session. Lincoln draws up separate answer of Ezekiel S. Young to chancery bill in Gulliford v. Young. Photo.

NOVEMBER 4. Springfield. Lincoln buys 3/16 yard "Muslin de Lain" for 13˘. Irwin Ledger and Journal.

NOVEMBER 5. Camden [Postville]. Lincoln & Herndon represent complainant in divorce case, Paranteau v. Paranteau, in Logan Circuit Court some time during this term. Sangamo Journal, Aug. 27.

NOVEMBER 7. Springfield. Lincoln writes and signs petition to review in Hawks v. Landes. Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

NOVEMBER 9. Sangamon Circuit Court convenes and remains in session until Nov. 23. Lincoln & Herndon get judgment for $107.75 and costs in Wallace and Diller v. Merryman. They appear for complainant in Hampton v. Hall and get judgment for land. They represent plaintiff in Hampton v. Wadkins, Duryee v. Dykeman, trespass, in which they represent defendant, is continued. Lincoln wins by default Pius v. Carrigan, debt action, when plaintiff's attorney reports his client deceased. Record.

NOVEMBER 10. Lincoln & Herndon get jury verdict of $84 for plaintiff in Hagardine v. Shaw. Lincoln files report as guardian ad litem in Tinsley & Co. v. Smedley and Gampbell. Defendant defaults in Johnson and Bradford v. Prentiss, and writ of inquiry is awarded. Lincoln & Herndon appear for plaintiffs. People v. Sudduth, Lincoln for defendant, is continued. In Lockridge v. Gatton and Gatton, Lincoln writes answer of his client Charles Gatton, and signs Gatton's name, who makes his mark. lbid.;Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

NOVEMBER 11. Leave is given to open depositions in Hampton v. Wadkins, appeal. Williams and Loose v. Spottswood is continued by agreement. Lincoln & Herndon represent appellant in first case and Lincoln defendant in second. Record.

NOVEMBER 12. Jury is called in Law v. Keedy, assumpsit; plaintiff takes nonsuit. Lincoln & Herndon appear for plaintiff in this case and in Hampton v. Wadkins. In this case jury, unable to agree, is discharged. Robblns and Lincoln lose Merrill v. Jewett and Hitchcock, appeal in which they appear for appellant. Ibid. Lincoln writes bill in Cooper v. Crosby and Robbins. Photo.

NOVEMBER 13. Grand jury returns indictment for assault in People v. William Vigal. Lincoln is attorney for defendant. Record. Lincoln

279

draws up bill of particulars and exceptions to answer filed in John Calhoun v. John Warner and Lawrence Gros. Photo.

NOVEMBER 14. Lincoln & Herndon enter motion to vacate sale made in Cooper v. Crosby and Robbins. Record.

NOVEMBER 16. Plaintiff's demurrer to defendant's plea is argued and overruled in Backenstos v. Freeman. WeIles appears for plaintiff and Lincoln for defendant. Lincoln & Herndon for complainant in Cooper v. Crosby and Robbins move court set aside sale of real estate and order resale. Lincoln & Herndon win Cook v. Chatterton, assumpsit, when Logan, defendant's attorney, defaults. Clerk assesses damages at $149.58. Ibid.

NOVEMBER 17. Lincoln draws up affidavits of defendants in People v. Lane et al., and People v. Merrill, praying that venue be changed. Photo.

NOVEMBER 18. In Fletcher v. Fletcher, court orders land divided according to petition for partition. Lincoln & Herndon represent petitioner. People v. John Smith, forgery case, is continued — defendant, Lincoln's client, to give bond of $300. Record.

NOVEMBER 19. People v. Vigal, indictment for assault, is continued with defendant, Lincoln's client, giving bail for $200. In Thompson and wife v. Broadwell et al. plaintiffs are awarded judgment by default. Robbins is attorney for plaintiffs and Logan, Lincoln & Herndon for defendants. Ibid.

NOVEMBER 20. By agreement in Campbell v. Trumbull, assumpsit suit, plaintiff is awarded $200, and appeal to Supreme Court. Logan appears for plaintiff and Lincoln, Herndon, and Peck for defendant. In Lamb v. Hickox, court orders bill dismissed and complainant to pay costs. Lincoln & Herndon appear for defendant. Ibid.

NOVEMBER 23. In Sangamon Circuit Court, in chancery case of Cooper v. Crosby and Robbins, court denies motion to set aside sale, to which complainant's attorneys, Lincoln & Herndon, except. They also take exception to court's approval of report of sale by master in chancery. Lincoln & Herndon have nine cases continued. Ibid.

DECEMBER 2. Petersburg. Menard Circuit Court opens for special three-day term. Lincoln appears for four supervisors of Menard County indicted for failure to do their duty; jury finds William Young and William McNeely not guilty and prosecution drops case against Bennett Abell and Bluford Atterbury. James v. Engle is by agreement dismissed at defendant's cost. Lincoln & Herndon appear for plaintiff. Lincoln writes bond for costs in Elmore v. Moon. Ibid.

280

DECEMBER 3. In People v. Ammai Merrill, indictment for giving payment in counterfeit coin, jury finds defendant guilty; he is sentenced to three years. Lincoln, Herndon, and Robbins appear for defendant. Ibid. Lincoln writes affidavit in People v. Lane. Photo.

DECEMBER 4. In Elmore v. Moon, jury finds defendant guilty and assesses damages at $50. Court awards $317.32 to complainants in John Bennett et al. v. Richard E. Bennett et al., and orders real estate sold as per bill of complaint. In chancery case of Waggoner v. Lukins, jury awards land to complainant on payment of $125.34. Lincoln is for plaintiffs in all three cases. Record. He writes court order in three cases: Bennett, executor v. Bennett et al.; Backenstos v. Backenstos; Wright v. Adams et al. Photo.; Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

DECEMBER 6. Springfield. Lincoln writes to Hezekiah M. Wead, Lewistown attorney, about case Wead has on U.S. Circuit Court docket. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 391.

DECEMBER 7. Lincoln writes assignment of errors in Wilcoxon v. Roby (SC) and signs Logan's name. Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

DECEMBER 12. In U.S. Circuit Court, Donaldson v. Reynolds and Walker is continued by agreement. Peters is attorney for plaintiff and Lincoln for defendant. Record. Stephen A. Douglas is elected to U.S. Senate, by legislature, over Cyrus Edwards, Whig.

DECEMBER 14. Supreme Court opens winter term. Defendant, Lincoln's client in Edgar County v. Mayo, is ruled to join in error by Dec. 21. Record. Lincoln writes abstract and assignment of errors for Supreme Court case, Wafer v. heirs of William Stover, but case is evidently dropped. Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

DECEMBER 15. Lincoln writes petition to review Cowls v. Cowls (SC) and signs "Webb & Lincoln." Ibid.

DECEMBER 16. By consent of parties in Wren v. Moss et al. (SC), court orders decree of Peoria Circuit Court reversed with costs against Thomas Wren. Lincoln and Powell represent plaintiff and Peters defendants. Record.

DECEMBER 17. In Roney v. Monaghan (SC), from Lake County involving sufficiency of evidence to sustain judgment for damages, defendant is ruled to join in error by Dec. 21. Lincoln writes and signs reply to assignment of errors. Morris and Pearson appear for appellant and Lincoln for appellee. Ibid.; Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. Lincoln writes and files return of Judge Browne to writ of alternative mandamus issued by Supreme Court Feb. 10, 1844 People v. Browne, who signs. Photo.

281

DECEMBER 18. In People v. Browne, Washburne, attorney for plaintiff and Lincoln, for defendant, argue plaintiff's motion to have writ of alternative mandamus made peremptory. Court denies motion. Douglas gives brilliant levee at state house in honor of his election to U.S. Senate. Record; Sangamo Journal, Dec. 24.

DECEMBER 19. In Wilcoxson v. Roby (SC), suit on penal bond from Stephenson County, court orders appellant to file abstracts by Dec. 23. Lincoln is attorney for appellant and Jesse B. Thomas for appellee. Appellant is ordered to assign errors in Garrett v. Stevenson (SC), appeal from Tazewell County. Lincoln appears for appellant. Record. Lincoln writes assignment of errors in Shaffer and Shaffer v. Weed (SC), signing for Constable and Lincoln. Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

DECEMBER 30. Whig members of legislature meet in "Sangamo Journal" office to select candidate to fill congressional seat left vacant by resignation of E. D. Baker. Lincoln declines, and Judge William Brown is chosen. Chauncey v. Jackson is argued before Supreme Court by O. C. Skinner for plaintiff and Lincoln for defendant. Sangamo Journal, Jan. 14, 1847; Record.

DECEMBER 31. Defendant in Roney v. Monaghan (SC), is ordered to join in errors on transcript filed Dec. 14, joinder in error to be made before Jan. 4, 1847. Morris and Pearson appear for appellant and Lincoln for appellee. Record. Lincoln buys two books ("Miss Leslie's Cookery," 87˘, "Miss Leslie's Housekeeper," 80˘), lamp shades, $1.50, and $3.17 in groceries. Irwin Ledger and Journal.

1847

JANUARY 5. Springfield. Lincoln has three cases in Supreme Court. In People ex rel. Harris v. Browne, action to compel defendant, circuit judge, to sign bill of exceptions, he resists relators' motion to quash return to mandamus writ. He argues for defendant in Edgar County v. Mayo, action contesting circuit clerk's right to certain fees, and for plaintiff in Hawks v. Landes, assumpsit. Record.

JANUARY 6. Thomas for defendant and Lincoln for plaintiff conclude arguments in Hawks v. Landes. Same attorneys try Munsell v. Temple, appeal from McLean Circuit Court holding that liquor license is transferable. Ibid. Lincoln draws $55.56 from auditor for A. Shaw, state's attorney, Shaw's salary for quarter ending Dec. 20, 1846. Photo.

JANUARY 7. Lincoln loses Edgar County v. Mayo when court rules that defendant is not entitled to fees in question, reversing decision of Edgar

282

Circuit Court. He wins Munsell v. Temple when Supreme Court reverses McLean Circuit Court. 8 Ill. 82, 93. Lincoln appears for defendant in Roney v. Monaghan. Record.

JANUARY 8. Lincoln wins Roney v. Monaghan when Supreme Court affirms decision of Lake Circuit Court. Question at issue concerns sufficiency of evidence to sustain judgment for damages. Ibid.; 8 Ill. 85.

JANUARY 9. [John Henry of Morgan County has refused to concede nomination of Judge Brown as Whig Congressional candidate. Rather than "sow seeds of dissention in our party," Judge Brown withdraws and meeting of Morgan County Whigs in Jacksonville indorses Henry. Sangamo Journal, Jan. 14.]

JANUARY 12. Lincoln writes agreement on transcript of record in Cooper v. Crosby and Robbins, filed in Supreme Court. Photo.

JANUARY 13. Lincoln files petition for rehearing in Gear v. Clark (SC). Minute Book 1845-49.

JANUARY 16. Lincoln for appellant and Thomas for appellee try Wilcoxon v. Roby. Stephenson Circuit Court awarded appellee $400 damages for breach of penal bond whereby parties agreed to desist from interference with tract of government land which both claimed until claim should be determined. Record.

JANUARY 18. Supreme Court denies Lincoln's petition for rehearing in Gear v. Clark. Minute Book 1845-49.

JANUARY 20. Lincoln votes for John Henry in special election to fill congressional seat left vacant by E. D. Baker's resignation. Henry is elected over J. W. Crosby and Arch Job. Election Returns. He represents plaintiff in Lyman Trumbull v. Campbell (SC), assumpsit appealed from Sangamon Circuit Court. Logan and Bledsoe appear for defendant. Record.

JANUARY 23. Lincoln writes and signs motion to admit lower court record in Thomas Cowls v. Ann Cowls, appeal from Edwards Circuit Court involving support of divorced wife and children. Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

JANUARY 28. In Cowls v. Cowls (SC) Lincoln files motion for appellant asking admission of lower court record of divorce proceedings. Ibid.; Minute Book 1845-49.

JANUARY 29. Supreme Court reverses decision of Stephenson Circuit Court in Wilcoxon v. Roby, remanding case to lower court. Record; 8 Ill. 475. In Cowls v. Cowls Lincoln for appellant argues motion entered yesterday. Bledsoe, attorney for appellee, resists. Record.

283

JANUARY 30. Supreme Court denies Lincoln's motion in Cowls v. Cowls. Case is argued and submitted. Ibid.

FEBRUARY 2. Merriman for appellant and Peters for appellee try Garrett v. Stevenson et al. (SC), case arising under mechanics lien law. Lincoln loses appeal in Hawks v. Landes when court affirms decision of McLean Circuit Court. Ibid.; 8 Ill. 227.

FEBRUARY 3. Lincoln concludes for appellant in Garrett v. Stevenson et al. (SC). Record.

FEBRUARY 4. Lincoln for appellant and Bledsoe for appellee try Henderson v. Welch (SC), action to recover costs paid by appellee as nominal plaintiff in former suit. In Steele v. Gilbert et al., Lincoln moves appeal be dismissed because of appellant's failure to file record within first three days of term. Court awards procedendo to Randolph Circuit Court. Ibid.

FEBRUARY 7. [William Slade, former governor of Vermont, lectures in House of Representatives on "Popular Education." Illinois Gazette, Feb. 20.]

FEBRUARY 8. Lincoln loses Henderson v. Welch when Supreme Court affirms decision of McHenry Circuit Court. 8 Ill. 340. Cooper v. Crosby et al. is tried by Lincoln for appellant and Logan for appellees. Lincoln replies to letter from Henry E. Dummer of Beardstown: "I have procured Judge Lockwood's part to be performed and now mail the record to St. Louis as you desired." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 392.

FEBRUARY 9. Lincoln loses Cowls v. Cowls when Supreme Court affirms judgment of Edv/ards Circuit Court. Sargeant v. Kellogg, Lincoln for appellee, is continued. Record; 8 Ill. 435.

FEBRUARY 10. Lincoln acknowledges service of notice in Young v. Hanon et al., Christian County chancery case. Lincoln & Herndon are for defendants. Photo.

FEBRUARY 11. Lincoln loses Cooper v. Crosby et al. when Supreme Court affirms decision of Sangamon Circuit Court. Record; 8 Ill. 506.

FEBRUARY 12. Lincoln appears for appellants in three cases before Supreme Court — Jesse Fell et al. v. Price et al., Anderson v. Ryan, and Wafer et al. v. Stover et al. In Garrett v. Stevenson et al., decree of Tazewell Circuit Court is affirmed in part, but Lincoln is substantially successful when court reduces appellees' claim by nearly half. 8 Ill. 261.

