iv

Advisory Committee.

L. Quincy Mumford, Chairman Paul M. Angle
Roy P. Basler
David C. Mearns
Clyde Walton

v

Lincoln Sesquicentennial Commission.

Ex officio members:
The President of the United States
The President of the Senate
The Speaker of the House of Representatives

Members appointed by the President of the Senate:
Hon. John Sherman Cooper, Kentucky, Chairman
Hon. Homer E. Capehart, Indiana
Hon. Frank Church, Idaho
Hon. Everett M. Dirksen, Illinois
Hon. Paul H. Douglas, Illinois
Hon. William E. Jenner, Indiana
Hon. Ralph W. Yarborough, Texas

Members appointed by the Speaker of the House of Representatives:
Hon. Leo E. Allen, Illinois
Hon. William G. Bray, Indiana
Hon. Frank Chelf, Kentucky
Hon. Winfield K. Denton, Indiana
Hon. Peter F. Mack, Jr., Illinois
Hon. F. Jay Nimtz, Indiana
Hon. John M. Robsion, Kentucky
Hon. Eugene Siler, Kentucky

Members appointed by the President of the United States:
Miss Bertha S. Adkins, Washington, D. C.
Mr. Victor M. Birely, Washington, D. C.
Dr. Ralph J. Bunche, New York
Dr. John S. Dickey, New Hampshire
Mr. John B. Fisher, Washington, D. C.
Dr. R. Gerald McMurtry, Indiana
Dr. L. Quincy Mumford, Washington, D. C.
Rev. Paul C. Reinert, Missouri
Mr. Walter N. Rothschild, New York
Hon. William G. Stratton, Illinois
Mr. Jouett Ross Todd, Kentucky
Dr. William H. Townsend, Kentucky
Hon. Sinclair Weeks, Massachusetts

Statutory member:
Mr. Conrad L. Wirth, Director National Park Service

vii

Location Symbols.

[NOTE FOR THE ELECTRONIC EDITION: All of the abbreviations have eliminated in the electronic edition and extended to their full form. — The Abraham Lincoln Historical Digitization Project.]

The following symbols provide a description of sources abbreviated within the text.

BHWC — Black Hawk War Collection, Illinois State Historical Library, Springfield, Illinois.

CWThe Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953.

DD — David Davis Papers, Illinois State Historical Library, Springfield, Illinois.

EBW — Elihu B. Washburne Papers, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

HW — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

JF — Jesse W. Fell Papers, Illinois State Historical Library, Springfield, Illinois.

JJH — John J. Hardin Papers, Chicago Historical Society, Chicago, Illinois.

LKLincoln Kinsman

JMP — John M. Palmer Papers, Illinois State Historical Library, Springfield,Illinois.

LLLincoln Lore.

LT — Lyman Trumbull Papers, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

OMH — Ozias M. Hatch Papers, Illinois State Historical Library, Springfield, Illinois.

RTL — Robert Todd Lincoln Collection of the Papers of Abraham Lincoln, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

RY — Richard Yates Papers, Illinois State Historical Library, Springfield, Illinois.

SC — Simon Cameron Papers, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

SPC — Salmon P. Chase Papers, Library of Congress, Washington, D. C.

WHH — William H. Herndon Papers, Henry E. Huntington Library, San Marino, California.

The word record, used frequently as a citation, refers to the appropriate official record of the court in which the case in question was filed.

viii

Abbreviation of Sources.

[NOTE FOR THE ELECTRONIC EDITION: All of the abbreviations have eliminated in the electronic edition and extended to their full form. — The Abraham Lincoln Historical Digitization Project.]

CSmH — Henry E. Huntington Library, San Marino, California.

DLC — Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

DNA — National Archives, Washington, D.C.

IA — Archives Division, Illinois State Library, Springfield, Illinois.

ICHi — Chicago Historical Society, Chicago, Illinois.

IHi — Illinois State Historical Library, Springfield, Illinois.

ISLA — The Abraham Lincoln Association, Springfield, Illinois. [Files and records on deposit at Illinois State Historical Library, Springfield, Illinois.]

IU — University of Illinois Library, Urbana, Illinois.

IaDaM — Davenport Public Museum, Davenport, Iowa.

IBloHi — McLean County Historical Society, Bloomington, Illinois.

InFtwL — Lincoln National Life Foundation, Fort Wayne, Indiana.

LNT — Howard-Tilton Library, Tulane University, New Orleans, Louisiana.

MH — Harvard University Library, Cambridge, Massachusetts.

NNP — Pierpont Morgan Library, New York City.

OCHP — Historical and Philosophical Society of Ohio, Cincinnati.

RPB — Brown University Library, Providence, Rhode Island.

1

1849-1860

3

1849

JANUARY 1. Washington. Lincoln writes draft to Robert Irwin for $4.22 to balance account. Irwin Ledger.

JANUARY 2. House considers bill to supply deficiencies in appropriations for year ending June 30th. Amendment is proposed allowing sergeant-at-arms clerk at $4 day provided office is deprived of messenger. Lincoln votes to strike out proviso. Motion carries. He votes aye on amendment, which carries. Globe.

JANUARY 3. Lincoln votes to table resolution whereby House would purchase copies of The Constitution, by William Hickey, to be distributed to libraries and institutions. Motion carries. He votes to table resolution criticizing secretary of treasury for method of administering Tariff of 1848. Resolution is tabled. Ibid.

JANUARY 4. Lincoln votes against reconsideration of vote whereby President's message was referred to select committee. He votes aye on resolution to raise mileage allowance of "Persons appointed to deliver the votes for President and Vice President . . . to the President of the Senate" from 12 1/2˘ to 25˘ per mile. It is passed 114-62. Ibid. At War Department he swears to facts re Joseph Newman, Mexican War Casualty. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 18.

JANUARY 5. Lincoln writes to Walter Davis of Springfield: "When I last saw you I said, that if the distribution of the offices should fall into my hands, you should have something; and I now say as much, but can say no more." In letter to Herndon he denies that he has promised Davis post office, but reiterates his intention to help him obtain "something" if he can. He enjoys himself writing to collector who wants his autograph and "a sentiment." Lincoln says he is not sentimental, and best sentiment he can think of is "that if you collect the signatures of all persons who are no less distinguished than I, you will have a very undistinguishing mass of names." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 18-9.

JANUARY 6. After acrimonious sectional debate. House votes on committee report favoring bill granting $1,000 compensation to slaveowner whose slave, joining Florida Indians in 1835, was captured by U.S. troops and sent west. Vote is close, and speaker and clerk disagree on count. Lincoln votes nay and asks how his vote was recorded. Globe; The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 19.

JANUARY 8. "Mr. Lincoln gave notice . . . for leave to introduce a bill in relation to school lands which may have been or may be relinquished."

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Journal. He votes against suspension of rules to permit introduction of resolution instructing committee on judiciary to report bill for apprehension of fugitive slaves. Motion is defeated 79-100. Globe.

JANUARY 9. Lincoln votes to reconsider vote of yesterday whereby bill to establish board of private claims was referred to Committee on Judiciary. He votes in favor of reconsideration of vote by which Committee of Whole was discharged from consideration. Former motion passes, latter fails. Ibid.

JANUARY 10. Lincoln reads amendment he intends to propose to resolution of Dec. 21 instructing Committee on District of Columbia to report bill abolishing slavery in District. Amendment, which would be submitted to people of District, would grant freedom to children born of slave mothers after Jan. 1, 1850, and provide for voluntary, compensated emancipation and rendition of fugitive slaves escaping into District. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 20-2.

JANUARY 11. Lincoln's boarding house messmates linger at table all evening discussing Lincoln's amendment. They heartily approve. "Giddings' Diary," Cleveland Post, Mar. 31, 1878; Nicolay & Hay, I, 533. Lincoln writes to James M. McLean, former Whig legislative colleague, who asked about jobs. Lincoln says he knows nothing about Taylor's intentions. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 22.

JANUARY 12. Lincoln attends House, for his name does not appear on list of absentees. Journal.

JANUARY 13. "Mr. Lincoln gave notice of a motion for leave to introduce a bill to abolish slavery in the District of Columbia, by consent of the free white people of said District, and with compensation to owners." Ibid.

JANUARY 14. Lincoln receives letters from John Bennett and James Berdan. Former desires office in California, latter, Jacksonville lawyer, asks for documents. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 23.

JANUARY 15. Besides attending House, Lincoln answers letters of previous day. He will do what he can for Bennett. Referring to James Shields' nomination and probable election to Senate, he asks Berdan: "How do you suppose this, as a fruit of the glorious Mexican war, tastes to Breese, McClernand et al?. Do you suppose they are in a mood of blessing the war about now?" Ibid.

JANUARY 16. Lincoln answers roll call in House. Journal.

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JANUARY 17. Lincoln's name is not on list of absentees, so he must have attended House. Ibid.

JANUARY 18. Lincoln votes against House motion to table resolution reported by committee on printing 1,000 extra copies of documents submitted by secretary of war relating to harbor at Buffalo. Motion fails and resolution, amended, is adopted. Globe.

JANUARY 19. Lincoln votes against reconsideration of bill granting compensation for slave sent west with Indians. He votes against passage, but it passes 101-95. Ibid. To J. B. Herrick, who has recommended William M. Black for register of Land Office at Vandalia, Lincoln writes: "I shall, when the time comes, try to do right, in view of all the lights then before me." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 23-4.

JANUARY 20. In Journal Lincoln's name does not appear on absentee list.

JANUARY 22. Lincoln, as agent of Thomas French, presents two drafts, totaling $1,476.67, and sent to him for collection, to Gales and Seaton, publishers of "National Intelligencer." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 24. In House, Lincoln votes to reconsider bill relative to claims of Alabama for money spent suppressing Creek Indians in 1836-37. Motion is passed. Globe.

JANUARY 23. In House amendment to civil and diplomatic appropriations bill to allow congressmen ten˘ per mile for mileage, and $2,000 per annum in lieu of per diem expenses and all other allowances, is defeated, 36-150. Lincoln votes with majority. Ibid. Lincoln writes to Henry E. Dummer of Beardstown, relating results of Post Office chore performed for this old friend and colleague. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 24.

JANUARY 25. Lincoln answers House roll call. Journal.

JANUARY 27. Lincoln answers House roll call. Ibid. Evening meeting of subscribers to Inaugural Ball is held at Willard's Hotel. Lincoln is elected to board of managers. National Intelligencer, Jan. 30. He writes to John Murray, Belleville Whig, who has applied for job. Others, Lincoln explains, are in line ahead of Murray, and Lincoln has no idea how much patronage authority Taylor will give him. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 24.

JANUARY 29. Lincoln presents memorial of Illinois citizens praying grant of public land to aid railroad from upper and lower Mississippi to Chicago. Journal. He votes to resolve House into Committee of Whole to consider bill reducing postal rates and correcting franking abuses. Motion is carried. Globe.

JANUARY 30. Lincoln votes against motion to table resolution for printing 10,000 extra copies of report of Committee on Naval Affairs on railroad

6

across Panama. Vote is tie, speaker votes nay, defeating motion. When resolution comes to vote, Lincoln votes aye. It passes 96-86. Ibid.

JANUARY 31. District of Columbia Committee reports bill which merely prohibits slave trade in District of Columbia. Motion to table is defeated, 72-117, Lincoln voting nay. Debate on slavery rages, but Lincoln does not participate. Ibid. In evening, board of managers of Inaugural Ball meets at Copp's Pavilion. National Intelligencer.

FEBRUARY 1. Bill concerning U.S. District Court for Western District of Virginia is again reported in House. Amendment is offered raising to $2,0000 salaries of district judges. After discussion bill is tabled, Lincoln voting nay. Globe.

FEBRUARY 2. Lincoln writes confidentially to William Schouler: "In these days of Cabinet making, we out West are awake as well as others." He asks Schouler to insert in his paper, with or without comment, as he sees fit, article from "Illinois Journal" proposing E. D. Baker for cabinet. West "is not only entitled to, but is in need of, one member of the cabinet." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 25.

FEBRUARY 5. On Feb. 3 Stephens of Georgia offered resolution that President furnish House information relative to negotiation of Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo. Houston of Alabama moves to amend, "if compatible with the public interest." Lengthy partisan discussion of administration's Mexican policy follows. Amendment is defeated 89-46, Lincoln voting against it. Globe.

FEBRUARY 6. Lincoln answers roll call. Journal. To William A. Crafts, who has written regarding financial status of Asahel Thayer, he writes that he is under impression that he "is not able to pay any thing," but has brother in Springfield in good circumstances. "Lest I be mistaken, I send your letter to a friend in Springfield, with the request that he will ascertain the material facts and write you." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 25.

FEBRUARY 8. Lincoln votes in favor of motion to table joint resolution from Senate "to extend the time for receiving proposals for the printing of Congress." Motion passes 90-86. Globe.

FEBRUARY 9. Lincoln attends House. Journal.

FEBRUARY 10. Lincoln attends House. Ibid.

FEBRUARY 12. Lincoln votes to make bill relating to Department of Interior special order of day for Feb. 16. It fails. Questions recurs of referring bill to Committee of Whole. This also fails, Lincoln voting nay. On question of ordering bill engrossed for third reading, Lincoln votes aye, and motion passes 111-76. Globe. Lincoln receives draft for $105 on Corcoran & Riggs, Washington bankers, evidently legal fee. Henry E. Huntington Library, San Marino, California.

7

Original. He writes David Davis of Bloomington that he has received more than 300 letters about job of commissioner of General Land Office. Lincoln, whose term expires March 4, has designs on this for himself. He thinks he could get it, but "every man in the state, who wants it himself, would be snarling at me about it, I shrink from it." Photo. Lincoln's Springfield bank account is debited $27 for payment to Bela C. Webster. Irwin Journal.

FEBRUARY 13. Lincoln presents five memorials of citizens of Illinois for grant of land to aid railroad (Journal), and speaks on railroad grants. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 26-7. He votes to amend yesterday's "Journal" to show that while rules were suspended to allow Wallace of South Carolina to address House on Wilmot Proviso, same courtesy was refused Ashmun of Massachusetts. Globe.

FEBRUARY 14. There is no evidence of Lincoln's presence in Congress; but he is probably there, as House and Senate met in joint session to count electoral votes. Lincoln receives letter from Cyrus Edwards of Alton soliciting his aid in securing appointment as commissioner of General Land Office. Illinois State Historical Library, Springfield, Illinois. — Journal, XXV, 143.

FEBRUARY 15. Lincoln votes against motion to table bill to incorporate Washington, Alexandria, and Georgetown Steam Packet Company. It is defeated 70-106. He votes for bill to settle private claims against U.S. Bill is rejected 85-98. Globe.

FEBRUARY 17. Lincoln attends House. Journal. From William Brown and Richard Yates he receives papers relating to bounty land and pension claimed by Mrs. Eliza Pearson. He receives letter from G. R. Welles inquiring about letter and money given to Lincoln to deliver to Young & Brothers in St. Louis on his way to Washington. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 27-9.

FEBRUARY 19. In morning Lincoln visits Pension Office in behalf of Mrs. Pearson. In House he presents joint resolutions of Illinois Legislature asking railroad land grant. Globe. In evening he calls on Thomas Yeatman, son-in-law of Judge Nathaniel Pope, to whom he gave letter and money entrusted to him by C. R. Welles. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 27-30.

FEBRUARY 20. Lincoln answers Welles' letter. He explains that he forgot letter and money until he was on boat below St. Louis. He asked Yeatman, who was returning to St. Louis, to deliver them. Yeatman remembers receiving them, but fears pickpocket got them. Lincoln writes to Joshua F. Speed that he believes he could get Land Office appointment for himself, but doubts if he can for anyone else. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 28-30.

FEBRUARY 21. Lincoln votes against amendment to strike out of bill regulating mileage of members of Congress section compelling members to deduct

8

per diem allowance on days they fall to attend sessions, unless sick. It is rejected 51-112. He votes aye on bill itself, which passes 158-16. He votes against bill abolishing franking privilege. It fails 81-104. Globe. [In Springfield, Mrs. Lincoln buys and charges three yards check cloth for 75˘. Irwin Ledger and Journal.]

FEBRUARY 22. Lincoln votes on four minor amendments to bill establishing Territory of Minnesota, and on other minor questions. Globe.

FEBRUARY 23. Lincoln answers roll call. Journal.

FEBRUARY 24. Lincoln votes aye on bill to aid Louisiana in reclaiming swamp lands. It passes 100-61. Globe.

FEBRUARY 26. [Lincoln's name does not appear on roll call.]

FEBRUARY 27. Lincoln votes to establish temporary territorial government for Upper California. Bill passes 126-87. Globe. In evening speaker Winthrop entertains Gen. Taylor "in company with a large number of the Members of both Houses of Congress and other distinguished persons." National Intelligencer, Mar. 2. Lincoln is not mentioned but may have attended. Lincoln writes two short notes to Taylor recommending Edward D. Baker for cabinet, enclosing testimonial papers. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 30.

FEBRUARY 28. Lincoln reports Senate bill from Committee on Post Office and Post Roads. Bill is passed and returned to Senate. Globe. House holds evening session at which Lincoln presents petition of citizens of Morgan County praying Congress to abolish slave trade in District of Columbia. Journal.

MARCH 1. Lincoln votes for motion to reconsider bill, passed yesterday, providing for settlement of accounts of officers who collected duties in Mexico. Motion fails 86-88. He votes three times on minor matters relating to Indian appropriation bill. Ibid.

MARCH 2. Lincoln votes against Senate amendment to civil and diplomatic appropriations bill to provide for extension of U.S. laws and Constitution to new territories west of Rio Grande. Amendment is rejected, 100-114, on sectional vote. Globe. This is so-called Walker Amendment to provide temporary government for New Mexico and California.

MARCH 3. Lincoln answers roll call at day and night sessions. House does not adjourn until 7 A.M. Mar. 4th. Lincoln stays until end. Journal. He votes aye on motion that House recede from its rejection of Walker Amendment to appropriations bill. It passes, 110-107. He also votes for Walker Amendment, which passes 187-19. Globe.

MARCH 4. During night House amends Senate amendment providing territorial government for New Mexico and California to declare that laws of

9

Mexico remain in effect. Among them is law prohibiting slavery. Polk is ready with veto message. About 6 A.M. appropriations bill with both Walker and House amendments eliminated is presented to Polk. He approves it and crisis is deferred. Diary.

MARCH 5. Lincoln attends inauguration of President Taylor. In evening he, Washburne "and a small number of mutual friends" attend Inaugural Ball. "We did not take our departure until three or four o'clock in the morning. When we went to the cloak and hat room, Mr. Lincoln . . . was unable to find his hat . . . and after an hour . . . started off bareheaded for his lodgings." Rice, 19-20.

MARCH 7. Lincoln is admitted to practice before U.S. Supreme Court, (William E. Barton, The Life of Abraham Lincoln, I, 307) and argues case of William Lewis v. Thomas Lewis. Case was tried in U.S. Circuit Court, Springfield, June 10, 1845. Court decided for complainant and Lincoln appealed. Transcript of Records, II, Dec. Term 1845, No. 3.

MARCH 8. Trial of Lewis v. Lewis is concluded. Case involves Illinois statute of limitations as applied to suits brought by nonresidents. Ibid. Court announces decision five days later. Lincoln, his party now in power, writes two notes to John M. Clayton, secretary of state, recommending Dr. Anson G. Henry of Springfield as secretary of Minnesota Territory (with supporting recommendation), and Archibald Williams of Quincy as U.S. district attorney for Illinois. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 31.

MARCH 9. Lincoln writes to William M. Meredith, secretary of treasury, asking that he and E. D. Baker be consulted when appointments are made for Illinois, as Whigs of that state hold them responsible to some extent. Lincoln and Baker write to Thomas Ewing, secretary of interior, recomending Mathew Gillespie for land office at Edwardsville. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 31-2.

MARCH 10. Lincoln writes Meredith about several applicants for U.S. marshal for Illinois. Benjamin Bond of Carlyle is "personally, every way worthy of the office"; but "in my individual judgment, the appointment of Mr. Thomas [of Galena] would be better." Lincoln applies for patent on "new and improved" manner of combining adjustable buoyant chambers with steam boats or other vessels." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 32-7.

MARCH 11. With Edward D. Baker, Lincoln calls on Secretary Thomas Ewing, Interior, and discusses patronage. Paul I. Miller, "Lincoln and the Governorship of Oregon," Miss. Valley Hist. Rev., XXIII, 391.

MARCH 13. [Lincoln loses appeal in Lewis v. Lewis when U.S. Supreme Court affirms decision of Illinois court. Transcripts of Records, II, Dec. Term, 1848, No. 3.]

10

MARCH 14. Lincoln endorses E. D. Baker's nomination of Nathaniel G. Wilcox, Schuyler County Whig, as Navy purser. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 37. [Lincoln's, bank balance gains $21 on payment of legal fee by one Keeling. Irwin Journal.]

MARCH 19. [Sangamon Circuit Court convenes for spring term.]

MARCH 20-MARCH 25. En route to Springfield. Before departing from Washington for home via St. Louis on railroad, stage, and steamer, Lincoln endorses to Secretary of State Clayton Edward D. Baker's nomination of himself (Baker) as agent to go to California and bring territory into Union as Whig state. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 38.

MARCH 26. St. Louis. Lincoln meets Benjamin Bond, who is en route to Washington seeking appointment as marshal. Lincoln writes letter of introduction to Secretary of State Clayton. He writes note to House postmaster asking that letters Bond wrote to Lincoln and Baker at that address a be turned over to Bond. Ibid.

MARCH 27. Alton. Lincoln, on his way home, writes to Cyrus Edwards explaining that he has made no recommendation for General Land Office because, while he is for Edwards, Baker is for Don Morrison, and unless Lincoln and Baker agree on recommendation, appointment will probably go to some other state. If one will withdraw they will recommend the other. Illinois State Historical Library, Springfield, Illinois. — Journal, XXV, 144.

MARCH 31. Springfield. "Honorable A. Lincoln arrived in this city on Saturday evening." Illinois Journal, Apr. 2.

APRIL 1. Lincoln buys bond no. 89 ($50) of issue for refinancing state house debt. The Abraham Lincoln Association, Springfield, Illinois. [Files and records on deposit at Illinois State Historical Library, Springfield, Illinois.] — Files.

APRIL 4. [Tazewell Circuit Court opens its session at Tremont.]

APRIL 7. Lincoln writes four letters recommending Whigs for various offices held by Democrats. To W. B. Warren, clerk of Second Grand Division of state Supreme Court, Lincoln writes that he wishes Edwards, or if he withdraws, Morrison, to have General Land Office; but "if the office could be secured to Illinois by my consent to accept it, and not otherwise, I give that consent." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 39-41.

APRIL 10. Lincoln writes Thomas Ewing that he cannot recommend for Kaskaskia Land Office appointments, that region being too far away and not in his district. He will back anyone favored by J. L. D. Morrison and R. B. Servant, Whigs. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 42.

APRIL 12. Lincoln resumes legal drafting, writing statement of fees and

11

receipt for clerk's fees in David Broadwell et al. v. J. B. and William Broadwell. Photo.

APRIL 13. On 7th Lincoln wrote Thomas Ewing recommending Walter Davis for receiver and Turner R. King for register of Land Office at Springfield. He asks Ewing to transpose those recommendations. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 42. He writes affidavit filed in Joseph Nelson v. John Busher and Elizabeth Nelson, Sangamon County Court case. Photo.

APRIL 16. [McLean Circuit Court convenes at Bloomington.]

APRIL 18. Lincoln buys $6.03 worth of paper and oilcloth shelf "bordering." Irwin Journal.

APRIL 19. Replying to Cyrus Edwards, who informs him that Morrison will not withdraw as candidate for Land Office, Lincoln reiterates his helplessness until Edwards and Morrison get together. Lincoln's friends have urged him to take office, but he has declined unless administration refuses to give it to Edwards. Illinois State Historical Library, Springfield, Illinois. — Journal, XXV, 144.

APRIL 20. Lincoln writes to W. B. Preston, secretary of the navy, that most government advertising in Illinois goes to Democratic papers. Taylor will probably "not go the doctrine of removals very strongly," but when job is not already in Democratic hands it should be given to Whig. "And if still less than this is done for our friends, I think they will have just cause to complain." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 42-3.

APRIL 23. Lincoln gives John E. Roll, carpenter, six walnut doors in part payment for remodeling his house. Illinois State Historical Library, Springfield, Illinois. — Journal, XIX, 159-60.

APRIL 24. Jacob Bunn's store has new customer, Mrs. Lincoln, who sends E. G. Johns, painter, for keg of lead paint, who charges it ($2) to Lincoln. Bunn Journal.

APRIL 25. Lincoln, having learned that Justin Butterfield of Chicago is being considered for Land Office, writes to J. M. Lucas, of Jacksonville, clerk in Land Office in Washington: "He is my personal friend, and is qualified to do the duties of the office; but of the quite one hundred Illinoisians, equally well qualified, I do not know one with less claims to it." He writes to Philo H. Thompson of Pekin, for whom he recommended T. R. King for Land Office appointment. This is giving him trouble, for King has been attacked as gambler. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 43-4.

APRIL 26. Lincoln writes to Ewing regarding charges made against T. R. King. He requests that when charges are made against anyone recommended by him, action be suspended until he can investigate. He knows "the principal object of the fault-finders, to be to stab me." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 44-5. Mrs. Lincoln's painter buys second keg of lead paint. Bunn Journal.

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APRIL 27. [DeWitt Circuit Court convened in Clinton yesterday.]

APRIL 30. Lincoln replies to letter from Cyrus Edwards in which Edwards instructs him to take whatever course he deems best. Lincoln states that he believes Edwards has chance and prefers he not withdraw. Illinois State Historical Library, Springfield, Illinois. — Journal, XXV, 144. Lincoln writes, signs, and swears affidavit in Edward D. Baker v. J. Vincent Browne, case filed in Sangamon Circuit Court. Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — David Davis Papers, Illinois State Historical Library, Springfield, Illinois. Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

MAY 1. Lincoln writes to Caleb B. Smith of Indiana, former colleague in Congress, now member of Mexican Claims Commission, asking him and George Evans, of Maine, to call on Ewing in behalf of Dr. Anson G. Henry, applicant for register of Minnesota Land Office. "I have always had a tolerably high hope that Mr. Ewing will appoint Henry, if he does not forget my peculiar anxiety about it." He writes memorandum stating that W. S. Wallace and Orville Paddock of Springfield, rivals for pension agent, are both good Whigs and business men. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 45-6.

MAY 2. [Champaign Circuit Court convenes at Urbana.]

MAY 3. [Herndon states that sometime during spring of 1849, Grant Goodrich of Chicago tried to induce Lincoln to come to Chicago and form partnership. Lincoln refused because, having tendency toward tuberculosis, he feared that confinement and hard study would undermine his health. Herndon-Weik, 247.]

MAY 7. Lincoln loans John Hay $500, taking promissory note secured by mortgage on 150 acres of land about two miles south of Springfield. Note is payable six months from date, and is to bear interest at 6 per cent. Book CC of Mortgages, 43. Lincoln writes to George W. Rives of Edgar County, who seeks his patronage assistance, that he has not been outstanding in securing jobs. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 46. He buys, at Irwin's store, $4.62 in groceries and 6 3/4 yards moreen and piece of binding (15˘). Irwin Journal and Ledger.

MAY 9. On back of C. Ludlum's rent note Lincoln acknowledges receipt of full payment for house rental. Privately Owned.

MAY 10. Lincoln writes to Thomas Ewing explaining that his letter of Apr. 13, in which he requested that King's and Davis's recommendations be transposed, was written at request of friend who then attacked King's character in order to get appointment for himself. Lincoln defends King and asks that his recommendations stand as originally made. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 46-7.

MAY 13. Lincoln writes, for Charles H. Constable of Wayne County, job seeker, letter of introduction to Secretary Clayton. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 48.

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MAY 14. [Edgar Circuit Court begins its session at Paris.]

MAY 15. Lincoln is much disturbed by receipt of letters from Washington informing him that Justin Butterfield will probably be appointed commissioner of General Land Office. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 48-9. Lincoln pays $4 cash at Bunn's store, amount he owes for two kegs paint. Bunn Journal.

MAY 16. Lincoln writes to Secretary Preston reminding him of promise that no one from Illinois would be appointed to high office without his being heard. "When you and I were almost sweating blood to have Gen. Taylor nominated . . . [Butterfield] was ridiculing the idea, and going for Mr. Clay; and when Gen. T. was nominated, if he went out of the city of Chicago to aid in his election, it is more than I ever heard, or believe." He writes another letter of introduction to Secretary of State Clayton, this time for E. P. Oliphant of Pennsylvania, fellow soldier of Black Hawk War, and job seeker. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 48-9.

MAY 17. Lincoln records mortgage made by John Hay on 7th. Book CC of Mortgages, 43.

MAY 18. Lincoln writes to Duff Green protesting against Butterfield's appointment. "In the great contest of /40 he was not seen or heard of; but when the victory came, three or four old drones, including him, got all the valuable offices. . . . Try to defeat B. and in doing so, use Mr. Edwards, J. L. D. Morrison, or myself, which ever you can to best advantage." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 49-50.

MAY 19. Lincoln is doing everything in his power to prevent appointment of Butterfield. He writes to Joseph Gillespie asking him to request Senator John J. Crittenden of Kentucky to do what he can to block appointment. "He can control the matter." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 50.

MAY 21. Lincoln writes and files praecipe in Cantrell and Cantrell v. Primm, slander, in Sangamon Circuit Court. Photo. [Shelby Circuit Court opens its session at Shelbyville.]

MAY 22. Lincoln is granted patent on device for lifting boats over shoals. National Archives, Washington, D.C. — File No. 6469. [He applied Mar. 10. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 32-6.]

MAY 25. Lincoln writes letters to Richard W. Thompson and Elisha Embree, Whig congressmen from Indiana. He describes Butterfield's proposed appointment as "an egregious political blunder" which "will give offence to the whole whig party here," and asks them to write to President Taylor, "saying that either I, or the man I recommend, should . . . be appointed to that office, if any one from Illinois shall be." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 51. He buys $2.39 worth of clothing material, plus half-yard flannel for 38˘. Irwin Journal.

MAY 28. [Moultrie Circuit Court convenes at Sullivan.]

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MAY 29. Charleston. Lincoln visits his father and stepmother. Thomas Lincoln's health is failing. Charles H. Coleman, Abraham Lincoln and Coles County, Ill., 128. Mrs. Lincoln buys and charges 7 pounds sugar at Bunn's Grocery (50˘). Bunn Journal.

MAY 30. Lincoln is with his Coles County relatives, relating experiences as congressman. Coleman, 129-30.

MAY 31. Lincoln is still visiting. Ibid. [Macon Circuit Court begins its session at Decatur.]

JUNE 2. En route to Springfield. A. G. Henry writes to Joseph Gillespie that he has just learned Taylor has been persuaded to delay Land Office appointment for three weeks. "Secretary Preston says Lincoln is the only man in Illinois that can beat Butterfield, but that he can do it if he comes on, & his friends back him up. . . . Lincoln will go the moment he gets home he is now in Coles, but is looked for to-night." The Abraham Lincoln Association, Springfield, Illinois. [Files and records on deposit at Illinois State Historical Library, Springfield, Illinois.] — Files.

JUNE 3. Springfield. Lincoln writes to Dr. J. B. Herrick: "It is now certain that either Mr. Butterfield or I will be Commissioner of the General Land-Office. If you are willing to give me the preference, please write me to that effect, at Washington, whither I am going. There is not a moment of time to be lost." Mrs. Lincoln writes and signs Lincoln's name to similar letters. While she copies form letter, Lincoln tells Thomas Ewing that he cannot recommend for Land Office receiver at Vandalia, which is not in his district. He also writes to Congressman R. C. Schenck of Ohio, briefing form letter message. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 52-3.

JUNE 4. Lincoln writes form letter: "Would you as soon I should have the Genl. Land Office as any other Illinoian? If you would, write me to that effect at Washington where I shall be soon. No time to loose." He sends similar letter to Willie P. Mangum, U.S. Senator from North Carolina, and William H. Seward of New York. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 53; VIII, 414.

JUNE 5. Lincoln sends more form letters, and buys $1 worth of sperm candles. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 53; Bunn Journal.

JUNE 6. Justin Butterfield, in town from Chicago, writes J. J. Brown that Lincoln has told George W. Meeker, who accompanies Butterfield, he is not yet candidate for Land Office but "might be." Butterfield believes this is meant to deceive him while Lincoln circulates petitions in his own behalf. Illinois State Historical Library, Springfield, Illinois. — Journal, XXV, 141. Lincoln's account is charged $1.75 for 6 pounds sugar and lemon syrup. Bunn Journal.

JUNE 7. Several Whigs, including clerks of circuit and county courts, probate judge and sheriff, have signed petition in Butterfield's behalf. According to Butterfield, Lincoln and Stephen T. Logan are trying to persuade signers to retract and are circulating Lincoln petitions among farmers. Illinois State Historical Library, Springfield, Illinois — Journal, XXV, 141.

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JUNE 8. Lincoln writes to Nathaniel Pope, U.S. judge, asking him to state in letter, "what you did say to me last spring . . . in relation to my becoming an applicant for that office? Having at last concluded to be an applicant, I have thought it is perhaps due me, to be enabled to show the influences which brought me to the conclusion — among which influences the wishes and opinions you expressed were not the least." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 53-4. [Judge Pope did not respond as Lincoln hoped. He told Secretary Ewing (Interior) that either Lincoln or Butterfield would be acceptable. Beveridge, I, 49on.]

JUNE 9. Butterfield sends Lincoln a letter, by Levi Davis, proposing that neither go to Washington. When Davis delivers letter, Lincoln has gone to bed and excuses himself from sending written reply because he cannot see to write. He would agree to Butterfield's proposal if he were at liberty to do so, but he is so far committed to his friends that he cannot. Illinois State Historical Library, Springfield, Illinois — Journal, XXV, 142.

JUNE 10. Springfield and en route to Washington. "On Sunday evening last," observes Register (June 14), "Lincoln and Butterfield ‘went off handsomely,’ the former having a slight advantage in the start, though Lincoln had the ‘inside track,’ (in the opinion of his friends;) it being a ‘steeple chase,’ . . . the goal being the federal capital. . . . Bets run high, though the backers of Lincoln give slight odds."

JUNE 11. En route. According to Herndon, Lincoln's only companion in stage is Kentuckian who offers Lincoln chew, smoke, and drink, all of which he refuses. On taking his departure that afternoon, Kentuckian remarks: "See here, stranger, . . . my experience has taught me that a man who has no vices has d—d few virtues." Herndon & Weik, 244.

JUNE 12. [Mrs. Lincoln draws $10 from Lincoln's account. Irwin Journal.]

JUNE 13. En route Terre Haute to Indianapolis. In stage with Lincoln are Abram Hammond, later county judge and governor of Indiana, and Thomas H. Nelson. Not knowing Lincoln, they have much merriment, as they think, at his expense. Arriving Indianapolis at night, they stop at Browning's Hotel, where Lincoln, to their surprise, is greeted by John McLean, Judge E. Hannigan, A. S. White, and R. W. Thompson. Herndon & Weik, 244-46.

JUNE 15. En route. [At some point on his journey Lincoln writes memorandum of what he will tell President Taylor in making his case for commissioner. His main argument is geographical. Central Illinois Whigs have had no important patronage, and Whigs of Northwest states are for Lincoln. "Is the center nothing? — that center which alone has ever given you a Whig representative?" The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 54.]

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JUNE 19. Washington. Lincoln writes to Thomas Ewing recommending N. G. Wilcox for receiver of Land Office at Stillwater, Minnesota. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 55.

JUNE 21. Justin Butterfield is appointed commissioner of General Land Office. Lincoln, learning of his defeat, comes back to his room, throws himself on the bed, and lies there an hour or more. Illinois State Historical Library, Springfield, Illinois — Journal, XXV, 152.

JUNE 22. Suspecting that some of letters of recommendation which he secured have been withheld from President, Lincoln writes to Ewing asking him to transmit to him (Lincoln) all papers on file in Department of Interior recommending him for commissioner. He writes endorsement of William Porter of Sangamon County, applicant for Land Office job, and forwards to Interior Department. He gets back from Interior his letter recommending Charles G. Thomas for marshal. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 55; VIII, 415.

JUNE 24. Lincoln writes to Navy Secretary regarding removal of his "personal friend" and "fellow Illinoisan," A. F. Patrick, Democrat, from clerkship, on charge of incompetence. "In such an implication I suspect injustice has been done him." He requests Secretary look into matter, rectify it, and find temporary employment for Patrick until meeting of Congress. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 56.

JUNE 25-JULY 3. En route to Springfield.

JULY 4. Springfield. Lincoln writes to secretary of state hoping that Richard W. Thompson of Indiana may secure diplomatic appointment. Ibid.

JULY 5. Lincoln writes Secretary Ewing, asking that if anyone in his district is to have "little favor" of appointment as Land Office examiner, William Porter be selected. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 56-7. He buys six "tumblers" at Bunn's store. Bunn Journal. [U.S. District Court, Judge Pope presiding, opens session in Chicago.]

JULY 6. Lincoln writes David Davis, relating his trip to Washington and failure in patronage struggle. Photo. He buys 75˘ worth of "sundries" at Bunn's store. Bunn Journal.

JULY 13. In letter to Joseph Gillespie, Lincoln deplores Cyrus Edwards' belief he has played false with him. He encloses another letter to be shown to Edwards stating that he first determined to be applicant only when he was

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informed by telegraph that "the question was narrowed down to Mr. B. and myself." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 57-9.

JULY 14. Lincoln writes and signs bill of divorce for Robert Plunkett from Ann Plunkett. Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — David Davis Papers, Illinois State Historical Library, Springfield, Illinois. Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

JULY 21. Lincoln receives letter from John Addison, Land Office clerk, Washington, stating that Butterfield has James Berdan in mind for job. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 59.

JULY 22. Lincoln writes patronage letters. He asks John Addison to forward letters arriving at Land Office supporting Lincoln for commissioner. "I should like to see them. I have now about forty such." He informs James Berdan that Berdan is now being considered for appointment by Butterfield. "I took the precaution to withdraw the letters filed in my favor for Comr.; so that the very pretty one you wrote for me, can not rise in judgment against you." He also sends testimonial to Secretary Ewing for George H. Holtzman, clerk applicant. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 59-60; Photo.

JULY 23. [First train runs on Sangamon & Morgan Railroad, rebuilt Northern Cross Railroad, in which Lincoln is interested. The Abraham Lincoln Association, Springfield, Illinois. [Files and records on deposit at Illinois State Historical Library, Springfield, Illinois.] — File]

JULY 24. Lincoln is rebuilding his law practice. He writes and signs declaration in Edward D. Baker v. J. Vincent Browne. Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — David Davis Papers, Illinois State Historical Library, Springfield, Illinois. Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

JULY 25. Lincoln and B. S. Edwards, for plaintiff, write and file in Sangamon Circuit Court declaration in Watson v. Sangamon & Morgan Railroad Co., suit to collect for cross ties delivered railroad. In another suit against new railroad, John B. Morgan plaintiff, Lincoln writes part of declaration and signs for Stuart and Edwards and Lincoln & Herndon. Ibid.

JULY 26. Lincoln buys scythe and handle at Irwin's store. Irwin Ledger and Journal.

JULY 27. Lincoln writes and files declaration, and bill in chancery, injunction, in Webster et al. v. French et al. , signing for plaintiffs' attorneys, Logan, Lincoln & Herndon, and Brayman. He writes and files declaration in Coon v. Lloyd. Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — David Davis Papers, Illinois State Historical Library, Springfield, Illinois. Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

JULY 28. Lincoln writes to John M. Clayton criticizing policy of leaving responsibility for appointments to departments. This "is fixing for the President the unjust and ruinous character of being a mere man of straw." Unless arrested "it will damn us all inevitably." Taylor "must occasionally say, or seem to say, ‘by the Eternal,’ ‘I take the responsibility.’" The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 60.

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JULY 31. Lincoln writes, signs, and files in Sangamon Circuit Court declaration and affidavit in Henry Bailer v. Oliver Davis. Bailer signs affidavit with his mark. Record; Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

AUGUST 6. Lincoln writes and files in Sangamon Circuit Court bill of complaint and bill in chancery in William D. Enyart v. Smith McAtee. Ibid.

AUGUST 7. Lincoln writes agreement on facts in case of Hiram Penny v. Henry McHenry et al. Record; Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

AUGUST 9. Lincoln wins, for William Porter, stay of execution in sale of lots to satisfy judgment of Nov. 16, 1847, $178.39 damages and interest, in I. T. Butts v. Garrett Elkin. Execution Record.

AUGUST 11. Lincoln pays two workmen $37.50 from his bank account. Irwin Journal.

AUGUST 12. Lincoln writes to Secretary of State Clayton, reminding him that Allen Francis of Springfield is applicant for Glasgow consulship. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 61.

AUGUST 13. Lincoln writes and signs two bills of foreclosure: William Fithian v. Mordecai Mobley et al.; Thomas Condell Jr. et al. v. Henry Dresser and wife. Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

AUGUST 15. Lincoln writes and signs declaration in Reuben Coon v. Turner W. Lloyd et al. Ibid.

AUGUST 17. Lincoln writes declaration and complaint, filing latter, in Robert Wilboum Sr. v. William and Edward Crenshaw. Ibid.

AUGUST 20. Lincoln buys 1 5/8 yards black silk at Irwin's store ($2.44) and pays $2.50 to have it "coloured" in Philadelphia. Irwin Ledger and Journal.

AUGUST 21. Lincoln writes Secretary of State Clayton declining offer of secretary of Oregon Territory, and recommending Simeon Francis for post, The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 61.

AUGUST 23. In Hiram Penny v. Henry McHenry, John Irwin, and Robert Irwin, Lincoln writes and signs McHenry's answer. For John and Robert Irwin, he writes statements for their signature. Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

AUGUST 27. Sangamon Circuit Court convenes. Lincoln & Herndon have three cases. Parker v. Colburn, in which they represent defendant, is dismissed at defendant's costs. Their two other cases are set for later hearing. Record.

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AUGUST 28. Lincoln & Herndon have 17 cases in Circuit Court. They dismiss two and win three by default. In Yocum et al. v. Yocum et al., partition suit in which they represent complainants, commissioners are appointed to divide lands. They lose Maxcy v. Brown, appeal, when jury finds property in plaintiff. They win Bailer v. Davis when plaintiff gets judgment for $112.30. Lincoln writes and signs declaration in Joseph Nelson v. John Busher and Elizabeth Nelson. Remaining cases are continued. Ibid. Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

AUGUST 29. Eight Lincoln & Herndon cases are called in Circuit Court. In one they file and argue demurrer, which court takes under advisement. In Fithian v. Mobley et al. they dismiss their bill against one defendant. John T. Stuart consents that Mobley be ordered to pay complainant $3,175.20, principal and interest on two mortgages, by Mar. 1, on penalty of foreclosure. Lincoln writes court order to foreclose. He writes and signs joinder in plea in Coon v. Lloyd et al. Motions are entered in remaining cases. Ibid.

AUGUST 30. Demurrer argued Wednesday in Jackson v. Brown is sustained. Herndon v. Hall and Waddell, in which Lincoln & Herndon represent junior partner's father, is dismissed at plaintiff's costs. Two other cases are continued. Record.

AUGUST 31. In Hunt v. West et al. defendants default and are ordered to pay Lincoln & Herndon's client $2,566.08, on penalty of foreclosure. In Enyart v. McAtee, Campbell enters motion for rule against complainant, represented by Lincoln, Herndon, and Ferguson, to show cause why he should not be ruled to file security for costs. One other case is continued. Ibid. Lincoln buys "sundries" for $1. Bunn Journal.

SEPTEMBER 1. In Graham v. Busher, Lincoln & Herndon lose appeal from justice's court when Circuit Court finds for defendant. Branson v. Stipp, assumpsit, in which they appear for defendant, is settled by agreement. Pleas are filed in three other cases. Record. In John B. Moffett v. Thomas Lewis and Willis H. Johnson, Lincoln writes plaintiff's affidavit. Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

SEPTEMBER 3. Lincoln & Herndon win Wilbourn v. Crenshaw et al. when jury finds defendants guilty of trespass and assesses damages of $32.50. In Baker v. Brown, attachment suit, defendant defaults and jury assesses their client's damages at $2,000. In Jackson v. Brown, plaintiff submits to nonsuit. They file pleas for defendant in Penny v. McHenry et al. Record.

SEPTEMBER 4. In Penny v. McHenry et al., Stuart and Edwards file demurrer to Lincoln & Herndon's pleas. In Enyart v. McAtee, defendant's demurrer is argued and overruled, whereupon Lincoln & Herndon file replication for complainant. Coon v. Lloyd et al. is continued. Ibid. Lincoln buys seven pounds of sugar for 50˘. Bunn Journal.

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SEPTEMBER 5. Lincoln & Herndon file and argue demurrer in Nelson v. Busher and Nelson. Court sustains it, whereupon they dismiss cause as to Nelson. Busher's attorney withdraws all pleas except non detinet. This plaintiff confesses, and case is dismissed at his costs. Demurrer filed Tues day in Penny v. McHenry et al. is overruled and Lincoln & Herndon move for continuance. Lincoln buys 50˘ worth loaf sugar and pound of candles (40˘). Bunn Journal.

SEPTEMBER 6. After busy day in court, Lincoln attends sympathy meeting for Louis Kossuth and Hungarian revolutionists. E. D. Baker speaks, and Lincoln, appointed to committee on resolutions, writes and presents committee's report, which is adopted. Illinois journal, Sept. 7; The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 62.

SEPTEMBER 7. In People v. Sullinger, indictment for keeping disorderly house, Lincoln & Herndon enter plea of guilty to first count in indictment Plaintiffs agree not to prosecute on remaining counts. Penny v. McHenry et al. is continued. Record.

SEPTEMBER 8. Defendants in Condell Jones & Company v. Dresser et al., chancery, default. Complainants, represented by Lincoln & Herndon, a ordered to recover $1,173.62 and defendants' equity if property in question is foreclosed. Ibid. Lincoln writes court decree. Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

SEPTEMBER 10. Lincoln & Herndon have only one case in Circuit Court — Plunkett v. Plunkett — and it is continued. Record. Lincoln pays 30˘ for broom. Bunn Journal.

SEPTEMBER 11. Sullinger, who pleaded guilty to keeping disorderly house, is fined $25 and costs. By agreement, Enyart v. McAtee is set for hearing next term, Lincoln & Herndon being granted injunction to restrain defendant from cutting timber pending settlement. Penny v. McHenry et al. is continued. Record.

SEPTEMBER 13. Lincoln & Herndon represent complainants in Webster et al. vs. French et al. Three defendants default. Four file demurrers which are sustained. In Moffett v. Lewis and Johnson, in which they represent complainant, leave is given to file bill of exceptions for appeal to Supreme Court. Preparing for higher court, Lincoln writes exhibits he files at close of evidence, and memorandum of process by which decision was reached. Then he writes court decree and order granting appeal. Watson v. Sangamon and Morgan Railroad is referred to arbitrators. Record; Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

At his office, Lincoln talks to George D. Berry, from Christian County, who wishes to sue John S. Cagle for trespass. Lincoln writes declaration alleging that Cagle caused Berry's daughter Elizabeth to bear illegitimate child and be sick for nine months. Lincoln & Herndon ask $1,000 damages,

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asking clerk of Christian County to file declaration and subpoena eight witnesses. Record.

Lincoln writes two patronage letters. He recommends Hart Fellows of Schuyler County for Oregon appointment to Secretary of State Clayton. He tells Elisha Embree of Indiana that he has already made a recommendation for secretary of Oregon Territory. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 62-3.

SEPTEMBER 14. Lincoln writes to William Fithian explaining status of his suit against Mobley et al., which came before Circuit Court Aug. 29. "The court allowed Mobley till the first of March to pay the money, before advertising for sale. Stuart was empowered by Mobley to appear for him, and I had to take such decree as he would consent to or none at all." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 63.

SEPTEMBER 15. Lincoln reminds Secretary of State Clayton that Simeon Francis will accept Oregon secretaryship, and lists 12 Whigs who support Francis. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 64. He buys $1.02 in "sundries." Bunn Journal.

SEPTEMBER 16. Lincoln again writes to Secretary of State for Simeon Francis, saying he ought to be appointed, testifying to his long party service and honesty. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 64.

SEPTEMBER 17. Preparing to go on circuit, Lincoln buys umbrella (75˘), and $2.13 in other merchandise. Irwin Ledger.

SEPTEMBER 18. Lincoln buys groceries for family ($4.86) before departure. Ibid.

SEPTEMBER 20. Pekin. In Tazewell Circuit Court, meeting at Pekin, Lincoln, for defendant, writes plea in Boyle v. Stafford. He writes amendment to original answer of defendant in Pearl v. Wellman. Photo. [Mrs. Lincoln buys $4.35 in "sundries." Bunn Journal.]

SEPTEMBER 21. ["We learn by despatch from Washington that the Governorship of Oregon . . . has been tendered to the Hon. A. Lincoln, of this city. Mr. Lincoln being absent from home, we have no means of knowing, for a certainty, whether he will accept it or not. Judging from what we know of Mr. L's present position, we are inclined to the opinion that he will decline the appointment." Illinois Journal, Sept. 26.]

SEPTEMBER 23. Lincoln writes Secretary Ewing declining Oregon governorship, about which Lincoln read in the papers. He sends letter to Dr. A. G. Henry at Springfield, for dispatch through Whig channels. They hold it up, thinking Lincoln has declined in haste and might reconsider. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 66.

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SEPTEMBER 24. [A. G. Henry, Springfield, chairman of Whig state executive committee, announces that Lincoln declines governorship of Oregon. The Abraham Lincoln Association, Springfield, Illinois. [Files and records on deposit at Illinois State Historical Library, Springfield, Illinois.] — Files.]

SEPTEMBER 25. Tazewell Circuit Court adjourns. Record. [Secretary Ewing telegraphs to Lincoln at Springfield that the President wishes to hear from him immediately.] Miller, 392.

SEPTEMBER 26. En route to Springfield. [Mrs. Lincoln buys "sundries," 560. Bunn Journal.]

SEPTEMBER 27. Springfield. Lincoln telegraphs Secretary Ewing declining Oregon governorship, then writes letter explaining delays in communication while he was out of town. He writes Secretary of State Clayton, who says he has not heard from Lincoln as nominee for secretary of Oregon. Astonished, Lincoln writes that he promptly declined by letter. He writes John Addison, his friend at interior, Washington, thanking him for his efforts in governorship matter. "I cannot consent to accept it." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 65-6.

SEPTEMBER 28. [Illinois Journal reports (Oct. 3): "We have understood that Hon. Abraham Lincoln has declined the office of Governor of Oregon."]

SEPTEMBER 29. Mrs. Lincoln buys half gallon of vinegar for 13˘. Bunn Journal.

OCTOBER 1. Bloomlngton. McLean Circuit Court convenes. Lincoln is given leave to amend complainant's bill in Allen v. Allen, divorce. Record. [Mrs. Lincoln buys second half gallon of vinegar, for 12˘. Bunn Journal.]

OCTOBER 2. For plaintiff in John W. Stover v. Ludwel E. Rucker, replevin, Lincoln is granted leave to file bond for costs. Record.

OCTOBER 4. [Mrs. Lincoln shops. At Irwin's she buys pair of child's boots for $1.75. At Bunn's grocery she spends $1.20. Irwin Journal; Bunn Journal.]

OCTOBER 5. Stover v. Rucker is tried by jury, which finds that property in dispute belongs to Lincoln's client. Record.

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OCTOBER 6. Lincoln writes receipt for his fee in Stover v. Rucker. "Received of J. M. Stover by the hand of K. H. Fell five dollars in full for my fee in case of said Stover vs L. E. Rucker." Bloomington Pantograph, May 12, 1893. Acting under power of attorney from defendant in Henry v. Creal, Lincoln confesses judgment for $139.57. Record.

OCTOBER 8. Mount Pulaski? [Logan Circuit Court convenes. Court records have been destroyed, but Leonard Swett stated that in autumn of 1849, Judge David Davis introduced him to Lincoln "in a small country hotel in Mt. Pulaski, Illinois." Rice, 455. Mrs. Lincoln buys $7.46 worth of merchandise. Irwin Ledger.]

OCTOBER 9. [Mrs. Lincoln buys 13˘ worth of matches. Bunn Journal.]

OCTOBER 11. [DeWitt Circuit Court commences its fall session at Clinton. Mrs. Lincoln buys $1 worth of sugar and coffee. Bunn Journal.]

OCTOBER 13. [Mrs. Lincoln's Saturday shopping comes to 75˘ in "sundries." Ibid.]

OCTOBER 14. Springfield. Lincoln answers letter from Isaac Onstot, son of Henry Onstot who was cooper in New Salem when Lincoln lived there. Isaac wishes to be appointed postmaster at Havana. "When a Petition comes to me in relation to your Post-Master," promises Lincoln, "it shall be attended to at once." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 66.

OCTOBER 18. [During this week the Lincolns leave for Lexington to investigate Wickliffe case and Robert S. Todd's estate. Lincoln has evidently been selected to look after interests of four children (Mrs. Lincoln, Mrs. N. W. Edwards, Mrs. Wallace, and Mrs. C. M. Smith) who reside in Springfield. Townsend, Lincoln and His Wife's Home Town, 208.]

OCTOBER 22. En route. [Illinois legislature meets in special session at Springfield. In letter of Nov. 21, Lincoln states that he was "absent from before the commencement till after the close of the late session of the Legislature."]

OCTOBER 23. [G. W. Forden, who was on boat with the Lincolns, recalled that on Mississippi some passengers arrange mock arrest and trial of one who played several pranks on them. Lincoln is selected judge. Unpublished MS. by G. W. Forden, owned by J. R. Payton, Springfield, Ill.]

OCTOBER 26. [Going up Ohio River, race develops between Lincoln's steamer and another boat. Lincoln's boat, short of fuel hitches to flatboat of wood. Lincoln, shouting "Come on boys," jumps down and pitches wood like deck hand until wood is loaded. But his efforts are unavailing, for with cheers and laughter rival boat passes them. Ibid.]

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OCTOBER 28. Lexington.

NOVEMBER 5. Lincoln writes to Secretary Preston, Navy, recommending Dr. John T. Parker, Mary Lincoln's uncle, for Kentucky "Hemp Agency." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 66.

NOVEMBER 6. The Lincolns prepare to return home. Judge George Robertson is left in charge of Wickliffe case and it is agreed that Mrs. R. S. Todd administratrix, shall bring suit to settle estate. Townsend, Lincoln and His Wife's Home Town, 222.

NOVEMBER 7-NOVEMBER 13. En route to Springfield. [Special session of Illinois legislature adjourns.] About this date the Lincolns must have left for home. Orville H. Browning, in his Diary, describes eight-day trip from Lexington to Quincy, Illinois, in summer of 1850. The Lincolns doubtless spend about same time to get from Lexington to Springfield.

NOVEMBER 14. En route. [On his return, Lincoln finds maid has charged "sundries" totaling $7.10 at Bunn's store, and 20˘ at Irwin's. Bunn Journal; Irwin Ledger, Oct. 18-Nov. 10 passim]

NOVEMBER 15. Springfield. "Mr. Lincoln returned to this city on Thursday evening last, from a journey of business to Kentucky, which occupied his time for some three or four weeks." Illinois Journal, Nov. 19.

NOVEMBER 16. Lincoln reads accumulated mail. Among his letters is one from J. M. Lucas of Land Office. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 67. He writes brief in John Eckel v. William Warnick, Macon County case. Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

NOVEMBER 17. Lincoln answers Lucas' letter: "I regret that the elections in the states have gone so badly; but I think there is some reason for hoping that this year has been the administration's ‘darkest hour.’ The appointments were it's most difficult task. . . . These are pretty much through with, and next we can get on grounds of measures — policy — where we can unite & rally again. At least, I hope so." Learning that Simeon Francis has not been appointed secretary of Oregon, or anything else, he telegraphs Secretary Ewing that he "most anxiously" desires Francis appointed Oregon surveyor general. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 67.

NOVEMBER 19. In "Illinois Journal" Lincoln reads notice of article printed in Chicago "Journal" giving account of intemperate speech delivered by Usher F. Linder in Illinois legislature, and supposedly endorsed by Lincoln and other Whigs, denouncing Thomas Ewing for appointment of Butterfield. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 68.

NOVEMBER 20. Lincoln receives marked copy of Chicago "Journal" containing Linder's speech. Ibid.

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NOVEMBER 21. Lincoln writes to editor of Chicago "Journal": "I was absent, from before the commencement, till after the close of the late session of the legislature, and . . . the fact of such a speech having been delivered never came to my knowledge, till I saw a notice of your article, in the Illinois Journal. . . . Had the intention of any whig to deliver such a speech been known to me, I should . . . have endeavored to prevent it." Ibid.

NOVEMBER 22. Lincoln buys merchandise, $1. Irwin Ledger.

NOVEMBER 24. Lincoln purchases $1.50 worth of groceries. Bunn Journal.

NOVEMBER 25. Lincoln writes letter of introduction for Dr. Anson G. Henry to Secretary of State Clayton. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 68-9.

NOVEMBER 29. Lincoln writes reply to answer in Eckel v. Warnick, and mails to J. S. Post, Decatur, with whom he is associated in case. Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. Lincoln buys wall lamp for $3.50. Bunn Journal.

DECEMBER 1. [Register prints Lincoln's letter of Nov. 21 to Chicago "Journal." It comments editorially: "This letter . . . does not touch the principal point at issue . . . viz: that Messrs. Ewing and Butterfield are popular with their own party in this state. The reverse of this assumption is too notoriously true . . . [but] having been, and doubtless being, an applicant for the favors of the cabinet, he [Lincoln] could not prudently say less than he has."]

DECEMBER 3. [Federal courts convene in Springfield. Illinois Journal.]

DECEMBER 4. Lincoln goes shopping, buying 200 worth merchandise at Irwin's, $6 sundries at Bunn's. Irwin Ledger; Bunn Journal.

DECEMBER 8. Lincoln buys $1.50 in "sundries" at Bunn's. Ibid.

DECEMBER 10. Lincoln buys $1.50 butter dish. Ibid.

DECEMBER 15. Lincoln writes to George W. Rives of Edgar County: "Last summer . . . I was painfully constrained to withhold a recommendation which you desired, and shortly afterwards I learned . . . that you were indulging open abuse of me. . . . The question occurred whether you were attempting to use me, at the same time you would injure me. . . . I have remained in suspense. I now enclose you a letter which you may use if you think fit." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 69.

DECEMBER 19. Lincoln buys 50˘ worth sugar at Bunn's. Across square at Irwin's, he deposits $27.50 cash. Robert Irwin credits account $250 on note he gave Lincoln for legal fees. Bunn Journal; Irwin Journal and Ledger.

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DECEMBER 20. Lincoln pays $259.50 to Irwin's for accumulated charges, and store pays Lincoln $19.95 cash for "profit & loss." Irwin Journal.

DECEMBER 27. In Supreme Court, Wright v. McNeeley, case involving parole agreement by plaintiff to redeem certain lands sold under judgment and bill praying injunction on collection of judgment, comes up from Logan County. Logan commences argument for plaintiff. Brown and Thomas follow for defendant. Record.

DECEMBER 28. Lincoln concludes argument for plaintiff in Wright v. McNeeley. Court takes case under advisement, and later reverses decision of circuit court, which dismissed bill for want of equity. While refusing prayer for redemption. Supreme Court enters order satisfying judgment. Ibid. II Ill. 241.

DECEMBER 31. Lincoln deposits $4.70 cash. Irwin Ledger.

1850

[_,_] Lincoln writes memorandum to Joseph Ledlie, country surveyor, concerning land conveyed about 1826 from Elijah Iles to Thomas Neale. Mrs. Neale, widow, thinks some of land, now valuable town property, still belongs to her. Lincoln acts without fee. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 70-1.

JANUARY 1. Springfield. Lincoln has $37.93 credit on books at Bunn's store. Bunn Journal.

JANUARY 15. Webster et al. v. French et al., before Sangamon Circuit Court Sept. 12, 1849, comes before Supreme Court. Logan & Herndon argue for plaintiffs. Browning for defendants. Case involves validity of sale of Quincy House at auction by governor under act of legislature. Plaintiffs contend that theirs was only bid which conformed to advertisement, and should have been accepted. Record.

JANUARY 16. Lincoln concludes argument for plaintiffs in Webster et al. v. French et al. (See Jan. 19.) Stuart for plaintiff in error commences argument in Lewis v. Moffett. He is followed by Conkling for defendant. Lincoln is counsel for defense. Ibid.

JANUARY 17. Lincoln continues argument in Lewis v. Moffett. Logan concludes for plaintiff. Case involves right of partner, Lewis, to compensation for selling patent rights to churn. Sangamon Circuit Court awarded Lewis $1,000 and ordered him to turn over $1,377.41 to Moffett. Ibid.

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JANUARY 18. Emerson and Lincoln represent defendant in Adams et al. v. County of Logan in Supreme Court. Plaintiff seeks to recover property at Postville, donated to county on consideration of location of county seat there, and sold on its removal to Mt. Pulaski. Lincoln also represents defendant in Austin v. County of Edgar, action in debt on guardian's bond. Circuit Court found Austin guilty. Ibid. Lincoln writes and signs bill of complaint in John M. Burkhardt et al. v. J. Vincent Browne and Francis Cox, Sangamon Circuit Court case. Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

JANUARY 19. Supreme Court hands down opinions. In Adams et al v. County of Logan, decision of Circuit Court is upheld, declaring conveyance of land to county in consideration of location of county seat docs not deprive legislature of right of removal. In Austin v. County of Edgar judgment of Circuit Court is reversed and case is remanded. Webster et al. v. French et al. is also reversed and remanded. Record; II Ill.., 254, 336, 452.

JANUARY 21. Supreme Court renders decision in Lewis v. Moffett, tried 17th. It affirms award of $1,000 to Lewis, and reverses remainder of Circuit Court's decision. II Ill.., 392.

JANUARY 25. Lincoln writes President Taylor on appointment of federal judge for Illinois. Either Stephen T. Logan or Samuel D. Lockwood would give "general satisfaction." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 71.

JANUARY 28. Lincoln receives letter from Orville H. Browning of Quincy soliciting his aid in behalf of Browning's partner, Nehemiah Bushnell, to succeed Nathaniel Pope as judge of the U.S. Court for Illinois. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 72.

JANUARY 29. Lincoln replies to Browning's letter: "As you anticipate, I had already recommended Judge Logan . . .; and more, I had already said all I could consistently with this, in favor of Judge Lockwood. I certainly esteem Mr. Bushnell as being every way worthy of such an office. In moral character, and legal attainments, he is entirely sound and sufficient. If you think this letter can be used to any advantage, you are at liberty to so use it." Ibid.

JANUARY 30. Lincoln's second son, "Eddie," is desperately ill. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 77.

FEBRUARY 1. Edward Baker Lincoln dies after illness of 52 days. He would have been four years old March 10. Ibid. Poem, "Little Eddie," published in Illinois Journal Feb. 7, may have been written by Lincoln.

FEBRUARY 2. Edward Baker Lincoln is buried. "The funeral will take place this morning at 11 o'clock from the residence of Mr. Lincoln." Illinois Journal.

FEBRUARY 5. In Supreme Court Lincoln & Herndon for appellants and Stuart and Edwards for appellees argue Pearl and Holland v. Wellman and

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Wellman. Wellmans sued in Tazewell Circuit Court to compel payment of judgment, which had been appealed and affirmed by Supreme Court in 1848. Tazewell court decided against Pearl and Holland and they again appealed. Record.

FEBRUARY 6. Lincoln concludes for appellants in Pearl and Holland v. Wellman and Wellman. Court affirms judgment of Circuit Court. Ibid.; II Ill.. 352. [Register alludes to "ardent scramble" among Whigs for office of federal judge. "Among the most prominent names . . . are Messrs. Browning, Bushnell, Butterfield, Logan, Lincoln and Williams."]

FEBRUARY 8. Lincoln receives letter from Sylvester Emmons of Cass County, requesting recommendation for appointment under U.S. marshal. He writes to Thomas J. Turner about land case. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 72.

FEBRUARY 9. Lincoln writes to Emmons: "I shall be entirely satisfied for you to receive the appointment you desire; still I know . . . [the marshal] will look to the wishes of the people of your county, rather than to mine, as to who shall have the appointment. Therefore as your friend, I advise you to get the recommendation of some of your prominent whigs — . . . and I will most cheerfully present them to the Marshall when he shall be here." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II. 72-3.

FEBRUARY 15. Lincoln writes to John Tillson, early settler, land-owner and philanthropist of Quincy, in behalf of "a near and favorite" neighbor, Mrs. Stout, who "thinks that some relatives of hers in Bond county have not done exactly right with her in relation to the estates of her grand-father & grand-mother, and that you have some knowledge on the subject." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 73.

FEBRUARY 16. Lincoln writes to William Fithian of Danville in response to inquiries about sale and rental value of properties belonging to Major Mobley which are to be sold under judgment secured by Lincoln, Fithian's attorney, in Sangamon Circuit Court Aug. 29, 1849. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 74.

FEBRUARY 18. Lincoln writes and signs bill in chancery in Gatton et at. v. Turner and Ransom, Sangamon Circuit Court case. Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

FEBRUARY 19. [Declaration and praecipe in Bale v. Wright & Hickox, written and signed by Lincoln, for plaintiff, is filed in Petersburg. Photo.]