FEBRUARY 13. Wright v. Taylor is tried before Supreme Court by Bledsoe for appellant and Lincoln for appellee. Wright charges that Taylor

284

assigned note, signed by Wright, to Bank of Illinois and paid it in depreciated currency of bank. Consequently he avers that he is bound to pay Taylor only equivalent value. Lower court decided against him. Record.

FEBRUARY 15. Lincoln is attorney for appellants in Shaeffer et al. v. Weed et al., suit to enforce mechanics lien. He is opposed by Stickney and Bledsoe. Case is appeal from White Circuit Court. Welch et al. v. Sykes et al. is continued by consent. Young and Lincoln are attorneys for appellant. Ibid.

FEBRUARY 16. Lincoln loses Wright v. Taylor when Supreme Court reverses decision of Menard Circuit Court. He also loses Anderson v. Ryan when judgment of Coles Circuit Court is affirmed. He wins Fell et al. v. Price et al. when court reverses McLean Circuit Court and makes perpetual injunction against defendants' claim to land owned by plaintiff. Ibid.

FEBRUARY 17. By consent of parties, order of continuance in Welch et al. v. Sykes is vacated. Ibid.

FEBRUARY 18. Lincoln for appellants and Constable for appellee try Welch et al. v. Sykes. Peters for appellees moves to have Garrett v. Stevenson et al. remanded to Peoria Circuit Court. Lincoln resists motion. Lincoln loses appeal in Wafer et al. v. Stover et al. when Supreme Court affirms decision of Woodford Circuit Court. Ibid.

FEBRUARY 19. Lincoln wins appeal in Trumbull v. Campbell. Trumbull received $400 for services rendered while he was secretary of state. Campbell, his successor, claimed that $200 of this should have gone to him. Sangamon Circuit Court upheld his claim; but Supreme Court rules that right of recovery lies only in state. Ibid; 8 Ill. 502.

FEBRUARY 20. Supreme Court denies defendants' motion of 18th in Garrett v. Stevenson et al. Record.

FEBRUARY 22. Lincoln wins Shaeffer et al. v. Weed et al. when Supreme Court reverses decision of White Circuit Court and denies relief sought. He also wins Welch et al. v. Sykes et al. when decision of Clark Circuit Court is reversed. This is action to collect judgment obtained in Maryland. Supreme Court decides that appellees had not been under jurisdiction of Maryland court. Record.

FEBRUARY 25. "Yours of the 2d of December was duly delivered to me by Mr. Williams," writes Lincoln to Andrew Johnston of Quincy. "I am not at all displeased with your proposal to publish the poetry, or doggerel . . . which I sent you . . . but let names be suppressed by all means. I have not sufficient hope of the verses attracting any favorable notice to tempt me to risk being ridiculed for having written them." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 392.

285

MARCH 5. In Catherine Early v. James M. Bradford et al. Lincoln writes and signs petition for dower. Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

MARCH 9. Lincoln collects from auditor $211.75 for E. B. Tinney under private law for Tinney's relief, and writes receipt. Photo.

MARCH 15. Lincoln has nine cases in Sangamon Circuit Court. Hackney v. Boyle & Co. and Bishop v. Hinton are dismissed on his motion, and Hampton v. Wadkins is dismissed by agreement. Dement v. Reynolds is continued. People v. Smith is set for hearing on igth and Thompson Campbell v. Lyman Trumbull is stricken from docket. Lincoln appears for plaintiffs in first three cases and for defendants in others. In Alexander v. Brown, assumpsit, Lincoln, for defendant, is ordered on plaintiff's motion to answer on Mar. 18. Springfield v. Nathaniel Hay, appeal, Lincoln for defense, is dismissed by agreement, defendant paying Circuit Court costs, plaintiff lower court costs. Lincoln writes part of defendants' answer in Betts v. Porter and Russell. Record; Photo.

MARCH 16. Lincoln has four cases in Circuit Court. In Williams and Loose v. Spotswood his client defaults and plaintiffs are awarded $87.37 damages. Early v. Bradford et al., petition for dower, is dismissed by agreement, Lincoln & Herndon representing complainant. In Duryee v. Dikeman Lincoln & Herndon obtain rule on plaintiff to file security for costs. People v. Thomas Sudduth et al., Lincoln for defense, is tried by jury, which finds Sudduth guilty and fines him $3. Other defendants are found not guilty. Record.

MARCH 17. Plaintiff in Duryee v. Dikeman fails to file bond and case is dismissed. By consent, Wallace v. Billings, in which Lincoln represents appellant, is set for later hearing. Lincoln, for defendant in Alexander v. Brown, assumpsit, moves continuance. Court overrules, and he enters pleas. Ibid.

MARCH 18. Lincoln has only one case — Huntington v. Menard and O'Brien — in which Bledsoe, attorney for defendants, presents petition to set aside sale. Court takes it under advisement. Ibid. Lincoln writes and signs declaration in Clark and Clark v. Sangamon County. Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

MARCH 19. By agreement, McLelland and Datty v. McTinsley is tried without jury. Davis and Edwards represent plaintiffs, Logan and Lincoln defendants. Court takes it under advisement. In Malloy v. Ossian Ross judgment of justice's court is affirmed and case dismissed. Lincoln and Campbell are attorneys for appellant. Record. Lincoln writes, for defendants, demurrer to cross bill in William Broadwell v. Charles and John Broadwell. Lincoln's notice, for plaintiff in Waggoner v. Ritter et al., is filed in Menard Circuit Court at Petersburg. Photo.

286

MARCH 22. In Backenstos v. Freeman, assumpsit. Wells, attorney for plaintiff, files replication. Lincoln is for defense. Alexander v. Brown is tried by jury, which finds Lincoln's client owes $100 damages. Record.

MARCH 23. Lincoln defends John Smith on charge of forgery. Jury finds his client not guilty. Ibid.

MARCH 24. In Wallace v. Billings, jury is waived and case is tried by court, Lincoln for appellant and Gampbell for appellee. Court takes it under advisement. Lincon is attorney for John Calhoun in six cases brought against him by Warner and Gros. All are continued. Ibid.

MARCH 25. Lincoln files defendant's demurrer in Backenstos v. Freeman. Ibid.

MARCH 26. Lincoln withdraws demurrer filed yesterday and case is tried by court, which later finds for plaintiff in amount of $52.80 damages. Ibid.

MARCH 27. In Wallace v. Billings court finds for appellant in amount of $15. Lincoln for plaintiff and Bledsoe for defendants file written arguments in Huntington v. Menard and O'Brien, whereupon court dismisses defendants' motion to set aside sale. Logan and Lincoln win Nathaniel Hay v. Bryant et al. when defendants default. In Michael Thompson and wife v. John B. Broadwell et al., defense attorneys, Lincoln, Herndon, and Logan, file answer to bills, and case is continued. Ibid. Lincoln spends 50˘ for merchandise. Irwin Ledger.

MARCH 30. In Walters v. Drennan et al., Lincoln writes, signs, and files petition for dower and property partition, and writes and swears affidavit. Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. Mrs. Lincoln buys collar and silk for 50˘. Irwin Ledger and Journal.

APRIL 1. Signing "Logan & Lincoln," Lincoln files joint answer of John Broadwell and Charles Broadwell to original and amended bills of Marshall Thompson and wife in Sangamon Circuit Court. Original owned by Thomas F. Madigan.

APRIL 5. Afternoon meeting is held to "adopt measures to co-operate with citizens in other counties . . . in their expression of sympathy and regret for Gen. J. J. Hardin" and other Illinoisans killed at Buena Vista. Lincoln explains purpose of meeting and offers resolutions. Committee of five is appointed to correspond with representatives of other counties to arrange ceremonies. Sangamo Journal, April 8; The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 392-93.

APRIL 6. Lincoln signs petition for pardon of John Hoffman, convicted in Sangamon Circuit Court, March term, of unlawful assembly and assault, fined $10 and sentenced to ten days. Photo.

287

APRIL 7. [Tazewell Circuit Court convenes for spring term at Tremont.]

APRIL 8. Tremont. Peters for plaintiff and James and Lincoln for defendant argue plaintiff's demurrer in Wells, administrator of Allen v. Clark, administrator of Shustoff. Court takes it under advisement. Case is action for debt. Record.

APRIL 9. Lincoln and Saltonstall obtain leave to amend their bill by making new parties in William and Deborah Phillips v. widow and heirs of Jonathan Merriam. Ibid. [Schedule of insolvent debtor J. G. H. Smith filed in Menard County lists $15 note owed Lincoln. Original owned by King Hostick, Springfield, Ill..]

APRIL 10. On notice by Lincoln and Parker for defendant and affidavit filed, Dillon v. Scott is continued. Wells, administrator of Allen v. Clark, administrator of Shustoff, is also continued. Record.

APRIL 12. Walker v. Livingston and Powell, action in debt, is settled by agreement, plaintiff ordered to recover $276.58 debt and $55.44 damages. Lincoln represents plaintiff. Ibid.

APRIL 14. On motion of complainant, decree of Sept. 15, 1846 in Snell v. Snell et al. is set aside; mortgagee having released his interest to complainant, bill against one defendant is abandoned. Others default. Complainant is ordered to recover $3,843.93, and mortgaged property to be sold to satisfy judgment. Lincoln represents defendants. Ibid.

APRIL 15. Metamora. Woodford Circuit Court begins its session. In Smith v. Strawn, plaintiff is awarded $500 for breach of covenant. Fenn and Lincoln, for defendant, move arrest of judgment. Motion is overruled and appeal to Supreme Court allowed. Lincoln is attorney for defendant in Headlock v. Jenkins and Jenkins. After hearing testimony, Gridley, for plaintiff, dismisses suit. George Kerr Sr. and J. Randolph Scott, indicted for aiding fugitive slave, win dismissal of charge when Lincoln argues lack of proof that Negro in case was slave. Ibid.

APRIL 17. Tabor v. Higginbotham, ejectment suit, is settled by agreement between Peters, attorney for plaintiff, and Lincoln and Merriman for defenant. Ibid.

APRIL 19. [At Bloomington spring term of McLean Circuit Court begins.]

APRIL 20. Bloomington. Lincoln negotiates agreement in McDuffe v. Ward to drop case at cost of plaintiff on surrender of notes by Defendant. Lincoln signs petition for pardon of Jacob Hoffman. Ibid; Photo.

288

APRIL 26. [Logan Circuit Court begins session at Mt. Pulaski. Lincoli writes and signs amended declaration in Charleston case of Pearson and Anderson v. Monroe and Eastin. Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.]

APRIL 29. Clinton. DeWitt Circuit Court convenes. Lincoln and Stuart file defendants' plea in Moore v. Grosh et al. Bushnell v. Knapp et al., chancery, is continued on motion of Moore, defendants' attorney. Lincoln is for complainant. Record; Files. He writes and files, for defendants, plea in Moore v. Sampson and Sampson. Photo.

APRIL 30. Springfield. Lincoln loans to Joel Johnson $10 from his bank account. Irwin Ledger.

MAY 3. Petersburg. Menard County was dropped from Eighth Circuit at last session of legislature but Lincoln attends court, evidently to finish his pending cases. center v. Hall is dismissed by agreement between Lincoln for plaintiff and Logan for defendant. In People v. Miller, indictment for larcency, jury returns verdict of not guilty for Lincoln's client. Lincoln & Herndon file demurrer in third case. Record; Photo.

MAY 4. In People v. Lane et al. jury finds defendants guilty of larceny. They are later sentenced to three months and fined $30 each. Case is brought to Menard County on change of venue from Sangamon. Lincoln appears for defendants. Instructions to jury are in his handwriting. Stuart, attorney for plaintiff, dismisses Shipley v. Thomas. Lincoln and Logan represent defendant. Ibid.

MAY 5. Lincoln loses Philbrick v. Philbrick when complainant is awarded divorce. He writes and files plea and joins in plaintiff's demurrer in Hill v. Master and Goodpasture. Court awards plaintiff judgment for debt of $257. Lincoln & Herndon file plea and affidavit for continuance in Page v. Boyd and Boyd. Record; Files.

MAY 6. [Champaign Circuit Court began its session yesterday at Urbana.]

MAY 10. [Vermilion Circuit Court begins its session at Danville.]

MAY 12. Danville. Lincoln and Murphy appear for plaintiff in Fithian v. Cunningham. Defendant defaults and their client is awarded judgment of $5,123 for debt and $3,474.76 damages. Record.

MAY 14. Charleston. On his way to Paris, Lincoln stops in Charleston to represent defendant in Strader v. Harris, replevin suit. Court takes case under advisement. Court later decrees that horse and cow belong to plaintiff and defendant respectively. Ibid; Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. In Leverick v. Eccles, Lincoln writes defendant's affidavit, joinder in answer to plea, and annotates plea. Ibid.

289

MAY 16. Middle Lick Creek? Sometime during this month Lincoln and J. B. Weber address local temperance society. As regular time of meeting — was third Sunday of month, it is probably on this date. Attendance is fair Most of those present have already signed pledge, but three new converts are enrolled. Illinois State Historical Library, Springfield, Illinois. — Minutes of Sangamon County Temperance Union.

MAY 17. Greenup. In Cumberland County Court, Lincoln appears for defense in People v. Sigler H. Lester, manslaughter, change of venue from Coles County. The Abraham Lincoln Association, Springfield, Illinois. [Files and records on deposit at Illinois State Historical Library, Springfield, Illinois.] — File.

MAY 19. Lincoln's client Lester is found guilty, and he draws up petition for pardon. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 394.

MAY 20. Springfield. Lincoln buys for $200 two shares of Alton & Sangamon Railroad Co. stock. Illinois State Historical Library, Springfield, Illinois. — Original.

MAY 22. [Meeting of citizens considers railroad from Springfield to Alton. Committee is appointed to prepare address showing advantages of project. Delegates are selected to attend River and Harbor Convention at Chicago.]

MAY 24. [Shelby Circuit Court convenes at Shelbyville for spring term.]

MAY 26. Lincoln learns from sheriff of Warren County that William Trailer left no property to be sold at auction to pay legal fee granted Logan & Lincoln Nov. 19, 1845. Record.

MAY 31. [At Sullivan, spring term of Moultrie Circuit Court begins.]

JUNE 3. [Macon Circuit Court convenes at Decatur.]

JUNE 7. Taylorville. On opening day of Christian Circuit Court, Lincoln & Herndon for plaintiff in Faith v. Vandeveer submit to nonsuit with leave to move court to set aside. Their declaration asks $100 damages for "bright sorrel mare," which defendant refuses to return. Lincoln, for defendant in Melinda White v. Eleazer White, appeal, loses when court orders defendant to pay plaintiff $26 and costs. Court finds for defendant, Lincoln's client, in Martin White v. Andrew D. Northcutt. Record. [In Springfield, convention called to frame new state constitution begins work. It sits until Aug. 31. U.S. Circuit Court also begins session.]