FEBRUARY 20. Lincoln, Richard Yates, W. Pickering, and others sign address to secretary of war recommending Capt. Napoleon Koscialowski, Polish revolutionary and Mexican War soldier, as major of proposed regiment. Lincoln also writes personal recommendation for Koscialowski to present to secretary. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 74-6. Lincoln buys $1.50 in merchandise. Irwin Ledger.

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FEBRUARY 22. Lincoln writes to Abram Bale: "I understand Mr. Hickox will go, or send to Petersburg to-morrow, for the purpose of meeting you to settle the difficulty about the wheat. . . . If you settle, I will charge nothing for what I have done, and thank you to boot. By settling, you will most likely get your money sooner; and with much less trouble & expense." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 76.

FEBRUARY 23. Lincoln writes to John D. Johnston, his stepbrother, who wishes his help in securing contract for mail route: "I have made out a bid for you at $120, guaranteed it myself, got our PM here to certify it, and sent it on." Regarding previous letter of Johnston's concerning "some man's claim for a pension," he writes that those of whom he inquired about claim "decide that he can not get a pension." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 76-7.

FEBRUARY 25. Lincoln writes to John Murray and President Taylor regarding office Murray wants. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 77.

MARCH 1. Lincoln writes and signs bill of divorce for Joseph S. McNew v. Grizzelle McNew. Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

MARCH 4. Lincoln writes and signs for his client Robert S. Plunkett answer to cross bill in Ann Alexander Plunkett v. Robert S. Plunkett. Ibid.

MARCH 5. Lincoln writes, signs, and files declaration and praecipe in Lincoln & Herndon v. John B. Moffett, Sangamon Circuit Court case. He writes and signs praecipe in Levi Nave for use of Charles Matheny v. Andrew McCormack. Ibid.

MARCH 6. Lincoln writes declaration in Nave v. McCormack. Ibid.

MARCH 7. Lincoln signs, with 54 others, petition to Gov. French asking appointment of William B. Fondey as notary public. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 77.

MARCH 8. Lincoln writes and signs declaration in Presby A. Saunders v. William L. Foukes and Silas W. Robbins. Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

MARCH 9. Lincoln writes and files in Sangamon Circuit Court bill of complaint in McNew v. McNew. Ibid.

MARCH 15. Lincoln writes to President Taylor recommending Robert G. Schenck of Ohio for minister to Brazil. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 77-8.

MARCH 16. Lincoln writes, signs, and files declaration and rule in Hiram Penny v. Henry McHenry. Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

MARCH 18. Lincoln & Herndon have 11 cases in Sangamon Circuit Court, which convenes for spring term. In five cases defendants default and their clients are awarded judgments for debts and damages aggregating $1,906.

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Two cases are stricken from docket on their motion. Pleas are filed in other cases, and two are continued. Record. Lincoln writes affidavit of Charles Arnold, and has it sworn, for Penny v. McHenry. Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

MARCH 19. Four of Lincoln & Herndon's cases are called in Circuit Court. One is dismissed by agreement. In another, defendants default and they recover debt of $92.23 and $158.17 damages. In third, Webster et al. v. French et al., remanded by Supreme Court Jan. 19, they secure leave to file supplemental bill. Fourth case is continued. Record. For Penny v. McHenry, Lincoln writes and has sworn affidavit of James M. Robinson. He writes and signs supplemental bill in chancery for plaintiffs in Webster and Huntington v. Augustus C. French et al. Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

MARCH 20. Five Lincoln & Herndon cases come before Circuit Court. In one they are awarded judgment of $90; two are dismissed; pleas are filed in fourth. In fifth case — Lincoln & Herndon v. John B. Moffett — they sue for fee of $150 for legal services. By agreement they are awarded $75 and costs. Record; Townsend, Lincoln the Litigant, 19-20.

MARCH 21. Lincoln & Herndon have four cases. In Luckett v. Crary, appeal, agreed judgment for $30.37 1/2 is entered for appellant, their client. Lincoln, Herndon, Logan, and Browning secure rule on defendants in Webster et al. v. French et al. to answer their original and supplemental bills. Pleas are filed in two remaining cases. Record.

MARCH 22. Robbins and Taylor, representing plaintiff in Foukes v. Saunders, file replication to which Logan, Lincoln & Herndon demur. Ibid. Lincoln writes to Thomas Ewing recommending Dr. A. G. Henry for Indian Agency. "Of all those whom I have desired should receive appointments from this Administration, Dr. Henry was at first, has always been, and still is, No. One with me." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 78.

MARCH 23. In Circuit Court Lincoln & Herndon win divorce for complainant in Plunkett v. Plunkett. Lincoln writes court decree. In People v. Henry McHenry and Martha Graves, adultery, McHenry, their client, posts $200 bond for appearance. On behalf of defendant, they move to dismiss Glynn v. McMurray et al. Record; Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

MARCH 25. Penny v. McHenry, before court Sept. 4, 1849, comes to trial. Lincoln & Herndon appear for defendant. Lincoln writes testimony of Robert Irwin and part of testimony of Wiley P. Renshaw in case. After hearing arguments of counsel, jury retires to consider. In Nave v. McCormack, jury is waived, and court awards their client $92.23 debt and $158.17 damages. Record; Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

MARCH 26. Lincoln writes letter to John T. Stuart in Washington, D.C.

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(Letter is not extant, but photostat of envelope, addressed in Lincoln's hand, and name and date written in one corner, is in The Abraham Lincoln Association, Springfield, Illinois. [Files and records on deposit at Illinois State Historical Library, Springfield, Illinois.] — Files.)

MARCH 27. In Penny v. McHenry, jury brings in verdict for plaintiff, and assesses damages at $35. In adultery case before court Mar. 23d, Lincoln & Herndon move to quash indictment, but motion is overruled. Their motion of same day to dismiss Glynn v. Murray et al. is also overruled. Two other cases are continued. Record.

MARCH 28. Lincoln & Herndon win Lloyd v. Pierce, appeal from justice's court, when jury is waived and court finds for plaintiff in sum of $24.41. Two other cases are continued. Ibid. For Reuben Coon v. Turner W. Lloyd et al., Lincoln writes affidavits of three witnesses and has them sworn before clerk. Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — David Davis Papers, Illinois State Historical Library, Springfield, Illinois. Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

MARCH 29. Lincoln & Herndon file answer of Brayman, one of defendants in Glynn v. Murray et al. Coon v. Lloyd et al. and Penny v. McHenry et al. are continued. Record. Lincoln writes two more affidavits, and has them sworn, in latter case. Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

MARCH 30. McNew v. McNew, action in chancery in which Lincoln & Herndon represent complainant, is their only case, and is continued. Record. Abraham Lincoln and Mary Lincoln convey south 20 feet of Lot 12 in Block seven of E. Iles' addition to Springfield by warranty deed to Harriett W. Dean and F. S. Dean. Deed Record, David Davis Papers, Illinois State Historical Library, Springfield, Illinois, 482. Lincoln hires John E. Roll and Isaac Smith, plasterers, to whitewash two rooms for $2. Roll & Smith Account Book.

APRIL 1. In Circuit Court A. G. Herndon v. Hough and Hough is dismissed by agreement at defendants' costs. Lincoln & Herndon appear for junior partner's father. In Webster et al. v. French et al. Logan, Lincoln & Herndon secure rule on defendants to answer by June 1. Lincoln writes court order. Pleas are filed and matters relating to submission of evidence agreed on in Enyart v. McAtee. In latter case, Lincoln writes motion for leave to withdraw replication and file amendment to bill, writes amendment to bill and court order allowing defendant to present evidence. Record; Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

[In Petersburg, Bale v. Wright & Hickox, Lincoln & Herndon for plaintiff, is dismissed by agreement, each party paying his costs. Record.]

APRIL 3. [Tazewell Circuit Court begins spring term in Tremont.]

APRIL 4. [In Pekin, court rules in Perkins v. Hall that defendant plead Apr. 8. Lincoln and Jones represent defendant. Record.]

APRIL 6. Tremont. Lincoln loses Perkins v. Hall by default. Norman H. Purple represents complainant. Ibid. Sale of land made by Mr. and

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Mrs. Lincoln to Mr. and Mrs. Dean Mar. 30 is recorded. Deed Record, David Davis Papers, Illinois State Historical Library, Springfield, Illinois, 482.

APRIL 9. In Tazewell Circuit Court, Prettyman files plaintiff's declaration in ejectment and proof of service in Reeves v. Wilkey. Jones and Lincoln, representing defendant, are ruled to plead in 20 days. Record. Lincoln writes answer of William Butcher in Butcher v. Gipps et al. He writes, signs, and files replication in case, and writes William Butcher's deposition. Photo.; Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

APRIL 10. Lincoln is granted leave to file amended and supplemental bill in Butcher v. Gipps et al., foreclosure suit, and writes pleas. In Ely v. Kirk, appeal, Lincoln secures injunction for defendant and dismissal of plaintiff's bill. Grain v. Mattox et al. and Pope v. Atwater and Parker are set for hearing at next term. Record; Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

APRIL 11. Metamora. In Nelson v. Hall, appeal, jury is waived and court finds for plaintiff in sum of 30˘. Lincoln is counsel for defense. Lincoln and Brown lose Swett v. Tuthell, replevin suit, when jury finds for plaintiff. Peters is plaintiff's attorney. Record. [Mrs. Lincoln buys $1.75 in merchandise. Irwin Ledger.]

APRIL 12. Lincoln, for petitioner in People v. Brown et al., petitions for mandamus, which is denied. Lincoln and Peters lose case, suit over township organization, when court finds for defendant. Lincoln writes order of court and appeal to Supreme Court, which is granted. Photo.

APRIL 15. [McLean Circuit Court convenes at Bloomington. Election for mayor in Springfield results in tie between J. C. Conkling and John Calhoun. Calhoun wins runoff election Apr. 19th. William H. Herndon is elected clerk and city attorney. Illinois Journal, April 16, 20.]

APRIL 17. Bloomington. Lincoln loses People v. Van Deventer when jury finds defendant guilty on charge of assault and battery and court imposes fine of $30 and costs. Record. Lincoln writes instructions to jury. Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

APRIL 18. People v. Van Deventer is reopened. Defendant posts bond for appearance. Lincoln obtains divorce for complainant in Allen v. Allen. Record.

APRIL 22. Springfield. Lincoln returns home. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, VIII, 415.

APRIL 25. [DeWitt Circuit Court begins its session at Clinton.]

APRIL 26. Lincoln writes Thomas J. Turner about case. "I came home from the circuit four days ago, and found your letter in waiting. To-day I made some corrections of mistakes in the descriptions of the land and filed

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the Bill." Ibid. [Lincoln's declaration signed and probably filed by Herndon, in Christian County Court, alleges that defendant in Vandeveer v. Whitcraft cut trees on plaintiff's land and asks $1,166 damages. Photo.]

APRIL 30. For Tremont case of Lucy Matthews v. Josiah Matthews, Lincoln writes defendant's answer, signing "Saltonstall & Lincoln." Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

MAY 1. Charleston. Lincoln, for defendant in People v. Davis, murder, moves for change of venue to Clark County, which is granted. Record. [Champaign Circuit Court begins its session at Urbana.]

MAY 2. Urbana. In Nancy Jane Dunn v. Albert G. Carle, bastardy, and Zephaniah Dunn v. Carle, trespass for seduction, defendant posts recognizances and files affidavits for continuance. In Dunn v. Carle, assumpsit, defendant is permitted to plead over. In all three cases, Lincoln, Howitt, and McRoberts are attorneys for plaintiffs, Benedict, Gridley, and Somers for defense. Record.

MAY 3. Signing names of all three counsel, Lincoln writes and files demurrer in bastardy case. Photo. In assumpsit suit, jury hears arguments, after which plaintiff submits to nonsuit. In Davis v. Redmond et al., bill is taken for confessed when adult defendants fail to appear. Commissioners are appointed to partition property. Lincoln writes decree of court. Record; Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

MAY 4. [Mrs. Lincoln buys linen braid and black thread (39˘). Irwin Journal]

MAY 6. [Mrs. Lincoln buys 200 worth of merchandise. Irwin Ledger. Spring term of Vermilion Circuit Court begins at Danville.]

MAY 7. Danville. In Vermilion Circuit Court Lincoln and Sconce, for plaintiff, dismiss Shearer v. Lawrence, appeal in case of forcible detainer. Record.

MAY 8. Davis, for plaintiff, asks leave to file two replications to pleas entered by Lincoln and Peters in Lee v. Coburn, assumpsit. When jury hears case, plaintiff submits to nonsuit. Murphy and Lincoln, representing defendant in Young v. Littler, file affidavit for continuance, which is granted. Ibid.

MAY 13. [Edgar Circuit Court convenes at Paris.]

MAY 15. Paris. Lincoln and Linder represent defendant in Albin v. Bodine, slander. Jury finds their client not guilty. Record. Lincoln writes and files pleas in Joseph Matkin v. Jacob and Joseph Brown, and writes Brown's answer. Photo.

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MAY 16. Lincoln files defendant's answer and cross-bill in Matkin v. Brown, chancery. Record. He writes demand notice on farm, for John Shearer, to James Lawrence, for Vermilion County case. Photo.

MAY 18. Danville. John Shearer signs affidavit, written by Lincoln, alleging forcible detainer of farm by James Lawrence after expiration of lease. Lincoln also writes and files complainant's bill. Photo. He corrects declaration filed in Macon County case, Jacob Spangler, executor of William Hanks v. Samuel Wood, heir of Henry Wood. Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

MAY 20. Shelbyville. Shelby Circuit Court begins its session. In ex parte James Millikin jury finds John Millikin insane and appoints James Millikin conservator. He files bond of $1,200. Lincoln writes bond and decree of court. Two other cases are continued. Record; Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

MAY 21. Lincoln represents defendant in slander suit — Fanchier v. Gallagher. Issue is joined on defendant's plea of not guilty. Jury finds defendant guilty on two counts and not guilty on two others. Court awards plaintiff $1,000 damages. Plaintiff remits his damages, but retains his right to costs. Record. In another slander suit, Alsop v. Sturgeon, Lincoln writes and files pleas, signing "Ficklin & Lincoln p. d." Photo.

MAY 23. Lincoln writes and signs plea and reply in Fanchier v. Gallagher. In Alsop v. Sturgeon, he writes and signs motion for arrest of judgment. Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

MAY 27. [Moultrie Circuit Court begins its session at Sullivan.]

MAY 30. [Macon Circuit Court opens at Decatur.]

MAY 31. Decatur. In Spangler v. Wood, Lincoln writes and files plaintiff's replications and pleas. He writes demurrer and replication in John Andrews v. Fielding House. Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. Photo.

JUNE 1. Jury is waived in Spangler v. Wood and court awards plaintiff $64. 29 interest on note. Lincoln and Post appear for plaintiff, Emerson for defendant. Lincoln's fee is $5. Lincoln has two other cases but both are continued. Lincoln writes additional count in Andrews v. House. Record; The Abraham Lincoln Association, Springfield, Illinois. [Files and records on deposit at Illinois State Historical Library, Springfield, Illinois.] — Files; Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — David Davis Papers, Illinois State Historical Library, Springfield, Illinois. Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

JUNE 2. En route to Springfield. Lincoln leaves circuit and returns to Springfield for session of U.S. and Sangamon Circuit Courts.

JUNE 3. Springfield. On Lincoln's motion, U.S. Circuit Court adjourns until tomorrow in memory of Judge Nathaniel Pope, who died Jan. 22. At night bar meets to honor judge's memory. Lincoln, appointed member of committee to frame appropriate resolutions, writes committee's report. Register, June 4; The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 78-9.

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JUNE 5. Writing to editor of "Illinois Journal" regarding article in "Tazewell Mirror" recommending him as Whig candidate for Congress, Lincoln states that he prefers that his name not be brought forward. "Let a Convention be held at a suitable time, and in good feeling, make a nomination; and I venture the prediction we will show the District once more right side up." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 79. Lincoln buys 75˘ worth of merchandise. Irwin Ledger.

JUNE 8. [Western Whig of Bloomington observes: "We see that the last Pekin Mirror is out in favor of A. Lincoln of Springfield, as the Whig candidate for Congress in the Congressional District. — We certainly could have no particular objection to the above nomination. Abe has beaten locofocoism heretofore, & can most assuredly do so again."]

JUNE 11. Lincoln writes to Nathaniel Hay ordering bricks for wall in front of his house. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 79-80.

JUNE 13. [Eighty-three prominent members of Whig and Democratic parties sign call for meeting of citizens favorable to solution of problem of slavery in territories acquired from Mexico as proposed by Congressional Committee of Thirteen, forerunner of Compromise of 1850. Neither Lincoln's nor Herndon's name appears on call. Illinois Journal; Register.]

JUNE 14. Lincoln and Herndon write legal notice for "Illinois Journal" stating that bill has been filed and subpoena issued to foreclose mortgage in Shaw & Co. v. Alsop. They also write notice of petition for divorce in Susanna Gillman v. Benjamin M. Gillman. Illinois Journal, June 18.

JUNE 15. [Pursuant to call, meeting convenes at courthouse to discuss proposal of Congressional Committee of Thirteen. John T. Stuart, Gov. Metcaife of Kentucky, and others address meeting. Resolutions favoring recommendations of committee are unanimously adopted.]

JUNE 18. ["A. Lincoln, esq., Wm. Brown, esq., and Richard Yates," says Peoria Press, "are the whig candidates in the 7th district. The democrats appear to unite on Hon. T. L. Harris, the present able representative in that district. After beating Judge Logan so badly, the Major will have but little difficulty in overcoming any other whig in his district." Clipped in Register.]

JUNE 19. Lincoln and Logan insert notice of pending suit of Buckhart et al. v. Browne et al. in Illinois Journal.

JUNE 27. Lincoln writes instructions to Richard S. Thomas, of Virginia, Illinois, as to how to proceed in suit on "grocery keeper's" bond. He apologizes for not replying sooner to Thomas' inquiry. Receiving Thomas' letter, he put it in his old hat, "and buying a new one the next day, the old one was set aside, and so, the letter lost sight of for a time." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 80-1.

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JUNE 30. En Route to Marshall.

JULY 1. Marshall. Lincoln assists in defense of William D. Davis, charged with killing Henry Louthan in Coles County. Brought to Clark County on change of venue, accused is tried at special session, convicted of manslaughter and sentenced to three years. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 187-88. [About this time, Lincoln writes several pages of "Notes for a Law Lecture." Nicolay and Hay date these fragments "July 1, 1850?" "But it seems probable," says Basler, "that Lincoln wrote these observations . . . several years later." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 81-2. U.S. District Court begins its Chicago session.]

JULY 2. En route to Springfield.

JULY 4. En route to Chicago.

JULY 7. Chicago. "Hon. A. Lincoln of Springfield arrived in town . . . to attend to duties in the U. S. Dist. Court now in session in this city." Chicago Journal, July 8.

JULY 9. News reaches city that President Zachary Taylor has died in Washington. Evening meeting plans memorial service. Committee appointed to choose speaker selects Lincoln. Trial of Z. Parker v. Charles Hoyt, alleged infringement of patent on water wheel, comes to trial in U. S. District Court. Lincoln represents Hoyt. Chicago Journal, July 10.

JULY 10. Lincoln informally accepts invitation to deliver eulogy on President Taylor. Trial of Hoyt case continues in Federal Court. Ibid.

JULY 11. Hoyt trial.

JULY 12. Hoyt trial.

JULY 13. Hoyt trial.

JULY 15. Hoyt trial.

JULY 16. Hoyt trial.

JULY 17. Hoyt trial goes into second week.

JULY 18. Hoyt trial. [Mrs. Lincoln buys merchandise, 50˘. Irwin Ledger.]

JULY 19. Hoyt trial.

JULY 20. Hoyt trial. [Menard County Whigs, meeting at Petersburg, adopt resolution of thanks to Lincoln for his service in Congress. Illinois Journal, Aug. 1.]

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JULY 22. Committee on memorial meeting for President Taylor sends Lincoln formal invitation to speak. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 82-3. Lincoln continues to attend court in connection with Hoyt case.

JULY 23. At end of second week Parker v. Hoyt is still before court.

JULY 24. Hoyt case is finally concluded and Lincoln, winner of long trial, formally accepts invitation to deliver eulogy on President Taylor. "The want of time for preparation will make the task for me," he writes, "a very difficult one to perform, in any degree satisfactory to others or to myself. Still I do not feel at liberty to decline the invitation; and therefore I will fix to-morrow as the time." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 82-3.

JULY 25. At four o'clock at city hall Lincoln delivers Taylor eulogy. "I fear," he says, "the one great question of the day, is not now so likely to be partially acquiesced in by the different sections of the Union, as it would have been, could Gen. Taylor have been spared to us. Yet, . . . trusting to our Maker, and . . . to the great body of our people, we will not despair, nor despond." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 83-90.

JULY 26. Lincoln complies with request from L. C. Kercheval and Richard J. Hamilton for original draft of his Taylor address. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 91.

JULY 27. En route to Springfield?

JULY 30. Springfield. "Hon. A. Lincoln returned to this city on Tuesday from Chicago, where he had been attending the U.S. District court." Register, Aug. 1.

AUGUST 1. Whig county convention meets to select delegates to district convention at Pekin. Sangamon delegation is instructed for Richard Yates for congressman. Candidates for legislature, sheriff, and coroner are also chosen and resolutions approving compromise report of Congressional Committee of Thirteen are adopted. Lincoln probably attends. Illinois journal, Aug. 2. He writes to Edwin W. Bakewell of Bloomington, enclosing bill for legal services. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 91.

AUGUST 3. Lincoln writes and files in Sangamon Circuit Court bill of complaint in Costen v. Costen et al., chancery. Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

AUGUST 5. ["The Congressional Convention (at Pekin) . . . passed off with great concord and unanimity." Yates is nominated for Congress by acclamation. Tazewell delegates are instructed for Lincoln but on learning that he wishes his name withdrawn and that Sangamon delegation is instructed for Yates, they vote with majority. Illinois Gazette, Aug. 10.]

AUGUST 7. Lincoln signs, for Lincoln & Herndon, agreement on deposition

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in Martha K. Graves v. Hiram Penny, Sangamon Circuit Court case. Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

AUGUST 8. Lincoln receives letter from John Addison, who has tried in vain to secure appointment from Whig administration in Washington. Addison informs Lincoln that some letters recommending him for commissioner were withheld at time Butterfield was appointed. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 91-2.

AUGUST 9. Replying to Addison, Lincoln writes: "The substance of the matter you speak of, in detail, has long been known to me. . . . But my high regard for some of the members of the late cabinet; my great devotion to Gen. Taylor personally; and, above all, my fidelity to the great whig cause, have induced me to be silent. . . . I would not now accept the Land Office, if it were offered to me." Ibid.

AUGUST 14. Lincoln writes, signs, and files in Sangamon Circuit Court petitions for dower in Wright et al. v. Enos. Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

AUGUST 15. In letter to S. R. Lowry dated Aug. 17, Lincoln says: "Your letter of the 13th was received a day or two ago." He is evidently in Springfield this and following day. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 92.

AUGUST 17. Lincoln writes to S. R. Lowry about case involving title to land. "The trouble with this deed was, that the plaintiff proved it to be a forgery; and I see no way in which the defendants can ever succeed unless they can somehow prove that this deed is not a forgery. This is the whole story. The case can not be gained by much talking." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 92-3.

AUGUST 22. Taylorville. At special term of Christian Circuit Court, Lincoln & Herndon win Vandevcer v. Whitcraft et al. when jury finds for plaintiff in sum of $476. In Cawood v. Benson, jury fails to agree and is dismissed, and on motion of Lincoln, for plaintiff, change of venue is granted to Sangamon County. Lincoln writes bond for costs and affidavit for costs in Wood v. Ketchum et al. Record; Photo.

AUGUST 23. Lincoln files defendants' plea and notice in Woods v. Ketchum et al., case involving trespass of cattle on plaintiff's land and crops. He will prove that defendants' land was fenced and there was no trespass. Lincoln also files plea and notice in Tanner v. Ketchum et al. In Vandeveer v. Whitcraft et al., he joins in demurrer with defendants attorney. Photo.

AUGUST 24. Lincoln writes part of bill of exceptions in Vandeveer v. Whitcraft et al., decided Aug. 23. Judge Davis signs bill and it is filed on this date. Case is action in debt involving cutting of trees on plaintiff's land, Photo. Lincoln writes decree for conveyance in Thomas P. Bond v. unknown heirs of Marvellous Eastham, chancery. Record.

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AUGUST 26. Springfield. "Sangamon County Circuit Court commences its August term today. Judge Davis has arrived." Illinois Journal. Lincoln & Herndon have two cases, but both are continued. Record. Whig county convention nominates Preston Breckinridge for legislature in place of Jesse Pickerel, who has declined. Illinois Journal, Aug. 27. Lincoln writes and has sworn affidavits of G. W. Willson and J. W. Simpson in Graves v. Penny. Library of Congress, Washington, D. C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

AUGUST 27. Demurrer filed March 22 by Lincoln, Herndon, and Logan, attorneys for defendant in Foukes v. Saunders, is argued and sustained. Lincoln & Herndon dismiss Shaw & Co. v. Alsop. In Coon v. Lloyd et al., continued Mar. 29, Stuart and Edwards, defendants' attorneys, again move continuance. McHenry v. Penny is continued. Record.

AUGUST 28. Motion for continuance in Coon v. Lloyd et al. is argued and considered by court. Foukes v. Saunders and Saunders v. Foukes and Robbins, in both of which Lincoln & Herndon represent Foukes, are dismissed by agreement. Two other cases are dismissed on Lincoln & Herndon's motion. They file exceptions to complainant's depositions in Glynn v. Murray et al. Ibid. Lincoln writes and has sworn affidavit of Henry McHenry in Graves v. Penny. Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

AUGUST 29. Jury brings in true bill in People v. Smith on charge of obstructing road. Lincoln & Herndon represent defendant. In Luckett v. Garvey jury finds defendant guilty of trespass and awards Lincoln & Herndon's client damages of $38.97. In Gillman v. Gillman, Lincoln & Herndon get rule on defendant to answer by tomorrow. Record.

AUGUST 31. Lincoln writes James Gordan's application for pay for arresting horse thief. Photo.

SEPTEMBER 1. Lincoln writes letter of introduction to Thomas Corwin, secretary of treasury, in behalf of Simeon Francis, editor of "Illinois Journal," who wishes interview with Alexander H. H. Stuart, new secretary of interior. Lincoln will be obliged for any assistance Corwin can render Francis. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 93.

SEPTEMBER 2. Lincoln writes to Thomas Corwin and John J. Crittenden, attorney general, recommending John Addison for clerkship. Ibid. He writes answer of Mary Lyons in Jared P. Irwin v. Mary Lyons and Lewis Graves, Sangamon Circuit Court case. Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. ["Circuit Court, Sickness in the family of Judge Davis, at Bloomington," says Illinois Journal, "has been the cause of the adjournment of the Circuit Court of Sangamon county, until November next."]

SEPTEMBER 4. Lincoln writes, has sworn, and files affidavit of Patrick Giblin in Coon v. Lloyd et al. Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

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SEPTEMBER 9. To John Addison Lincoln writes: "There are some letters remaining at the Department of the Interior, which were placed there as recommendations of myself for Comr. of the Genl. Land Office. I will thank you to withdraw them, and forward them to me." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 93.

SEPTEMBER 12. Lincoln fills in writ of scire facias for appearance of defendant in case of Susan P. Enos et al. v. Jabez Capps. He files writ with clerk of Supreme Court. Photo.

SEPTEMBER 18. Pekm. Tazewell Circuit Court meets in Pekin, new county seat. In Butcher v. Gipps, defendant is given leave to amend his answer. Lincoln represents complainant. Record.

SEPTEMBER 19. Lincoln is appointed guardian ad litem for infant defendants in Opdycke v. Prickett et al., petition to sell real estate. In Ely v. Kirk, appeal, Lincoln and Parker, for defendant, move to dismiss suit for want of jurisdiction, but motion is overruled. Lincoln writes and files order of court ordering partition of lands in Prickett v. Griffith. Record; Photo.

SEPTEMBER 21. Lincoln and Parker win appeal when jury finds for plaintiff in Daven v. Armington and assesses his damages at $52.63. In People v. Hawley, indictment for obstructing road, jury brings in true bill. Lincoln and Haines are attorneys for defendant. Record.

SEPTEMBER 23. Defendant in People v. Hawley posts bond for appearance. Lincoln and Parker win Ely v. Kirk when jury finds for defendant. Ibid. Lincoln gives J. A. Grain receipt for $10, for fee in Grain v. Walter et al. "except a contingent fee as per his written promise to me." Hertz, Lincoln, 605. Lincoln writes replication and demurrer in People v. Moss et al., in which, with Campbell and Stuart, he acts for People. Photo.

SEPTEMBER 24. Larimore v. Berry, appeal, Lincoln for plaintiff, is tried by jury, which finds for defendant. Lincoln writes and signs defendant's plea in Selak v. Saltonstall. Record; Photo.

SEPTEMBER 25. Lincoln has six cases in court. He dismisses one, settles second (Butcher v. Gipps) by agreement, files pleas in third, and fourth case is continued. In Opdycke v. Prickett, lands are ordered partitioned. In Pope v. Atwater and Parker, bill for relief, court dismisses Lincoln's bill and orders public administrator to pay Atwater $719 due him on order of probate court. Record. In Butcher v. Gipps and People v. Moss et al. Lincoln writes order of court. Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C; Photo.

SEPTEMBER 26. Metamora. In Hart v. O'Neal, agreed judgment written by Lincoln, attorney for defendant, affirms judgment of lower court which awarded plaintiff $16.15 and costs. In People v. Snyder et al. and

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People v. Clifton et al., indictments for "gaming," defendants, represented by Lincoln, give bond for appearance at next term. Record.

SEPTEMBER 27. Pekin. Lincoln endorses petition of 60 Tazewell County citizens to Gov. French: "The signers to this petition are excellent citizens." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953. II, 94.

SEPTEMBER 30. Bloomington. [McLean Circuit Court convenes.]

OCTOBER 2. In Allen v. Allen, in which divorce was granted on April 2, court refuses to allow defendant's claim for alimony. Lincoln is attorney for complainant. Record. [Mrs. Lincoln buys $1 cap and 1/4 yard ribbon (45˘). Irwin Journal.]

OCTOBER 7. Mount Pulaski. Logan Circuit Court begins its session. Lincoln writes sheriff's return on back of writ of scire facias executed against Jabez Capps to appear at Dec. term of Supreme Court in Enos v. Capps. Photo.

OCTOBER 10. Clinton. [DeWitt Circuit Court term begins.]

OCTOBER 12. Clinton. Lincoln writes and files answer of Alexander Argo in Alsop v. Argo, petition for mechanics lien, and writes decree of court. Photo.

OCTOBER 14. Monticello. [Piatt Circuit Court convenes. No cases are docketed for Lincoln but his presence is assumed from his letter of Nov. 6.]

OCTOBER 16. Urbana. [Champaign Circuit Court begins. Lincoln's presence cannot be established from records, but is indicated by letter of Nov. 6. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 94.]

OCTOBER 21. Danville. Vermilion Circuit Court begins its session. Lincoln writes answer of Edwin Littler in Young v. Littler. Photo.

OCTOBER 22. Lincoln writes and files cross-bill in chancery in Van Gundy v. Gundy. Photo. Two Lincoln cases are docketed and continued. Lincoln wins Shearer v. Laurence when court finds for plaintiff. He writes court order. Record.

OCTOBER 23. Demurrer filed by Lincoln and Davis for plaintiff in Hickman v. McCormack, assumpsit, is argued and sustained. McRoberts, Benedict and Murphy, for defendants, are granted leave to withdraw their plea and plead again. Ibid.

OCTOBER 24. Issue is joined in Hickman v. McCormack on defendant's plea of nonassumpsit. Lincoln and Davis win case when jury finds for plaintiff and assesses his damages at $656.55 and costs. Ibid.

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OCTOBER 28. Paris. In People, use of Nancy Burr et al. v. Seth Austin, administrator of Elijah Austin, action in debt, Lincoln and Benedict file final order of Supreme Court, in accordance with which case is reinstated on docket. State's attorney amends his declaration. Record.

OCTOBER 30. In Isaac Ray v. William Cummins, slander, Lincoln, for defendant with Linder, files demurrer. Record.

OCTOBER 31. Leave is given to file bill of revivor in White v. Alexander. Lincoln is counsel for defense. Record.

NOVEMBER 3. En route to Springfield. Interrupting his circuit work, Lincoln starts for Springfield to vote in approaching election.

NOVEMBER 4. [Shelby Circuit Court convenes for fall term.]

NOVEMBER 5. Springfield. Lincoln gets home in time to vote in election for congressman, representatives for legislature, treasurer, sheriff, and coroner. Election Returns.