JUNE 16. Springfield. Lincoln represents defendants in Donaldson v. Reynolds and Walker in U.S. Circuit Court. By agreement plaintiff is ordered to recover $900 debt and one cent damages. Record.

290

JUNE 17. Lincoln & Herndon win U.S. Circuit Court case of Rockwell et al. v. Bradford, getting $4,100 judgment for plaintiff. [Nine years later Lincoln wonders if judgment was paid. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 357.]

JUNE 19. Lincoln deposits $7.50 in his account in bill receivable from G. Smith. Irwin Ledger.

JUNE 20. Langston's Settlement. Lincoln and S. S. Brooks attend meeting of local temperance society. "Interesting meeting. Mr. Lincoln made an excellent address — none signed pledges." Illinois State Historical Library, Springfield, Illinois. — Minutes of the Sangamon County Temperance Union.

JUNE 23. Springfield. Lincoln buys 2 1/2 yards black cloth for $15, coat trimmings, $2.62, sprucing up for Chicago convention, and $18.37 in merchandise to run household while he is gone. Irwin Ledger and Journal.

JUNE 24. Lincoln writes to O. H. Browning of Quincy regarding cases in which Browning is interested. "I do not know what they are doing in the [Constitutional] Convention. . . . I am not easy about the Courts. I am satisfied with them as they are. . . . I fear, however, . . . ‘A Puppy Court’ that is, a Judge in each county. . . . ‘A Migratory Supreme Court ’ and Salaries so low as to exclude all respectable talent." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 394-95.

JUNE 29. Lincoln buys $1.25 pair suspenders, completing convention wardrobe. Irwin Ledger and Journal.

JUNE 30. Lincoln, member of committee of ten, writes open letter to "People of Sangamon County" appealing for subscriptions to stock of projected railroad, Springfield to Alton. His name heads list of signers. Letter is published in "Sangamo Journal" July 6, in "Register" July 9. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 395-9.

JULY 1. En route Springfield to Chicago Lincoln leaves home to attend River and Harbor Convention at Chicago See History of Congress, Biographical and Political, comprising a History of Internal Improvements, II, 294-344; Chicago History, V, 161-63.

JULY 5. Chicago River and Harbor Convention meets. Lincoln, Dr. Merryman, and Fred Doyle represent Sangamon County. At 10 o'clock, preceded by bands, fire companies and militia, delegates March to pavilion. Addresses are delivered and temporary organization effected. Permanent organization and more speeches occupy afternoon. Fergus Historical Series, No. 18. Lincoln's new clothes do not produce intended effect. E. D. Washbume of Galena recalled: "One afternoon, several of us sat on the sidewalk under the balcony of the Sherman House, and among the number was the accomplished scholar and unrivaled orator. Lisle Smith. He

291

suddenly interrupted the conversation by exclaiming, ‘There is Lincoln on the other side of the street. Just look at "Old Abe".’ And from that time we all called him ‘Old Abe’. No one who saw him can forget his personal appearance at that time. Tall, angular and awkward, he had on a short-waisted, thin swallow-tail coat, a short vest of the same material, thin pantaloons, scarcely coming to his ankles, a straw hat and a pair of brogans with woolen socks." AllenThorndike Rice (ed.). Reminiscences of Abraham Lincoln, by Distinguished Men of his Time, 16.

JULY 6. Addresses are delivered by Andrew Stewart of Pennsylvania and David Dudley Field of New York. Latter takes "strict construction" view of Constitution and favors only such improvements as are consistent therewith. "In the afternoon Hon. Abraham Lincoln, a tall specimen of an Illinoisan . . . was called out, and spoke briefly and happily in reply to Mr. Field." N.Y. Tribune, July 17.

JULY 7. Resolutions to print and circulate proceedings are adopted and Executive Committee appointed to present its views to Congress. After speech by Edward Bates, presiding officer, convention adjourns. In afternoon "committee of the whole," with Horace Greeley in chair, adopts resolution advocating construction of railroad to Pacific. Fergus Historical Series,No. 18.

JULY 8. En route. Lincoln boards stage at 9 A.M., arriving Peru next morning. The Abraham Lincoln Association, Springfield, Illinois. [Files and records on deposit at Illinois State Historical Library, Springfield, Illinois.] — Files.

JULY 9. Lincoln begins boat trip, Peru to Peoria, at 10 A.M. Ibid.

JULY 10. Reaching Peoria at 2 A.M., Lincoln boards stage at 4 A.M., arriving Springfield that evening. Ibid.

JULY 14. Jacksonville? Gen. Hardin is buried. At 10 A.M. procession forms in public square and moves to his residence. Richard Yates pronounces eulogy. After burial "collation" is served in grove, where Richardson, Forman, and Baker speak. Sangamo Journal, July 15 and 20. Lincoln's attendance is likely, but not certain.

JULY 28. Springfield. Lincoln takes oath before deputy clerk of Sangamon Circuit Court that John Grigg, defendant in Crowl v. Grigg et al.,is not resident of Illinois. He and Herndon file bill in chancery alleging that defendants are attempting to dispossess complainant of improvements erected on land which he supposed belonged to him but which has since been found to be outside his purchase. Lincoln also writes complainant's bond. Photo.

AUGUST 2. Lincoln votes straight Whig ticket in county election. Whigs win every office. Election Returns.

292

AUGUST 3. Lincoln buys sewing materials ($1.39) and merchandise, $2.44. Irwin Ledger and Journal.

AUGUST 5. Committee on projected railroad from Springfield to Alton reports in "Journal." Expense of grading, population to be served, products to be transported and estimated value, probable income, possibility of connections with East, and means of financing are dealt with. John Calhoun's name heads list of signers, with Lincoln's second. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 398-405. Lincoln signs bond for John M. Cabiniss, constable. Photo.

AUGUST 12. Lincoln buys 30˘ worth of pearl buttons and needles. Irwin Ledger and Journal.

AUGUST 25. Lincoln draws up mortgage, charging $5, for James A. Barrett, who borrows $1,100 from William F. Thornton, secured by mortgage on 575 acres in Sangamon County. Lincoln & Herndon Fee Book.

AUGUST 30. Lincoln buys clothing material, 75˘. Irwin Ledger. He and J. Robinson address meeting of Sangamon Temperance Union. One listener signs pledge. Townsend, Lincoln and Liquor, 60. [Members of Constitutional Convention who favor Zachary Taylor for President hold evening meeting in Capitol. Some 50 Whigs attend. Illinois Gazette, Sept. 11.]

AUGUST 31. [At Springfield, Constitutional Convention adjourns.]

SEPTEMBER 1. [Tazewell Circuit Court convenes for fall term.]

SEPTEMBER 2. Tremont.motion of Lincoln and Saltonstall for complainant, William D. Briggs is appointed guardian litem infant defendants in William and Deborah Phillips v. and eirs of Jonathan Merriam, and defendants are ruled to answer by tomorrow morning. Case was before court Apr. 9. Record.

SEPTEMBER 3. Lincoln writes and files answer of William D. Briggs, guardian ad litem for infant defendants in William and Deborah Phillips v. widow and heirs of Jonathan Merriam. Photo. Lincoln buys pair "buskins," and $7.72 in merchandise. Irwin Ledger and Journal.

SEPTEMBER 4. In Dillon v. Scott jury is waived and judgment of justice's court affirmed. Dillon is represented by Holmes, while Lincoln and Parker appear for Scott. Case was before court Apr. 10. Record.

SEPTEMBER 6. Lincoln and Saltonstall move to have Angelina Hazeltine made defendant in William and Deborah Phillips v. widow and heirs of Jonathan Merriam. Subpoena issues for her appearance. Lincoln appears for defendants in two other suits but both are continued. Ibid.

293

SEPTEMBER 9. [Woodford Circuit Court begins its session.]

SEPTEMBER 13. Bloomington. Fall term of McLean Circuit Court begins. Parties in People, use of Swallow v. Bernard and Francis file agreement to dismiss suit. Lincoln is counsel for defendants. Record. (Lincoln's attendance at this term is confirmed by letter he writes to Herndon from Washington Dec. 5 in which he mentions having been in Bloomington "last fall." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 416-17.)

SEPTEMBER 18. Springfield. Lincoln buys 66˘ worth silk fringe and buttons. Irwin Ledger and Journal.

SEPTEMBER 20. [Logan Circuit Court begins.]

SEPTEMBER 23. Clinton. DeWitt Circuit Court convenes for fall term. Stuart and Lincoln appear for defendants in Ayers v. Griffin et al. Court decrees that by reason of defendant's insolvency conveyance of lands made by him was fraudulent. Moore v. Grosh et al., before court Apr. 29, is dismissed by agreement. Lincoln is attorney for defendants. Record. Lincoln files complainants' petition for release from bond in Watson and Lend v. Troxtil and Paine. Photo.

SEPTEMBER 24. Defendant in Bushnell v. Knapp, before court Apr. 29 is granted leave to file answer and case is set for hearing at next term. Lincoln is attorney for complainant. Record.

SEPTEMBER 27. [Piatt Circuit Court begins its session.]

SEPTEMBER 28. Lincoln's account is credited $9 for years interest on $150. Irwin Ledger.

SEPTEMBER 29. [Champaign Circuit Court meets.]

SEPTEMBER 30. Lincoln pays $5.56 for clothing materials and two pair "spun silk hose." Irwin Ledger and Journal.

OCTOBER 1. Springfield. "If you will let Mr. E. G. Johns have any amount of oil not exceeding ten dollars in value," writes Lincoln to Messrs. Converse & Priest, "I will pay you the money for it in three months from date." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 405. [Johns was Springfield house painter.]

OCTOBER 2. Lincoln deposits $28.74 cash. Irwin Ledger.

OCTOBER 4. [Vermilion Circuit Court commences fall term.]

OCTOBER 8. [Bill in Hannah Miller v. Mary E. and Nancy A. Miller, written by Lincoln and signed "Lincoln and Herndon for complt." is filed in Menard Circuit Court, Petersburg. Photo.]

294

OCTOBER 11. [Edgar Circuit Court begins its session.]

OCTOBER 14. Charleston. Lincoln represents defendant in Linder v. Fleenor in Coles Circuit Court. Jury finds defendant guilty of slander and assesses plaintiff's damages at $1,000. He remits $950 of this amount. Record. Pleas, joinders, and replication in Lincoln's handwriting are in Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. Town is tense over impending slave trial.

OCTOBER 15. Anthony Bryant and family, having run away from their Kentucky master, Robert Matson, were placed in county jail. Gideon Ashmore and Hiram Rutherford petitioned for writ of habeas corpus. Justice Wilson of Supreme Court accompanies Judge Treat to Charleston to hear case. Rutherford tries to retain Lincoln but he has already agreed to appear for Matson.

OCTOBER 16. Ficklin and Constable appear before Wilson and Treat in behalf of petitioners, with Linder and Lincoln representing Matson. Court orders slaves discharged from sheriffs custody and from "all servitude whatever from henceforth and forever." At night, Matson, disgruntled at verdict, leaves state without paying his attorneys their fee. Beveridge, I, 392-97; Record; Charleston (Ill.) Globe, Oct. 27; Illinois Law Review, I, 366. Lincoln, for complainant, writes and signs declaration, pleas, and instrucions for jury in Watson v. Gill. Jury finds defendant guilty and awards Lincoln's client $215. Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

OCTOBER 17. En route to Springfield. [Journey probably continues next day.]

OCTOBER 19. Springfield. "The Governor is not here," writes Lincoln to Morris & Brown, Chicago attorneys, "and will not be, it is thought, for about ten days. Unfortunately for my attending to the business you sent, I start for Washington, by way of Kentucky, on next monday." He will see that matter is presented to governor, however. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 405.

OCTOBER 21. Having received another letter from Morris & Brown, Lincoln consults Logan. "If the Governor shall arrive before I leave, Logan & I will both attend to the matter," he assures them, "and he will attend to it if he does not come till after I leave; all upon the condition that the Governor shall not have acted upon the matter, before his arrival here. . . . The case is a clear one on our side; but whether the Gov. will view it so is another thing." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 406.

OCTOBER 23. Preparing to leave for Washington to take his seat in Congress, Lincoln leases his home to G. Ludlum for one year beginning Nov. 1, at rental of $90 for year. He reserves "the North-up-stairs room" to store furniture. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 406-07.

295

OCTOBER 25. En route to Kentucky and Washington. Lincoln family leaves for Kentucky.

OCTOBER 26. En route. [In Petersburg, Menard Circuit Court grants divorce in John D. Bowen v. Rhoda A. Bowen. Lincoln wrote court decree. Photo.]

OCTOBER 27. St. Louis. Daily Era of Oct. 28 lists "A. Lincoln and family" and "Joshua F. Speed" as guests at Scott's Hotel, southwest comer 3rd and Market Sts., W. C. Scott, prop. They must have registered on 27th for their names to appear in paper on 28th.

OCTOBER 28. En route. ("Mr. Lincoln, the member of Congress elect from this district, has just set out on his way to the city of Washington," reports Illinois Journal (formerly "Sangamo Journal"). "His family is with him; they intend to visit their friends and relatives in Kentucky before they take up the line of March for the seat of government. He will find many men in Congress who possess twice the good looks, and not half the good sense, of our own representatives.")

OCTOBER 29. [O. H. Browning and family of Quincy, Illinois, made trip to Lexington, Kentucky, in 1850. They required a week to travel from St. Louis. Evidently Lincoln's trip required the same time.]

OCTOBER 30. [The Lincolns traveled from St. Louis by boat probably to Frankfort, Kentucky. From there Lexington and Ohio Railroad, forerunner of Louisville and Nashville, ran to Lexington. Journey probably continues through Nov. 2. John W. Starr, Lincoln and the Railroads, 47.]

NOVEMBER 3. Lexington. [During their stay the Lincolns probably made trips to nearby places. As definite information on these trips is not available and as they were probably not absent overnight, Lexington is given as their location during entire visit.]

NOVEMBER 13. Henry Clay speaks on Mexican War, denouncing it as war of aggression. Meeting adopts resolutions declaring hostilities occasioned by Taylor's army advancing into territory under jurisdiction of Mexico. Lincoln undoubtedly attends. William H. Townsend, Lincoln and His Wife's Home Town, 152-55.

NOVEMBER 25-DECEMBER 1. En route to Washington. The Lincolns leave for national capital. Ibid, 161. (They probably travel by stage from Lexington to Winchester, Virginia, where they could take Winchester and Potomac Railroad to Harpers Ferry. From there they could take Baltimore and Ohio to Relay Station, Maryland. Thence branch line ran to Washington. Starr, 48.)

296

DECEMBER 2. Washington. The Lincolns arrive late at night and take lodgings at Brown's Hotel. AllenC. Clark, Abraham Lincoln in the National Capital, 3. (Later they take rooms at Mrs. Sprigg's boarding house on site of Library of Congress. Samuel C. Busey, Personal Reminiscences and Recollections, 25.)

DECEMBER 3. "This is my first day at this place," writes Lincoln to Robert Smith of Alton, "& on reaching here I found your letter in relation to your business with Douglass. I met him afterwards, but disliking to dunn him at the first meeting with him, I let it pass for the time. I will attend to it shortly however & write you." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 416.

DECEMBER 4. Lincoln attends evening Whig caucus which nominates Winthrop of Massachusetts for speaker, Sargent of Pennsylvania for sergeant-at-arms, Horner of New Jersey for doorkeeper, and McCormick of District of Columbia for postmaster. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 416-17.

DECEMBER 5. Lincoln writes to Herndon regarding case in Illinois Supreme Court. Last year plaintiff paid firm $20 advance fee and left Lincoln $10 to pay for abstracts. Lincoln forgot to leave $10 with Herndon. He sends it, and describes caucus. "The Whig majority . . . is so small . . . [it] leaves it doubtful whether we will elect them all." Ibid.

DECEMBER 6. House convenes at 12 o'clock. Lincoln votes for Robert G. Winthrop of Massachusetts for speaker. He is elected on third ballot. After administration of oath to members. House adjourns. Congressional Globe.

DECEMBER 7. Lincoln votes for Thomas J. Gampbell for clerk. He is elected. House and Senate listen to President Polk's message in which he accuses Mexico of "invading the territory of the State of Texas, striking the first blow, and shedding the blood of our citizens on our own soil." Ibid. Lincoln also signs petition for appointment of John Raub to minor post. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 417.

DECEMBER 8. Lincoln writes to President Polk recommending appointment of Franklin L. Rhoads of Pekin and Thomas Graham Jr. of Beardstown as lieutenants. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 417-18. House members draw for seats. Lincoln draws number 191. He votes for Nathan Sargent for sergeant-at-arms and Robert E. Horner for doorkeeper. Both are elected. He votes for William J. McCormick for postmaster but he is defeated by John M. Johnson. Globe.

DECEMBER 9. Lincoln is appointed to two standing committees— Committee on Post Office and Post Roads and Committee on Expenditures in War Department. House adjourns until Dec. 13 at 12 o'clock. Ibid.

DECEMBER 10. "I represented your claim to Douglass this morning . . .," writes Lincoln to Richard Yates of Jacksonville. "He will pay it in

297

296 a few days. . . . I believe Mr. Calhoun and what force he can control are preparing to support Gen. Taylor for the Presidency. I get this impression from conversations with Duff Greene, who boards at the same house I do. There are, however, a great many Whigs here who do not wish to go for Taylor." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 419.

DECEMBER 11. Lincoln again writes to President Polk regarding F. L. Rhoads' application for lieutenancy. Since his letter of 8th he has received letter on behalf of Rhoads from E. D. Baker, which he submits to Polk. Ibid.

DECEMBER 12. "It is my intention," writes Lincoln to T. J. Henderson of Stark County, "to snatch a moment now and then, to send documents to some friends, out of my district, among whom I shall place Captain Butler and yourself." Illinois State Historical Library, Springfield, Illinois. — Journal, IV, 74. He writes Herndon that "Congressional Globe" will begin arriving at Lincoln & Herndon office. He suggests his partner read and preserve them. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 419.

DECEMBER 13. Lincoln receives letter from Herndon informing him of receipt of fee. "I . . . wish you to buy Bank certificates and pay my debt there," he replies, ". . . pay Lavely and Stout $20 — and Priest & somebody (oil makers) $10 — for materials got for house-painting. . . . As you are all so anxious for me to distinguish myself, I have concluded to do so, before long." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 420.

DECEMBER 14. Rev. R. R. Gurley is elected chaplain of House. He wins by two votes over Rev. Mr. Gushman, for whom Lincoln votes. Globe.

DECEMBER 15. Lincoln writes petition for Dr. A. G. Henry, which Henry signs, asking compensation for expenses incurred in supplying volunteer Mexican War company of Capt. Edward Jones. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, VIII, 414.

DECEMBER 20. Lincoln presents petition from A. G. Henry, and gives notice of motion for leave to introduce bill to amend "an act to raise . . . an additional military force . . . approved Feb. 11, 1847." He votes against resolution declaring war just and necessary and that indemnity must depend on obstinacy of enemy in prolonging it. Globe.

DECEMBER 21. Lincoln votes against motion to table memorial from citizens of District of Columbia requesting that all laws authorizing or sanctioning slave trade in District be repealed. He votes aye on resolution declaring that general government has right to construct harbors and improve rivers for commerce and national defense. It passes, 134-54. Ibid. He receives from Stephen A. Douglas check for $167, for Robert Smith of Alton. Original owned by Douglas Family.

DECEMBER 22. Lincoln presents resolutions requesting President to inform

298

House whether "spot" on which American blood was first shed in Mexican War was within territory claimed by Mexico. Resolutions are read and laid on table. Globe; The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 420-22. He presents memorial of citizens of Illinois in behalf of Great Western Railroad. Journal of the House of Representatives [cited as Journal.]

DECEMBER 23. [House hears obituary on late T. L. Hamer, representative-elect from Ohio. After adopting appropriate resolutions, it adjourns until Dec. 28. Globe.]

DECEMBER 26. Lincoln writes Pension commissioner asking status of land warrant claims of two constituents, John Huckleberry and Thomas Collins of Sangamon County, Mexican War veterans. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 422.

DECEMBER 28. C. B. Smith presents petition of citizens of Jay County, Indiana, praying abolition of slavery and slave trade in District of Columbia. Petition is tabled, 76-70, Lincoln voting nay. Globe.

DECEMBER 29. Lincoln, Douglas, McClernand, Richardson, Ficklin, Robert Smith, and Thomas Turner, Illinois senators and representatives, sign letter to President Polk requesting that Francis B. Thompson of Edwards County, Illinois, be appointed assistant surgeon in army. Photo.

DECEMBER 30. Amos Tuck of New Hampshire presents petition of citizens of Philadelphia praying for passage of law to appropriate proceeds of public land sales for extinction of slavery in U.S. and moves its reference to Committee on Territories. It is tabled, 86-70, Lincoln voting nay. House adjourns until Jan. 3. Globe.

1848

JANUARY 1. Washington. "There is a good deal of diversity among the whigs here, as to who shall be their candidate for the Presidency; but I think it will result in favor of Genl. Taylor," writes Lincoln to R. S. Thomas of Virginia, Illinois. He informs Thomas of what he has done regarding application for lieutenancy for one of his friends. He knows of nothing more he can do, for "you know I can have no intimacy with the President." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 422-23.

JANUARY 3. Lincoln votes against resolution to inquire into expediency of proposing peace without indemnity. It is rejected 41-137. Ashmun moves to amend resolution of thanks to Gen. Taylor for his victory at Buena Vista by inserting, "in a war unnecessarily and unconstitutionally

299

begun by the President." Whigs force adoption of amendment, Lincoln voting aye. Globe. [Herndon deposits $500 in Lincoln's bank account at Robert Irwin's store, his share of fee from Siter Price & Co. Irwin Ledger.]

JANUARY 4. Lincoln presents petition of "James Semple and others, against the petition of the city of Alton, Illinois, praying a relinquishment of certain lands." He votes for resolution requesting President to communicate to House any instructions given to officers or others regarding their permitting Santa Anna to return to Mexico, Globe.

JANUARY 5. Replying to Botts of Virginia, Lincoln defends action of Postmaster General in fixing compensation to be paid Richmond, Fredericksburg and Potomac Railroad for transporting mail between Washington and Richmond. Company petitions for increase. Botts supports claim and accuses Postmaster General of personal antagonism. Ibid; The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 423-29.

JANUARY 6. Postal discussion continues. Lincoln makes brief statement explaining attitude of Committee on Post Office and Post Roads. Lincoln writes third auditor certifying signature of E. D. Baker on claim papers of Dr. Argyle W. Furr. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 429-30. One evening between today and Jan. 19 Mr. and Mrs. Lincoln attend performance of "the Ethiopian Serenaders" at Carusi's Saloon. National Intelligencer, Jan. 6, 17; The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 495-96.

JANUARY 8. "It is very pleasant to learn . . . that there are some who desire that I should be reelected," writes Lincoln to Herndon. ". . . I made the declaration that I would not be a candidate again, more from a wish to deal fairly with others . . . and to keep the district from going to the enemy, . . . so that . . . if . . . nobody else wishes to be elected, I could not refuse the people the right of sending me again." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 430-31.

JANUARY 10. Lincoln votes against proposed amendment to post office bill which would divide railroad and steamboat companies carrying mail into four classes and specify rate of compensation. Negative vote of speaker prevents passage. Globe.

JANUARY 11. Stewart of Pennsylvania attacks Polk's war and tariff policies, and Venable of North Carolina assails Ashmun's resolution. Lincoln obtains floor, but House adjourns before he can speak. Ibid. He writes Blair & Rives, publishers of "Congressional Globe" asking loan of Debates of 28th Congress, second session. "If sent [by messenger], I shall be careful to return uninjured, or pay for." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 431.

JANUARY 12. Lincoln attacks Polk's war policy. He defends his "spot resolutions" and attempts to disprove Polk's contention that Mexicans began war. "The President is, in no wise, satisfied with his own positions," he declares. ". . . He is a bewildered, confounded, and miserably perplexed

300

man. God grant he may be able to show, there is not something about his conscience, more painful than all his mental perplexity!" Globe; The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, 431-42.

JANUARY 13. Lincoln votes to end debate on President's message at 2 o'clock tomorrow. Motion carries 100-95. Journal. In response to request of House, President submits all information relative to Santa Anna being permitted to return to Mexico "which is compatible with the public interests." John Quincy Adams denounces Polk for withholding information. General debate follows. Globe.

JANUARY 14. [After routine business House adjourns until Jan. 17.]

JANUARY 17. Seizure of colored waiter in Washington by three slave traders Induces Giddings to introduce resolution to investigate slave trade in District or removing capital to free state. Lincoln votes against motion to table, but it passes. He votes in favor of resolution declaring it inexpedient to order our troops in Mexico to fall back. Ibid.

JANUARY 18. John Jameson of Missouri replies to Lincoln's speech of 12th. "Strange position before the American Congress for such a Representative [from district of Hardin, Baker, and Shields]," he says. Ibid. [Henry Clay presides over immense meeting of American Colonization Society in House.]

JANUARY 19. From Committee on Post Office and Post Roads Lincoln reports bill for relief of William Fuller and Orlando Saltmarsh. Globe; The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 442-44. He writes to Herndon regarding case in Christian County, and to J. R. Diller, postmaster at Springfield, promising that he will do what he can to have his allowance for clerk hire and other expenses increased. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 444-45.

JANUARY 21. House goes into Committee of Whole on private calendar. Lincoln presents petition of Uriah Brown "praying for a further testing of his discovery of ‘liquid fire,’ to be used in national defenses; which was referred to Committee on Naval Affairs." Petition tabled. House adjourns until Jan. 24. Journal.

JANUARY 22. Before leaving Springfield Lincoln received letter from S. D. Marshall of Shawneetown asking him about law case. Not having time to look into it, he referred matter to Logan, who evidently forgot it. Having received another letter from Marshall, he explains. "I know nothing thai I can here do in the matter." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 445.

JANUARY 24. Lincoln introduces petition of John Dawson praying remu neration for his services as acting pension agent in Illinois for three years during Tyler's administration. Journal. Barrow of Tennessee speaks on

301

administration's war policy, claiming that war was unnecessary, and criticizing Polk's request for additional troops. Dixon of Connecticut defends Ashmun's resolution. Globe.

JANUARY 25. Lincoln presents petition of citizens of Scott County, Illinois, requesting mail route from St. Louis to Jacksonville, Illinois. Journal. Green of Missouri defends administration's war policies. Globe.

JANUARY 26. Lincoln votes aye on motion to end debate on President's message. It passes 104-95. Journal. Palfrey of Massachusetts delivers antislavery speech. Remarks by Henley of Indiana precipitate argument regarding President's alleged partiality to Democrats in army appointments. Henley defends Polk and attacks Whigs' evident intention to nominate "military chieftain," for President. Globe.

JANUARY 27. Lincoln votes aye on resolution directing clerk to prepare report on private claims. It passes. Journal. Most of day is taken up with committee reports and debate on war policies. Globe. [Meeting at Marshall, Ill. complains of Lincoln and his "Spotty" resolutions. Fulton (Canton, Ill.) Ledger.]

JANUARY 28. Lincoln votes against reconsideration of yesterday's vote. Motion to reconsider is tabled, 89-87. Journal. House takes up private calendar and receives petitions and executive communications. Globe. On or about this date, Lincoln returns to William Thomas, Jacksonville attorney, letters he is afraid of losing in connection with Treasury matter. Lincoln can do nothing, he notes, "till a further hearing from you." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 445-46.

JANUARY 29. Lincoln answers roll call. Journal. House receives committee reports and considers petitions and private bills. Globe. Lincoln writes second auditor of Treasury about pay and land warrant due W. H. Hodge of Bloomington, father of Andrew Hodge, war casualty. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 446.

JANUARY 31. Lincoln receives letter from Herndon questioning wisdom of his stand on Mexican War. Ibid. In House he votes against tabling resolution, offered by Giddings, whereby committee would be appointed to inquire under what authority slave trade is carried on in District of Columbia. He votes for resolution requesting President to explain why Gen. Scott has been suspended. Globe.

FEBRUARY 1. Lincoln answers Herndon's letter. "I will stake my life, that if you had been in my place, you would have voted just as I did. . . . You are compelled to speak; and your only alternative is to tell the truth or a lie." While Whigs condemn President for beginning war, they consistently vote supplies. Even Whigs who have participated in war "do not hesitate to denounce, as unjust, the Presidents conduct in the beginning of the war." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 446-48.

302

FEBRUARY 2. Rhett, Cobb, Collamer, Brown, and Stephens debate administration's war policies. Lincoln is so affected by Stephens' speech that he writes to Herndon: "My old, withered, dry eyes, are full of tears yet." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 448. Lincoln's bank account, at his order, is debited $14.52 for taxes. Irwin Ledger. [Treaty of peace is signed at Guadalupe Hidalgo.]