NOVEMBER 6. To Isaac Onstot, who is still trying to get postmastership at Havana, Lincoln writes that he has informed Post Office Department "that if the recommendations from your own county place you on very nearly equal ground with the best of your competitors, I desire that you may be appointed." Lincoln says he would have answered sooner, but has "been absent on the circuit for seven weeks." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 94.

NOVEMBER 8. Lincoln collects $25 retainer from state for future legal services in Compiler et al. v. People. Illinois Reports, 1851.

NOVEMBER 11. Lincoln writes and signs declaration in Saunders v. Harrison, Sangamon Circuit Court case. Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

NOVEMBER 14. Decatur. Rhodes v. Helm, assumpsit, comes to trial in Macon Circuit Court. Emerson and Lincoln represent plaintiff. Post defendant. Jury fails to agree and case is continued. Warnick v. Eckel, ejection suit, Lincoln and Post for plaintiff, is continued. Record.

NOVEMBER 15. Lincoln writes and files bond for costs for plaintiff in Hill v. Whitley, slander. He also writes replication and plea. Photo.; Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

NOVEMBER 16. Lincoln has three cases in court. In Froman v. Pearson, attachment case involving cattle, attorneys for plaintiff file proof of publication, and Lincoln and Benedict are ruled to answer for defendant by Apr. 1. Thornton and Lincoln file defendant's answer in Redfield and Redfield v. Dewees, case involving dower right. Case is continued. Hill v. Whitley

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is continued. Record, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. [Mrs. Lincoln buys $1.25 worth of merchandise. Irwin Ledger.]

NOVEMBER 18. Taylorville. Fall term of the Christian Circuit Court opens. Yates, one of defendants in Barrett v. heirs of Eastham, last before court Aug. 22, files cross bill. Record.

NOVEMBER 19. Lincoln files affidavit for defendant in People v. Brown. Files. Lincoln writes and signs answer of William Yates in Barrett v. Eastham. Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953.

NOVEMBER 20. [Illinois Journal reports rumored resignation of Justin Butterfield as commissioner of General Land Office. "Abraham Lincoln, who was defeated . . . by, as we think, the withholding of certain papers in his behalf, — will not now from the peculiar state of his private affairs, accept the office, even if it should be offered to him. . . . But Mr. Lincoln will most cheerfully and heartily sustain Hon. Cyrus Edward for the appointment."]

NOVEMBER 21. In Tanner v. Ketchum et al., trespass vi et armis, jury fails to agree and is discharged. Vandeveer argues for plaintiff, Lincoln for defendant. Record.

NOVEMBER 22. Springfield. Sangamon Circuit Court convenes for fall term. Lincoln & Herndon, representing plaintiff in Gillman v. Gillman, secure rule on defendant to answer by Nov. 25. Ibid.

NOVEMBER 23. Lincoln & Herndon have two cases in Circuit Court. Thaxton et al. v. Dunn et al., in which they are attorneys for complainant, is stricken from docket. In Glynn v. Murray et al. they suggest marriage of Margaret Murray, their client, to James M. Hailey. Ibid.

NOVEMBER 25. Lincoln & Herndon have five cases in court. One is dismissed by their opponents. In Gillman v. Gillman, defendant defaults and their client is granted divorce. They file declarations and proof of service in Neale v. Britton and Beerup et al. v. Britton. In Bunn v. Jones, defendant confesses debt of $1,598.60 and judgment for that amount is entered for their client. Ibid.

NOVEMBER 26. State's attorney drops People v. Smith, indictment for obstructing road. Lincoln & Herndon appear for Smith. Warner v. Calhoun, in which they represent defendant, is abated by reason of plaintiff's death. They file answer of Mason Brayman, one of defendants in Freeman & Co. v. Bradford et al. Ibid. Lincoln buys $1.25 umbrella. Irwin Journal.

NOVEMBER 27. Lincoln & Herndon win appeal, Graves v. Penny, when court awards plaintiff $76.99 debt. Defendant appeals to Supreme Court.

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They lose second appeal, Kirts v. Wilbourn, when court finds for defendant. Coon v. Lloyd et al., suit on contract to "grub stake" man in California gold rush, is dismissed by agreement at defendant's costs. Lincoln, Herndon, and Ferguson represent Coon. Record.

NOVEMBER 29. Lincoln files defendant's pleas in Gross v. Calhoun, action for debt. Ibid.

NOVEMBER 30. Lincoln writes and signs, for Logan, Brayman, and Lincoln, assignment of errors in Webster and Huntington v. French et al. Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

DECEMBER 2. Depositions of complainant in Glynn v. Murray et al., to which Lincoln & Herndon filed exceptions Aug. 28, are sustained. Record, U.S. Circuit and District Courts convene. Register, Dec. 3.

DECEMBER 5. Lincoln writes and files with Supreme Court clerk assignment of errors in McHenry v. Watkins. Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

DECEMBER 6. In Lyons v. Hill et al., assumpsit suit in Circuit Court, defendants default and Lincoln & Herndon secure damages of $440.66 for plaintiff. Record.

DECEMBER 7. On Lincoln & Herndon's motion Costen v. Costen et al. is continued. Ibid. Lincoln writes additions to chancery bill in case. Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

DECEMBER 9. In Circuit Court Lincoln & Herndon dismiss McNew v. McNew at cost of their client, complainant. In two other cases in which they represent complainants — Burkhardt et al. v. Brown, and Enos v. Wright et al. — they secure rules on defendants to answer. Record.

DECEMBER 10. Robbins and Taylor, attorneys for plaintiff in Glynn v. Murray et al., move to withdraw depositions. Their motion is overruled. Ibid. Illinois Supreme Court convenes.

DECEMBER 11. Lincoln writes amendment to bill of complaint in Enyart v. McAtee. Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

DECEMBER 12. Webster et al. v. French et al. is called. After taking parole proofs and after tender by complainants in court of state bonds and promissory notes, which are accepted, court, by consent, dismisses complainants' bill and allows appeal to Supreme Court. Record.

DECEMBER 13. In Supreme Court Lincoln & Herndon represent appellant in Enos v. Capps, case involving right of Sangamon Circuit Court to enter default against infant defendant and whether chancery decree binding on several defendants may be reversed as to some defendants. Decision is

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rendered Jan. 17. Ibid. In Circuit Court, Webster and Huntington v. French et al. is settled by agreement, Lincoln writing court order. Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

DECEMBER 17. Lincoln writes, signs, and files with Supreme Court clerk assignment of errors in Smith et al. v. Dunlap. Ibid.

DECEMBER 18. In Supreme Court Blackwell begins argument for plaintiffs in Compher et al. v. People. Stuart follows for defendants. In afternoon Lincoln continues for defendants and is followed by Purple for plaintiffs. Arguments take up entire day. Record.

DECEMBER 19. Purple concludes his argument in Compher et al. v. People. Case involves question whether sureties on bond of collector of Peoria County are discharged by changes in law regulating collectors. Court later affirms judgment of Peoria Circuit Court. Ibid.; 12 Ill., 290.

DECEMBER 21. William Wallace, Lincoln's third son, is born. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 304.

DECEMBER 24. Lincoln writes reply to assignment of errors and agreement on motions in lower court in Whitraft v. Vandeveer (SC). Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

DECEMBER 26. In Supreme Court, Bushnell commences plaintiffs' argument in Smith et al. v. Dunlap. He is followed by Williams for defense. Case involves note of Dunlap for $131,480.52, payable in State of Illinois indebtedness, held by assignees of Bank of Illinois. Lincoln is one of plaintiffs' counsel. Record.

DECEMBER 27. Williams continues for defendant in Smith et al. v. Dunlap. Logan follows for defendant. Question at issue is whether Dunlap should pay face value of note or market value of $131,480.52 of state securities at time of note's maturity. Ibid.

DECEMBER 28. Logan resumes his argument in Smith et al. v. Dunlap. Lincoln concludes for plaintiffs. Court later affirms decision of lower court, which held Dunlap liable only for market value, which Judge David Davis set at $38,361.93. Ibid.; 12 Ill.., 184.

DECEMBER 30. Lincoln writes assignment of errors in Webster et al. v. French (SC). In Sangamon Circuit Court case of Alton & Sangamon Railroad v. Burkhardt, he writes and files, for plaintiff, praecipe and bond. Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

DECEMBER 31. At year end balance of books at Robert Irwin's bank, Lincoln is debited $15 for "profit & loss," and pays $3.09 cash "for balance." Irwin Journal and Ledger.

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1851

Lincoln writes two letters on care of "this boy," identified by G. A. Tracy as Gilbert J. Greene, bound for northern Illinois in January. Lincoln writes to "Mr. Wilson," Globe Tavern proprietor: "Take care of this boy until to-morrow, or longer if the weather is bad, and send the bill to me." He also writes to "Mr. Wallace" at Peoria: "This boy wants to reach the Rock River country somewhere near Beloit. If he needs any assistance so you can help him in any way, it will be appreciated, and I will be responsible." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 96.

JANUARY 2. Springfield. ["A. Lincoln, Esq., is spoken of as likely to succeed Hon. J. Butterfield, as Commissioner of the General Land Office." Illinois Journal.]

JANUARY 6. Illinois legislature convenes. In letter to William Martin Feb. 19, Lincoln says: "The Legislature having got out of the way, I at last find time to attend to the business you left with me." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 98. From this it appears that when not busy in court, he was following activities of legislature.

JANUARY 7. Whitcraft et al. v. Vandeveer, appealed from Christian Circuit Court, is tried by E. B. Herndon for plaintiffs and Lincoln for defendant. Case is action in debt to recover for cutting trees. Record.

JANUARY 8. Lincoln collects $25 from auditor, fee in full for legal services to state in Compher et al. v. People. Warrant #4746, Auditor's office.

JANUARY 9. In Whitcraft v. Vandeveer, Supreme Court decides that since declaration does not allege that trees were cut vi et armis and without owner's consent, case is not within meaning of statute. Verdict of Christian Circuit Court is reversed and case remanded. Record; 12 Ill.; 235.

JANUARY 10. Lincoln receives letter from Harriett Hanks, daughter of his cousin Dennis Hanks. She informs him that his father is very ill and will probably not recover. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 96.

JANUARY 11. Logan for plaintiff and Lincoln for defendant try Linton v. Anglin before Supreme Court. Anglin filed plea in abatement in Clark Circuit Court on ground that process issued in Clark was served on him in Coles County, where he was not resident. Plaintiff demurred, court overruled demurrer and Linton appealed. Court overrules Circuit Court and remands case. Record.

JANUARY 12. Lincoln writes to John D. Johnston, his stepbrother, explaining his inability to visit his father. "My business is such that I could hardly

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leave home now, if it were not, as it is, that my own wife is sick-a-bed." He desires that his parents shall not want for any attention, medical or otherwise, which use of his name can procure. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 96-7.

JANUARY 13. U.S. District and Circuit Courts adjourn. Register, Jan. 14. Webster et al. v. French et al., remanded to Sangamon Circuit Court Jan. 19, 1850, and appealed again Dec. 12, again comes before Supreme Court. Case turns on time bids for Quincy House were offered. Logan and Lincoln argue for plaintiffs, Edwards and Browning for defendants. Record. Lincoln writes to Senator James A. Pearce of Maryland recommending Charles H. Constable, Illinois Whig, for Oregon judgeship. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 97.

JANUARY 14. In Supreme Court Peters for plaintiff and Lincoln for defendants argue Majors v. Hawks et al., which involves question whether debtor of partnership can discharge his debt, after notice of dissolution of partnership, by payment to one partner. McLean Court decided against Majors, defendant. Record.

JANUARY 15. Stuart and Edwards for plaintiff and Lincoln & Herndon for defendant try Penny v. Graves in Supreme Court. Question at issue is admissibility of testimony by deposition to vary terms of written agreement. Sangamon Circuit Court ruled such testimony inadmissible. Ibid.

JANUARY 16. Lincoln & Herndon lose Ward v. Owens, appeal from Cumberland, when Supreme Court reverses judgment of lower court and remands case. This is bill in chancery to set aside conveyance. Ibid.; 12 Ill., 283.

JANUARY 17. Supreme Court hands down opinions in five Lincoln & Herndon cases. They lose Webster et al. v. French et al., and Majors v. Hawks. They win Penny v. Graves, McHenry v. Watkins, and Enos v. Capps. Record; 12 Ill., 302, 298, 287, 233, 255. [Lincoln's father dies in Coles County. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 95.]

JANUARY 18. On 14th bill to incorporate Illinois Central Railroad Company was introduced in Illinois Senate. It has been referred to Committee on Internal Improvements where it is under consideration. Senate Journal.

JANUARY 20. Bill to incorporate Illinois Central Railroad is still in committee. According to affidavit of Anthony Thornton, representative from Shelby, Lincoln and several members of legislature were retained by company to promote its interests. Affidavit, files of Illinois Central Railroad Co. Another source claims he opposed Illinois Central. Starr, 42-5. At any rate he is actively interested in bill.

JANUARY 21. Illinois Central incorporation bill is still in Senate committee. Senate Journal.

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JANUARY 22. Bill incorporating Illinois Central is introduced in House, House Journal.

JANUARY 23. Illinois Central bill is reported to Senate, with amendments Senate journal.

JANUARY 24. In Supreme Court Harris v. Shaw et al. is tried by Edwards for plaintiff and Purple for defendants. Lincoln is also counsel for plaintiff, who gave property in public square at Tremont to Tazewell County on condition of county seat's being there and now sues for recovery because of removal to Pekin. Tazewell Circuit Court found for defendants. Record.

JANUARY 25. Logan continues his argument in Harris v. Shaw et al., and Lincoln concludes for plaintiff. Court takes case under advisement. Ibid.

JANUARY 28. In Senate, bill to incorporate Illinois Central is referred to Committee of Whole and made special order. Senate Journal.

JANUARY 29. Illinois Central bill is made special order of every day at 2 P.M. until finished. Ibid.

JANUARY 30. Illinois Central bill is before Senate. Ibid. Lincoln buys $1.87 in merchandise. Irwin Ledger.

JANUARY 31. Senate is still considering Illinois Central bill. Senate Journal.

FEBRUARY 1. Illinois Central bill is still under consideration. Ibid.

FEBRUARY 3. Senate postpones vote on Illinois Central bill until Feb. 5 Senate Journal.

FEBRUARY 4. Supreme Court rules in Harris v. Shaw et al., affirming lower court decision that county did not contract with Harris that county seat remain forever at Tremont. 13 Ill., 456.

FEBRUARY 5. Amendments to Illinois Central bill are offered and col sidered by Senate. Senate Journal.

FEBRUARY 6. Senate passes, 23 to 2, Illinois Central bill. Ibid.

FEBRUARY 10. House of Representatives passes Illinois Central incorporation bill by unanimous vote. House Journal.

FEBRUARY 12. Lincoln spends 7˘ for pound of nails. Irwin Journal.

FEBRUARY 17. [Legislature adjourns.]

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FEBRUARY 18. Lincoln does paper work in three cases involving Alton & Sangamon Railroad Co. He writes and files declaration in suit against Joseph Klein. He revises declaration, which Herndon wrote, and writes praecipe in action against Thomas Kirkpatrick. In third suit, against John M. Burkhardt, he revises and files Herndon's declaration. Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

FEBRUARY 19. Lincoln writes long letter to William Martin of Alton, commissioner for sale of stock, as to liability of stockholders and procedure in collecting overdue installments. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 98-100.

FEBRUARY 20. Lincoln writes to D. A. Smith of Jacksonville, attorney for defendant in Atwood v. Caldwell, pending in Supreme Court. "I learn that Caldwell has execu[ted his] bond and qualified under the decree. I am now anxio[us to] know whether the arrangement has been made to your sat[isfac]tion; and I do not like to ask Caldwell. Will you write [me] by return mail?" The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 100.

FEBRUARY 21. Lincoln writes and files in Sangamon Circuit Court notice that he will take depositions in Alton & Sangamon v. Klein. Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

FEBRUARY 22. Lincoln votes in special election for constable and justice of peace. Election Returns. Lincoln writes legal papers in fourth Alton & Sangamon case, against James A. Barret, from whom railroad seeks $2,000 damages. He writes and signs praecipe, declaration, and list of stockholders, filing in Sangamon Circuit Court. Lincoln lists himself as owner of six shares worth $600. Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.; Photo.

FEBRUARY 24. Lincoln replies to another letter from William Martin. He does not think cases referred to by Martin in support of their position are in point. "We have sued for payments which we say the Directors have required. We must prove that the Directors did require them. Our exact question is ‘Can we prove this without producing the books containing the orders requiring the payments?’" The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 100-01. Lincoln buys $4.04 in merchandise. Irwin Ledger.

FEBRUARY 25. Lincoln writes and files notices that depositions will be taken in remaining three Alton & Sangamon cases. He writes and signs "Parker & Lincoln" to declaration in Hicks v. Meeker, Tazewell County case in which plaintiff accuses defendant of raping his daughter and asks $1,000 damages, and mails it to Pekin. Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

FEBRUARY 26. Lincoln writes to Isaac Gibson, secretary of Alton & Sangamon, that company books must be introduced in trial if cases are to be won. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 101.

MARCH 5. Lincoln receives another letter from William Martin. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 102.

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MARCH 6. Replying to Martin, Lincoln states: "In my view, if there were no minutes — no entries in writing — of the calls, then we could prove by parol that the Directors required the payments, and procured the publication of notices of them in the papers." He does not think that change in location of road will release stock subscribers from liability. Ibid.

MARCH 11. Lincoln writes to President Fillmore recommending Francis Arenz, Whig, for appointment by which he can visit his native Prussia. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 103. He writes sheriff's return in Yates v. Smedley et al., Menard County case and dispatches it to Petersburg. Photo. [Praecipe in Atchison v. City of Pekin, written by Lincoln and signed "James and Lincoln," is filed in Tazewell Circuit Court, probably by James. Photo.]

MARCH 17. Sangamon Circuit Court begins spring term. Lincoln & Herndon have two assumpsit suits. They dismiss first, and in second, defendant defaults. Record. In evening Whigs hold meeting at courthouse. William H. Herndon is again nominated for city clerk and attorney. There is no record of Lincoln's attendance but he is probably there. Illinois Journal, Mar. 19.

MARCH 18. Eight Lincoln & Herndon cases are called in court. They dismiss three cases in which they represent plaintiffs and two are dismissed by opponents. Two, in which they appear for defendants, are settled by agreement, their clients paying $291.53 and $38 respectively. In eighth case opponents are ruled to plead Wednesday. Record. Lincoln writes court order in Penny v. McHenry. Photo.

MARCH 19. In People v. McHenry and Graves, jury finds Lincoln & Herndon's client, McHenry, guilty of adultery; they move for new trial. In Gillett v. Henrietta et al., defendants, their opponents, default. Two other cases are continued. Record.

MARCH 20. Lincoln & Herndon file defendant's answer in Lamb v. Shipman, chancery case in Circuit Court. Ibid. Lincoln writes and signs Shipman's answer. Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. On plaintiff's motion, Alton & Sangamon v. Barret is continued. File.

MARCH 21. Buress et al. v. Britton, chancery, and Neale v. Britton, ejectment, are settled by agreement. In each case judgment is rendered for defendant as to possession of premises, plaintiffs paying three-fourths and defendants one-fourth of costs. Lincoln & Herndon are attorneys for plaintiffs. Record.

MARCH 24. Enyart v. McAtee, chancery case continued from Apr. 1, 1850, is tried without jury in Circuit Court. Lincoln, Herndon & Ferguson represent complainant. Court takes case under advisement. People v. McHenry, recognizance to keep peace, is dismissed. In Watson and Moffett

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v. Gardner et al., Logan, Lincoln & Herndon, for complainants, argue defendants' motion to overrule their deposition. Record. Lincoln and Herndon acquire land as settlement of judgment won Mar. 20, 1850 against John B. Moffett. Executive File.

MARCH 25. Defendants' motion in Watson and Moffett v. Gardner et al. is overruled. Lincoln & Herndon's motion for new trial in People v. McHenry is denied and McHenry is fined $50 and costs. Representing complainants in Gillman et al. v. Hamilton et al., Lincoln and Smith file Supreme Court order remanding case. Enos v. Wright et al. is continued. Record. Lincoln writes, has sworn, and files separate answers of several defendants in Wright and Beidler v. Enos et al. Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. For Dewitt County case, Twing v. Cundiff, he writes and signs, for plaintiff, bill and process, and files by mail in Clinton. Photo.

MARCH 26. Logan, Lincoln & Herndon secure injunction restraining defendant in Enyart v. McAtee, from cutting timber. Lincoln & Herndon enter motions in three cases involving dower rights — Porter v. Clinton, Porter v. Fulkerson, Gillett v. Henrietta et al., in which they are given leave to withdraw deed filed. Record.

MARCH 27. Smith et al. v. Dunlap, decided by Supreme Court Dec. 28, again comes before Circuit Court when Logan, attorney for Dunlap, enters motion for order from Judge Davis requiring assignees of State Bank to accept notes and certificates of bank in payment of Dunlap's debt. Lincoln opposes motion. Later Judge Davis denies motion and Dunlap appeals. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 104.

MARCH 28. Lincoln, Logan, and Herndon win Enyart v. McAtee when court orders land deeded back to complainant. By consent defendant is given until Nov. to file bill of exceptions. Record. Lincoln writes to D. A. Smith of Jacksonville explaining what took place yesterday in Smith et al. v. Dunlap. He writes to O. H. Browning and Nehemiah Bushnell of Quincy regarding Hoyt case evidence. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 103-04.

MARCH 29. Lincoln writes and files in Sangamon Circuit Court affidavit in Penny v. McHenry. Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

APRIL 2. Pekin. Spring term of Tazewell Circuit Court begins. Prettyman, attorney for plaintiff in Perkins v. Hall, action in debt, secures rule on Lincoln to plead by Friday. Norman Purple files answers for some of defendants in Doolittle v. Bailey et al., case in which Lincoln is attorney for plaintiff. Record.

APRIL 3. In People v. Hawley, court sustains motion of Lincoln and Haines

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to quash indictment for obstructing road. Parker and Lincoln secure rule on defendants in Hicks v. Meeker, trespass, to plead by Saturday. Ibid.

APRIL 7. Lincoln and Parker win Hicks v. Meeker when jury finds for plaintiff and assesses his damages at $400. Defendant moves for new trial. Record. Lincoln, signing "Jones and Lincoln," writes and files defendant's plea and notice in Perkins v. Hall. Photo. James and Lincoln, for plaintiff, file replication in Hamilton v. City of Pekin. Photo.

APRIL 8. Lincoln and Jones lose Perkins v. Hall when jury finds for plaintiff in sum of $544 debt and one cent damages. They move for new trial. In Atchison v. City of Pekin, and Hamilton v. City of Pekin leave is given to answer jointly. Lincoln and James are attorneys for plaintiffs, Prettyman and Merriman for city. Record.

APRIL 9. Court denies defendant's motion for new trial in Hicks v. Meeker. Lincoln and Jones enter defendant's appearance and file plea of not guilty in Prettyman v. Yacle, ejectment suit. In Doolittle v. Bailey et al., heirs of J. B. Doolittle are made parties to suit. Reeves v. Wilkey is continued. Ibid.

APRIL 10. Metamora. On first day of Woodford Circuit Court Lincoln appears for defendants in two actions for "gaming" — People v. Clifton et al. and People v. Miller. In first case jury finds one defendant guilty. He is fined $10 and costs. Second defendant is found not guilty and case against third is continued. In second case Miller is found guilty of keeping gambling house and fined $15 and costs. Berkey v. Engle, chancery, Lincoln for defendant, is tried by court, which orders defendant to convey land when plaintiff pays $135.58. Lincoln writes defendant's answer, and court decree, which is victory as plaintiff asked conveyance of land without payment. Ibid.; Photo.

APRIL 11. Blakeslee & Co. v. Gregory and Laning, trespass, is dismissed by agreement at defendants' costs. Lincoln and Holmes represent plaintiffs, Gridley defendants. Record.

APRIL 14. [McLean Circuit Court begins its session.]

APRIL 15. Bloomington. Lincoln files plaintiff's declaration, and prays injunction in Campbell v. Allen. Injunction is granted and defendant ruled to answer. Ibid.

APRIL 17. In Fell v. McIntire, ejectment, plaintiff files declaration and defendant's plea, "thereto which issue is joined and case continued." Ibid.

APRIL 21. [Logan Circuit Court begins its session, and city election is held in Springfield.]

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APRIL 23. Mount Pulaski. Lincoln writes Lewis M. Hays of Gosport, Indiana that he has brought suit in Logan Circuit Court "against Turley." Suit will be tried in Oct., and he sends papers to be filled out. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 105.

APRIL 24. [DeWitt Circuit Court convenes.]

APRIL 28. [Piatt Circuit Court begins its session. Lincoln writes first part of court order in People v. Dodd, indictment for malicious mischief. Judge David Davis completes and signs order. Photo.]

APRIL 30. [Spring term of the Champaign Circuit Court begins.]

MAY 1. Urbana. Lincoln writes and signs for Davis and Murphy replication to defendant's answer in Davis v. Wilson, and writes court decree. Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

MAY 2. Lincoln, Howitt, and Roberts win Nancy Jane Dunn v. Albert G. Carle when jury finds defendant is father of plaintiff's child. Defendant is ordered to pay $50 a year for child's support. In Z. Dunn v. Carle, jury finds defendant guilty of seduction and assesses damages of $180.41. Record.

MAY 5. Danville. Vermilion Circuit Court begins its session. Young v. Littler, continued at last two terms, is abated by reason of plaintiff's death. Lincoln is attorney for defendant. Van Gundy v. Gundy, in which he also represents defendant, is continued. Ibid.

MAY 6. Defendants in McRoberts v. Hollingsworth et al., whom Lincoln represents, default and clerk assesses plaintiff's damages at $284.62. Case is action in assumpsit. People v. Kingsbury et al., action in debt, is heard on defendant's demurrer to plaintiff's declaration. Lincoln and Murphy lose case when court sustains demurrer. Ibid.

MAY 9. In Smith et al. v. Dunlap, decided by Supreme Court Jan. 7, defendant moves that Sangamon Circuit Court enter partial satisfaction of judgment. Judge Davis overrules motion, grants defendant's appeal to Supreme Court and instructs clerk to enter foregoing order, which is in Lincoln's handwriting. Photo.

MAY 12. Paris. Lincoln has only one case on first day of Edgar Circuit Court and it is continued. Record. In Alexander v. Parish, debt, he writes and files four pleas for defendant. Photo.

MAY 13. Lincoln writes petition of Joshua Gipson for writ of certiorari, who makes his mark before court, re judgment of Sangamon County Justice of Peace Court. Photo.

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MAY 14. Two of Lincoln's cases are called but both are continued. Record.

MAY 15. Two more of Lincoln's cases are continued. Ibid.

MAY 16. Starr et al. v. Cassidy, bill to set aside deed, is submitted to court by Lincoln and Benedict for complainants and Dill and Linder for defendant. Court dismisses complainants' bill. Three other Lincoln cases are continued. Ibid.

MAY 17. Coles County. Lincoln probably visits his stepmother at her home near Charleston. He makes entries in Lincoln family Bible, and discusses his stepmother's support. Coleman, 133; The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 94-6.

MAY 19. [Shelby Circuit Court convenes.]

MAY 21. Shelbyville. In Fanchier v. Gollager, slander, issue is joined on defendant's plea of not guilty. Jury finds defendant guilty on two counts and not guilty on two. Plaintiff's damages are assessed at $1,000. Plaintiff remits damages but retains his right to costs. Linder and Moulton are plaintiff's attorneys, Lincoln is defendant's. Record; Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

MAY 26. [Spring term of Moultrie Circuit Court begins.]

MAY 27. [Mrs. Lincoln buys from John Williams & Co. "7 yds. Cross Barred Swiss @.37" and small basket, 23˘. Harry E. Pratt, The Personal Finances of Abraham Lincoln, 145.]

MAY 28. Decatur. In Hill v. Whitley, trespass, Emerson and Lincoln for plaintiff win judge's leave to take depositions. Rhodes v. Helm, assumpsit, Emerson and Lincoln for plaintiff, is dismissed by agreement, each party paying his costs. Record.

MAY 29. In King et al. v. Lee, Lincoln writes and files affidavit that he published notice of case on four consecutive days in "Illinois State Register," He writes replication in Andrews v. House. Photo.; Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

MAY 30. Hill v. Whitley comes to trial. Jury finds for Lincoln's client awarding him five cents damages and costs. Lincoln and Benedict file defendants' answer in Froman v. Pearson and Walton. Warnick v. Eckel is again continued. Record. Andrews v. House is continued. Lincoln writes and signs amended bill in King et al. v. Lee et al. Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

MAY 31. Lincoln moves for judgment in Hill v. Whitley but defendant moves to set aside award. Lincoln and Post lose replevin suit, House v. Smith et al., when court orders defendants to restore plaintiff's household goods. Lincoln also loses Redfield and Redfield v. Dewees when court

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decrees that Maria Redfield recover her dower. King et al. v. Lee et al., chancery, Lincoln for plaintiff, is continued. Record.

JUNE 2. Taylorville. Christian Circuit Court convenes. Woods v. Ketchum et al., action for trespass vi et armis, is dismissed by plaintiff at his costs. Lincoln appears for defendant. Tanner v. Ketchum et al., in which jury failed to agree Nov. 21, 1850, is continued. Record.

JUNE 3. Lincoln's signature is written in blank space in court record for this date opposite case of Barrett v. heirs of Eastham. All defendants except two default and court orders land divided. Lincoln writes and files affidavit that he published notice of cross bill in "Illinois Journal" in Yates v. Barrett et al. He appears for defendant in Duncan v. Simpson, suit to collect $2,450 for timber cut on Duncan's land. Record; Photo.

JUNE 4. Springfield. Lincoln returns from circuit. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 105. Mrs. Lincoln buys $1.29 in merchandise from John Williams & Co. H. E. Pratt, 145.

JUNE 5. Lincoln again writes his friends Browning and Bushnell of Quincy about Hoyt case evidence. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 105. Lincoln collects from auditor $250 salary for Judge Justin Harlan of Fourth Judicial Circuit. Photo.

JUNE 9. [Illinois Supreme Court for Third Grand Division begins session at Ottawa.]

JUNE 11. Ottawa. Lincoln, for defendants, opposes Stephen A. Douglas and Logan in Dunlap v. Smith et al. in Northern Grand Division of Supreme Court. After decision of Supreme Court Dec. 28, 1850, Judge Davis refused to allow Dunlap's claim to discharge his debt to assignees of State Bank in notes and certificates of bank, and Dunlap appealed. Record.

JUNE 12. Dunlap v. Smith et al. is concluded. Supreme Court later decides against Lincoln's client, holding that act liquidating bank authorized its debtors to discharge their indebtedness in notes and certificates of bank unless indebtedness arose as subscription to bank's stock. Ibid.; 12 Ill.., 399.

JUNE 13. Lincoln and Wingate represent relators in People ex rel Stephenson v. Marshall. On Feb. 11 legislature united Gallatin and Saline Counties, making Equality county seat. Saline County Court, claiming this act unconstitutional, applies for mandamus to compel Marshall, circuit judge, to hold regular term of court at Raleigh in Saline County. Record.

JUNE 16. Trial of People ex rel Stephenson v. Marshall is concluded. Lincoln and Wingate win case when Supreme Court holds action of legislature invalid without sanction of people of counties, declares law unconstitutional, and awards mandamus. Record; 12 Ill.., 391.

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JUNE 21. Springfield. Lincoln buys Robert pair of shoes for 75˘. Jrwin Journal.

JUNE 23. Lincoln takes up Sangamon & Alton Railroad cases. "What points, in our Rail Road cases, were decided at the Spring term of your Circuit Court?" he asks William Martin, "and how were they decided? Will the Secretary, with his Books, be out here at our fall terms? or will we be driven to try to prove the ordering of the calls, by depositions?" The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 105-06.

JUNE 26. Lincoln writes and files in Sangamon Circuit Court mortgage foreclosure bill in Baker v. Moffett and Allen, and fills out summons form, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — David Davis Papers, Illinois State Historical Library, Springfield, Illinois. Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

JUNE 28. By virtue of decree in chancery in Barrett v. heirs of Eastham, decided by Christian Circuit Court Aug. 22, 1850, Lincoln, as commissioner, executes and signs deed conveying properties in Taylorville to complainants. Deed Record, Christian County, III, 857-59.

JUNE 30. Lincoln appears before N. W. Matheny, clerk of Sangamon Circuit Court, and has Christian County deed acknowledged. Ibid.

JULY 1. Lincoln writes chancery bill to foreclose in Webster and Hickos v. Goodman and McAtee. Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. He buys $1.25 pocket knife, Irwin Journal.

JULY 4. Lincoln writes to Andrew McCallen: "I have news from Ottawa, that we win our Galatin & Saline county case. As the dutch Justice said, when he married folks ‘Now, vere ish my hundred tollars?’" He refers to People ex rel Stephenson v. Marshall. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 106.