FEBRUARY 3. Lincoln votes against resolution directing Committee on Ways and Means to inquire into advisability of raising $5,000,000 annually, until public debt is paid, by taxes on personal property, stocks, and money at interest. It is defeated 44-143. He votes in favor of two resolutions referring sections of President's message to committees. Globe. Lincoln's tenant, Cornelius Ludlum, pays $22.50 cash into Lincoln's account for three months rent. Irwin Ledger.

FEBRUARY 4. "There is now some probability of peace;" writes Lincoln to Andrew McCallen, Shawneetown lawyer, "but, should the war go on, I think volunteers, with the right of electing their own officers will be voted, but that no more regulars, will be voted. Until Congress shall act, of course, nothing can be done towards getting your Regiment into the service. Whenever it shall act I shall be happy to assist you in any way I can." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 448-49.

FEBRUARY 7. Lincoln presents memorial of citizens of Tazewell County praying reduction of postage. Journal. He votes aye as House passes resolutions of thanks to Taylor and Scott. Wilmot of Pennsylvania, who introduced tax resolution, denies proposal is primarily scheme to tax slaves. He blames Buchanan for charge, whereupon Brown and Thompson defend Buchanan in acrimonious debate. Globe.

FEBRUARY 9. Lincoln replies to invitation to attend Taylor meeting at Philadelphia on 22d. "It will not be convenient for me to attend, yet . . . I am decidedly in favor of Gen. Taylor." His selection will probably be pleasing to Whigs of Illinois, he states, for at constitutional convention last summer more than 70 members signed endorsement of him as their favored candidate. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 449.

FEBRUARY 10. Lincoln votes aye on motion to print copies of memorial from representatives of Society of Friends of New England praying speedy termination of war. It passes, 98-88. Globe.

FEBRUARY 11. Speaker transmits President's reply to House resolution requesting information regarding peace overtures by Mexico. Ibid. Lincoln votes aye on motion to take up private calendar. It passes. Journal.

FEBRUARY 13. D. W. Tompkins, representative from Mississippi, who also boards at Mrs. Sprigg's, shows Lincoln letter from Josephus Hewett of Natchez, whom Lincoln had known ten years ago in Illinois. Lincoln

303

writes to Hewett. "For old acquaintance sake, if for nothing else, be sure to write to me on receiving this." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 450.

FEBRUARY 14. Lincoln receives letter from Herndon defending Polk. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 451-52. He votes to table motion to expunge Ashmun's Jan. 3 amendment, and presents petition praying that Congress make same bounty land provision for veterans of War of 1812 as for Mexican War soldiers. Globe.

FEBRUARY 15. Lincoln replies to Herndon. "Allow the President to invade a neighboring nation, whenever he shall deem it necessary to repel an invasion, and you allow him to . . . make war at pleasure," he contends. "Your view . . . places our President where kings have always stood." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 451-52. He votes on two roll calls on bill authorizing loan for prosecution of war. Globe. National Intelligencer announces Lincoln and Douglas as Illinois managers of "Birth Night Ball" planned for Feb. 22 to raise money for Washington Monument.

FEBRUARY 16. "Your letter, asking me to procure passports, has been received," writes Lincoln to H. O. Merriman of Peoria or A. L. Merriman of Pekin: "I have just been to Mr. Buchanan [secretary of state], who turned me over to an understrapper. . . . He gave me a printed circular showing exactly what is to be done, which I transmit to you." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 452. He attends House where loan bill is under consideration. Journal. Managers of "Birth Night Ball" meet at City Hall. National Intelligencer, Feb. 16.

FEBRUARY 17. Loan bill passes 192-14, Lincoln voting for it. Journal. In Illinois, writes Lincoln to T. S. Flournoy, nomination of Taylor " probably would give us the electoral vote of the state . . . but the majority against us there, is so great, that I can no more than express my belief that we can carry the state." He writes William H. Young of Mount Pulaski, Mexican War veteran, that he will attend to Young's bounty land claim. "Hurra for Gen: Taylor." (The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 452-53.)

FEBRUARY 18. Lincoln answers roll calls on several private bills and presents petition from citizens of Edgar County requesting reduction of postal rates. Globe; Journal.

FEBRUARY 19. [Messenger from Mexico transmits Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo to President Polk. Polk's Diary.]

FEBRUARY 20. Lincoln writes letter to Usher F. Linder, candidate for Illinois General Assembly: "You should simply go for Genl. Taylor; because by this, you can take some democrats, and lose no whigs; but if you go also for Mr. Polk on the origin and mode of prossecuting the war, you will still take some democrats, but you will lose more whigs, so that in the sum of the opperation you will be loser." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 453.

304

FEBRUARY 21. Lincoln attends House. Journal. Speaker is suddenly interrupted "by several gentlemen, who sprang from their seats to the assistance of the venerable John Quincy Adams, who was observed to be sinking from his seat in what appeared to be the agonies of death." He is borne to rotunda, and thence to speaker's room, and House adjourns.

FEBRUARY 22. Commissioner of General Land Office informs Lincoln that he is sending him patent in favor of John W. Stringfield. Lincoln forwards letter to Noah W. Matheny at Springfield, writing at bottom: "Dear Noah: Please forward the Receiver's receipt to Judge Young as commissioner." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 453. House meets, but after prayer for "the venerable sage who lay in an adjoining room," adjourns. Globe. Lincoln and Douglas are advertised as representatives of Illinois on managers list for "National Birth-Night Ball" scheduled for Mar. 1. Charles O. Paullin, "Lincoln in Congress," Magazine of History, XLIII, No. 1.

FEBRUARY 23. [After prayer and reading of Journal House adjourns. Globe. At 7:30 P.M. Adams dies in speaker's room. He was 81 years old.]

FEBRUARY 24. House and Senate meet together. Prayer is followed by speeches by Winthrop, Hudson, and Holmes. It is resolved that Adams' seat remain unoccupied for 30 days and be draped in mourning. Lincoln is appointed to committee of 30 "to superintend the funeral solemnities." Ibid.; Journal.

FEBRUARY 26. Members of House and Senate, President and Cabinet, Justices of Supreme Court, officers of army and navy attend Adams' funeral service in House. Lincoln, of Committee on Arrangements, marches in procession which conducts body to Congressional Burying Ground. Ibid.; Globe.

FEBRUARY 28. Putnam of New York introduces resolution, similar to Wilmot Proviso, prohibiting slavery in territory acquired from Mexico. Lincoln votes against motion to table, but motion passes, 105-92. House passes bill giving Mrs. Adams franking privilege for life. It then goes into Committee of Whole to consider deficiency appropriation bill. Ibid.

FEBRUARY 29. In evening Lincoln receives letter from R.. S. Thomas of Virginia, Illinois, enclosing petition for mail route. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 455.

MARCH 1. Lincoln acknowledges Thomas' letter and presents his petition. Ibid.; Journal. "It now seems to be understood on all hands that the war is over — that the treaty sent in will be ratified," he writes to Jesse Fell of Bloomington. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 454-55. He expresses same opinion in letter to Jesse Lynch of Magnolia. Privately Owned. "National Birth-Night Ball," postponed out of respect for Adams, is held. Lincoln, a manager, probably attends. National Intelligencer.

305

MARCH 4. Lincoln writes to Ignatius R. Simms, Jacksonville hotel keeper, enclosing documents for Simms' son, whose first name Lincoln cannot remember. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 455.

MARCH 6. "Owing to my father being left an orphan at the age of six years, in poverty, and in a new country, he became a wholly uneducated man," writes Lincoln in reply to letter from Solomon Lincoln, "which I suppose is the reason why I know so little of our family history. . . . If you shall be able to trace any connection between yourself and me . .. I should be pleased to have a line from you." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 455-56. He attends session of House.

MARCH 7. Lincoln votes against two amendments to deficiency appropriations bill and hears discussion of soldiers' bounty lands. Globe.

MARCH 8. Lincoln votes aye as deficiency appropriations bill is passed 137-15. Ibid.

MARCH 9. Lincoln reports bill from Committee on Post Office and Post Roads authorizing postmasters at county seats to receive subscriptions for newspapers and periodicals and permitting Post Office to act as agent in receiving payments. He also reports joint resolution for relief of H. M. Barncy. Ibid.; The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 456-57.

MARCH 10. House is "thrown into confusion by personal conflict between Mr. Haralson and Mr. G. W. Jones. . . . The collision was sudden and inexplicable.. . . . Several members . . . promptly interposed and separated them." They finally shake hands and apologize to House, which accepts apology. Lincoln votes in favor of acceptance. Globe. (Senate ratifies treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo.)

MARCH 13. Lincoln votes aye on resolution directing speaker to improve seating facilities and desks of House and to provide tribune for speakers. It passes. He votes to table resolution looking to amendment to Constitution whereby tenure of Federal judges would be limited to years instead of during good behavior. It is tabled. Ibid.

MARCH 16. House debates motion to reconsider resolution directing printing of 10,000 copies of abstract of war contracts let by administration. Democrats, fearing Whigs will use document to "fix upon the present Administration the charge of fraud," oppose printing. Lincoln votes against reconsideration. Motion is defeated, 93-78 Ibid.; Journal.

MARCH 17. Lincoln answers two roll calls. House considers private bills and debates resolution to print 90,000 copies of report of commissioner of patents. Ibid.

306

MARCH 20. After receiving resolutions and executive communications, House goes into Committee of Whole to consider bill granting appropriations for Indian Department. Lincoln attends session. Ibid.

MARCH 22. Lincoln replies to letter from Usher F. Linder criticizing his position on Mexican War. Whigs, he says, cannot keep silent because Democrats continually try to force them to endorse Polk's policies. He does not believe Whig attitude will "strip" Taylor and Scott of "their laurels." Nor does he think it justifiable to charge Whigs with abolitionism because they vote with abolitionists in condemning war. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 457-58

MARCH 23. House passes bill allowing $138, balance of pay and mileage due J. W. Hornbeck, late member of House, to his widow. Lincoln twice votes against motions to grant additional allowances for funeral expenses. Both are rejected. Journal. House begins consideration of Senate amendments to deficiency appropriation bill. Globe.

MARCH 24. James McDowell, former Governor of Virginia, member of House, has suggested to Lincoln that David Lincoln of Virginia may be related. Lincoln writes to him asking for information on family. He writes another letter concerning his family to Solomon Lincoln, who has written again. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 459-60.

MARCH 25. House takes up private calendar. It also receives majority and minority reports of Committee on Elections, which is examining claims of James Monroe and D. S. Jackson to seat of 6th Congressional District of New York. Lincoln attends session. Globe; Journal.

MARCH 27. Lincoln votes against motion to take from table and refer to Committee on Military Affairs Senate bill for raising ten additional regiments of regular troops. It fails. Globe.

MARCH 29. Lincoln interviews J. A. McClernand, representative from Illinois, about petition concerning school lands he has received from R. S. Thomas, McClernand explains attitude of Committee on Public Lands, of which he is member. Lincoln speaks briefly on bill granting military bounty lands. Ibid.; The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 460-61.

MARCH 30. Lincoln writes to R. S. Thomas recounting his conversation with McClernand. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 461.

MARCH 31. Lincoln attends House, which devotes day to private calendar. Journal.

APRIL 1. Lincoln receives reply to his letter of Mar. 24 to David Lincoln. Latter has found that his uncle was Lincoln's grandfather. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 461-62. Lincoln is present at session of House, which continues consideration of private bills. Journal.

307

APRIL 2. Lincoln answers David Lincoln's letter. He asks which of his grandfather's brothers was latter's father. "What was your grandfather's Christian name? Was he not, a Quaker? About what time did he emigrate from Berks county, Pa. to Virginia? Do you know any thing of your family (or rather I may now say, our family) farther back than your grandfather?" The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 461-62.

APRIL 3. "Mr. Lincoln moved to suspend the rules of the House to take up the joint resolution from the Senate relative to contracts for the purchase of hemp for the use of the navy, for the purpose of referring it to the Committee on Naval Affairs." Motion fails to receive two-thirds majority necessary to suspend rules. Globe; The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 462-63.

APRIL 6. House debates resolution to print extra copies of correspondence between War Department and Gen. Scott, Gen. Taylor, and Nicholas P. Trist, negotiator of treaty of peace with Mexico. Debate is cut short by motion to go into Committee of Whole. Lincoln votes against motion but it carries 93-80. Globe; Journal.

APRIL 7. Lincoln is present as House takes up private calendar. He votes against motion to adjourn until Apr. 10. Motion fails. Journal.

APRIL 9. Lincoln writes to Mrs. Lincoln. Letter is not extant but is mentioned in letter he writes to her Apr. 16. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 465.

APRIL 10. Lincoln visits Patent Office to inquire about application for patent by Jesse Lynch of Magnolia. Lynch is optimistic about Taylor's chances, but Lincoln informs him that same day his letter arrived he received one from another man in Magnolia which was less hopeful. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 463-64. Lincoln votes to concur in Senate resolution congratulating people of France on their establishment of republican government. Globe.

APRIL 11. Palfrey of Massachusetts moves to add to yesterday's resolution prefix: "Resolved, That no despotism is more effective than that which exists under the semblance of popular institutions." Debate on slavery ensues. Motion is finally tabled, Lincoln voting aye. Lincoln votes to repeal part of West Point appropriation act which provides board of visitors and allows them $2,000 expenses. Ibid.

APRIL 13. Day is taken up with introduction of bills, committee reports, and speeches on contested election in 6th New York district. Lincoln votes against resolution declaring James Monroe entitled to seat occupied by D. S. Jackson. It fails 75-95. Ibid.; Journal.

APRIL 14. Lincoln writes Walter Davis, Springfield mechanic, about pension and land claim. He certifies to pension commissioner facts of Lt. Thomas Davis, Mexican War casualty, brother of Walter Davis. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 464-65.

308

APRIL 15. In accordance with request from his wife, Lincoln goes shopping for pair of plaid stockings for his son Eddie. He visits two shops, but one has gone out of business and other does not have the kind Mrs. Lincoln wants. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 465-66.

APRIL 16. Lincoln writes to Mrs. Lincoln: "In this troublesome world, we are never quite satisfied. When you were here, I thought you hindered me some in attending to business; but now, having nothing but business — no variety — it has grown exceedingly tasteless to me. I hate to sit down and direct documents, and I hate to stay in this old room by myself." Ibid.

APRIL 17. Lincoln votes to authorize Committee on Ways and Means to inquire into expediency of repealing all duties on French products provided France will reciprocate with respect to American products. It passes 99-85. He votes to suspend rules to permit introduction of resolution requesting President to inform House whether Gen. Scott has been suspended from his command, and if so, for what reason. It fails. Globe.