JULY 5. Lincoln writes sheriff's return in Baker v. Moffett and Allen. Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

JULY 7. Lincoln buys 50˘ pair of suspenders. Irwin Journal. [U.S. Circuit Court convenes at Springfield, Judge McLean presiding. Judge Drummond has not arrived. Register, July 8.]

JULY 8. [Federal Courts are both in session at Springfield, Judge Drummond having arrived. Illinois Journal, July 9.]

JULY 10. "U.S. Circuit Court — Nearly one hundred causes were continued on Thursday. This has disposed of the principal business on the docket. All of the important patent cases were continued." Register, July 12. Lincoln is engaged in these patent cases, similar to Hoyt case tried in Chicago in July 1850.

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JULY 19. After visit to telegraph office, Lincoln writes to Martin about telegram pertaining to Sangamon & Alton cases which Martin claims was sent from Springfield office. "The operator . . . declares that no such despach ever went from this office — at least, never in . . . February or March last. He then got up a correspondence with the operator at Alton, who . . . says . . . no such despach was ever, received there." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 106.

JULY 21. Lincoln fills out and signs for Lincoln & Herndon printed form notice of commission to take depositions in Alton & Sangamon Railroad Co. v. Klein, and files in Sangamon Circuit Court. Logan, for defendant, acknowledges receipt of notice. Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

JULY 25. Lincoln receives letter from William Martin on telegram mystery. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 107. Mrs. Lincoln buys $1.85 "mdse" from John Williams & Co. H. E. Pratt, 145.

JULY 26. Lincoln again visits telegraph office. This time he finds despatch in question, dated Jan. 25. Operator claims, however, that it is not in handwriting of man who was operator at that time. Lincoln then takes James L. Lamb to see it. Lamb says he believes he knows whose handwriting it is. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 107.

JULY 31. Still at work on Sangamon & Alton cases, Lincoln writes to Martin: "The present operator here says, that the operator who was here on Jany. 25, 1851 is C. P. Rosser; and that he has no knowledge of his present whereabouts. . . . This is all I can learn." Ibid.

AUGUST 1. Lincoln receives from clerk of Sangamon Circuit Court writ appointing Edward C. West to take deposition of Isaac Gibson in New York for use in Alton & Sangamon cases against Barret and Klein. Photo.

AUGUST 5. Lincoln swears affidavit that David H. Rutledge, deceased, served in Black Hawk War and was honorably discharged. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 108.

AUGUST 11. Lincoln votes in election for constable. Election Returns.

AUGUST 12. For nominal consideration Lincoln, sole heir of Thomas Lincoln, deeds west 80 acres of his father's 180-acre farm in Coles County to John D. Johnston, stepbrother, subject to Sarah Bush Lincoln's dower right. Mrs. Lincoln joins in deed. Coles County Record, D, 215; The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 108-09. Lincoln writes and signs chancery bill to foreclose in Talbott v. Dresser and Dresser. Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

August 13. Mrs. Lincoln buys four yards of calico ($1) at John Williams & Co. H. E. Pratt, 145.

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AUGUST 15. Lincoln takes mortgage on Lots 9, 10, 11, and 12 in Block 3 in Allen's addition to Springfield and to part of lot 8 in Block 10 in Springfield from Daniel E. Ruckel and Catherine V. G. Ruckel, his wife. Mortgage secures promissory note for $300 bearing interest at 10 per cent from next Dec. 25, and payable Dec. 25, 1854. Book GG, 440-1; The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 109.

AUGUST 25. Lincoln informs Martin that he has received depositions from officers and directors of Sangamon & Alton Railroad and that Circuit Court begins today. "Send me, instanter, the minutes of organization, the newspaper publications of the calls [for stock payments], and a witness to prove all by." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 110. Lincoln & Herndon win two cases, one by default, one by agreed judgment. Record. Lincoln writes affidavit and has it sworn in Lamb v. Shipman, and files it next day in Sangamon Circuit Court, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

AUGUST 26. Eight of Lincoln & Herndon's cases come up in court. They dismiss one and two are dismissed by their opponents. Graves v. Penny is settled by agreement, judgment in amount of $93 and costs being entered for their client. In Keady v. Barney they default and plaintiff recovers $40 debt and $54.80 damages. Remaining cases are continued. Record. Lincoln writes judgment in Graves v. Penny, affidavit of defendant in McClurkan & Co. v. Teasdale, plus notice of deposition and list of questions and acknowledgment of notice of service in latter case. Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

AUGUST 27. Depositions are opened in Lincoln's two Sangamon & Alton cases. Joseph Klein and James A. Barret are defendants. Default entered yesterday in Keady v. Barney is set aside on Lincoln & Herndon's motion. Of their remaining seven cases, they lose one by default, and another, appeal, when court dismisses their writ of certlorari. They win third case and rest are continued. Lincoln writes order of court in Gipson v. Guard. Record; Photo.

AUGUST 28. Lincoln & Herndon have four cases in Circuit Court. Motions or pleads are filed in three, and fourth — Watters et al. v. Drennan et al. — they dismiss. Ibid.

AUGUST 29. Lincoln is impatient with Martin for not sending him necessary records in Sangamon & Alton cases. "You had distinctly promised me that you would send them up whenever I should want them," he complains. "Now, send them at once, if you shall not have done so already." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 110. Lincoln & Herndon's only case in court is dismissed at opponent's cost. Record.

AUGUST 30. In Porter v. Clinton, defendant defaults and Lincoln & Herndon's client is awarded dower. Lincoln & Herndon oppose Stuart and Edwards in action for divorce — Chapman v. Chapman. They win case

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when complainant is granted divorce and custody of five children. Question of alimony is continued. Ibid.

AUGUST 31. Lincoln writes to John D. Johnston: "Inclosed is the deed for the land. We are all well, and have nothing in the way of news. We have had no cholera here for about two weeks. Give my love to all, and especially to mother." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 110.

SEPTEMBER 2. Defendants in Sangamon & Alton cases file their pleas. Logan, Lincoln & Herndon file answer of one defendant in Glynn v. Glynn et al., chancery case. In Hall v. Powell, Lincoln & Herndon, for defendant, argue motion to set aside levy and sale. Court takes motion under advisement. Record. Still seeking Alton railroad records, Lincoln writes to Robert Dimlap of Alton, Alton & Sangamon commissioner, asking him to mail immediately copy of Alton paper containing notice of stock sale. "Be sure you do not send a wrong paper." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 111.

SEPTEMBER 3. Lincoln and Smith secure rule on defendants in Gillman et al. v. Hamilton et al. to answer in 60 days. On their motion B. S. Edwards is appointed guardian ad litem for infant defendants. Lincoln's only other case is continued. Record.

SEPTEMBER 4. Lincoln & Herndon, representing plaintiff, dismiss replevin suit against Peter Van Bergen. Porter v. Sangamon County is continued with leave to Lincoln & Herndon to file amended bill. Ibid.

SEPTEMBER 6. Lincoln & Herndon lose Robbins v. Morgan, appeal, when jury finds for plaintiff in sum of $75. Record. Mortgage taken by Lincoln from Ruckel Aug. 15 is recorded. Mortgage Record, GG, 440-41.

SEPTEMBER 8. Five of Lincoln & Herndon's cases are called. They dismiss one, their opponents dismiss another, third is dismissed by agreement, and fourth and fifth are continued. Record.

SEPTEMBER 9. [Sangamon Circuit Court adjourns. Illinois Journal, Sept. 10.]

SEPTEMBER 10. Pekin. Tazewell Circuit Court convenes. In Jones v. Maus, action for trespass vi et armis, Lincoln and Parker for plaintiff move that damages demanded in declaration be made to conform to writ. Lincoln files answer of A. H. Saltonstall, guardian ad litem for infant defendants in Opdycke v. Opdycke et al. Record; Photo.

SEPTEMBER 13. In Doolittle v. Bailey et al., bill for relief before court Apr. 9, Lincoln, Jones, and Merriman, attorneys for complainant, are granted injunction. Two other cases of Lincoln's — Prettyman v. Yacle and Prettyman v. Stoltz — are continued. Record.

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SEPTEMBER 15. Lincoln writes and files defendant's answer in Rorebeck v. Bennett. Photo.

SEPTEMBER 16. Prettyman and Merriman file demurrer to plaintiff's replication in Atchison v. City of Pekin. Court sustains demurrer and leave is granted defendant to amend his plea. Lincoln and James, for plaintiff, file replication to amended plea. Defendant again demurs but demurrer is overruled. Case is action in debt. Record. Lincoln writes, for plaintiff in Harris v. Shaw et al., agreement on facts with Briggs, Prettyman, and Purple, representing defendants, in case to be tried by court. Photo.

SEPTEMBER 18. Purple, attorney for defendants in Doolittle v. Bailey et al., moves for dissolution of injunction. Defendants also file answer to which plaintiff excepts. Exception is sustained and he is given 30 days to amend his bill. Record. Lincoln and James file replication in Atchison v. City of Pekin. Photo.

SEPTEMBER 19. Lincoln, signing "Holmes, James & Lincoln," files replication to another plea in Atchison v. City of Pekin. Issue is joined, jury fail; to agree and is discharged. Lincoln also writes and files replication in Hamilton v. City of Pekin. Both cases are actions for debt. Record; Photo.

SEPTEMBER 23. Two of Lincoln's cases are called and continued. Record. Lincoln writes affidavit of Samuel Hall in Perkins v. Hall and has it swon by defendant. Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

SEPTEMBER 24. Lincoln writes and files decree of court in Opdycke v. Opdycke et al. Allegations of complainant's bill are taken as true except that alleging depredations on complainant's timber, which is not proved Complainant is ordered to sell lands in question and invest proceeds for benefit of defendants. Record.

SEPTEMBER 25. Metamora. Woodford Circuit Court convenes. Lincoln and Clark dismiss Hornbuckle v. Neal at cost of their client, plaintiff. Ibid.

SEPTEMBER 26. In Eddy and Jameson v. Delph, defendant confesses owing $438.21 and court grants Lincoln power of attorney for execution. Ibid.

SEPTEMBER 27. Gridley and Lincoln, for defendant, move to dismiss indictment for perjury — People v. Johnson; motion is denied. Defendant gives bond for appearance at next term. Lincoln, Clark, and Gridle dismiss Gingrich v. Evans et al., trespass. Ibid.

SEPTEMBER 29. Bloomlngton. McLean Circuit Court begins its session Only one case, Thompson v. Henline, can be definitely assigned as Lincoln's, and it is continued. Ibid.

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SEPTEMBER 30. In Thompson vdot; Patton, slander, Lincoln's client, defendant, is ruled to plead by tomorrow. Ibid. Lincoln writes and signs replication. He writes joinder in issue, which plaintiff's counsel, Gridley and Stuart, sign. Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

OCTOBER 1. "Circuit C. is now in session," observes Whig. "The following are the lawyers in attendance: Lincoln & Campbell, Spg.; Wdot; Parker, Pekin; Emerson, Wait, Post & Burr of Decatur; Cdot; H. Moore, Clinton; A. Gridley, Wm. H. Holmes, J. M. Scott, J. H. Wickizer, A. McWilliams, Wm. H. Hanna & __ Hill of Bloomington. We understand the docket is small, & very little business to do."

OCTOBER 2. Lincoln, defendant's attorney in Thompson v. Henline, slander with $3,000 damages claimed, moves to amend declaration. Motion denied. Record.

OCTOBER 3. Thompson v. Henline is tried by jury, which disagrees and case is continued. Lincoln writes replication, defendant's plea, and joinder in issue. Ibid.; Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

OCTOBER 4. Thompson v. Patton is continued on Lincoln's motion. Record.

OCTOBER 6. Lincoln buys lots 11 and 12 in Evans' Addition to City of Bloomington from Levi Davis and wife of Alton for $325.08. Deed Record Q, 174. (He sells them Apr. 12, 1856 for $400. Book 27, 686.) [Logan Circuit Court begins its session at Mt. Pulaski.]

OCTOBER 7. [U.S. District Court begins fall term in Chicago. Chicago Journal.]

OCTOBER 9. [Fall term of Dewitt Circuit Court begins.]

OCTOBER 10. [Mrs. Lincoln buys cloth, collar, pair of slippers, and ribbon from John Williams & Co. H. E. Pratt, 145.]

OCTOBER 13. Monticello. Piatt Circuit Court convenes. Barry v. Sword, appeal, is continued at plaintiff's costs. Moore and Lincoln are attorneys for plaintiff. Record; Docket.

OCTOBER 15. Urbana. On first day of Champaign Circuit Court, Davis v. Wilson and Wilson, before court May 1, is settled by agreement, defendants being ordered to convey premises in question to complainant. In case they default, Lincoln is to act as commissioner and make conveyance. Brownfield v. McElroy, appeal, is dismissed by Lincoln at cost of his client, plaintiff. Record.

OCTOBER 20. [Fall term of Vermilion Circuit Court begins.]

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OCTOBER 21. Danville. Johnson Pate, one of defendants in People v. Pate and Pate, larceny, defaults. Lincoln and O. L. Davis are his attorneys. Cooper v. Grace, in which Lincoln and Davis represent defendant, is continued. Record.

OCTOBER 22. In Cooper v. Grace jury finds defendant guilty and assesses plaintiff's damages at $35. Canterbury v. Hollingsworth, appeal, is continued on Lincoln's affidavit that he cannot proceed because of absence of defense witness. Ibid. Lincoln writes court order in People v. Pate and Pate. In Peabody v. Roney, chancery, he obtains leave to take depositions. Photo.; Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

OCTOBER 23. In Van Gundy v. Gundy, complainant having filed amended bill since last term, when case was continued, parties agree that defendant's answer to original bill stand as to amended bill so far as it applies. Murphy is attorney for complainant, Lincoln and Sconce represent defendant, Record.

OCTOBER 24. In Joseph Wilson and James Palmer, conservators of William Wilson v. Kingsbury et al., Davis, for defendants, files demurrer to part of Lincoln and Murphy's bill. Demurrer is argued and sustained and plaintiffs are given leave to file amended bill. Ibid. Lincoln writes and mails to Springfield declaration in Green v. Strode, Level and Power, Sangamon Circuit Court case. He includes $475.11 promissory note, acting for defense. Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

OCTOBER 25. [Mrs. Lincoln sends Robert to John Williams' store for two 15˘ cards of buttons. H. E. Pratt, 145.]

OCTOBER 27. Paris. Edgar Circuit Court convenes. By agreement between Benedict and Lincoln for plaintiff and Emerson and Steele for defendant, court dismisses People, use of Nancy Burr et al. v. Seth Austin, adm. of Elijah Austin, action for debt. Matkin v. Brown is also dismissed. Lincoln is attorney for Brown. Record.

OCTOBER 28. In Mathews v. Shaw, Lincoln, exhibiting power of attorney from defendant, confesses judgment of $1,009.75. Lincoln and Dill secure rule on defendant in Sizemore v. Make to plead by tomorrow. Lincoln and Linder lose Make v. Willhoit, appeal, when jury finds for plaintiff in sum of $45. Lincoln files defendant's plea of not guilty in Davidson v. Bailey, ejectment suit. Five other Lincoln cases are continued. Record. He writes and signs plea in Paddock v. Snyder. He also writes joinder of issue, which John P. Usher signs. Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

OCTOBER 29. In Sizemore v. Make jury fails to agree and is discharged Case is assumpsit suit. Lincoln's only other case is continued. Record.

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OCTOBER 31. Lincoln and Dill recover part of damages claimed in Ten Brook v. Guthrie when court awards plaintiff $532.77. They win assumpsit suit, Benson v. Mayo, when jury finds for plaintiff in sum of $400. Munsell v. McReynolds, bill for settlement of partnership in which Lincoln and Linder represent defendant, is referred to master for taking testimony. Ibid.

NOVEMBER 2. Charleston. In letter of Nov. 4 to John D. Johnston Lincoln says: "When I came into Charleston day-before yesterday I learned that you are anxious to sell the land where you live, and move to Missouri." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 111.

NOVEMBER 3. Shelbyville. Shelby Circuit Court convenes. Lincoln writes and signs "Ficklin & Lincoln" to pleas in Mercer v. Evans. He writes, signs, and files pleas in Nathan v. Noland, and writes affidavit of James Evans. He and Ficklin are for defense. Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.; Photo. [Lincoln has at least two cases at this term which cannot be assigned to particular days. In Stewartson v. Stewartson he and Ficklin dismiss complainant's bill. In Mercer v. Evans, slander, jury finds for plaintiff and assesses damages at $5. Lincoln is attorney for defense. Record.]

NOVEMBER 4. Lincoln writes to his stepbrother about his proposed removal to Missouri: "What can you do in Missouri, better than here? . . . Your thousand pretences for not getting along better, are all non-sense — they deceive no body but yourself. Go to work is the only cure for your case." At all events Lincoln intends to protect his mother's interest in Coles County land. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 111-12. [In Lincoln's long absence on circuit, his banker pays his bills. Robert Irwin debits Lincoln's account $250 for bills payable. Irwin credits Lincoln with $35.30 interest, deposits $9.57 cash received from some Lincoln debtor, and gives Mrs. Lincoln $5 cash. Irwin Journal & Ledger.]

NOVEMBER 5. [Mrs. Lincoln buys $2 in merchandise. Ibid.]

NOVEMBER 6. [Mrs. Lincoln buys $2 bonnet at Irwin's store, and $4.97 worth of red flannel and merino at John Williams & Co. Ibid.; H. E. Pratt, 145]

NOVEMBER 8. [Mrs. Lincoln buys yard of plaid flannel and buttons ($1.48) at John Williams & Co. Ibid.]

NOVEMBER 9. Having received another letter from Johnston, Lincoln writes: "I still think as I did; but if the land can be sold so that I get three hundred dollars to put to interest for mother, I will not object if she does not. But before I will make a deed, the money must be had, or secured, beyond all doubt, at ten per cent." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 112.

NOVEMBER 10. [Moultrie Circuit Court convenes at Sullivan.]

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NOVEMBER 13. Decatur. Froman v. Pearson and Walton is dismissed by agreement. Lincoln and Benedict appear for defendants. Signing "Post & Lincoln," Lincoln writes and files five pleas and affidavit for defendant in Austin v. Whitley. After having agreed to submit dispute to referee, defendant refused to accept award and plaintiff sues for $500 damages, Lincoln writes and signs replication in King et al. v. Lee et al. In Andrews v. House he wins leave to take depositions for plaintiff. Record; Photo.; Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

NOVEMBER 14. Emerson and Wait, attorneys for plaintiff in Austin v. Whitley, dismiss suit. Record. Lincoln writes decree of court in Sarah Ogden v. Jonathan Ogden, tried by jury which finds for his client, plaintiff. In lieu of alimony, Sarah Ogden receives bed, bedstead, and $400 plus costs, Photo.; File. Lincoln writes to Joseph Mclntyre, Pekin attorney, about legal document he needs at once. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 112.

NOVEMBER 15. On Lincoln's motion Robert M. Evans of Indiana is admitted to practice in Macon Circuit Court. In Eckel v. Warnick, defendant, represented by Post and Lincoln, is enjoined from further proceedings in ejectment suit. King et al. v. Lee et al. is tried by Lincoln for complainants. Court takes it under advisement. Lincoln copies bond for execution of warranty deed and has clerk certify it. Lincoln wins Andrews v. House when jury is waived and case is tried by court by agreement. Court finds for plaintiff and assesses $116.48 damages. Record; Photo.

NOVEMBER 17. Taylorvllle. Sanders and Sanders v. Dunham is dismissed by agreement at defendant's cost. Plaintiffs sued for $5,000 charging that Dunham circulated report that Katherine Sanders, his wife, had child in adultery by Negro. Lincoln is Dunham's attorney. Tanner v. Ketchum et al., continued at last term, is abated by death of defendant, Lincoln's client. Lincoln writes his own name on judge's docket in several cases. He evidently acquires these clients on arriving in Taylorville on morning of 16th or 17th. Record.

NOVEMBER 18. Lincoln writes and files affidavit for continuance in Hill v. Bennett and Maupin. Order in Record continuing case is in Lincoln's handwriting. Lincoln files defendant's plea in Duncan v. Boyd, trespass case in which plaintiff asks $200 for injury to mares placed in care of defendant. Jury finds defendant not guilty. Ibid. Lincoln writes and files defendants' pleas in John Webb v. William and John Hays. He writes and files papers in John Hays v. William Hays. Photo.

NOVEMBER 20. Springfield. Lincoln writes and files summons in Baker v. Moffett & Allen. Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. His bank account is debited $5 for "Subscription." Irwin Journal.

NOVEMBER 21. Sangamon Circuit Court convenes for special session. Lincoln & Herndon file interrogatories for Jacob Bunn, plaintiff in garnishee

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suit against Snow and Keys. Three other Lincoln & Herndon cases are continued. Record.

NOVEMBER 22. In Husband v. Elder, appeal, Lincoln & Herndon file plaintiff's declaration and secure rule on defendant to plead to 20 days. With Logan, they file exceptions to complainant's depositions in Glynn v. Glynn. Ibid.

NOVEMBER 24. On motion of Lincoln & Herndon, defendant in Porter v. Porter is ruled to answer by first day of next term. Three of their cases are continued. Ibid.

NOVEMBER 25. Lincoln writes to John D. Johnston that latter's proposal to sell 40 acres is not satisfactory. "I fed that it is my duty, to some extent, to see that she [mother] is not wronged." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 113. Lincoln & Herndon obtain divorce and custody of children for their client in Reuben Radford v. Caroline Radford when defendant defaults. In Bunn v. Snow and Keys, defendants confess debt of $18.26. Record.

NOVEMBER 26. Defendants Anderson Blackburn and Trustees of Illinois College, having failed to answer complainants' original, amended, and supplemental bills, filed by Lincoln and Smith in Gillman et al. v. Hamilton et al., bill is taken pro confesso. Lincoln and Smith file bill suggesting death of Mary A. Thornton, another defendant, and secure order of revivor against her unknown heirs. Ibid.

NOVEMBER 28. Lincoln takes mortgage on 80 acre farm from Thomas Cantrall and Elizabeth, his wife, to secure promissory note for $600, payable two years from date with interest at 10 per cent. Book HH, 148. In Circuit Court, exceptions to complainant's depositions in Glynn v. Glynn, filed by Logan, Lincoln & Herndon on 22nd, are argued and overruled. Record.

NOVEMBER 29. In "Illinois Journal" Lincoln's name heads list of leading Whigs who call convention to meet in Springfield Dec. 22. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 113-114. Circuit Court finds pro forma for plaintiffs in Lincoln's two Sangamon & Alton cases, last before court Sept. 2, and assesses railroad's damages at $1,350 and $1.75 respectively. Defendants are allowed appeals to Supreme Court. Three other Lincoln & Herndon cases are dismissed. Record. Lincoln writes court judgment in Alton & Sangamon v. Klein. Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. He deposits $9.57 in his bank account. Irwin Journal. Mrs. Lincoln buys calico and "Swiss" at John Williams' store. H. E. Pratt, 145.

DECEMBER 2. John Hutchinson and Mary L. Hutchinson convey to Lincoln lot 490 in Hutchinson's Cemetery. Price of lot is $15. Book HH, 189-90. This is probably lot in which Edward Lincoln was buried.

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DECEMBER 6. In margin of mortgage book Lincoln records satisfaction of mortgage he took from John Hay May 7, 1849. Book CC, 43. Lincoln writes, and he and Stephen T. Logan sign, arbitration award in dispute between David Spear and Isaac P. Spear. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 114.

DECEMBER 8. Lincoln writes and files in Sangamon Circuit Court affidavit in Penny v. McHenry. He also writes bill of exceptions and certifies transcript in case. He writes and signs "Lincoln & Herndon" to joinder in pleas in Husband v. Elder. Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. [Illinois Supreme Court convenes at Springfield. Illinois Journal, Dec. 9.]

DECEMBER 10. Mortgage taken by Lincoln from Cantralls Nov. 28 is recorded. Book HH, 148.

DECEMBER 11. Lincoln writes and signs reply to assignment of errors in Penny v. McHenry. Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

DECEMBER 15. Lincoln makes copy of declaration in Alton & Sangamon v. Barret, and writes argument he intends to use when case reaches Supreme Court. Photo. [Opening of U.S. District and Circuit Courts is delayed by absence of Judge Drummond. He left Chicago by stage on Friday but has not arrived. Register, Dec. 16.]

DECEMBER 16. [Judge Drummond arrives late at night. Register, Dec. 18.]

DECEMBER 17. [U.S. District Court convenes. "After hearing a few motions, the court adjourned . . . . We understand there is a full docket, and the probability is there will be a lengthy session." Ibid.]

DECEMBER 19. Lincoln and Ghumasaro for plaintiffs and Logan and Powell for defendants try Columbus Insurance Co. v. Curtenius et al. in U.S. Circuit Court. Plaintiffs are suing certain stockholders of Peoria Bridge Co. for damages sustained by them as insurers of canal boat and cargo sunk by striking pier of bridge in Illinois River. Ibid., Dec. 20.

DECEMBER 20. Trial of Columbus Insurance Co. v. Curtenius et al. continues. Defendants plead act of legislature authorizing construction of bridge. Case turns on question of power of state to authorize obstruction of navigable stream. Court takes the case under advisement. Ibid.

DECEMBER 22. Whig state convention meets. Lincoln is appointed to committee on resolutions and committee of seven to nominate four delegates to Whig national convention and to select Whig central committee. Committee's selections are approved and convention to nominate candidates for state offices is called for July 7. Illinois Journal, Dec. 24. Mrs. Lincoln buys 46˘ piece of silk at John Williams & Co. H. E. Pratt, 145.

DECEMBER 25. Lincoln buys $4 worth of merchandise. Irwin Ledger.

DECEMBER 31. Lincoln deposits $9.91 cash. Ibid.

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1852

JANUARY 1. Springfield. Lincoln buys $2.81 in merchandise. When Mrs. Lincoln needs two pieces of "Border," she sends neighbor, Edmund G. Johns, painter, to store. Irwin Journal and Ledger.

JANUARY 5. Lincoln, Archibald Williams, E. Peck, W. H. Herndon, Lyman Trumbull, Thomas L. Harris, R. S. Blackwell, G. Edmunds, Jr., and W. I. Ferguson sign call for meeting of citizens Thursday evening to express their views on Louis Kossuth and revolution in Hungary. Register; The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 115.

JANUARY 8. Palmer and Gillespie for plaintiffs and Lincoln and Blackwell for defendant try Tuller et al. v. Voght, appeal from Jersey County, in Supreme Court. At 7 P.M. Kossuth meeting is held. Lincoln states purpose of meeting and he, Trumbull, and others speak. Lincoln is appointed to committee of seven to draw up resolutions. Register. Mrs. Lincoln buys 2 1/2 yards muslin (46˘) at John Williams' store. H. E. Pratt, 145.

JANUARY 9. Lincoln reports resolutions drawn up by committee. They express sympathy for Hungarian, Irish, and German revolutionists, denounce foreign intervention in domestic troubles, and assert that "it is the right of any people, sufficiently numerous for national independence, to throw off . . . heir existing form of government, and to establish such other in its stead as they may choose." Register; The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 115-16.

JANUARY 12. Lincoln and Blackwell lose Tuller et al. v. Voght. Circuit court decided that Tuller was liable for $1,000 damages for broken leg sustained by Voght when he was knocked off his horse by coach and four driven by Tuller's coachman. Supreme Court reverses decision and remands case with permission to Voght to amend his declaration. Record; 13 Ill. 271-77.

JANUARY 15. In Supreme Court Lincoln for plaintiff and Blackwell for defendant try Dorman et ux v. Yost, appeal from decree of White Circuit Court authorizing administrator to sell real estate of decedent. Lincoln writes and signs assignment of errors. Record; Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

JANUARY 16. Markeley et al. v. Ellis (SC), appeal from McLean County, Lincoln and Trumbull for defense, Wead for plaintiff, is continued. Record; Photo. Lincoln buys boots for Robert ($1.75) and 2 3/4 yards "Black Silk Nett" (56˘), and silk and ribbon ($2.87) Irwin Journal; H. E. Pratt, 145.

JANUARY 19. Lincoln wins his appeal in Dorman et ux. v. Yost when Supreme Court reverses decision of Circuit Court. Record; 13 Ill. 127-31. Orville H. Browning of Quincy delivers lecture on "The Dignity of Labor"

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at Third Presbyterian Church. "After the lecture," he records in his Diary, "went to Mr. Lincoln's to supper."

JANUARY 20. On Jan. 22, Lincoln writes to Hezekiah Morse Wead, Lewistown attorney, about case in federal court. "We finished arguing, and submitted the case yesterday afternoon, and it is not yet decided. We had a two days trial of it." He is in U.S. Circuit Court. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 117.

JANUARY 21. Lincoln is busy in U.S. Circuit Court on Smith v. Gardner. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 117-18.

JANUARY 22. Lincoln is doubtful about outcome of case. "They are pressing us very hard on one or two points," he writes to Wead. "I should not wonder if the case is decided against us." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 117.

JANUARY 24. Judge Drummond gives his opinion in Peoria Bridge Case, tried in federal court Dec. 19 and 20, 1851. He decides that legislature has no right to authorize obstruction of navigable stream. Question whether Peoria bridge is, in fact, obstruction is to "be settled by testimony on trial." Register, Jan. 27. Case is later compromised. McLean's Reports, VI, 209.

JANUARY 26. Lincoln and others sign call for meeting to invite Louis Kossuth to stop at Springfield on his way from Indianapolis to St. Louis. Meeting is held and Lincoln appointed to committee of 13 which is instructed to request city council to extend invitation. Illinois Journal, Jan. 30; The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 118. Lincoln writes to O. H. Browning about case of Smith v. Gardner, decided against him on two points, which he states. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 117-18.

JANUARY 27. Kossuth meeting reconvenes. When chairman calls for committee's report, none of its members is present "although it appeared that everybody else was here." Virgil Hickox suggests that members of committee May have feared expense would devolve on them. On motion of John Calhoun, another committee is appointed to extend invitation. Lincoln is on it. Illinois Journal, Jan. 30.

JANUARY 29. Committee appointed to invite Kossuth to Springfield is called to meet at 4 o'clock at office of secretary of state. Ibid.

FEBRUARY 2. Penny v. McHenry, chancery, is tried before Supreme Court. Stuart argues for plaintiff, Lincoln for defendant. On Mar. 18, 1851 Sangamon Circuit Court dismissed bill. Record.

FEBRUARY 3. Lincoln concludes his argument in Penny v. McHenry. Logan follows for plaintiff and continues until adjournment. Ibid.

FEBRUARY 4. Logan concludes his argument in Penny v. McHenry. Lincoln wins case when court upholds lower court. Lincoln's two

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Sangamon & Alton cases come to trial. One case involves liability of stock subscriber to pay his subscription, other question of whether change in route of railroad releases subscriber from his contract. Lower court found for railroad and decisions are affirmed. Ibid.

FEBRUARY 6. Logan, Stuart, and Edwards for plaintiff and Lincoln, Ferguson, and Herndon for defendant try McAtee v. Enyart before Supreme Court. McAtee, getting Enyart intoxicated, persuaded him to make conveyance of land. On Mar. 28, 1851 Sangamon Circuit Court annulled deed on ground of fraud. Supreme Court affirms decision. Record; 13 Ill., 242-51.

FEBRUARY 7. Lincoln writes to H. M. Wead: "Your letter enclosing ten dollars was received today. I have just called on Logan and he tells me they have paid the costs and will take a new trial. Be sure, therefore to send the brief, with the authorities on it." He evidently refers to case discussed Jan. 20. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 118.

FEBRUARY 9. For defendant, Lincoln writes notice to take depositions in McClurken and Fleming v. Teasdale. Photo.

FEBRUARY 14. Lincoln writes declaration, for defendant, in Township 16 Trustees v. Henry Prather, Macon County case involving property claimed for school. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 118-19.

FEBRUARY 23. Lincoln writes praecipe and signs bond for costs in William C. Lumsden v. George L. Lumsden, debt case for Sangamon Circuit Court. Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

FEBRUARY 28. Mrs. Lincoln sends Robert to John Williams' store for $1.75 "Black Lawn Veil." H. E. Pratt, 145.

MARCH 1. Lincoln writes plaintiff's answer in Warren v. Miller et al., which is set for hearing at approaching term of Sangamon Circuit Court, action in assumpsit. Photo.

MARCH 3. Lincoln writes and signs declaration in Joel Johnson v. John McMullen, Sangamon Circuit Court case. Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

MARCH 5. Lincoln receives letter from William Fithian of Vermilion County, and two drafts by Fithian on M. Mobley. When paid, drafts will defray judgment Lincoln won for Fithian Aug. 29, 1849. Photo.

MARCH 14. Lincoln writes to J. C. Louderman & Co. of St. Louis ordering 35 yards of new carpet to match sample he sends. "I must now ask the favor of you to send us back the sample, (as, to lose it will spoil the carpet we have)." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 120.