APRIL 19. Seat from 6th New York district is contested on ground that 157 inmates of Blackwell's Island and city almshouse voted illegally for Jackson, Democratic candidate. Whig majority of Committee on Elections recommends that Monroe, Whig, be declared entitled to seat. Lincoln votes against giving seat to either candidate, and in favor of resolution declaring neither entitled to it. Journal.

APRIL 20. In compliance with request from Benjamin Kellogg, Lincoln visits Patent Office. He leaves Kellogg's letter with request for information desired. It is returned to him in evening with pencilled notations. Lincoln writes secretary of war nominating Hezekiah H. Garber of Petersburg to West Point. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 466-67.

APRIL 21. Lincoln answers Kellogg's letter. "I return the letter, because I suppose you will understand their notes better by seeing them, than you could by my writing about them." Ibid. [House adjourns until Apr. 24.]

APRIL 24. Lincoln is present at House session. Numerous motions are introduced to suspend rules to make one bill or another order of day. All are voted down, and House adjourns early. Globe.

APRIL 25. Imprisonment of 80 slaves who escaped on steamer docked at Georgetown provoked outburst in "National Era," abolition paper, and mob threatens to dismantle press. This precipitates heated debate in House. Finally Brown of Mississippi moves to table subject to prevent its going "to the country to a greater extent than it had already gone out." Lincoln votes aye; and motion passes 130-42. Ibid.

APRIL 26. Burt of Committee on Military Affairs introduces amendment to military bill providing for limiting major generals to one and brigadier

309

generals to two on ratification of treaty of peace. Lincoln votes against motion to table. Motion is defeated 73-105. Ibid.

APRIL 29. Lincoln lays on clerk's table memorial of heirs of Abraham Tipton, previously presented to House in 1835 and referred to Committee on Revolutionary Pensions. Journal.

APRIL 30. "My hope of Taylor's nomination is as high, — a little higher — than it was when you left," writes Lincoln to E. B. Washburne." . . . My prayer is, that you . . . send us a good Taylor delegate from your circuit. Make Baker . . . help about it. He is a good hand to raise a breeze." He sends similar request to Archibald Williams of Quincy. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 467-68.

MAY 1. Little business is transacted and after listening to obituary on Chester Ashley, deceased senator from Arkansas, House adjourns. Lincoln is present. Globe; Journal.

MAY 3. Lincoln requests that 300 copies of speech by William Watson Wick of Indiana be sent to folding room for him. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 468.

MAY 4. Lincoln participates in debate on proposal to pay regiment of Texas volunteers for horses lost during campaign. Volunteers are not allowed compensation for lost horses, and he opposes preferential treatment for Texas regiment. He votes against motion to refer bill to raise ten additional regular regiments to Committee of Whole. Motion is defeated. Globe; The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 468-69.

MAY 5. Lincoln attends House. Day is devoted to private calendar. Journal.

MAY 8. Lincoln votes aye on motion to go into Committee of Whole, where House debates and passes bounty lands bill. There is no roll call on passage. Globe.

MAY 11. House passes bill admitting Wisconsin to Union. Lincoln moves to reconsider and speaks against policy of granting alternate sections of land to states to aid in internal improvements and then increasing price of reserved sections. He favors appropriations of land with or without enhancement, but thinks it better not to raise price. "Having accomplished the object for which he rose, he withdrew his motion to reconsider." Ibid.; The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 469-71.

MAY 12. House takes up private calendar. "The first bill . . . was . . . for settling the claim of the legal representatives of Richard W. Meade, deceased. The debate was resumed by Mr. Woodward . . . and was continued by Messrs. Lincoln, McLane, and Marvin, each of whom were frequently interrupted in their remarks for explanations." Bill is finally tabled. Globe.

310

MAY 15. House passes bill amending charter of Washington. Lincoln votes to reconsider, but motion is tabled. Ibid.

MAY 16. Lincoln is not listed among absentees when roll is called to determine quorum in Committee of Whole. Journal.

MAY 17. Lincoln attends House. Consideration of Post Office appropriations bill develops into debate on Congress' power over slavery in territories. Ibid.; Globe.

MAY 18. Lincoln is not listed among absentees on quorum roll call as House goes into Committee of Whole. Ibid.

MAY 19. The House takes up private calendar. Lincoln votes aye on bill granting $280 to legal representatives of Cornelius Manning, deceased, for slave carried away by British fleet in 1814. It passes, 125-28, abolitionists opposing it. Ibid.

MAY 20. Lincoln votes aye on bill to purchase papers of James Madison. It passes 82-59. Journal. In evening he receives copy of Belleville (Illinois) Advocate, containing what he considers "laboured justification of the administration on the origin of the Mexican war," by Rev. J. M. Peck. He assumes that Peck sent it. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 472-73.

MAY 21. Lincoln writes to Peck in attempt to refute his argument. If Peck will admit facts, Lincoln will "be obliged for a reference to any law of language, law of states, law of nations, law of morals, law of religion, — any law human or divine, in which an authority can be found for saying those facts constitute ‘no aggression.’" Ibid. He also writes to Mrs. Lincoln. This is not extant, but referred to in his letter of 24th.

MAY 22. After reading "Journal," House adjourns until May 25 to permit laying carpets. Globe. [Democratic National Convention meets in Baltimore.]

MAY 23. ["A remarkably quiet day," records Polk in his Diary. ". . . Congress having adjourned over until Thursday, almost all the members, I learn, have gone to Baltimore to attend the Democratic national convention."]

MAY 24. Lincoln writes to Mrs. Lincoln and encloses draft for money. "I write this letter in the post-office, surrounded by men and noise, which, together with the fact that there is nothing new, makes me write so short a letter." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 473-74.

MAY 25. Lincoln is present as House convenes. Journal. "At the hour of meeting scarcely a quorum attended in either House," records Polk. ". . . The members are still absent at Baltimore. . . . About two o'clock P.M. a telegraphic despatch was received announcing that Lewis Cass of

311

Michigan had, on the fourth ballot, been nominated . . . as the candidate of the Democratic party for President of the United States." Diary Lincoln writes Silas Noble, constituent, who wants documents for campaign ammunition. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 474.

MAY 26. [Lincoln's name does not appear on roll call. Globe.]

MAY 29. Tuck of New Hampshire asks House to consent to introduction of resolution directing committees to which petitions for abolition of slave trade have been referred to report bill. Antislavery men vote for suspension of rules, but Southern representatives, with Northern Whigs, Lincoln among them, defeat motion to suspend. Globe.

MAY 30. House passes Post Office appropriations bill. Lincoln moves previous question on adoption of amendment, votes on several roll calls on amendments and for passage of bill. Debate on administration's Mexican policy follows. Journal; Globe.

MAY 31. Lincoln receives letter from Rev. Henry Slicer inquiring why he was not invited to participate in John Quincy Adams' funeral services. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 474-75. Lincoln attends session of House, where Committee on Public Expenditures presents review of annual report of secretary of treasury. Journal; Globe.

JUNE 1. Lincoln explains to Rev. Slicer that Committee on Arrangements delegated authority to subcommittee of which he was not member. Consequently he had nothing to do with details of funeral arrangements. "Until I received your letter," he asserts, "I should have given it as my recollection, that you did actually participate." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 474-75. Lincoln's Springfield bank balance is credited with cash deposit of $31.25, legal fee from David Newsom. Irwin Ledger.

JUNE 2. House devotes day to private calendar. Lincoln is present. Globe; Journal.

JUNE 3. Lincoln votes to go into Committee of Whole, where House takes up naval appropriations bill. It is soon diverted, however, to debate on slavery in territories. Ibid.

JUNE 5. Lincoln attends House. After discussion as to proper committee to which to refer bill to protect naturalized citizens against foreign governments, House again engages in partisan discussion of administration s Mexican policy. Ibid.

JUNE 6. En route to Philadelphia. Lincoln is on his way to Whig national convention. [House meets and adjourns until June 9. Globe.]

312

JUNE 7. Philadelphia. Whig convention effects temporary organization. In afternoon ex-Gov. John M. Morehead is elected permanent chairman and other recommendations of committee on organization are accepted. N.Y. Tribune, June 17.

JUNE 8. Convention begins balloting on nominee for President. On first ballot Taylor leads with Ill votes, followed by Clay with 97, Scott with 43, Webster 22, Clayton 4, and McLean 2. On second ballot Taylor has 118, Clay 86, and Scott 49. Ibid.

JUNE 9. Taylor is nominated on fourth ballot. "The result was communicated to the immense concourse [outside], and then a cheer burst forth which made the very earth tremble." Fillmore is selected for Vice-President. Delegates adjourn to Independence Square for ratification meeting. Speakers hold forth from three stands "and a dozen stumps." Ibid.

JUNE 10. Philadelphia and Wilmington. This evening Lincoln and three House colleagues address ratification meeting at Wilmington, Delaware. "Lone Star of Illinois," as press calls him, delivers "eloquent and patriotic speech" on Whig principles and denounces presidential despotism. Polk's aim in making war on Mexico was "to catch votes." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 475-76.

JUNE 11. En route and Washington. Travelling all night, Lincoln arrives in Washington in morning. He finds letter from Mrs. Lincoln, who is in Kentucky. She is anxious to return to Washington. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 477-78.

JUNE 12. Washington. While attending House, Lincoln answers his wife's letter. "Come on just as soon as you can," he writes, "I want to see you, and our dear — dear boys very much." He also writes to Herndon: "By many, and often, it had been said they would not abide the nomination of Taylor; but since the deed has been done, they are fast falling in, and in my opinion we shall have a most overwhelming, glorious, triumph." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 476-78.

JUNE 13. "In my anxiety for the result, I was led to attend the Philadelphia convention," writes Lincoln to R. S. Thomas. ". . . I have entered the names you sent me, on my book, and commenced sending documents to them." He explains attitude of Congress on school lands. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 478-79. He attends House and in evening is present at public dinner in honor of Senator Crittenden at National Hotel.

JUNE 14. In morning Lincoln goes to Land Office to inquire further into school lands. Ibid. He attends House, where bill to establish post routes and naval appropriations bill are under consideration. Journal.

JUNE 15. House continues deliberations on naval appropriations bill. Lincoln votes on several amendments. Ibid. He writes to Richard S. Thomas

313

on school lands, having found law dealing with fractional townships which have no 16th section for school support. They can claim other public land. Lincoln suggests this obscure law be given publicity in newspapers, which Thomas does by printing Lincoln's letter. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 479.

JUNE 16. Bill appropriating money "for certain fortifications" is taken up in Committee of Whole. After amendment it is reported and passed, Lincoln voting aye. Globe; Journal.

JUNE 17. Lincoln is present as House devotes day to private bills. Ibid.

JUNE 19. "Do you know any democrats who will vote for Taylor?" inquires Lincoln of R. S. Thomas, "and if so, what are their names? Do you know any Whigs who will not vote for him? and if so, what are their names? and for whom will they vote? Please answer this just as soon as it is received." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 479. He votes to refer memorial from Chicago River and Harbor Convention to Committee on Commerce. Resolution is adopted 133-56. Globe.

JUNE 20. Lincoln speaks in favor of internal improvements and criticizes doctrines enunciated by Polk in his veto of internal improvement bill passed by last Congress. Ficklin replies, upholding Democratic doctrine. Journal; The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 480-90. Lincoln franks envelope of campaign documents to James Berdan of Jacksonville. Davenport Public Museum, Davenport, Iowa. — Original.

JUNE 21. Lincoln is present at House. He votes aye as naval appropriations bill is passed and on other roll calls. Globe. In evening he attends Whig caucus. All are confident of success in election. Illinois is expected to do well. Returning to his room, however, he is perturbed to find pessimistic letter from Herndon. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 490-92.

JUNE 22. Lincoln writes to Herndon, advising him to organize young men for campaign. He is provoked at Whig newspapers for not publishing Whig speeches he sent, and is impatient with Herndon for not yet understanding Whig argument as to unjustness of war. Ibid. In House he votes for bill for regulation of seamen on public and private vessels. It passes. Journal.

JUNE 23. Lincoln is present at House. Committee on Commerce, to which President's message vetoing river and harbor bill has been referred, reports resolutions declaring that President's reasons for his veto "insufficient and unsatisfactory." Ibid.; Globe.

JUNE 24. Lincoln attends House, but nothing of importance is done. Journal. At Lincoln's order, Robert Irwin, his banker, pays Allen Francis $272 cash to cancel note and interest. Lincoln evidently borrowed from Francis to pay for his trip to Washington. Irwin Ledger. ["Barnburner" faction of Democratic party has nominated Van Buren for President on Wilmot Proviso platform.]

314

JUNE 25. Lincoln begins letter to Mrs. Lincoln but does not finish it The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 495.

JUNE 26. House discusses civil and diplomatic appropriations bill. It soon digresses to slavery in territories, comparative expenditures of government under this and preceding administrations, Taylor's position with respect to veto power and general uncertainty of his political opinions. Lincoln attends session. Globe. He transmits to J. M. McCalla, second auditor of Treasury, papers in Thomas Davis claim case, and writes Walter Davis that he has done so. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 493.

JUNE 27. Lincoln writes to Horace Greeley criticizing article in "Tribune." "By putting us in the position of insisting on the line of the Nueces, you put us in a position which, in my opinion, we cannot maintain. . . . If the degree of arrogance is not too great, may I ask you to examine what I said on this very point in the printed speech I send you." He finishes his letter to his wife and sends it with draft for $100. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 493-94.

JUNE 28. Lincoln receives "dunn" from P. H. Hood & Co. for $5.38 and one from Walter Harper & Co. for $8.50 for goods purchased by Mrs. Lincoln. He hesitates to pay them, because, as he recalls, she told him when she left that no bills remained unpaid. Ibid. In House Lincoln speaks on bill changing time of holding courts in western Virginia and raising judge's salary from $1,600 to $2,500. He votes to strike out salary raise. Ibid., I, 494.

JULY 1. Lincoln attends evening concert in Capitol grounds. In crowd he sees two ladies of the town, "our two girls . . . whose peculiarities were the wearing of black fur bonnets, and never being seen in close company with other ladies. . . . One of them was attended by their brother, and the other had a member of Congress in tow. He went home with her; and if I were to guess, I would say, he went away a somewhat altered man — most likely in his pockets, and in some other particular. The fellow looked conscious of guilt." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 495-96.

JULY 2. To Mrs. Lincoln, in Lexington, Lincoln recounts his activities: "Father expected to see you all sooner," he writes; "but let it pass; stay as long as you please, and come when you please. Kiss and love the dear rascals." [See July 23.] Ibid.