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MARCH 15. Sangamon Circuit Court begins spring term. Defendants in Perrin v. Hall et al., chancery, enter motion to dissolve injunction. Lincoln & Herndon, representing plaintiff, argue against motion. Court takes it under advisement. He is appointed guardian ad litem of infant defendants in William Enos et al. v. Enos Enos et al. Record. Lincoln writes and swears defendants' answer in Kelly v. Wells and Wells. Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

MARCH 16. Ten of Lincoln & Herndon's cases are called in Circuit Court. They dismiss three, file demurrers in two others and plea in sixth. In another they argue demurrer filed by their opponents. Their opponents file pleas in three cases. Record.

MARCH 17. Injunction in Perrin v. Hall et al. is dissolved. In Hinkle & Bro., use of Jacob Bunn v. DeCamp and Burnapp, defendants default and Lincoln & Herndon's client is awarded $185.08 damages. Lincoln & Herndon dismiss one case, file pleas or enter motions in four others and one is continued. Ibid.

MARCH 18. Lincoln & Herndon appear in four cases in Circuit Court. They file pleas in one, enter motions in two, and fourth is dismissed by opponents. Ibid.

MARCH 19. Five of Lincoln & Herndon's cases come before Circuit Court, In Herndon v. Todd, assumpsit suit brought by junior partner, defendant defaults and Herndon is awarded damages of $100.50. Lincoln writes, signs, and files declaration in lies v. Johnston & Brigham, and wins when defendants default and are assessed $418.19 damages. In Peter Wallace v. Daniel W. Witmer and James P. Langford, Lincoln writes Witmer's affidavit and has it sworn and files. Ibid.; Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

MARCH 20. Lincoln & Herndon dismiss Costen v. Costen et al., chancery. They file pleas in two other cases and fourth case is continued. Record.

MARCH 22. Lincoln & Herndon lose two cases — Webster & Co. v. Roberts, and Riggs & Levering v. Murray — by nil diclt. Plaintiff's damages are assessed at $420.91 and $677.25 respectively. They win two replevin suits, one by jury verdict, other by default. They dismiss fifth suit, file pleas in two others, and two are continued. Ibid.

MARCH 23. Lincoln & Herndon win partition suit, Elliott v. Archer, by default. In Johnson v. McMullen, trespass, jury finds defendant guilty and their client is awarded damages of $6. Four more of their cases come before court but none comes to trial. Ibid.

MARCH 24. Defendants' demurrer in Gillman et al. v. Hamilton et al. is sustained and Smith and Lincoln, representing complainants, are given leave to amend their bill. In Porter v. Hoffman et al. complainant, their

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client, is awarded dower of $10 a year. In People v. Clark et al. jury is waived and court finds their client indebted to plaintiff $30,000 with $2,918.47 damages. Ibid. In Margaret M. Porter v. Andrew Porter, Lincoln & Herndon file amended bill. Photo.

MARCH 25. Lincoln & Herndon win appeal, Johnson v. McMullen, when jury finds for plaintiff in amount of $100 and costs. Record.

MARCH 26. Representing E. D. Baker, Lincoln & Herndon secure decree of foreclosure against Moffett and Allen to recover debt of $2,175.56. They lose dower case, win appeal from justice's court and settle fourth case by agreement. Defendant in Johnson v. McMullen moves for new trial. Ibid.

MARCH 27. Defendant in Connelly v. Van de Velde moves to dissolve injunction. Pleads are filed in Johnson v. McMullen, and Enos v. Wright et al. is dismissed by agreement. Lincoln & Herndon are attorneys for plaintiffs in all three cases. Ibid.

MARCH 29. Court dissolves injunction in Connelly v. Van de Velde, as moved by defendant on 27th. Defendant's motion for new trial in Johnson v. McMullen is allowed. In Lamb v. Shipman, chancery, court dismisses complainant's bill at his costs. Lincoln & Herndon are attorneys for defendant. Ibid.

MARCH 30. Lincoln & Herndon file defense plea in Kirkpatrick v. Cox. Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

APRIL 6. Lincoln buys "1 3/4 yds. Paper Cambric & @ .15" at John Williams' store. H. E. Pratt, 145.

APRIL 7. Springfield or Pekin. Whigs meet to nominate candidates for city offices. Lincoln is one of about 199 signers of call. After selecting candidates, meeting adopts resolution censuring N. W. Edwards for abandoning Whig principles and requests that he resign from legislature. Illinois Journal, Apr. 9 and 10; The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 120. Tazewell Circuit Court begins spring session at Pekin.

APRIL 8. Pekin. Signing "James & Lincoln," Lincoln writes and files plaintiff's replication in Atchison v. City of Pekin. Defendant joins issue. Photo.

APRIL 9. In Trustees of Tremont Female Seminary v. Hamilton, jury is waived and court reverses judgment of justice's court. Lincoln and Saltonstall represent appellant. Lincoln files pleadings for defendants in Gill and Rupert v. Webster, and McNaughton and Cromwell v. E. D. Baker. Lincoln, Jones, and Merriman move to dismiss ex parte Doolittle, appeal from Tazewell County Court on petition to sell real estate. Record.

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APRIL 10. Lincoln loses Gill and Rupert v. Webster when court renders judgment for plaintiff in amount of $437.55. Case is action in assumpsit. By agreement Lincoln and Parker, attorneys for plaintiff, dismiss Jones v.Maus, action in trespass continued from Sept. term. Ibid. Lincoln writes and signs agreement that plaintiff take judgment in Gill and Rupert v. Webster, adding jocose award of $4 to losing defendant for peach liquor. Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

APRIL 12. Lincoln and Merriman, for complainant, dismiss Doolittle v. Preston et al., "injunction by bill." Lincoln files order for sale of real estate in Opdycke v. Opdycke, and is awarded $25 from Opdycke estate. Third case is continued. Record; Photo; Sangamon County Probate File. [Mrs. Lincoln buys piece of carpet binding (40˘), charging to her husband's account, with John Williams & Co. H. E. Pratt, 145.]

APRIL 13. Hall v. Tyler is tried by court, which affirms decision of justice's court. Lincoln appears for appellee. Complainants in Rorebeck v. Bennett, bill for conveyance continued from Sept. term, dismiss case. Lincoln is attorney for defendant. Record. [In Springfield, Mrs. Lincoln joins First Presbyterian Church. Beveridge, I, 595n.]

APRIL 14. Lincoln & Prettyman win Grain v. Mattox et al. when court orders that complainant recover $250, value of property taken from his premises, and $135 interest. Decree is in Lincoln's handwriting. On motion of Lincoln's opponents, complainants, Crabb and Watts v. Wallace is stricken from docket. Pleas are filed in third case and two others are continued. Record; Photo.

APRIL 15. Metamora. Lincoln is attorney for defendants in two indictments for "gaming." In People v. Snyder et al., state's attorney enters nolle prosequi. In People v. Clifton, his client pleads guilty and is fined $10. In Davidson v. McGhilton, trespass, defendant defaults and jury assesses plaintiff's damages at $2,000. Lincoln and Gridley are attorneys for plaintiff. Record. Lincoln files report and answer as guardian ad litem in Joseph Dressier v. J. W. Dressier et al., petition for partition. Photo.

APRIL 16. Lincoln and Gridley defend Joseph K. Johnson, accused of perjury. Jury finds him not guilty. Record. [Under act of Congress of 1850 warrant for 40 acres of land is issued to Lincoln for services in Black Hawk War. Paul M. Angle, Lincoln 1854-1861, 313.]

APRIL 17. Lincoln is reappointed guardian ad litem of infant defendants in Dressier v. Dressier et al. He is appointed guardian also in Eliza Jane Rogers v. Fanny H. Rogers et al., and in Taylor v. Margaret S. Sands et al. In latter case he writes answer of former guardian, W. H. Hanna. Lincoln writes affidavit of Samuel Fleming filed in Ramey and Walsh v. Wolf. Hosher v. Spring and Lewis, appeal is continued. Record; Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

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APRIL 19. Bloomington. McLean Circuit Court begins its session. Thompson v. Henline and Henline is ordered dismissed for want of declaration. Lincoln is counsel for defendants. Record. "Besides the resident attorneys we noticed in attendance Messrs. Stewart [sic] and Lincoln of Springfield, Edward Jones of Tazewell, G. H. Moore of DeWitt and Chas. Emerson of Macon." Bloomington Intelligencer, Apr. 19.

APRIL 20. Lash v. Beaver, trespass for $300 damages, is tried by jury. Lincoln and Fell, for defendant, lose case but plaintiff's damages are only $2.20, plus costs. Lincoln writes pleas in Flagg and Ewing v. Martin and Gurnsey. Fell v. McIntire is, by consent, continued to next term. Record; Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

APRIL 21. Thompson v. Henline and Henline is reinstated. Jury is unable to agree and parties again dismiss suit. Lincoln, for plaintiffs, dismisses Hawks et al. v. Major, remanded by Supreme Court. Flagg and Ewing v. Martin and Gurnsey, trespass with $300 damages alleged, Lincoln for defense, is dismissed by agreement, each party paying his costs. Record.

APRIL 22. On Lincoln's motion, assumpsit suit of Flagg and Ewing v. David Pantier is continued. Pantier was friend of Lincoln at New Salem. In Thompson v. Patton, slander, plaintiff moves to amend his declaration, Lincoln withdraws his plea, and case is settled by agreement. Lincoln, for plaintiff, loses Gibbs, Rogers et al. v. Eckles, land conveyance suit, when court orders land conveyed and plaintiffs to pay costs. Ibid.

APRIL 23. Lincoln appears for defendant in action of trespass brought by fellow lawyer — Asahel Gridley v. Burbank. He is ordered to plead instanter and on his failure to do so court awards plaintiff $136.35 and costs. Hawks et al. v. Major, dismissed Apr. 21, is reinstated and continued. Ibid.

APRIL 24. Stern and Friedman v. Sawyer, attachment, Lincoln for plaintiff, is continued as Lincoln asks leave to amend declaration. Ibid. [In Springfield Whig delegates nominate James C. Conkling to succeed N. W. Edwards, who resigned from legislature because of resolution of censure passed Apr. 7. Illinois Journal, Apr. 27. Mrs. Lincoln buys $18.30 in wallpaper. H. E. Pratt, 145.]

APRIL 26. Mount Pulaski. Logan Circuit Court begins its term. Lincoln enters suit in Kelly v. estate of Blackledge. Record.

APRIL 27. Springfield. Smith and Lincoln file amended bill of Gillman et al. v. Hamilton et al. They obtain subpoena against nonresident defendants. Ibid.

APRIL 28. Lincoln and Smith publish notice of pendency of Gillman et al. v. Hamilton et al. Illinois Journal.

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APRIL 29. [DeWitt Circuit Court begins its session at Clinton.]

APRIL 30. Clinton. Campbell v. Warner, ejectment, is continued after defendant, by Lincoln and Moore, enters not guilty plea. Record. Lincoln handles real estate transaction between James Mattlen and John Billington, filling in mortgage form and writing two $500 notes which Mattlen signs. Photo. [In U.S. Circuit Court, Logan and Lincoln file praecipe and declaration in John Moore, use of State Bank of Indiana v. Banquary. They allege that defendant endorsed to plaintiff bill of exchange for $5,000 which he refuses to pay. They also file praecipe in Moore, use of Bank of Indiana v. Buchanan and Vandermark. Record.]

MAY 3. Monticello. Lincoln and Post dismiss their appeal in Johnson v. Marquis and Marquis. In Barry v. Sword, appeal, continued at last term, jury finds for plaintiff in amount of $12. Lincoln and Moore are plaintiff's attorneys. Lincoln & Post for complainant argue defendant's demurrer in Thorpe v. Thorpe, divorce. Demurer is overruled. Ibid.

MAY 4. Signing "Emerson & Lincoln," Lincoln writes and files complainant's replication in Thorpe v. Thorpe. He files bill of particulars in King v. Gill & Co. Photo.

MAY 5. [Champaign Circuit Court begins its session at Urbana.]

MAY 6. Urbana. Lincoln writes and files defendant's plea in Burt v. Jennings, trespass. He writes plea for defendant in Burt v. Owings. Photo.

MAY 7. [In Chicago "suit pending before the U.S. District Court for the past ten days of Johnson v. Jones . . . was given to the jury." Chicago Journal, May 8. This is famous "Sand Bar" Case in which Lincoln will later be counsel.]

MAY 8. [Jury in Johnson v. Jones brings in verdict for plaintiff. Ibid.]

MAY 10. Danville. Canterbury v. Hollingsworth, appeal, continued at last term, is settled by agreement. Peters and Lamon represent plaintiff, Lincoln defendant. Motions are entered in three other cases. Record. [Chicago Journal endorses editorial from Bloomington "Intelligencer" mentioning Lincoln, Stuart, or Browning as its choice for Whig candidate for governor.]

MAY 11. Lincoln, signing "Murphy & Lincoln," files defendant's plea in Liggett v. Frazier. Photo. He appears for plaintiff in Brown v. Makenson. Original owned by King Hostick, Springfield, Ill.

MAY 12. Oliver L. Davis, representing plaintiff in Liggett v. Frazier, secures change of venue to Champaign County. Pleas are filed in two other Lincoln cases. Record. He writes defendant's

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answer in Frazier v. Davis. Photo.

MAY 13. Lincoln and Davis win Brown v. Makenson when jury finds defendant guilty of trespass and assesses damages at $100. Record.

MAY 14. In People v. Hensley, appeal, jury finds defendant guilty and court fines him $3. Lincoln and Peters are attorneys for defendant. Lincoln and Davis, for defendant, secure verdict of not guilty in People v. Pate and Pate, larceny. Plaintiffs are allowed appeal to Supreme Court. Lincoln attests mark of Jesse Liggett who pledges himself as security for plaintiff's costs in Liggett v. Frazier. Ibid. Lincoln writes plea in Peabody v. Roney, chancery, and writes court order. Photo.

MAY 15. In Wilson et al. v. Kingsbury et al., before court Oct. 24, 1851, two complainants are ordered to file bond for costs. Murphy and Lincoln are complainants' attorneys. Lincoln appears for defense in People v. Johnson. Jury fails to agree, case is continued to next term, when it is dismissed. Record. C. L. Pate, defendant in People v. Pate and Pate, signs agreement and note with his attorneys, O. L. Davis and A. Lincoln, promising to pay $80 for value received when five suits against him in Vermilion Circuit Court "shall be finally decided in my favor and not before." Original owned by Fred B. Mann, Danville, Ill.

MAY 17. Munsell v. McReynolds, bill for settlement of partnership, is decided on filed agreement. Benedict is attorney for complainant; Dill, Lincoln, and Linder represent defendant. In Noblett v. Duck, action on covenant, Emerson and Steele, for plaintiff, get rule on Benedict and Lincoln to plead by May 19. Record.

MAY 18. Lincoln, Emerson, and Steele win criminal case — People v. Clark — when jury finds defendant not guilty of loaning public money. Archer v. Bartlett et al. is dismissed by plaintiff, Lincoln and Linder appearing for defense. Lincoln secures abatement of third suit by suggesting death of defendant. Ibid. He writes plea in Jaquith v. Larkin and Burr. Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

MAY 19. Lincoln and Linder for plaintiff lose ejectment suit of Dubois v. Nabb, continued from last term. On Lincoln's motion new trial is granted. They also lose Dudley and Sutherland v. Hite and Mann, trespass, when jury finds for plaintiff in amount of $150. New trial is also granted. Jaquith v. Larkin and Burr is continued on Lincoln's motion. Record.

MAY 20. Sizemore v. Make, assumpsit suit in which jury failed to agree Oct. 29, 1851, is tried by Lincoln and Dill for plaintiff and Benedict for defendant. Jury finds for plaintiff and assesses his damages at $260. Ibid. Lincoln files bill of complaint in Henderson v. Reed, suit to compel payment for horse. He writes amended declaration in case, signing for "Benedict & Lincoln." Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

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MAY 21. Lincoln and Dill lose assumpsit suit — Alexander v. Metcalf — when court finds for plaintiff and awards him $41.83 damages. Whitely v. Alexander et al. is continued on their motion. Benedict and Lincoln are for defense in Cassady v. Maxwell. Jury finds for plaintiff and awards $13.50 damages. Record.

MAY 24. Shelbyvllle. Shelby Circuit Court begins its session. Lincoln, for 12 defendants in Alderson v. Noland et al., writes and files pleas. For defense in John W. Johnson v. Thomas Hardy, Lincoln subscribes to plaintiff's motion to dismiss case. Photo.

MAY 25. Lincoln takes note from John P. Mercer for $7.69, evidently his fee in Mercer v. Evans. Photo. In inventory of Lincoln's estate, note is listed as "worthless." Illinois State Historical Library, Springfield, Illinois — Lincoln Estate Inventory. Lincoln writes affidavit of costs in Alderson v. Noland et al. Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

MAY 26. Lincoln wins Walker v. Morrison when court tries case and awards $7.39 to plaintiff. Record.

MAY 27. Lincoln writes plaintiff's replication and decree of court in Reader v. Williams. Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

MAY 30. Springfield. Lincoln writes and mails to Monticello draft of affidavit of Moses Thorpe in Lloyd v. Thorpe, Piatt Circuit Court case. Ibid.

MAY 31. [Moultrie Circuit Court begins its session at Sullivan.]

JUNE 1. Lincoln writes to J. Edwards asking him to give $20 credit to Sam Davis for "harness and paints . . . and I will see that you are paid." Photo.

JUNE 3. Decatur. Macon Circuit Court convenes. Lincoln has two cases, Warnick v. Eckel, injunction against ejectment, and Trustees of Schools v. Prather, both of which are continued. Record.

JUNE 4. In Edwards v. Florey, appeal, jury is waived and court affirms judgment of justice's court awarding plaintiff $77.65 and costs. Lincoln and Post are attorneys for defendant. Lincoln files declaration in Trustees of Schools of Township 16 v. Prather, ejectment suit. Taylor v. Moffett, also ejectment, is continued. Hoffman v. Edwards, appeal from justice court, is dismissed by Post and Lincoln for plaintiff. Smith, administrator of Rachel Owen v. William Prather, note suit, Lincoln for defendant, is continued. Ibid.

JUNE 5. Defendant in Smith v. Packard appeals from justice's decision awarding plaintiff $9 damages, "the value of one white cow with red ears, two years old last fall unjustly taken and detained by the defendant." Jury

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awards plaintiff, Lincoln's client, $10 and costs. Lincoln also wins chancery case, King et al. v. Lee et al., when jury finds for complainant. He writes decree of court. He wins Scott v. Hull, trespass, when jury decides defendant did not steal 4,000 rails and 1,000 stakes from plaintiff. Benjamin F. Taylor v. Samuel Rea, sheriff, suit to obtain payment of money, Lincoln for defense, is continued. Record; Photo.; Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

JUNE 7. Taylorvllle. Lincoln is appointed guardian ad litem for infant defendants in Thompson v. Shumway and unknown heirs of Henry J. Hannas. Shaw v. Johnson, appeal in which Lincoln represents plaintiff, is dismissed by court. Stuart, Edwards, and Lincoln for complainant dismiss Hill v. Maupin and Bennett, continued from last term. Record. [In Springfield, legislature convenes in special session.]

JUNE 8. Lincoln files report in Christian Circuit Court as guardian ad litem in Nichols and Nichols v. Turpin, petition for partition. Court grants petition. Ibid.

JUNE 10. Springfield. Lincoln writes joinder in plea in Trustees v. Prather and mails it to Decatur. Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

JUNE 15. Lincoln buys muslin for his wife. H. E. Pratt, 145.

JUNE 16. Lincoln files receipt for settlement in McGlurken & Co. v. Teasdale, decided at spring term. Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

JUNE 21. Lincoln files in Sangamon Circuit Court praecipe in Van Bergen and Gray v. Hewett. He writes and swears Van Bergen's affidavit. Ibid. He buys 50˘ worth of merchandise. Irwin Ledger.

JUNE 22. Lincoln buys new carriage ($260) from Obed Lewis, carrriage maker. Obed Lewis Account Books. He writes, signs, and mails to Decatur declaration in John Hanks v. Joshua B. Hanks. Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

JUNE 23. [Special session of legislature adjourns.]

JUNE 25. Lincoln pays his carriage maker $250 cash. Obed Lewis Account Books. Lincoln writes to Onslow Peters, Peoria attorney, who has asked him about "Shurtluff claim." Lincoln once looked into it, "& decided it to be valueless." He outlines case. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 120-21.

JUNE 26. [National Intelligencer, Washington, reports that Lincoln has been appointed Illinois member of Whig national committee.]

JUNE 29. In evening Lincoln presides at meeting called to arrange tribute to Henry Clay who died in Washington. He appoints committee of 13, Dr. John Todd chairman, to arrange program. Illinois Journal, July 1. Lincoln has his new carriage worked on ($2). Obed Lewis Account Books.

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JUNE 30. Lincoln presides as committee reports. It recommends that on July 6 people assemble at Episcopal Church and proceed to House of Representatives where Stephen T. Logan will address them. Lincoln appoints committee of seven to make arrangements. Illinois Journal, July 2. Lincoln exchanges his new buggy for another. Obed Lewis Account Books.

JULY 1. [On margin of Lincoln's speech on Henry Clay in Huntington Library Herndon wrote: "A public meeting chose Mr. Lincoln to address it — July 1st." Despite Logan's selection June 30, this point gains credence from Lincoln's delivery of Clay eulogy. Choice of Logan, not the favorite orator of Sangamon Whigs, may have been courtesy, intending that he hand assignment to Lincoln.]

JULY 2. In U.S. Circuit Court Lincoln and Logan file plaintiff's declaration in John Moore, use of Bank of Indiana v. Buchanan and Vandermark. They filed their praecipe Apr. 30. They allege failure of defendants to pay promissory note for $2,134 made by them to John Ross and assigned to bank. Record.

JULY 3. [Sangamon County Whigs meet, endorse nomination of Scott and Graham, party's presidential and vice-presidential candidates, propose John T. Stuart for governor, endorse Richard Yates for Congress, and select S. Francis, William Butler, William H. Herndon, P. P. Enos, Job Fletcher, James W. Neale and William J. Black as delegates to Whig state convention. Illinois Journal, July 6.]

JULY 5. In U.S. Circuit Court Logan files declarations for plaintiffs in two cases in which Lincoln represents defendants. In Everhard v. Welch and Dawson he alleges failure of defendants to pay judgments of $772.36 and $529.20 secured in Ohio, also failure to pay judgment of $1,534.72 and debt of $1,031.84. In Norton v. Gorden he alleges failure of defendant to pay note for $1,068.39. Record.

JULY 6. City pays tribute to Henry Clay. Rev. Dresser reads service at Episcopal Church, after which procession moves to Representatives Hall, "where A. Lincoln pronounced an impressive eulogy. . . . During the proceedings business was suspended, stores closed, and everything announced the general sorrow at the great national bereavement." Illinois Journal, July 9; The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 121-32. Lincoln writes and mails to Clinton summons and bond for costs in Welch v. Lewis, Dewitt Circuit Court case, signing "Ballon & Lincoln p.q." Ballon, associate with Lincoln for plaintiff, writes and files declaration. Photo.

JULY 7. Lincoln files defendants' pleas in answer to declarations filed by Logan July 5. In first case he alleges discharge of defendants from all debts by decree of bankruptcy. In second he alleges payment to prior assignee. Record. Whig state convention meets at state house in

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afternoon and Whig ratification meeting is held in evening. Illinois Journal, July 8, 9.

JULY 8. In U.S. Circuit Court Logan secures order on defendant in Everhard v. Welch and Dawson to plead by July 12. Record. "Judge McLean is not here — Drummond presides alone," records Browning in his Diary. "The weather is excessively hot, and on yesterday there were two deaths by cholera in Town."

JULY 9. Lincoln's and 37 other names appear on advertisement announcing meeting of commissioners of Springfield and Terre Haute Railroad to be held at Charleston Aug. 18 for organizing and opening books for subscription of stock. Advertisement is dated "Marshall, July 9." Journal; The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 133.

JULY 10. Lincoln buys three kinds of cloth and pair of slippers for his wife at John Williams & Co. H. E. Pratt, 145.

JULY 12. Orville H. Browning records in his Diary: "Attending [U.S. ] Court. Commenced trial of [William] Williamson, formerly Postmaster at Lacon who is indicted for robbing the mail. I am assisting Lincoln at his request." Lincoln pays $10 cash on his carriage account. Obed Lewis Account Books.

JULY 13. Browning is so discouraged over Williamson case he does not wish to speak, but at Lincoln's persuasion he addresses jury for two hours. "The defendant," he records, "is a young man, who lost a leg in the Mexican war . . . . I believe him to be guilty, but . . . am sorry for the poor devil." Browning, Diary. Lincoln files pleas in Moore v. Banquary and Moore v. Buchanan and Vandemark, before court Apr. 30 and July 2 respectively. Record. Lincoln takes home "5 yds. Quilled Ribbon," 89˘. H. E. Pratt, 145.

JULY 14. Jury finds Williamson guilty of embezzling package containing $15,000 in bank notes. Browning and Lincoln plan to try to arrest judgment "but have not much hope." Browning, Diary.

JULY 15. Williamson is sentenced to ten years in prison. Illinois Journal, July 16.

JULY 21. In Moore v. Buchanan and Vandermark, Lincoln and Logan argue plaintiff's demurrer. Court takes it under advisement. In Moore v. Banquary, jury is waived and verdict is rendered for their client in amount of $5,938.67 and costs. In Everhard v. Welch and Dawson, Dawson defaults and case against Welch is dismissed. Record. Lincoln writes to Mrs. Catherine Nance of Petersburg, who seeks land office patent, acknowledging receipt of necessary affidavit. "Herewith is the Patent. Please accept my respects." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 133.

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JULY 22. "One of the warmest days of the season," writes Browning in his Diary. "After tea Mrs. B. & self called at Mr. Ridgleys, Mr. Edwards, & spent the evening at Lincoln's."

JULY 26. U.S. Court sustains demurrer in Moore v. Buchanan and Vandermark. Record.

JULY 28. [Two pleas and rejoinder, written by Lincoln, are filed in Liggett v. Frazier in Champaign Circuit Court. Case was transferred from Vermilion County. They aver that at time of alleged trespass defendant was acting sheriff of county and his confinement of plaintiff in jail was done in line of duty under writ. Associated with Murphy for defense, he writes instructions to jury, and probably mails papers to Murphy. Photo.]

JULY 31. Moore v. Buchanan and Vandermark comes to trial in federal court. Jury is waived and court finds for plaintiff, Lincoln and Logan's client. His damages are assessed at $5,418.16. Record. [Edwards and Conkling address Springfield Scott Club. Illinois Journal.]

AUGUST 2. Lincoln writes to Adam Adams and John Bovey: "The court is about to adjourn; and it does not decide our case. . . . It appears to me, however, that the signs are against us. . . . I have entire confidence that the law is with us on the Statute of Limitations, and yet it seems, I can not get the judge to remember that this is a question in the case at all. . . . Be patient. They have not got your land yet." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 133-34.

AUGUST 3. U.S. Circuit and District Courts adjourn. Illinois Journal, Aug. 4. Lincoln writes bill of complaint in Wallace v. Miller. Photo.

AUGUST 9. Whig county convention meets to nominate two candidates for legislature. "Before the ballot was taken, Mr. Herndon stated . . . that Mr. Lincoln did not desire to be a candidate, that his business arrangements were such that he could not be a candidate at this time." Nevertheless Lincoln gets some votes on first ballot. On second J. M. Brown and P. P. Enos are nominated. Illinois journal, Aug. 11.

AUGUST 10. Lincoln writes to Justin Butterfield, commissioner of General Land Office in Washington, asking how to proceed to get title to tract of land applied for by J. T. Stuart but sold to subsequent bidder at same price bid by Stuart. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 134-35.

AUGUST 13. Lincoln writes, signs, and files declaration in Samuel Grubb v. John Fink & Co., Sangamon County personal damage suit. Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

AUGUST 14. Tompkins Bush, scheduled to address Scott Club, is unable to do so. Lincoln, at his own request, takes his place and speaks for two hours, devoting himself mainly to review of Douglas' speech at Richmond, July 9. Unable to finish, Lincoln announces that he will continue at next meeting,

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"Mr. Lincoln's speech was full of keen sarcasm and eloquence, and elicited shouts of laughter and approbation." Illinois Journal, Aug. 17; The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 135-43.

AUGUST 18. [Charleston? Incorporators of Springfield and Terre Haute Railroad meet and appoint committee of five to open subscription books in Springfield, Terre Haute, New York, and elsewhere. Gov. French presides. "Several speeches were made and a spirit of harmony and zeal for the work pervaded the meeting." Illinois Journal, Aug. 21. As Lincoln was one of those who signed call, he may have been present.]

AUGUST 19. Springfield. Lincoln writes Hon. W. P. Mangum of North Carolina, asking if his old friend and fellow lodger of congressional days can carry North Carolina for Scott. If he can, Lincoln will relinquish "the fond affections of Miss L. K.," a lady they had obviously discussed at their Washington boarding house. Photo. Lincoln certifies receipt of $5 from David Gold, fee in full as administrator in J. G. Reiley estate v. J. S. Ruby etal. The Abraham Lincoln Association, Springfield, Illinois. [Files and records on deposit at Illinois State Historical Library, Springfield, Illinois.] — Files.

AUGUST 23. Summer term of Sangamon Circuit Court begins. Judge Davis is absent and Judge T. Lyle Dickey presides. Register, Aug. 24.

AUGUST 24. Rawlings, use of McLeave v. Douglas & Rawlings, Lincoln & Herndon's only case in Circuit Court, is dismissed on their motion. Record.

AUGUST 25. In Peter Van Bergen v. Josephus Hewett, attachment suit, defendant defaults and plaintiff, Lincoln & Herndon's client, is awarded $913.71 damages. In Lowry v. Broadwell, agreed judgment for $10 and costs is entered for plaintiff, their client. Two other cases are continued. Record. Lincoln writes and files defendant's separate answer in Nathan Potts v. Clinton May et al., chancery. Photo.

AUGUST 26. Lincoln concludes his review of Douglas' speech before Scott Club. Club requests him to prepare copy for publication. Illinois Journal, Aug. 30. "Douglas was ‘killed’ again, of course," observes Register (Aug. 29). "As he was not ‘killed very dead,’ however the sanguinary work will be renewed next Saturday night week, instead of next Thursday." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 143-57.

AUGUST 27. In Circuit Court Crafton v. Dillon, appeal in which Lincoln represents defendant, is referred to three arbitrators. Later they find for plaintiff in sum of $67. Young v. Young is continued. Record.

AUGUST 30. Spear v. Humphreys, assumpsit suit, is submitted to jury of seven. Plaintiff then enters nonsuit. Lincoln & Herndon are attorneys for defendant. Lincoln is attorney for plaintiff in Furr v. Crafton, which is referred to arbitrators. Lincoln & Herndon file defendant's plea in Wallace v. Witmer and Langford, and writes defendants' affidavits. He writes

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and has sworn defendant's affidavit in Thomas Benbridge v. John Mitts. Ibid., Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

AUGUST 31. Lincoln writes and evidently mails to Blackburn, associate counsel in Paris, declaration in Burwell v. Dickerson, Edgar County case. Ibid.

SEPTEMBER 1. In Bruce v. Mallory, appeal, jury is waived and court finds for defendant. Lincoln and Boyd are plaintiff's attorneys. Weer and Ferguson, attorneys for defense in Gilman et al. v. Hamilton et al., are given leave to answer tomorrow. Lincoln and Smith are complainants' attorneys. Record. Lincoln has his carriage repaired ($7.25) at Lewis' shop. Obed Lewis Account Books.

SEPTEMBER 2. Weer and Ferguson file answer of defendants in Gilman et al. v. Hamilton et al. Record. Lincoln writes bill of exceptions, which T. L. Dickey signs, and jury instructions in Carpenter v. Alton & Sangamon Railroad. Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

SEPTEMBER 3. Some of defendants in Gilman et al. v. Hamilton et al. default, and Lincoln and Smith's bill is taken for confessed against them. Case is submitted to Judge Davis to be decided during vacation with both sides privileged to submit arguments in writing and appeal to Supreme Court. In McDonald v. Allen, action in debt, Lincoln & Herndon file defendant's affidavit and secure continuance. Record.

SEPTEMBER 4. In Riggs and Levering v. Murray and Hunt, assumpsit, Lincoln & Herndon withdraw pica of defendant Hunt. Ibid. Lincoln, defendant's attorney in People v. Loe, murder, writes Moses Loe's motion for change of venue from Sangamon County. Photo.

SEPTEMBER 6. Tilford v. Montgomery, appeal, is tried before court, which finds for plaintiff, Lincoln & Herndon's client, $14.25 and costs. Jury is also waived in Riggs and Levering v. Murray and Hunt, and court finds for plaintiff in sum of $678.28. Lincoln & Herndon are attorneys for defendant. Lincoln is foreman of jury in Derby & Co. v. Cary, which finds for plaintiff and awards damages of $760.48. Entitled to $1 for jury duty, Lincoln declines to collect. Herndon is losing defense attorney. Record.

SEPTEMBER 8. Lincoln writes court order in Jones v. Jones, divorce case. Photo.

SEPTEMBER 9. Potts v. May, chancery, is continued on complainant's motion. Photo.

SEPTEMBER 14. [Woodford Circuit Court case of Bryant v. Pool, Gridley, and Lincoln for defense, is continued on application of defendant's counsel. Record.]

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SEPTEMBER 15. Pekin. Tazewell Circuit Court convenes. On motion of Lincoln, Jones, and Saltonstall, for defendant, case of Grabb and Watts v. Wallace, stricken from docket Apr. 14, is reinstated and plaintiffs are ruled to file declaration. (See May 2, 1853.) Case is replevin suit. Prettyman is attorney for plaintiffs. Record.

SEPTEMBER 16. In Anthony v. Damerell, defendant defaults and appeal is dismissed with $3.09 damages to appellee whom Lincoln represents. In Hall v. Perkins, Lincoln files plaintiff's affidavit for continuance because of absence of material witness. Ibid; Photo.

SEPTEMBER 17. Pekin and Peoria. Erastus Briggs, agent Harris Lime Rock Co. v. Samuel B. Harris, attachment case, Lincoln for plaintiff, is "continued for publication" on his motion. Record. Concluding his court work, Lincoln goes to Peoria in evening to make campaign speech. "The Court House not being able to hold the throng, the speech was made outdoors — We are informed that it was a most capital speech, and told," reports Illinois Journal (Sept. 22). Peoria Democratic Press (Sept. 22), however, describes speech as "one of the most miserable failures we ever witnessed." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 158-59.

SEPTEMBER 18. Pekin. Back in court, Lincoln secures decree of foreclosure in Hamilton v. Haines et al. when defendants default. In Davis v. Hodge, appeal, Lincoln and Parker for plaintiff suffer nonsuit. Record. Smith v. Gains, tresspass, Saltonstall and Lincoln for plaintiff, is continued by agreement. Original owned by King Hostick, Springfield, Ill.

SEPTEMBER 20. "Our citizens were favored with a political address from Hon. David L. Gregg. . . . Mr. Gregg took the hide completely off that ‘old coon,’ whiggery, and buried its carcass so deep in the ‘ashes of despair,’ that the resurrection trump which Mr. Lincoln (who attempted to follow Mr. Gregg) attempted to sound, could not impart hearing into its ears, or give vitality to its prostrate and hidden carcass." Pekin Reveille, in Register, Sept. 25.

SEPTEMBER 21. Lincoln loses Eggleson v. Perkins, scire facias to revive judgment, when jury finds for plaintiff in amount of $110.45. Plaintiffs in People v. Hawley, indictment for obstructing road, enter nolle prosequl. Lincoln and Haines are defendant's attorneys. Record.

SEPTEMBER 22. Atchison v. City of Pekin, and Hamilton v. City of Pekin, continued at Apr. term, are again continued. (See May 3, 1853.) Ibid.

SEPTEMBER 23. Metamora. Woodford Circuit Court begins fall term. Lincoln wins appeal, Marteny v. McCloud, when jury awards plaintiff $10. Troster v. Brown, trespass, Lincoln for defendant, is continued. Ibid.

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SEPTEMBER 24. Lincoln and Peters win action for debt. People, use of Woodford County v. Dale, when jury finds for defendant. Plaintiff's motion for new trial is allowed. In Parke v. McManus, appeal, agreed judgment is entered for plaintiff for $30. Lincoln and Thorpe represent defendant. Gingrich v. Evans, trespass, Lincoln for plaintiff, is continued at defendant's cost with leave to file bill of discovery by Jan. 1, 1853. Ibid. Lincoln writes plaintiff's affidavit in Hoshor v. Lewis. Photo.

SEPTEMBER 25. Lincoln loses Ramsey v. Marteny, trespass, when jury awards plaintiff $13 and costs. Purple and Sanger are plaintiff's attorneys. Lincoln files plaintiff's affidavit in Hoshor v. Lewis, and case is continued. Record. He writes list of questions for witnesses in Bryant v. Pool, signing for Gridley, defense attorney. Photo.

SEPTEMBER 27. Bloomington. McLean Circuit Court convenes. In Brown et al. v. Sanford et al. defendants default and plaintiffs are awarded $1,239.84 damages. Record. Lincoln writes to Charles R. Welles, administrator of estate from which William Florville, Negro barber of Springfield, bought lots. Florville failed to have purchase recorded, and lost deed. To "get the thing fixed up," Lincoln needs Welles' signature on writ. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 159.

SEPTEMBER 28. Lincoln wins case for his old friend David Pantier, defendant in Flagg and Ewing v. Pander, assumpsit for $250 damages. Court hears evidence and instructs jury on law, whereupon plaintiffs enter nonsuit. Record. Lincoln writes and signs defendant's plea and agreement on evidence. Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

SEPTEMBER 30. Lincoln writes answer of John Shough, garnishee in Brown et al. v. Sanford et al. Stern & Friedman v. Sawyer, continued from spring term, is won by plaintiff, Lincoln and Fell, attorneys, when jury is called, defendant defaults, and jury awards $99.35 and costs. Ibid.; Record.

OCTOBER 1. In Brown et al. v. Sanford et al., decided Sept. 27, court orders that plaintiffs recover debts of $26 and $135 owed to defendant Booth. Ibid. [Lincoln subscribes to projected Illinois State University one scholarship ($300). He later pays $18 interest per year rather than pay pledge. Illinois State Historical Library, Springfield, Illinois — Journal, XXXI, 58-9.]

OCTOBER 2. Jurors are sworn in Hawks et al. v. Major, remanded from Supreme Court Jan. 27, 1851 and continued Apr. 23. Gridley, attorney for defense, presents affidavit for continuance, which is granted. Lincoln and Holmes appear for plaintiff. Record.

OCTOBER 4. Mt. Pulaski. Logan Circuit Court begins session. [On Oct. 27, Lincoln writes to L. M. Hays regarding case in this court, which shows he attended. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 160]

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OCTOBER 6. [In Nov. Lincoln, in reply to inquiry from A. L. Brewer, states that last spring he entered suit in Kelley v. estate of Blackledge in Logan Circuit Court. When Oct. term arrived, "behold, the Sheriff had not served the process. I ordered an alias for the next April term. It was all I could do." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 161.]

OCTOBER 7. Clinton. DeWitt Circuit Court convenes. On motion of Gridley and Lincoln, attorneys for complainant, leave is given to open depositions in chancery case of Harrold et al. v. Montgomery et al. (See May 21, 1853.) Record.

OCTOBER 8. Lincoln enters appearance of defendants in Hickox v. Walter and Walter and consents to foreclosure decree. In Shields v. Sampson, court finds for plaintiff, Lincoln's client, in sum of $80.53. Lincoln defends Moses Loe on charge of murder. On his motion and affidavit, case is continued. Loe is to be kept in Sangamon County jail until trial. Lincoln writes affidavit of accused, and of E. D. Meacham, prosecution witness, and writes continuance in court record. Gampbell v. Warner, ejectment, Lincoln and Moore for defense, is also continued, by consent, at plaintiff's cost. (See May 19, 1853.) Ibid.; Photo.

OCTOBER 11. Monticello. Change of venue to Menard County is granted Thorpe v. Thorpe. Entry in record is in Lincoln's handwriting. He and Emerson are attorneys for complainant. Four cases of People v. Hollingsworth — three charges of selling liquor and one of assault with deadly weapon — are continued on Lincoln's motion. Record in assault case is also in his handwriting. Record. Lincoln writes and files defendant's affidavit in Jordan v. Thorpe, involving alleged castration of bull, "change of condition," as Lincoln puts it, "by which he ceased to be a bull." Photo.

OCTOBER 12. Lincoln writes second affidavit for Moses Thorpe, plaintiff in Thorpe v. Rice. Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

OCTOBER 13. Urbana. Williams and Lincoln lose assumpsit suit, Barnett v. Bishop, when jury finds for defendant. Their motion for new trial is rejected. Matheny v. McKee, appeal, is dismissed by agreement between Somers for plaintiff and Lincoln for defendant. Liggett v. Frazier, trespass, change of venue from Vermilion, Lincoln for defense, is tried by jury, which fails to agree and case is continued. Record.

OCTOBER 14. ["From a correspondent at Pekin, who has traveled over every county of the 4th District," reports Journal, "we have received a letter which states that Knox's prospects are highly flattering, and adds, The hope is entertained in this section, that Illinois May be carried for Scott. Bebb has performed wonders. — Linder, Lincoln and Knox, have done good service. The question, however, is asked, ‘What of the South?’"]

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OCTOBER 15. Somers and Murphy sign and file plaintiff's replication in Burt v. Jennings. Replication is in handwriting of Lincoln, attorney for defendant. Defendant is accused of attacking plaintiff with knife, cutting him and impairing his sight. Jury awards plaintiff five˘ damages. Lincoln also writes and files defendant's answer in Burt v. Owings. Photo.

OCTOBER 16. Lincoln writes and files cross bill for defendants in Covey v. Moss and Rhodes, and writes court order. Photo.

OCTOBER 18. Danville. Vermilion Circuit Court begins. In People v. Bailey, indictment for selling whiskey, continued from last term, leave is given to open depositions. Lincoln, Lamon and Davis are conducting defense. Record.

OCTOBER 19. Lincoln and Peters win appeal, Simpson v. McCormack, when court finds for plaintiff in amount of $45. Lamon is attorney for defense. Frazier v. Davis, assumpsit, is dismissed by agreement at defendant's costs. Attorneys are Murphy for plaintiff, Lincoln and Peters for defendant. Four other cases are continued. Ibid. Lincoln writes, and Judge Davis signs, court decree in Courtney v. Crable. In Piper v. Piper et al., Lincoln writes and files separate answer of John Piper, defendant. Photo.; Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

OCTOBER 27. Springfield. Lincoln writes to L. M. Hays: "At our [Logan] court, just past; I could have got a judgment against Turley, if I had pressed to the utmost; but I am really sorry for him — poor and a cripple as he is. He begged time to try to find evidence to prove that the deceased on his death bed, ordered the note to be given up to him or destroyed. I do not suppose he will get any such evidence, but I allowed him till next court to try." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 160. Lincoln pays $94 cash on his bill at Obed Lewis' carriage shop. Obed Lewis Account Books.

OCTOBER 28. Logan, Lincoln, and Williams file complainant's amended bill in Bank of Missouri v. Caldwell et al. in U.S. Circuit Court, alleging that bank loaned Shawneetown officials money in 1837 to improve river bank, secured by mortgages on lots. Principal and interest of $38,311.29 is allegedly owed bank, and complainant asks lot owners to pay. This hopeless case has long been in courts, without Lincoln's assistance. Record. At state house Judge Robbins and Lincoln reply to speech made by Douglas in afternoon. Democrats try "to disturb the meeting by hallooing at the door and firing crackers in the hall." But Robbins "did his part up effectually. Lincoln put in a few good licks. The meeting adjourned till the next night, with three cheers for Scott, . . . Graham, and . . . Dick Yates!" Illinois Journal, Oct. 30.

OCTOBER 29. Leonard Swett, Whig presidential elector, speaks at courthouse. "He was fully posted up on the topics of the day, and secured the

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attention of the densely crowded room for more than three hours." Ibid., Nov. 11. Lincoln is probably present.

OCTOBER 30. Lincoln replies more fully to Douglas' speech. "We might go on in a further examination of the speech of Judge Douglas," says Illinois Journal in announcing meeting. "But that matter is in abler hands. . . . A full post mortem examination will take place to-night, at the Court House, under the hands of that skillful operator, ABRAHAM LINCOLN."

NOVEMBER 1. Article in "Register" induces Lincoln, B. S. Edwards, and Logan to write and publish opinion on Illinois election laws with respect to challenged votes. Their opinion, in which Judge Treat concurs, is that "any person taking the oath prescribed in the act of 1849, is entitled to vote, unless counter proof be made, satisfying a majority of the Judges that such oath is untrue." Illinois Journal, Nov. 2; The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 160.

NOVEMBER 2. Lincoln and Noah Johnston, appointed commissioners under act of legislature of June 22 to take evidence in relation to claims against Illinois and Michigan Canal, write notice, to be published in Chicago, Joliet, and Ottawa papers, informing claimants that they will meet at Ottawa on Dec. 3 to take evidence. Illinois Reports, 1853, No. 9. Lincoln writes, has Judge Davis sign, and mails to Clinton bill of exceptions in People v. Hinkle, indictment for improper sale of liquor. Photo.

NOVEMBER 4. Complainants in Bank of Missouri v. Caldwell et al. file copy of mortgage mentioned in their amended bill. Record.

NOVEMBER 5. Shelbyville. Complainants in Stewartson v. Stewartson file replication written by Lincoln and signed by Moulton. Case is action for divorce. Photo.

NOVEMBER 6. Jury grants complainant's petition for divorce in Stewartson v. Stewartson and awards $50 annual alimony. Decree of court is in Lincoln's handwriting. Photo. In Alderson v. Noland et al., trespass vi et armis, plaintiff fails to file security for costs, as ordered by court, and case is dismissed. Lincoln is attorney for defendants, whose pleas he writes and files. Record; Photo.

NOVEMBER 8. [Moultrie Circuit Court begins its session at Sullivan.]

NOVEMBER 10. [Danville. On July 6, 1853 Iroquois Journal of Middleport contains notice of this date that "Lincoln & Lamon, Attorneys at Law, having formed a co-partnership, will practice in the Courts of the Eighth Judicial Circuit, and the Superior Court, and all business entrusted to them will be attended to with promptness and fidelity. Office on the second floor of the ‘Barnum Building,’ over Whitcomb's Store."]

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NOVEMBER 11. [Macon Circuit Court convenes at Decatur.]

NOVEMBER 12. Decatur. In Turpin v. Wilson, jury is waived and court orders that plaintiff recover $5 and costs. Defendant, Lincoln's client, appealed from justice's decision awarding plaintiff same amount "for injuries done to one large sow and pigs by dogs." Lincoln and Thorpe take nonsuit with leave to reinstate in Peck v. Froman, trespass. Record.

NOVEMBER 13. Lincoln writes, signs, and files defendant's plea in Moffett v. Moffett, ejectment suit. In Peck v. Froman, in which nonsuit with leave to reinstate was entered Nov. 12, he joins issue on defendant's plea. Lincoln loses John Hanks v. Joshua Hanks, trespass, when plaintiff dismisses case. He also loses Taylor v. Rea, sheriff, when court upholds plea that Sheriff Rea owes plaintiff $167.27 due on execution against John B. Moffett's real estate. Two cases, Lucinda Brown, assignee of Anderson v. Froman et al., and John G. Taylor v. John B. Mofiett, in which Lincoln represents defendants, are continued. Record; Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

NOVEMBER 15. Taylorville. State's attorney enters nolle proseqin in three criminal cases in which Lincoln is attorney for defendants, — People v. Davis and People v. Chick, indictments for cutting timber, and People v. Brown, assault with deadly weapon. Lincoln loses two appeals — Long v. Duncan and Lloyd v. Ward. He files two pleas for defendant in Lemon v. Hargis. Record; Photo.

NOVEMBER 16. Lemon v. Hargis, in which plaintiff accuses Lincoln's client of unlawfully detaining four oxen, and demands $100 damages, is referred to umpires. Lincoln writes and files bond for costs in Page v. Tanner. In Markwell v. Harworth he writes and files affidavit for continuance. He loses Masterson v. Northcutt, trespass, when jury finds defendant not guilty. Record; Photo.

NOVEMBER 17. Shelbyville. Moulton and Lincoln for complainant and Thorton for defendant in Stewartson v. Stewartson, in which divorce was granted Nov. 6, file agreement stating that certain lands, bought by defendant with his wife's money and entered in her name, have been released to defendant with lien in favor of complainant to insure payment of alimony. Record. Lincoln writes agreement. Photo. Lincoln writes note to Anson L. Brewer, Ohio attorney, on developments in Kelly v. Blackledge. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 161.

NOVEMBER 18. Shelbyvllle and Springfield. Lincoln and Campbell leave for Springfield to seek of governor pardon for John Furrow and Thomas Rice, convicted in Oct. in Vermilion Circuit Court. Illinois State Historical Library, Springfield, Illinois — David Davis Papers, Illinois State Historical Library, Springfield, Illinois, letter of David Davis, Nov. 15, 1852. Photo.

NOVEMBER 22. Springfield. Lincoln writes petition to governor for pardon of John A. L. Grockett, convicted of manslaughter and imprisoned, on ground that prisoner is feeble-minded. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 161-62.

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NOVEMBER 24. Lincoln writes affidavit of Jacob Bunn, summons and capias in Bunn v. Houghton, assumpsit, Sangamon Circuit Court. Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

NOVEMBER 29. In margin of record book opposite Cantrall mortgage of Nov. 28, 1851, Lincoln writes: "Satisfied in full, this 29th day of November 1852. Witness my hand and seal. A. Lincoln." Book HH, 148; The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 162.

NOVEMBER 30. Springfield and en route to Naples. Lincoln leaves for Ottawa where he and Noah Johnston are to sit as commissioners to hear claims against Illinois and Michigan Canal. He goes by way of Naples and Illinois River. Illinois Reports, 1853, No. 9.

DECEMBER 3. Ottawa. Lincoln and Johnston take oath prescribed in act of legislature of June 22, 1852, whereby they were appointed commissioners to hear canal claims (see Nov. 2, 1852). Edwin S. Leland, judge of Ninth Circuit, administers oath. Ibid.

DECEMBER 4. P. Lindley, recorder of circuit court of LaSalle County, certifies correctness of abstract submitted as evidence before Lincoln and Johnston. Ibid.

DECEMBER 6. Lincoln and Johnston engage R. E. Goodell as clerk. They have rented sheriff's office and are conducting hearings there. Ibid.

DECEMBER 7. Lincoln and Johnston continue to hear claims.

DECEMBER 8. Chicago. "Noah Johnston, Esq., of Mt. Vernon, and Abraham Lincoln, Esq., of Springfield, Commissioners to take testimony in the case of Canal Claimants, arrived in this City on Wednesday last." Chicago Democratic Press, Dec. 10.

DECEMBER 9. Lincoln and Johnston hear claims against canal. Ibid. December 10. Lincoln and Johnston continue hearings. Ibid.

DECEMBER 11. "The Commission to take testimony for the state, relative to claims for damages to contractors on the Canal, has been in session at the Canal office for the past few days, and from the natural course of procedure we should judge its labors would close without prolonged delay." Chicago Journal.

DECEMBER 13. [In Springfield, opening of Supreme Court, scheduled for today, is postponed because of absence of Justices Caton and Trumbull. Register, Dec. 14.]

DECEMBER 14. Chicago? Lincoln and Johnston leave for Springfield to

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continue hearings. Date of departure cannot be determined, but it was probably during this week. Illinois Reports, 1853, No. 9.

DECEMBER 15. [Supreme Court begins its session in Springfield with Justices Treat and Trumbull on bench. Register, Dec. 16. Justice Caton does not arrive from Ottawa until night. "The different wagons he rode in on the trip down broke down seven times and a Troy coach upset with him, injuring his head badly." Ibid., Dec. 18.]

DECEMBER 17. Springfield. Lincoln and Johnston reach Springfield, where adjourned canal hearings resume Dec. 20. Ibid., Dec. 20.

DECEMBER 20. Lincoln and Johnston resume hearings, "and will continue . . . probably two weeks." Ibid.

DECEMBER 31. Lincoln deposits $3.31 cash at Robert Irwin's, probably to balance his account. Irwin Ledger.

1853

JANUARY 3. Springfield. [Legislature convenes for regular session.]

JANUARY 5. Lincoln and Doughty withdraw their plea in Norton v. Gorden, before U.S. Circuit Court July 8, 1852, and defendant defaults. Plaintiff is awarded $1,068.39 debt and $641.92 damages. Logan is attorney for plaintiff. In Supreme Court, Casey v. Casey, appeal from Jefferson County, is set for hearing tomorrow. Record.

JANUARY 6. Scates commences argument for plaintiff in Casey v. Casey, bill in chancery to set aside transfer of inheritance on ground of fraud, Lower court entered decree in accordance with bill. Scates, Logan, and Lincoln represent plaintiff. Nelson defendant. Ibid.

JANUARY 7. Scates continues his argument in Casey v. Casey. He is followed by Nelson for defendant. Ibid. Lincoln and Johnston submit report of investigation of Illinois and Michigan Canal claims to legislature. Lincoln also presents his account — $65 for travel and four dollars a day for 21 days service. Illinois Reports, 1853, No. 9; The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 162-87.

JANUARY 8. Nelson concludes argument for defense in Casey v. Casey. Record.

JANUARY 10. Lincoln concludes for plaintiff in Casey v. Casey. Lincoln writes Gov. Matteson recommending pardon for William D. Davis,

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sentenced to three years for manslaughter in July 1850, and whom Lincoln then defended (see July 1, 1850). The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 187-88. In afternoon Gov. Matteson is inaugurated. At night Ralph Waldo Emerson speaks on "The Anglo-Saxon" in House of Representatives. Browning, Diary.

JANUARY 11. [Emerson speaks on "Power." After his address ladies of First Presbyterian Church give supper in Senate Chamber. Lincoln is probably present. Ibid.]

JANUARY 12. [Members of legislature go in body to Alton on railroad. Lincoln may have gone along, although U.S. Court remains in session. Emerson delivers third lecture. Ibid.]

JANUARY 14. Lincoln is counsel for appellants in two related cases — Ross v. Irving, and Pryor v. Irving — before Supreme Court. Cases involve constitutionality of "occupying claimants' law," pertaining to manner of assessing value of improvements on land. Williams argues for appellants, Blackwell and Grimshaw for appellees. Record. Lincoln writes and signs rejoinder in Wallace v. Witmer and Langford, Sangamon Circuit Court case. Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

JANUARY 15. Lincoln concludes for appellants in Ross v. Irving, and Pryor v. Irving. On Feb. 2, Supreme Court decides that method of determining value of improvements by commissioners is unconstitutional, thus reversing Pike Circuit Court. 14 Ill. 171-83. Lincoln writes to N. W. Edwards: "Please pay N. W. Edwards & Co. eighty dollars, which will be in full of interest on your note till 1st May 1853." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 188.

JANUARY 19. Lincoln writes and signs petition for Supreme Court review of Alton & Sangamon Railroad v. Carpenter. Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

JANUARY 21. Lincoln writes and signs assignment of errors and writes part of transcript of instructions to jury in Alton & Sangamon v. Baugh. Ibid.

JANUARY 23. Lincoln attends temperance lecture by Rev. James Smith, D. D., pastor of First Presbyterian Church. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 188.

JANUARY 24. Lincoln and 38 others write to Dr. Smith: "The undersigned having listened with great satisfaction to the discourse, on the subject of temperance, delivered by you on last evening, and believing, that, if published and circulated among the people, it would be productive of good; would respectfully request a copy thereof for publication." Ibid.

JANUARY 25. "Commenced trial of case of Holloway v. Frink, Walker & Co. in the U.S. Court," records Browning in his Diary. "Lincoln & self for Pltf, Logan & Edwards for Deft-Weather has been cool & dry for several days. Quite cold tonight." Mrs. Lincoln buys and charges $8.80 worth of "Goods" at John Williams' store. H. E. Pratt, 146.

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JANUARY 26. "About as cold a day as we have had this season," Browning writes. "Concluded the trial of Holloway v. Frink, Walker & Co." Ibid.

JANUARY 27. Lincoln appears for appellant in Alton & Sangamon v. Baugh. He writes bill of exceptions, which T. L. Dickey signs. On Feb. 2, Supreme Court decides that company, after payment of damages for right of way, is not bound to construct fences along its road and that proprietors of land cannot place obstructions or cattle guards along it. Decision affirms judgment of Sangamon Circuit Court. Record; 14 Ill. 211; Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

JANUARY 28. By agreement defendant in Northup v. Brown is given leave to file his plea in U.S. Circuit Court. Williams and Lawrence are attorneys for plaintiff. Browning, Bushnell and Lincoln for defendant. Record.

JANUARY 29. Lincoln for plaintiff and Logan and Edwards for defendant try Alton & Sangamon v. Carpenter before Supreme Court. Issue is whether benefit to adjoining land from construction of railroad should be deducted in determining value of right of way. On Feb. 2, court decides in affirmative, reversing Sangamon Circuit Court. Record; 14, Ill. 190-93. Lincoln buys boys' cap and "1 5/8 yds. Jaconet" at John Williams' store. H. E. Pratt, 146.

JANUARY 31. About this date Lincoln receives letter from John A. Rockwell who solicits his aid in obtaining coal mining charter from legislature. "Being very busy in the Courts when your letter reached me," Lincoln later explains, "I let a few days slip before attending to it." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 190-91.

FEBRUARY 1. Lincoln substitutes for defendant's attorney, Ballance of Peoria, in Forsyth v. Barton in U.S. Circuit Court. Record.

FEBRUARY 2. Lincoln and Scates lose Casey v. Casey, before Supreme Court Jan. 6-9, when court decides that complainant fraudulently purchased defendant's interest in estate for $75, knowing it to be worth $1,294.47. Judgment for defendant, rendered by lower court, is affirmed. Record; 14 Ill., 112-28. Lincoln buys blankets, muslin, tape, and buttons ($10.51) at John Williams' store. H. E. Pratt, 146.

FEBRUARY 3. Lincoln writes part of Robert J. Blackwell's affidavit for Grubb v. Fink & Co., and has it sworn before Judge Treat. He writes and signs notice that depositions of R. C. Hall and William Dana will be taken for case. Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

FEBRUARY 4. Lincoln writes bill granting coal mining charter to John A. Rockwell and associates. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 189-91.

FEBRUARY 5. Coal mining charter is introduced in Senate. Senate Journal;

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The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 189-90.

FEBRUARY 7. Lincoln writes and swears his own affidavit in Grubb v. Fink &Co. Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

FEBRUARY 8. Lincoln buys $2.06 in merchandise. Irwin Ledger.

FEBRUARY 9. Lincoln's coal mining charter passes Senate 21 to 1. Senate Journal. Lincoln buys quilt, cloth, and thread ($8.07) at John Williams' store. H. E. Pratt, 146.

FEBRUARY 11. House passes — 56-2 — bill making town of Lincoln county seat of Logan County in place of Mt. Pulasld. Bill is introduced in Senate. Latham and Hickox, proprietors of town, who named it after Lincoln, retained him to see to drawing of bill and its passage by legislature. House and Senate Journals; Lawrence B. Stringer (ed), History of Logan County, I, 221.

FEBRUARY 12. Senate unanimously passes bill making town of Lincoln Logan County seat. Ibid.

FEBRUARY 14. Lincoln writes to Solon Cumins of Grand Detour about "Mr. Adams' business," in U.S. Court. "I shall be very glad if you will ascertain, and put down in writing, exactly what Bradshaw will swear, on the question of Denny having been paid for the land with Adams' money, & also, as to whether Adams, when he took the deed, had any knowledge of Kemper's judgment against Bradshaw." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 190. [Legislature adjourns.]

FEBRUARY 15. Lincoln writes to John A. Rockwell for whom he attempted to secure coal mining charter. It "was lost for want of time. No one was opposed to it, but every one was much more anxious about some other Bill. . . . If you continue to desire it, I will get it passed at the next Session — it being borne in mind that at a called. Session the door may not be opened for such business." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 190-91.

FEBRUARY 21. Lincoln buys $1.25 fork at John Williams' store. H. E. Pratt, 146.

FEBRUARY 23. Lincoln writes and signs defendants' demurrer in Kelly v. Wells and Wells. Photo.

FEBRUARY 24. Lincoln & Herndon file bill of complaint in Levi Cantrall v. Stephen Cantrall in Sangamon Circuit Court. Complainant prays permision of court to sell real estate belonging to his son, defendant, to help pay cost of his maintenance. Photo.

FEBRUARY 26. Lincoln writes two legal forms for taking deposition in Wallace v. Witmer and Langford, Sangamon Circuit Court case. Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

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MARCH 1. Lincoln opens bank account at Springfield Marine and Fire Insurance Company. Robert Irwin receives his deposit of $310. Marine Bank Ledger. He writes and signs bill to foreclose in Gray v. Stover, Sangamon Circuit Court. Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

MARCH 2. Lincoln and his wife convey north half of lot 12 and all of lot 13 in block 7 of Iles' addition to Springfield to Alexander Graham for $375. Lincoln bought both lots June 2, 1838, for $300. On Mar. 30, 1850 he sold 20 feet of lot 12 for $125. (Lot 12 is 4th 40 feet on west side of 8th Street north of Jackson. Lot 13 is 4th 40 feet on west side of 8th south of Capitol.) Deed Record KK, 356-57.

MARCH 3. Lincoln buys $7 wheelbarrow from his carriage maker. Obed Lewis Account Books.

MARCH 7. Lincoln buys and charges piece of wallpaper border. H. E. Pratt, 146.

MARCH 8. Lincoln writes Usher F. Linder of Charleston that he cannot attend Edgar Circuit Court this spring, and suggests Linder handle "a little Ejectment case" for him. "I have been paid a little fee. Now I dislike to keep their money without doing the service; & I also hate to disgorge." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 191. Lincoln returns for credit wallpaper bought yesterday. H. E. Pratt, 146.

MARCH 10. Lincoln writes and files, probably by mail, bond of M. P. Goodrich and Deal Davis in People v. Goodrich, Christian Circuit Court case. Photo.

MARCH 15. Lincoln writes injunction bond of Solomon Cross for Smallwood et al. v. Allen, and evidently mails it to Clinton. Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. Lincoln buys another piece of wallpaper (45˘). H. E. Pratt, 146.

MARCH 17. Lincoln buys 92˘ worth of gingham. Ibid.

MARCH 19. Lincoln writes to W. D. Briggs, attorney in Tazewell County, telling him how to proceed in attachment case about which Briggs asked his advice. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 192. Lincoln buys cambric and "Jaconet" ($2.13). H. E. Pratt, 146.

MARCH 21. Sixteen of Lincoln & Herndon's cases are called as Sangamon Circuit Court convenes. They dismiss two, their opponents dismiss four, and one is dismissed by agreement. Motions or picas are filed in seven other cases, and one is continued. Lincoln loses Crafton v. Dillon when court affirms decision of justice's court and enters judgment of $67 for plaintiff. Record. Lincoln writes bill in chancery in Mitts v. Benbridge, which plaintiff signs and swears. Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

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MARCH 22. Another busy day in court with 21 Lincoln & Herndon cases on docket. They dismiss three and win two by default. In Archer G. Herndon v. Bryan, action in trover, agreed judgment for $107.50 is entered for their client, plaintiff. They win appeal — Strickland v. Nagle — when jury finds for defendant. Motions or pleas are entered in six other cases and eight are set for hearing. Record.

MARCH 23. Thirteen Lincoln & Herndon cases come before Circuit Court. Two appeals are tried by court, which finds for plaintiffs, their clients, in sums of $11.60 and $82.45 respectively. They dismiss four cases, file motions or pleas in five others, and two are continued. Ibid.

MARCH 24. Eight Lincoln & Herndon cases come up in Circuit Court. Four are appeals from justice courts. Of these plaintiffs, their opponents, dismiss one, they win one and lose two. Lincoln and Taylor dismiss assumpsit suit. Pleas are filed or motions entered in remaining cases. Ibid. Lincoln buys 25˘ worth of oilcloth. H. E. Pratt, 146.

MARCH 25. Twelve Lincoln & Herndon cases come before circuit court, but only two are concluded. In Webster, Marsh & o. v. Gobb et al. Lincoln & Herndon, for defendants, default and damages of $943.97 are awarded plaintiffs. In Archer v. Duff, slander, jury finds for plaintiff, their client, and assesses his damages at one cent. Ibid.

MARCH 26. By agreement Josiah Francis is appointed receiver in chancery case of Shepherd v. Lamb et al. Lincoln & Herndon represent defendant. Lincoln & Logan lose assumpsit suit, Spear v. Humphreys, when jury finds for plaintiff and assesses his damages at $111.71 (see Apr. 2, 1853). Ibid.

MARCH 27. Lincoln writes guardian's answer in Sarah Jane Lewis et al. v. Parmelia Ann Lewis et al. Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

MARCH 28. In Allen v. Chicago & Mississippi Railroad Co., appeal from assessment for right of way, jury assesses plaintiff's damages at $2,100. Lincoln & Herndon represent railroad. Record. Lincoln writes case record in Moffett v. Warren, chancery concerning land, and writes replication in Johnson v. McMullan. Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. Lincoln writes to Henry E. Dummer of Beardstown: "Inclosed please find three dollars — the smallest sum I could send by mail for the $2.50 you kindly advanced for me; which please accept, together with my thanks, and offer to reciprocate." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 192.