JULY 4. [Washington Monument cornerstone is laid with ceremony. Executive officials, congressmen, military companies, fire companies, school children, and fraternal organizations march to site, where Robert C. Winthrop delivers oration. National Intelligencer, July 6; Beveridge, I, 454-55]

JULY 5. Lincoln votes against motion to table resolution from Committee on Commerce which declares that President's reasons for vetoing river and

315

harbor bill are "insufficient and unsatisfactory." Motion to table is defeated, 65-109. Debate on resolution follows. Globe.

JULY 6. At his House desk, Lincoln writes secretary of war about military commissions for two constituents, withdrawing one application. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 496.

JULY 8. Lincoln and 14 other representatives sign petition to Robert E. Horner, doorkeeper of House, asking that "A. G. Matlack be retained in his present situation as messenger." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 497. He votes on several roll calls in House where amendments to Indian appropriations bill are under consideration. Journal.

JULY 9. In evening Lincoln receives letter from Herndon. He is pained by latter's belief that young men are being "ungenerously thrust back" by "old fossils." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 497-98.

JULY 10. Lincoln attends House. Globe. He also answers Herndon's letter. He thinks Herndon mistaken about old men. "I was young once, and I am sure I was never ungenerously thrust back. . . . The way for a young man to rise, is to improve himself every way he can, never suspecting that any body wishes to hinder him." He sends to Stephen A. Hurlbut, northern Illinois Whig, form letter introducing campaign paper, "The Battery," asking for subscribers, and adding personal note. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 497-98.

JULY 11. From Herndon Lincoln receives another letter which gives him "unalloyed pleasure. I now almost regret writing the serious, long faced letter, I wrote yesterday;" he replies, "but let the past as nothing be. Go it while you're young." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 499. In House he votes for three resolutions criticizing President's message. Globe.

JULY 12. House debates amendments to appropriations bill. Many members are absent and it is impossible to get quorum. Fines are imposed on absentees and sergeant-at-arms is ordered to bring them before House in morning. Lincoln is present. Ibid.; Journal.

JULY 13. Lincoln receives memorandum from Richard M. Young, commissioner of General Land Office, in response to request for information for constituent. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 499-500. In House, absentees move for remittance of fines imposed, but speaker refuses to recognize them. Lincoln "remarking that he believed he was still a member," moves previous question. Matter is finally laid on table. Ibid.; Globe.

JULY 14. Lincoln forwards Young's memorandum to John Hogan. "Taylorism seems to be going right, for which, I am very glad. Keep the ball rolling." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 499-500. House takes up bill disbanding wartime

316

military establishment and approves amendments. Lincoln is present. Journal. Stephen T. Logan visits Lincoln's Springfield bank and reports he has $50 fee for Lincoln's credit, and will deposit cash soon. Irwin Ledger.

JULY 15. Roll call taken in Committee of Whole to determine quorum does not list Lincoln as absentee. House debates civil and diplomatic appropriations bill. Journal; Globe.

JULY 17. Lincoln moves to suspend rules to permit introduction of bill establishing post routes; but motion fails to receive two-thirds majority. Ibid. He writes to secretary of war regarding A. G. Henry's claim for Mexican War expenses. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 500. S. T. Logan deposits $50 cash in Lincoln's account at Robert Irwin & Co., Springfield. Irwin Journal.

JULY 18. Lincoln votes against amendment to appropriations bill striking out appropriation for Savannah River. It is defeated by negative vote of speaker, 85-85. He votes to agree to conference committee's report on bill for prosecution of war and on other amendments to appropriations bill. Globe; Journal.

JULY 19. Lincoln reports and explains bill from Committee on Post Office and Post Roads providing for post routes. He also moves amendment, but bill is passed without it. Ibid.; Globe; The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 500.

JULY 20. Lincoln votes aye on passage of appropriations bill; it is defeated 77-100. General confusion ensues, with motions to reconsider. Appropriation for Savannah River is main reason for bill's defeat. This leads to partisan debate on Internal improvements. Journal; Globe.

JULY 22. Appropriations bill again comes up for passage. Lincoln votes for it again, and it passes 108-78, with Savannah River item included. Ibid.

JULY 23. Mrs. Lincoln and boys probably arrive from Lexington about this time, Lincoln's last letter to Mary having been written July 2, in which he sent $100 for expenses. [See July 2.] The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 495-96.

JULY 24. House receives from Polk message relating to California and New Mexico. Amid considerable confusion, Lincoln obtains floor and announces his desire to speak, but defers his remarks to permit message to be referred to appropriate committees. There are cries of "No, no, go on," as he resumes seat. Globe; The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 501.

JULY 25. Lincoln is present in House. Conference committee reports Indian appropriations bill. Report is accepted and bill passed. Globe.

JULY 26. Lincoln attends House. [All day and all night Senate debates bill for territorial governments in Oregon, California, and New Mexico.

317

It provides that antislavery laws of Oregon shall continue, but forbids legislatures of California and New Mexico to pass any law relating to slavery. Status of slavery may be decided by Supreme Court. Ibid.]

JULY 27. "Mr. Lincoln spoke on politics in general and on the merits of the candidates for the Presidential office," reports Globe. This is his speech ridiculing efforts of Democrats to extol military record of Lewis Cass. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 501-16. [Senate passes territorial bill. It has approval of President Polk. Globe; Diary.]

JULY 28. Lincoln votes to table Senate bill establishing territorial governments in Oregon, California, and New Mexico. Motion is carried on vote of Northern Whigs. Bitter partisan debate on Congress' power over slavery in territories follows. Globe.

JULY 31. Lincoln answers roll calls on motions to suspend rules. Debate on establishment of territorial government in Oregon is order of day. House agrees to Senate resolution fixing Aug. 14 as date of adjournment. Journal; Globe.

AUGUST 1. Mason Brayman, for Lincoln's tenant, pays $22.50, quarterly rent, into Lincoln's bank account. Irwin Ledger.

AUGUST 2. Having rejected Senate bill (Clayton Compromise), House frames bill giving territorial government to Oregon. Lincoln votes against amendment striking out provision extending Ordinance of 1787 to territory. It is defeated 88-114. Bill passes 129-71, Lincoln voting for it. Globe.

AUGUST 3. Lincoln attends session of House where army appropriations bill is considered. Ibid.

AUGUST 5. House debates army appropriations bill and orders it engrossed and read third time. Lincoln is present. Ibid.; Journal.

AUGUST 7. Lincoln attends House session which passes army bill. Ibid. ["The House of Representatives, I learn, have been engaged during the whole day in making violent party speeches on the Presidential election," complains Polk in his Diary. ". . . This is a great outrage and they should be held to a strict account . . . for their wanton waste of the public time."]

AUGUST 8. Lincoln reports resolution from Post Office Committee, moves its passage and speaks briefly. It is tabled. Globe. "I am remaining here for two weeks to frank documents," he writes to William Schouler, editor of Boston Atlas. "Now that the Presidential candidates are all set, I will thank you for your undisguised opinion as to what New England generally, and Massachusetts particularly will do." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 516.

318

AUGUST 9. Lincoln attends House, which sits until 10:40 P.M. Journal. [In Buffalo, Barnburner faction of Democratic party, some disaffected Whigs and abolitionists form Free Soil Party and nominate Van Buren.]

AUGUST 10. House debates Senate amendments to general appropriations bill. Lincoln votes against amendment striking out Savannah River appropriation. It passes 95-92. Globe. [Senate amends House bill establishing territorial government in Oregon by inserting provision extending Missouri Compromise line to Pacific.]

AUGUST 11. House votes down Senate amendment extending Missouri Compromise line. Vote is 82-121, Lincoln against it. Lincoln votes aye on passage of River and Harbor bill. It passes 118-62. Globe.

AUGUST 12. Lincoln attends House. A variety of business is taken up and House sits until 9:15 P.M. Journal; Globe.

AUGUST 13. [Senate remains in session all night and at 10 A.M. passes Oregon bill with House provision excluding slavery by applying "restrictions and prohibitions" of Northwest Ordinance. Ibid.]

AUGUST 14. Lincoln announces that Committee on Expenditures in War Department has prepared report on extra compensation paid Cass and Taylor and asks suspension of rules to enable him to move printing of message of President and accompanying documents on which report is based. House refuses and adjourns sine die. Ibid.; The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 517.

AUGUST 17. Lincoln signs form letter from Whig Executive Committee to Whig politicians, addresses, and dispatches them under his frank. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 517-18.

AUGUST 23. [Illinois Journal announces that Whig State Committee has appointed "Assistant Taylor Electors for the State at large, with the understanding that they will take the stump, and labor industriously in the cause of ‘Old Rough and Ready,’ from now until November next." Lincoln is selected from Sangamon County.]

AUGUST 24. Seneca, Md. About 600 persons attend bipartisan meeting. "Major George Peter, a thorough free-trade democrat, and the owner of a large number of slaves, and Mr. Lincoln, . . . a high protective tarriffite, free soil-Wilmot Proviso-abolition whig, supported the cause of Taylor. . . . Mr. Bouye of Rockville, and Mr. Lowe, Presidential Elector for the Western Shore, replied to Major Peter and Mr. Lincoln." Republican Citizen (Frederick, Md.), Sept. 1.

AUGUST 26. Rockville, Md. "The Whig Convention of Montgomery county [Md.] met at Rockville on Saturday last. . . . On the night of the

319

same day the Rough and Ready Club held a meeting in the Courthouse, and was addressed in a most interesting speech by the Hon. Mr. Lincoln, of Illinois." National Intelligencer, Aug. 29.

AUGUST 28. Washington. "The news we are receiving here now from all parts is on the look-up," writes Lincoln to William Schouler. From Ohio particularly comes news of great enthusiasm for Taylor. Lincoln has received no particulars from his own district but attributes Logan's defeat to the fact that Major Harris, his opponent, is popular by reason of his war service. "That there is any political change against us in the district I cannot believe." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 518-19.

AUGUST 31. "The Rough and Ready Club held a meeting last night at their room on Sixth street. Messrs. Brady and Lincoln, of the House of Representatives, delivered addresses, in laudation of General Taylor and in opposition to the Democracy. The best spirit characterized those present, and many enrolled their names as contributors to furnish ammunition for the contest." Baltimore Clipper, Sept. 2.

SEPTEMBER 3. Lincoln writes to Thaddeus Stevens of Pennsylvania inquiring as to prospects in that state. "The news we are receiving here now, by letters from all quarters is steadily on the rise; we have none lately of a discouraging character." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 1.

SEPTEMBER 5. National Intelligencer announces that Whigs will hold mass meeting at "their Platform" at 7 P.M. to celebrate anniversary of defense of Fort Harrison, "the first of the glorious achievements of the gallant Zachary Taylor." J. E. Brady of Pennsylvania, A. Lincoln of Illinois, J. M. S. Gausin, T. F. Bowie, T. G. Duckett and Z.. C. Lee of Maryland, and L. F. Tasistro of New York are expected to speak.

SEPTEMBER 9. En route. About this date Lincoln and family leave Washington for speaking tour in New England. He travels to Baltimore over Baltimore and Ohio and from there to New York over four roads subsequently incorporated into Pennsylvania system. From New York he probably takes boat to Norwich, and proceeds to Worcester over Worcester Railroad. Starr, 49-51.

SEPTEMBER 12. Worcester, Mass. Lincoln speaks at city hall. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 1-5. "He has a very tall and thin figure, with an intellectual face, showing a searching mind, and a cool judgment," reports Boston Advertiser, Sept. 14. "He spoke in a clear and cool, and very eloquent manner, for an hour and a half, carrying the audience with him in his able arguments and brilliant illustrations."

SEPTEMBER 13. Lincoln and others speak briefly from stand near railroad station. Worcester Spy. He attends Whig state convention, and

320

is guest at large dinner given by Levi Lincoln, former governor of Massachusetts. Beveridge, I, 474.

SEPTEMBER 14. New Bedford. In evening Lincoln speaks at Liberty Hall. "Lincoln and the New Haven and the Boston and Albany Railroads," Railway and Locomotive Historical Society Bulletin No. 33.

SEPTEMBER 15. Boston. Lincoln addresses Boston Whig Club. "He defended General Taylor from the charge that he had no principles. . . . He pointed out the absurdity of men who professed Whig principles supporting Van Buren, with all his Locofocoism, while the Whigs were as much opposed to the extension of slavery as were the Van Buren party. . . . It was a glorious meeting." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 5.

SEPTEMBER 16. Lowell. "The Whigs of Lowell had one of the taIlest meetings on Saturday night that they have yet held. The large City Hall was crowded in every part. The meeting was addressed by Hon. Abraham Lincoln, of Illinois, and George Woodman, Esq., of Boston. . . . The work goes bravely on." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 6; Boston Atlas, Sept. 16.

SEPTEMBER 18. Dorchester. "The Hon. Abram Lincoln, of Illinois, and the Hon. Geo. Lunt, of Boston, will address the citizens of Dorchester on Monday evening next, Sept. 18th, at Richmond Hall," announces Boston Atlas, Sept. 16.

SEPTEMBER 19. Chelsea. "The Whigs of Chelsea last night held one of those meetings which do good to the inner man. The Hon. Abraham Lincoln made a speech, which for aptness of illustration, solidity of argument, and genuine eloquence, is hard to beat." Boston Atlas, Sept. 20.

SEPTEMBER 20. Dedham and Cambridge. Lincoln attends Whig ratification meeting at Dedham in afternoon, and speaks at Cambridge in evening. "Mr. Lincoln . . . is a capital specimen of a ‘Sucker’ Whig, six feet at least in his stockings, and every way worthy to represent that Spartan band of the only Whig district in poor benighted Illinois," writes one of his Cambridge hearers in Boston Atlas (Sept. 22).

SEPTEMBER 21. Taunton. "Mr. Lincoln is well versed in the political tactics of the Western country. His speech was full of humor, and was mainly devoted to the political course of Mr. Van Buren and the Free Soil party. He said very little about Cass." Taunton Gazette, Sept. 23; The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 6-9.

SEPTEMBER 22. Boston. Whigs hold huge mass meeting at Tremont Temple. Seward is principal orator. He is followed by Lincoln who "spoke about an hour, and made a powerful and convincing speech. . . . The audience then gave three hearty cheers for ‘old Zack,’ three more for Governor Seward, and three more for Mr. Lincoln, and then adjourned;

321

thus ended one of the best meetings ever held in this good Whig city." Boston Atlas, Sept. 23.

SEPTEMBER 23. Boston and en route to Springfield. Lincoln congratulates Seward on his speech. "I have been thinking about what you said in your speech. I reckon you are right. We have got to deal with this slavery question, and got to give more attention to it hereafter than we have been doing." Autobiography of William H. Seward, 79-80n. He then starts on his journey home. Boston Atlas, Sept. 25.

SEPTEMBER 24. En route to Springfield. Lincoln takes Boston and Worcester Railroad to Worcester where he boards Western Railroad, which takes him to State Line. From there he travels over Albany and West Stockbridge Railroad to Albany. From Albany he travels over various roads — now parts of New York central — to Buffalo, and Niagara Falls. From Buffalo he takes steamer Globe to Detroit. Starr, 52-6.

SEPTEMBER 25. En route.

SEPTEMBER 26. Albany? Lincoln meets Thurlow Weed, Whig editor, and they call on Millard Fillmore, Whig candidate for Vice President. Joseph F. Newton, Lincoln and Herndon, 36; Galaxy, XI, 247.

SEPTEMBER 28. Buffalo and Niagara Falls? Learning that steamer Globe will soon leave for Chicago, Lincoln books passage. He visits Niagara Falls, with family, who rejoined him probably in late July, and is so impressed by volume of water, roar, mist, and rainbows, that he begins scientific essay on the tremendous natural phenomenon, abandoning it after several pages. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 10-11.

OCTOBER 1. Buffalo and en route? Globe embarks for Chicago, give or take one day. Distance to Chicago is 1047 miles, and can be covered in 60 hours. That is "record" time, by shortest distance, and Globe goes out of its way to Milwaukee. St. Louis Gazette, July 9, 1839.

OCTOBER 2. En route. On two days of voyage Lincoln and Levi North of Kewanee, Ill. hold running political debate. North defending Van Buren's Free Soil candidacy, Lincoln boosting "Old Zack." Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Lyman Trumbull Mss., Levi North to Lyman Trumbull, Apr. 16, 1864 [cited as Lyman Trumbull Papers, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.].

OCTOBER 3. [Voyage inspires Lincoln to thoughts about how lake boats could be lifted over shoals. In subsequent weeks, in leisure time after election, he designs buoy. [See also Mar. 10, and May 22, 1849.] The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 32-6.]

OCTOBER 4. Milwaukee. Globe stops en route Chicago The Abraham Lincoln Association, Springfield, Illinois. [Files and records on deposit at Illinois State Historical Library, Springfield, Illinois.] — Files.

322

OCTOBER 5. Chicago Lincoln registers at Sherman House. Chicago Journal, Oct. 6; Beveridge, I, 477.

OCTOBER 6. Whig rally is held at courthouse in evening with Lincoln principal speaker. Although called on six hours' notice, crowd is so large meeting adjourns to public square. Lincoln speaks for two hours. Chicago Journal (Oct. 6, 7) describes his speech as "one of the very best we have heard or read, since the opening of the campaign." S. A. Hurlbut follows Lincoln. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 11.

OCTOBER 7. Chicago and en route to Peoria. "Hon. A. Lincoln and Family passed down to Springfield this morning on his way home from Congress," notes Chicago Democrat.

OCTOBER 9. Peoria. Lincoln and J. Y. Scammon speak at courthouse in evening. After chairman "designated the spot where he should stand," reported Democratic Free Press (Oct. 11), "Mr. L. blew his nose, bobbed his head, threw up his coat tail, and in the course of two hours was delivered of an immense amount of ‘sound and fury’." He defends Taylor's seeming lack of principles and urges Free Soil men to support Taylor rather than Van Buren.

OCTOBER 10. Springfield. "Hon. Abraham Lincoln . . . arrived at home on Tuesday last," records Register Oct. 13. "We are pleased to observe that his arduous duties since the adjournment of Congress in franking and loading down the mails with whig electioneering documents, have not impaired his health. He looks remarkably well."

OCTOBER 12. Mrs. Lincoln buys $2 in groceries and pair of kid slippers, $1.25. Irwin Ledger and Journal.

OCTOBER 16. Lincoln pays 75˘ for umbrella. Ibid.

OCTOBER 19. Beardstown. Lincoln delivers stump speech for party ticket. Beardstown Gazette, Oct. 25.

OCTOBER 20. [Lincoln has appointment to speak at Jacksonville but postpones his address until tomorrow. Register, Oct. 27.]

OCTOBER 21. Jacksonville. Lincoln and Murray McConnel speak. Lincoln tries to unite Whigs and Free Soil men. McConnel accuses him of misrepresenting his constituents by his attitude on war. Lincoln refuses to believe that majority favored war, whereupon McConnel cites Whig defeat in last congressional election. "Lincoln has made nothing by coming to this part of the country to make speeches," writes Register correspondent, The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 11-3.

323

OCTOBER 23. Petersburg. "Lincoln attempted . . . to make a defence of his course in Congress," reports Register Nov. 3, "when he was most signally ‘used up’ by Ferguson. Lincoln beat a retreat to Springfield, swearing that Billy's home-thrusts were ‘unconstitutional and unnecessary’."

OCTOBER 25. Lincoln presides over meeting of Menard County bar. Herndon is member of committee on resolutions. Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

OCTOBER 26. Meeting of Menard bar concludes. Record.

OCTOBER 27. Springfield. Lincoln buys 75˘ pair suspenders. Irwin Ledger. Lincoln and Gersham Jayne sell for $100 their land near Huron bought in 1836, to Pleasant Armstrong and John Yardly of Petersburg. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 13-4.

OCTOBER 30. Metamora. Lincoln and Dr. A. G. Henry address Whig meeting at one o'clock. Illinois Journal, Oct. 27.

OCTOBER 31. Magnolia and Hennepin. Lincoln and Henry deliver addresses at Magnolia in afternoon. Lincoln then goes on alone to Hennepin where he speaks at seven o'clock. Ibid.

NOVEMBER 1. Lacon. "Dr. Henry . . . and Hon. A. Lincoln addressed a numerous assemblage of our citizens from all parts of the county. . . . [Lincoln] declared that the contest was between Taylor and Cass . . . and admonished all ‘Liberty’ or Van Buren men . . . to cast their votes for Gen. Taylor, and not indirectly for Gen. Cass. . . . After listening about four hours . . . the audience retired, highly entertained and instructed." Illinois Gazette, Nov. 4; The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 14.

NOVEMBER 2. Washington. Lincoln and Henry continue tour. Illinois Journal, Oct. 27. [Mrs. Lincoln buys $2.80 worth of cloth and $4.30 in merchandise. Irwin Ledger.]

NOVEMBER 3. Tremont. Again leaving Henry temporarily, Lincoln goes to Tremont where he addresses Whig meeting at one o'clock. Illinois Journal, Oct. 27.

NOVEMBER 4. Pekin and Peoria. Lincoln and Henry again join forces and address Whig meeting at Pekin in afternoon, and at Peoria after dark. Ibid.; Peoria Democratic Press, Nov. 8.

NOVEMBER 7. Springfield. Election day. Lincoln votes for Whig presidential electors. Election Returns.

NOVEMBER 8. ["Information received by the telegraph . . . indicates the election of General Taylor, . . ." writes Polk in his Diary. "Without political information and without experience in civil life, he is wholly unqualified

324

for the station, and being elected by the Federal party and by the various factions of dissatisfied persons who have from time to time broken off from the Democratic party, he must be under their absolute control."]

NOVEMBER 16. Lincoln's bank balance is credited $23.23 in interest. He draws 91˘ cash, buys groceries with it, and buys pair of brass candlesticks, charged to his account. Irwin Ledger and Journal.

NOVEMBER 18. On back of rent note given him by C. Ludlum, Lincoln writes receipt for $90. Privately owned.

NOVEMBER 21. Lincoln draws on his account for $355 to pay bills. Irwin Ledger.

NOVEMBER 23. Lincoln deposits $30 received from client. Ibid.

NOVEMBER 26. En route to Washington. By this date Lincoln must have left for Washington. He goes by way of St. Louis and Ohio River. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 29-30.

NOVEMBER 28. [Mrs. Lincoln buys pair of gaiters, $1.50, and half yard white crape, 37˘. Irwin Ledger and Journal.]

DECEMBER 4. Lincoln has not arrived in Washington as Thirtieth Congress convenes for its second session. Globe.

DECEMBER 5. Lincoln is still listed as absentee. Ibid. [Mrs. Lincoln has William Butler, brother-in-law, buy firewood box costing, with drayage, 60˘ Irwin Ledger.]

DECEMBER 6. Lincoln is still absent. Globe.

DECEMBER 7. Washington. Lincoln arrives at capital and takes seat in House. Ibid.; National Intelligencer, Dec. 8.

DECEMBER 8. Lincoln replies to letter from Amos Williams of Danville, Illinois: "Herewith I send you a document of ‘Information &c’ which you can examine; and then if you think fit, to file a caveat, you can send me a description and drawing of your ‘invention’ or ‘improvement’ together with $20 in money, and I will file it for you." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 14-5.

DECEMBER 11. Lincoln is again appointed to Committee on Post Office and Post Roads. His appointment to Committee on Expenditures in War Department stands through 30th Congress. He votes in favor of resolution instructing Committee on Ways and Means to inquire into expediency of reporting tariff bill based on Tariff of 1842. It passes 96-94. Globe.

325

DECEMBER 12. Lincoln votes against reconsideration of resolution adopting rules of House. He votes to reconsider vote ordering engrossing of bill prohibiting appropriations from contingent fund except by joint resolution. Ibid.

DECEMBER 13. Lincoln opposes motion to permit Mr. Palfrey to introduce bill, without previous notice, to repeal all acts maintaining slavery in District of Columbia. Motion is defeated 68-89. He votes in favor of resolution instructing Committee on Territories to report bill providing territorial governments for California and New Mexico and excluding slavery. It passes 106-80. Ibid.

DECEMBER 18. Lincoln votes against reconsideration of vote excluding slavery from New Mexico and California. Motion to reconsider is tabled 105-83. He votes to table bill, introduced by Giddings, for referendum by people of District of Columbia on slavery. It is also tabled, 106-79. Globe.

DECEMBER 20. Washington citizens give complimentary dinner at Coleman's Hotel "to a portion of the two Houses of Congress and one or two other guests." Newspaper report does not give those present, but Lincoln may have attended. National Intelligencer, Dec. 25.

DECEMBER 21. Lincoln votes against resolution directing Committee on District of Columbia to report bill abolishing slave trade there. Resolution is adopted 98-88. He votes against tabling resolution whereby sale of public lands shall cease and be disposed of to occupants and cultivators at such prices as will indemnify cost of their purchase, management and sale. It is tabled 104-60. Globe.

DECEMBER 22. Lincoln receives letter from his father asking for $20 to satisfy judgment. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 15. Excitement prevails in House in consequence of yesterday's motion regarding slave trade. Southern members plan meeting. [Mrs. Lincoln buys load of firewood, again using William Butler, for $1.75. Irwin Ledger.]

DECEMBER 23. Lincoln is appointed to select committee on erection of marble column at Yorktown to commemorate Comwallis' surrender. Journal.

DECEMBER 24. Lincoln answers letter he received from his father Dec. 22: "I very cheerfully send you the twenty dollars, which sum you say is necessary to save your land from sale. It is singular that you should have forgotten a judgment against you; and it is more singular that the plaintiff should have let you forget it so long. . . . Before you pay it . . . be sure you have not paid." John D. Johnston, stepbrother, asked for $80. Lincoln tells him his difficulty is idleness, and offers to pay Johnston a dollar for each dollar he earns to May 1. "I do not mean you shall go off to St.

326

Louis, or the lead mines, or the gold mines, in Calif but . . . close to home [in] Coles county." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 15-6.

DECEMBER 25. Lincoln writes Joshua Speed about uncollected judgment against Thomas C. Browne in Speed's favor. Speed has said Logan & Lincoln are to blame. Lincoln says they are not, but he would rather lose fee than cause hard feelings. "Nothing of consequence new here, beyond what you see in the papers." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 17.

DECEMBER 27. Horace Greeley, in New York Tribune, has attacked mileage claims of members. Resolution is offered directing Committee on Mileage to report abuses and inquire whether Greeley's article amounts to allegation of fraud. Lincoln calls for division of resolution into two, which is ordered. First resolution is adopted without roll call; second passes, 101-43, Lincoln voting nay. Globe.

DECEMBER 28. Lincoln votes against motion to table bill giving Illinois and other western States same amount of public land to aid in constructing roads and canals and improving navigation as was given to Ohio. It is tabled 93-77. Ibid.

DECEMBER 29. Lincoln votes to terminate debate on bill appropriating $1,000 compensation to legal representatives of deceased owner of slave transported west with Seminole Indians in 1835. Motion is adopted. He then votes to table bill, but motion is defeated. House adjourns until Jan. 2. Ibid.

DECEMBER 30. [Mrs. Lincoln draws $30 from Lincoln's account. Robert Irwin credits account with $4.22, balance he owes Lincoln for legal services. Irwin Ledger.]

327

Glossary of Legal Terms.

ad litem — for a limited period

ad quod damnum — fine and imprisonment

appellant — supreme court plaintiff

appellee — supreme court defendant

assumpsit — action for breach of contract

capias — writ ordering that person be taken in custody

declaration — formal statement of plaintiff

dedimus — writ commissioning citizen to take evidence for court

demurrer — plea challenging allegations of opposite party

et al. — and others

ex parte — in the matter of

ex rel. — in relation to

et ux. — and wife

interlocutory decree — preliminary legal ruling

mandamus — command writ of superior court

nil dicit — nothing said

nolle prosequi — no further prosecution

non detinet — writ ordering release of property

p.d. — for defendant

p.q. — for plaintiff

parol — by deposition

praecipe — writ commanding person to come before court

procedendo — writ of remand

pro confesso — confessed

pro forma — as a matter of form

quo warranto — writ to show authority

replevin — action to recover goods or chattels

replication — defendant's reply to plaintiff

scire facias — writ requiring person named to show cause why court record should not be enforced

supersedeas — stay writ

trover — action to recover personal property

vi et armis — by force of arms

writ of certiorari — legal writ summoning lower court record

nts

Notes.

1. Entries listed "files" or "photos" and not specifically located are in the Illinois State Historical Library, Springfield, Illinois.

2. This survey was formerly owned by Oliver R. Barrett. Sources from the now dispersed Barrett Collection for which no location is known are listed as "Privately owned"

3. When ninth General Assembly was elected produced virtual tie between Alton (8,157), Vandalia (7,730), and Springfield (7,075). Geographical center (790), Peoria (424), and Jacksonville (273) were eliminated setting the stage for contest between three leaders. Pease, 94-6.

4. Henry returns with $4,000.

5. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, VIII, 434 lists "Sampson's Ghost" and similar letters as suspect.

6. SC denotes Illinois Supreme Court cases.