MARCH 29. Lincoln & Herndon win two chancery cases by default. One is foreclosure suit, other petition to sell real estate to pay estate debts. In Shoup v. Shoup, complainants, whom they represent, are awarded lands for which deed has been lost. They file reasons for quashing writ of certiorari in Glynn v. Glynn. Record.

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MARCH 30. Twenty-seven Lincoln & Herndon cases are called in court, They win four by default, five are dismissed, and five continued. They lose attachment suit for $125 and win replevin suit with one cent damages. Motions or pleas are filed in remaining cases. Ibid. Lincoln buys 31˘ worth of oilcloth. H. E. Pratt, 146.

MARCH 31. Lincoln & Herndon appear in four cases in Circuit Court. Defendants in Gambrell v. Gambrell et al., partition suit, default and lands in question are ordered divided. Lincoln & Herndon represent complainant. Pleas are filed in other cases. Record.

APRIL 1. Lincoln & Herndon have eight cases in Circuit Court. They win four, dismiss one, lose one by default, and two are continued. Ibid.

APRIL 2. Lincoln & Herndon conclude busy fortnight with 13 cases in Circuit Court. In People v. Williams, murder, they file plea of not guilty. In Spear v. Humphreys, which Logan and Lincoln lost Mar. 26, they file bill of exceptions and are allowed appeal to Supreme Court. They lose third case by default. Of remaining cases, two are dismissed, motions or pleas are filed in four, and four are continued. Ibid.

APRIL 4. Thomas (Tad), fourth child of Abraham and Mary Lincoln, is born. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, I, 304. [Logan Circuit Court convenes at Mt. Pulaski.]

APRIL 7. Lincoln writes and Judge Davis signs bill of exceptions in Spear and Spear v. Humphries. Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

APRIL 8. Lincoln withdraws $310 from his account at Springfield Marine and Fire Insurance Company. Marine Bank Ledger. Lincoln sells to William M. Dorman for $100 quarter section of land in Gallatin County on which Lincoln took mortgage as guarantee of his fee in Dorman v. Lane, begun in 1842. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 193.

APRIL 11. Bloomington. McLean Circuit Court begins its session. Bloomington Intelligencer notes following lawyers "from abroad": Campbell, Lincoln and Stuart of Springfield, Jones of Tazewell, and Moore of DeWitt; "a large amount of business is to be disposed of."

APRIL 12. In Hawks et al. v. Major, before court Oct. 2, 1852, jury is unable to agree and is discharged. Lincoln & Holmes are attorneys for plaintiff, Gridley for defendant. Record.

APRIL 13. Lincoln and Lacey for plaintiff and Gridley and Stuart for defendant try Campbell v. Weed, action in covenant, before court. Court takes it under advisement. Ibid.

APRIL 15. Lincoln writes and files amendment of defendants' petition in Houser v. Illinois Central. Ibid., Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

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APRIL 16. Plaintiff in Houser v. Illinois Central, appeal on petition for right of way, moves court to set aside report of commissioners. Motion is denied. Record.

APRIL 18. Paris. Noblett v. Duck, action on covenant, before court May 17, 1852, is dismissed. Emerson and Steele represent plaintiff, Lincoln and Benedict defendant. Leave is granted to open depositions in Paddock v. Snyder, assumpsit suit in which Lincoln and Benedict are for defendant. Ibid.

APRIL 19. Benedict for plaintiff and Lincoln, Dill, Emerson and Steele for defendants agree to dismiss Jaquith v. Larkin and Burr, assumpsit suit continued at last term. Ibid.

APRIL 20. In James v. Redinan et al., and Burwell v. Dickerson, Lincoln secures rules on defendants to plead by tomorrow. He writes court order continuing Davidson v. Baily. Ibid.

APRIL 22. In Henderson v. Reed, assumpsit suit, jury is waived and case is submitted to court, which takes it under advisement. Lincoln & Benedict are attorneys for plaintiff. Court later awards their client $100 damages and costs. Ibid.

APRIL 25. Metamora. On opening day of Woodford Circuit Court, Lincoln is appointed guardian ad litem in John F. Fields v. Rhoda Fields et al., petition for partition. He annotates sheriff's return in Hall v. Wilson, bill to perfect title, and files demurrer, for defendant, in Troster v. Simpson, trespass. Ibid., Photo.

APRIL 26. Two cases in which Lincoln represents defendants — Troster v. Simpson, and People, use of Woodford County v. Dale — are dismissed by agreement. Defendant in bastardy case, O'Neal v. Amrine, who is represented by Lincoln, Thorpe, and Cooper, gives bond for his appearance at next term. Lincoln and Shope dismiss Danforth v. Woodford County, appeal. Smith v. Moore, appeal, Lincoln for defendant, is continued at plaintiff's costs. Record.

APRIL 27. Jennings v. Woodford County, appeal from assessment for right of way, is tried by jury, which finds for plaintiff and awards $105 damages. Lincoln writes court order. Ibid.

APRIL 28. Smith v. Moore, appeal, is partially settled by agreement on judgment for $9 and costs. Lincoln acts for defendant. Ibid.

MAY 2. Pekin. Tazewell Circuit Court convenes. Lincoln, Jones, and Saltonstall, representing defendant in Crabb and Watts v. Wallace, before court Sept. 15, 1852, enter motion to quash writ issued for want of declaration

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filed in season. Lincoln files defendant's plea in Smith v. Parmelee. Ibid., Photo.

MAY 3. Motion entered yesterday in Crabb and Watts v. Wallace is argued and denied. Hamilton v. City of Pekin, and Atchinson v. City of Pekin, before court Sept. 22, 1852, are dismissed by agreement. In Harris Lime Rock Co. v. Harris, defendant defaults. Lincoln and Briggs are attorneys for plaintiff. Plaintiff's damages are later fixed at $5,000. Record.

MAY 4. Moore and Lincoln lose assumpsit suit of Wisner v. Sanger & Co. when jury finds for plaintiff in amount of $391.90. Prettyman for plaintiff and Jones and Lincoln for defendant try ejectment case, Reeves v. Wilkey (see May 9, 1853). Defendant in Smith v. Gains secures rule on Lincoln and Saltonstall to file bond for costs. Ibid. Lincoln telegraphs Mason Brayman, Springfield, Illinois Central attorney, that he "cannot go to Jonesboro." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 194.

MAY 5. Defendant in Smith v. Gains files plea of not guilty but Lincoln and Saltonstall win case when jury finds for plaintiff and assesses his damages at $100. Suit is action for trespass. Record.

MAY 6. Motions or pleas are filed in three cases in which Lincoln is retained — Kellogg v. Flint, Snell v. Ludwig et al., and Ruble v. Cashman — but none comes to trial. Ibid.

MAY 7. Lincoln for plaintiff in Ruble v. Cashman, appeal, agrees to continuance. Ibid.

MAY 9. Lincoln and Parker win Crittenden v. Sweeney, trover and conversion, when jury finds for plaintiff in sum of $300. Reeves v. Wilkey, tried on 4th, is decided in favor of plaintiff. Third case is settled by agreement. With important rape case coming on for trial, court orders Lincoln to act as prosecutor for remainder of term. Record. He writes indictment of Thomas Delany Watlen, signing "Lincoln atty Pro tem." Photo.

MAY 10. Lincoln is prosecutor in People v. Watlen. Defendant is accused of raping seven-year-old girl. Jury brings in verdict of guilty and court sentences accused to penitentiary for 18 years. Record. "A mob came very near getting possession of the base wretch and hanging him." Register, May 14. In Crabb and Watts v. Wallace, jury finds defendant, Lincoln's client, not guilty of detaining plaintiff's cattle. Record.

MAY 11. Fuller, attorney for plaintiff in Smith v. Parmelee, enters nonsuit. Lincoln is attorney for defendant. Ibid. He writes and files defendant's affidavit in Flint v. Kellogg, and writes court decree in Jennings v. Woodford County. Photo.

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MAY 12. In Chapman v. Durham, Lincoln secures decree of foreclosure to satisfy debt of $149.40. Decree is in his handwriting. He also writes court order in Doolittle et al. v. Reeves et al., chancery. Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.; Record; Photo. Lincoln writes to Joshua R. Stanford regarding conveyance of two lots, holders of which are in danger of losing title unless Stanford's testimony will show that he made conveyance as attorney for former owner and accounted for proceeds of sale. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 194.

MAY 13. Lincoln is for defendant in Prettyman v. Stoltz, which is continued on plaintiff's motion. In Hatch v. Preston and Wightman he writes bill of evidence and exceptions, has Judge Davis sign, and court adjourns. Record; Photo.

MAY 16. [DeWitt Circuit Court begins its session at Clinton.]

MAY 17. Clinton. Stuart and Moore, for defendant, move to dismiss Barger v. Illinois Central Railroad, appeal from assessment for damages for right of way. Lincoln and Swett, for plaintiff, resist motion, and it is overruled. Record.

MAY 19. Murder case of People v. Loe comes to trial. Jury brings in verdict of manslaughter against Lincoln's client. Court sentences him to eight years in Alton penitentiary, three months to be served in solitary confinement and remainder at hard labor. Ibid. [Four years later (Aug. 18, 1857) Lincoln writes petition for pardon. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 414.]

MAY 20. Lincoln and Moore lose McConnel v. Campbell et al. when jury finds defendants guilty of trespass vi et armis and assesses plaintiffs damages at $50. In Sawyer et al. v. Hayworth et al., agreed judgment for $117.82 is entered for plaintiff, their client. Case is action in assumpsit. Record.

MAY 21. In Harrold et al. v. Montgomery et al., Moore, for defendants, files exceptions to complainants' depositions. After argument, exceptions are sustained. Lincoln and Gridley appear for complainants. Lincoln argues against motion by defendant to dissolve injunction in Smallwood et al. v. Allen. It is overruled. (See Oct. 18, 21, 1853.) Ibid.

MAY 23. Decatur? On motion, Post and Lincoln, attorneys for plaintiff in John Hanks v. Joshua B. Hanks, trespass, are given leave to amend their declaration. Ibid. [Champaign Circuit Court convenes at Urbana.]

MAY 24. Urbana. Lincoln writes plaintiff's affidavit in Strong v. Thomas et al., and lists 47 heirs in case. Photo. [In Decatur, Brown v. Peck and Peck is settled without trial. Lincoln's name on docket as defendants' attorney is crossed out and replaced by Thorpe, indicating that Lincoln is not present. Record.]

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MAY 25. Urbana? [Record of this term of Champaign Circuit Court does not give specific dates for various cases. Among other cases, he represents plaintiff in Illinois Central v. McGinnis, appeal. Jury awards defendant $37.50 for damages sustained by construction of roadbed over his lands. (See June 4, 1853.) Ibid.

MAY 26. Danville. In evening Lincoln receives letter from G. B. Kinkead of Lexington, Ky., forwarded from Springfield by N. W. Edwards, which informs him that Oldham & Hemingway, surviving partners of Oldham, Todd & Co. of Lexington, have entered suit against Lincoln, Edwards, and Kinkead in Fayette Circuit Court, Ky. Their charge against Lincoln is that he failed to account for $472.54 he collected for them. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II. 194.

MAY 27. Vermilion Circuit Court begins its session. Lincoln writes to Kinkead in great indignation over Oldham & Hemingway suit: "I herewith inclose my answer. . . . I ask the Petitioners to be ruled to file a bill of particulars . . . to enable me to absolutely disprove the claim. . . . I know it is for them to prove their claim . . . but I am unwilling to trust the oath of any man, who either made or prompted the oath of the Petition." He writes and swears detailed answer to plaintiffs' petition. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 194-97. Lincoln has several cases in court, all are dismissed or continued. Record.

MAY 28. Lincoln and Lamon, representing defendants, lose three suits. In Phelps v. Benedict, appeal, plaintiff is awarded $38.75 damages; in Prather v. Strain, also appeal, damages are $7; in People v. McCardel et al., jury finds defendants guilty of petit larceny and court fines them $5 each. Two other cases are continued and one is settled by agreement. Ibid.

MAY 30. In Maddox v. Courtney et al., assumpsit, court renders judgment for plaintiff for $118.05, amount of his note, principal and interest. Lincoln and Lamon represent defendant. Court affirms judgment of lower court in Robeson et al. v. Barrackman, and awards plaintiff $43.89. Lincoln and Lamon are his attorneys. Ibid.

MAY 31. In Campbell v. Smith, trespass, Lincoln, signing "Benedict, Lincoln & Lamon," writes and files replication to defendant's pleas. Jury finds for plaintiff in amount of $45. Ibid. Lincoln writes court order. Photo.

JUNE 1. In Graham v. Sturm, chancery, court orders defendant to surrender to complainant deed to land at issue and to pay $829.22 and costs. Davis represents complainant while Lincoln and Lamon are for defendant. Record. For plaintiff in Beal v. Philips, Lincoln agrees to continuance. Original owned by King Hostick, Springfield, Ill.

JUNE 2. Lincoln writes and files defendant's plea and notice in Maddox v. Courtney et al. He also writes and files plea in Lamm v. Bachop. Photo.

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Duncan v. Simpson, appeal, is dismissed by agreement between Lincoln and Moulton, attorneys for plaintiff and defendant respectively. Record. In Knight v. Carter, Lincoln writes and files replication, order of court, abstract of bill, and answer of guardian ad litem. Original owned by King Hostick, Springfield, Ill. He writes and files bond for costs in Clark v. Hoxworth. Photo.

JUNE 3. Lincoln and Lamon win five cases by default. Two other cases are continued. He writes answer of guardian ad litem in Pickett v. Cunningham, and decree of court. In two other cases, Scott v. Alexander et al. and Hayman v. Alexander et al., he writes guardian's answer and court decree. Record; Photo.; Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

JUNE 4. Urbana. Lincoln, on his way home, signs receipt for $25, his fee as counsel in Illinois Central v. John McGinnis, tried May 25. Illinois Central Magazine, Nov., 1927, facsimile.

JUNE 5. Decatur. Spending Sunday here, Lincoln looks into his Macon County cases. He writes and signs replication and rejoinder in Scott v. Hull. Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

JUNE 6. Springfield. In his letter of May 27 to Kinkead, Lincoln stated that he would be in Springfield in about ten days. He probably arrives home on this date. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 195.

JUNE 10. James M. Higgins, Medical Superintendent of State Hospital for the Insane at Jacksonville, was removed by Board of Trustees June 6. His attorney, D. A. Smith, sends him to confer with Lincoln and Logan. Lincoln sends him back with letter to Smith stating that he and Logan think that Higgins' removal invalid. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 197-98.

JUNE 13. Lincoln petitions city council to have sidewalk on east side of Eighth St. between Cook and Adams graded, paved, and planked. Illinois State Journal, June 18, 1930. Sangamon Circuit Court begins its summer session with Judge Emerson on bench. Six of Lincoln & Herndon's cases come before court but none comes to trial. Record.

JUNE 14. "The amount of business . . . does not seem to be very great, and owing to the excessively warm weather, there is no disposition on the part of the members of the bar to crowd it forward . . . We are not surprised at this, for even we, who are working men, find it difficult to bear up under the high temperature of the season." Register, June 15. Of Lincoln's 14 cases, two replevin suits come to trial. He wins one and loses one. Record.

JUNE 15. Six of Lincoln & Herndon's cases come before circuit court. They win one. Smith v. Snow & Keys, assumpsit suit, when court finds for

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defendant. Two are stricken from docket, pleas are filed in two others, and one is continued. Ibid.

JUNE 16. Ten of Lincoln & Herndon's cases come before court. In Foster v. Tripp, appeal, jury finds for plaintiff, their client, in sum of $35. One case is dismissed by agreement, one stricken from docket, another is set for hearing tomorrow, and four continued. Pleas are filed in remaining cases. Ibid.

JUNE 17. In Gilman et al. v. Hamilton et al. court sustains Lincoln and Smith's motion to open depositions. Bryan v. Bates, assumpsit, is dismissed by Lincoln & Herndon for plaintiff. Webster, Marsh & Co., v. Gobb et al. is dismissed by agreement, Lincoln & Herndon for defendant. In Duff v. Clark, assumpsit, Lincoln & Herndon enter nonsuit. Pleas are filed in fifth case. Ibid. Lincoln writes to David A. Smith, reporting depositions received from New York for Gilman et al. v. Hamilton et al. Lincoln is so busy he has not had time to read them. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 198.

JUNE 18. In Lovelock v. Sangamon County, appeal, jury is unable to agree and is discharged. In Buruss v. Buruss, defendant defaults and complainant is awarded divorce on grounds of adultery. In Young v. Young, attachment suit, defendant defaults and plaintiff is awarded $209.25 damages. Lincoln & Herndon are attorneys for plaintiffs in all three cases. Pleas are filed in three other cases. Record. Lincoln has $3 worth of repairs made on his buggy. Obed Lewis Account Books.

JUNE 20. In Lowry Lamb & Co. v. Jones, appeal, Lincoln & Herndon file exhibits for defendant. Complainant files exceptions to their answer. After argument, one exception is sustained, one overruled, and case is continued by agreement. Two other cases are continued. Record.

JUNE 21. Fourteen of Lincoln & Herndon's cases come before Circuit Court. Four are stricken from docket, three decided in their favor, they win two by default, and rest are continued. Ibid. Lincoln writes and files by mail his bill for services to Gideon Hawley estate, Tazewell Circuit Court. Photo. Lincoln writes note on letter from Nathaniel Coffin, treasurer of Illinois College, which inquires about Gillman v. Hamilton. Lincoln has had case continued. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 198-99.

JUNE 22. Lincoln writes replication filed in Blackford, Williams, and Mitchell v. State of Illinois and Daniel S. Hay, signing "Lincoln & Herndon for complainant." Photo.

JUNE 23. Lincoln writes to Adam Adams: "The summer term of the U.S. court is close upon us. . . . I suppose you and your witness will be down; and I wish you to call at the Land Office at Dixon, and procure & bring with you the Register's certificate. . . . P. S. Since I wrote the above, Logan

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came in & proposed to continue the cause over this summer term. If you prefer doing this. Telegraph me at once." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 199. Lincoln sells at auction at "Court House door" 36 acres of land at northwest edge of Springfield owned by Mrs. Maria L. Bullock. Illinois Journal, June 18, 19.

JUNE 25. Lincoln receives letter from T. J. Turner about Adams case. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 199.

JUNE 27. Lincoln answers letter from T. J. Turner. After further consideration of Logan's proposal for continuance, he hopes Adams will not agree to it. "I have the case fresh in my mind, and therefore wish to keep it going till it is finished." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 199-200.

JULY 4. U.S. Circuit and District Courts convene with Judges McLean and Drummond on bench, and adjourn until tomorrow in observance of Independence Day. Register, July 6.

JULY 5. "Mr. Hoyne, the district attorney, arrived in town. . . . But few of the lawyers had arrived last evening." Ibid.

JULY 6. Lincoln writes to Kinkead about Oldham & Hemingway suit. "In the autumn of 1849 I was at Lexington several days, during which time I was almost constantly with L. O. Todd; and if he shall . . . think he remembers that I told him I had collected money for Oldham, Todd & Co., the story . . . would be an utter mistake; yet . . . I think it safest to look to their making this proof . . . and to be prepared for it." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 200.

JULY 7. In margin of record book Lincoln writes partial release of mortgage he took from Daniel E. Ruckel Aug. 15, 1851: "In consideration of Daniel E. Ruckel having perfected the title to the other parcel of ground included in the mortgage I do hereby release . . . Lots Nine, ten, eleven and twelve, in Block Three in Allen's Addition to Springfield." Book GG, 440; The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 201.

JULY 9. "Present appearances Indicate that but few of the numerous cases before the [federal] court will be tried at the present term," reports Register. "Many of the attorneys in charge of suits are absent, and with those present we suspect the excessive heat of the weather has produced an indisposition to labor, which, of course, is very natural and proper under the circumstances."

JULY 11. "In the evening," records Orville H. Browning, "called at Edwards', Stuarts & Lincoln's." Browning, Diary.

JULY 12. Federal Courts adjourn. Judge McLean left yesterday for Terre Haute by stage and Judge Drummond takes train for Chicago this morning. Most of business has been continued. Illinois Journal, Register, July 13.

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JULY 22. Lincoln buys two collars & @ 75˘ from John Williams' store. H. E. Pratt, 146.

JULY 24. Lincoln writes, for Moulton and Lincoln, transcript and writ of error in Mary J. Stewartson v. William Stewartson, divorce case appealed from Shelby County. Files.

JULY 28. Lincoln has $2 worth of repair work done on buggy at Lewis' carriage shop. Obed Lewis Account Books.

JULY 30. Obed Lewis makes $5 worth of repairs for Lincoln. Ibid.

AUGUST 15. Lincoln again writes to T. J. Turner about Adams case: "When I served notice on Logan I promised him that if he would name any attorney in the vicinity . . . to be present at the taking of the depositions, I would request you to notify him of the time and place, but he is gone off to the ‘World's Fair’ . . . [New York] without having named any." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 201.

AUGUST 17. Lincoln buys pole from Obed Lewis carriage shop. Obed Lewis Account Books.

AUGUST 22. [Register reports incorporation of town of Lincoln, 30 miles northeast of Springfield on Chicago & Mississippi Railroad. "The town was named by the proprietors of whom our enterprising citizen, Virgil Hickox, is one, in honor of A. Lincoln, esq., the attorney of the Chicago and Mississippi Railroad Company."]

AUGUST 24. Lincoln draws power of attorney for Virgil Hickox and John D. Gillette, proprietors of town of Lincoln, authorizing Col. Robt. B. Latham, third proprietor, to have town platted and surveyed and to sell lots. Stringer, I, 567-68; Henry E. Huntington Library, San Marino, California. William H. Herndon Papers, Henry E. Huntington Library, San Marino California.

AUGUST 25. Lincoln has his buggy repaired ($1). Obed Lewis Account Books.

AUGUST 29. Lincoln. First sale of lots takes place in new town. Ninety are sold at prices ranging from $40 to $150. [According to tradition Lincoln is present. At noon he purchases two watermelons and carries one under each arm to public square. There he invites Latham, Plickox, and Gillette, proprietors, to join him, saying, "Now we'll christen the new town."] Stringer, I, 568-69.

AUGUST 30. Springfield. Register and Illinois Journal announce that Lincoln will speak on "Colonization" at First Presbyterian Church this evening. "The subject is of deep interest and growing magnitude," says Register, "and well worthy of consideration on the part of all good patriots

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and well-wishers of humanity. . . . The subject and the speaker are both attractive. Let them meet with an appreciative audience."

SEPTEMBER 3. At auditor's office Lincoln picks up warrant No. 8456, $250, Judge Davis' salary for quarter ending Aug. 30. Warrant Register, Auditor's Office.

SEPTEMBER 5. Before departure on circuit, Lincoln has another adjustment made on his buggy, 50˘ iron band. Obed Lewis Account Books. [Logan Circuit Court begins its session.]

SEPTEMBER 7. Mount Pulaski. Lincoln gets judgment against G. W. Turley for $116.90. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 201-02.

SEPTEMBER 8. Lincoln writes to L. M. Hays asking him how he wishes him to send money awarded in Turley case. "I am following the Circuit," he says, "and shall be at Bloomington, Ills., two weeks, ending on the 24th of this month, from which place I will send you the money, if you will have a letter to reach me there on or before the last named day." Ibid.

SEPTEMBER 12. Bloomington. Lincoln learns that McLean County is proposing to tax Illinois Central Railroad property. Company offers to retain him. Before accepting he writes to T. R. Webber, clerk of Champaign Circuit Court: "As this will be the same question I have had under consideration for you, . . . you have the prior right to my services; if you choose to secure me a fee something near such as I can get from the other side. The question . . . is the largest law question that can now be got up in the State; and therefore, in justice to myself, I can not afford, if I can help it, to miss a fee altogether." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 202.

SEPTEMBER 13. Lincoln writes to Kinkead about Oldham & Hemingway suit: "Your letter . . . has been forwarded to me. . . . The matter now takes me at great disadvantage, in this, that it will cost me more to leave the Circuit . . . and attend to taking proof, than it would to give up the claim. . . . Without a bill of particulars . . . any proof I can possibly take, will be wide of the mark. . . . Can they not be ruled to give a Bill of particulars?" The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 203-04.

SEPTEMBER 15. Hawks et al. v. Major, in which jury was unable to agree Apr. 12, comes to trial again. Jury finds for plaintiff who is represented by Lincoln and Holmes. Gridley is attorney for defendant. Lincoln secures leave to amend his declaration in Woodworth v. Cox. Record.

SEPTEMBER 16. Lincoln moves to quash indictment in People v. Hendricks, perjury. His motion is argued and overruled. He then secures change of venue to Champaign County and files bond for defendant's appearance. Ibid.

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SEPTEMBER 19. In Buck v. Allen, debt, Lincoln moves for continuance on ground of plaintiff's failure to file copy of instrument sued on within time required by statute. His motion is allowed. Ibid.

SEPTEMBER 20. Lincoln loses divorce case, William McCorkle v. Nancy McCorkle, when court awards divorce without alimony. Court sets his fee at $15. Ibid.

SEPTEMBER 21. Lincoln and Orme for defendant secure continuance in Jackson v. Miller, trespass vi et armis. Ibid. Lincoln, as counsel, pays all costs except fees of sheriff of Sangamon County in William Florville v. James Allen et al., decree for deed. Judgment Docket III, 3.

SEPTEMBER 22. Lincoln writes notice to Oldham & Hemingway, stating that he will take depositions in their suit against him from John T. Stuart at Springfield Nov. 12, from H. E. Dummer and others at Beardstown Nov. 15, and from William F. Thornton and others at Shelbyville Nov. 8. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 204.

SEPTEMBER 24. [Mrs. Lincoln buys and charges "Opera Flannel" and three collars, two of which cost $3.25 each. H. E. Pratt, 146.]

SEPTEMBER 26. Metamora. Five of Lincoln's cases come before Woodford Circuit Court on first day of term. He dismisses one, his opponents dismiss another, and three are continued. Record.

SEPTEMBER 28. Signing Gridley's name, Lincoln writes and files plaintiff's replication in Richardson v. Jennings and Jennings. Photo.

SEPTEMBER 29. In Adams v. Woodford County, appeal, jury finds for plaintiff and assesses his damages at $296.85. Clark and Purple are attorneys for plaintiff, Haskill, Brown, and Lincoln for defendant. Gingrich v. Evans et al. is continued. Record.

SEPTEMBER 30. Peoria. Lincoln draws diagram of lands involved in Gingrich v. Evans et al. Below he writes: "I am to get a certificate as to who entered the different parts of the above section and bring to Woodford Circuit Court next term. Sept. 30, 1853." Photo. Lincoln receives letter from Kinkead informing him that bill of particulars has been filed in Oldham case. "I now feel that the case is entirely manage[a]ble," he replies. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 205.

OCTOBER 3. Pekin. Lincoln writes to Peter Doty, clerk of Woodford Circuit Court: "Herein is the writ . . . which I brought off to get the Sheriff's return amended. Please place it with the papers again." He writes Mason Brayman that he is free to make engagement with Illinois Central in McLean County case: "‘Count me in’. . . . I shall be here at least ten days." Ibid.

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OCTOBER 4. Purple & Lincoln, representing plaintiff, dismiss assumpsit suit, Kellogg v. Flint. Record. Lincoln writes and files motion to quash indictment (cheating) in People v. Shatter and Shaffer, change of venue from Peoria County. Photo. He writes to John Connelley, register of Springfield Land Office, asking him to sign and date land certificate for Woodford County case, Gingrich v. Evans et al. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 206.

OCTOBER 5. In Keener v. Hainline, Lincoln files affidavit for defendant stating that defendant believes plaintiff "is so unsettled as to endanger the officers of the Court with respect to their legal demands." Photo.

OCTOBER 6. Plaintiff in Keener v. Hainline files bond for costs and case is continued. People v. Shaffer and Shaffer is called and continued. Record.

OCTOBER 7. Lincoln writes receipt to Illinois Central Railroad Company for $250 given to him by Mason Brayman as retainer in Illinois Central v. County of McLean. Illinois Central Magazine, Feb., 1929, facsimile. [Lincoln & Herndon collect from John E. Short estate for legal services rendered. Sangamon County Probate File.]

OCTOBER 8. Lincoln writes and files defendant's answer in Hodson et al. v. Eli Enslow, administrator of William W. Enslow. Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

OCTOBER 10. Lincoln uses power of attorney to confess judgment for $113.50 in Higginson & Co. v. Gridley and Prettyman. Record.

OCTOBER 11. Parker and Lincoln, counsel for plaintiff in Hamilton v. Haines et al., chancery, move court to set aside judgment and ask leave to amend their bill. Clerk is ordered to give notice of motion. Lincoln writes and files agreement to dismiss Yates v. Worley. Tazewell Circuit Court adjourns. Ibid.; Photo. [In Springfield, Herndon deposits $400 to his account in Marine Bank. Mrs. Lincoln buys cloth and buttons, charging Lincoln's account $1.26. H. E. Pratt, 146, 162.]

OCTOBER 14. [James F. Joy telegraphs Lincoln at Springfield asking him to act as arbitrator in dispute over crossing between Illinois Central and Northern Indiana railroads. P. S. Blackendt telegraphs same inquiry. Frederick T. Hill, Lincoln the Lawyer, 250.]

OCTOBER 17. Clinton. Fall term of DeWitt Circuit Court begins. Swett and Lincoln for appellant resist motion by Stuart and Moore to dismiss Barger v. Illinois Central, appeal from assessment of damages for right of way. Motion is overruled. Record.

OCTOBER 18. Court finds for complainants in Smallwood et al. v. Allen, and orders that lands in litigation be divided in accordance with their bill.

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Lincoln, complainants' attorney, writes decree of court. Record; Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

OCTOBER 19. Gridley, Wickizer, and Lincoln, for plaintiffs in Scott and Scott v. Ellis, argue demurrer filed for defendant by Lewis, Swett, and McWilliams. Demurrer is partially sustained, whereupon defendant is allowed to plead again. Plaintiffs join issue on plea. Record.

OCTOBER 20. Defendant in Scott and Scott v. Ellis obtains change of venue to Logan County. Barger v. Illinois Central, before court Monday, is tried before jury which awards appellant $637.33 damages. Illinois Centra Railroad v. Hill, petition for right of way, is tried by Moore for plaintiff and Lincoln for defendant. Court takes it under advisement. Ibid.

OCTOBER 21. Lincoln and Scott lose Slatten v. Alsop and Clark, before court May 21, when they fail to file their answer within time specified. Lincoln writes order of court in Barger v. Illinois Central, and in Smallwood et al. v. Allen. In latter case he writes and files replication, for complainants. He writes answer of William Hutchin, defendant, in Hutchin et al. v. Hutchin et al., petition for partition. Ibid.; Photo.; Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

OCTOBER 22. En route to Urbana. Leonard Swett recalled that in fall of 1853, as he and Lincoln were driving from Clinton to Urbana, Lincoln, at his request, told him of his early life. Rice, 456-68.

OCTOBER 24. Urbana. Fall term of Champaign Circuit Court begins. Lincoln has at least three cases, but record does not give dates on which they come to trial. He loses appeal, Lyons v. Rea, when court awards plaintiff $20 damages. In Davis v. Redmond, court orders distribution of net proceeds of sale of lands. Master is to keep $5 as further fee and "to pay to A. Lincoln, Esq. Fifteen Dollars as a counsel fee." Record.

OCTOBER 25. Lincoln writes court order to partition land in Davis & Davis v. Redmond et al. Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

OCTOBER 26. Lincoln collects $15 fee for services in Davis and Davis v. Redmond et al. Ibid.

OCTOBER 28. Danville. Vermilion Circuit Court convenes. Whitcomb and Whitcomb v. Madden, trespass, Lincoln and Lamon for plaintiffs, continued from spring term, is again continued, at defendant's costs. Record.

OCTOBER 29. Lincoln, signing "Davis, Lincoln & Lamon," joins issue for defendants in Wm. M. Lamm v. Bachop, assumpsit suit. Court finds for defendant. Defendant in Toney v. Sconce, trespass, consents that judgement for $5,000 damages be entered against her. Davis, Lincoln and Lamon for plaintiff remit all except $50. Lincoln writes court order.

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Ibid.; Photo; Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. [Mrs. Lincoln buy $4.66 worth of yard goods. H. E. Pratt, 146.]

OCTOBER 31. Lincoln files pleas for defendants in Lamm v. Bachop and Helmick v. Helmick. In latter case he denies that defendant committed adultery, although her husband, in order to secure divorce, attempted to induce different men to make attempts on her chastity. Photo. Murphy and Lincoln for complainant and Davis for defendant try Wilson et al. v. Kingsbury et al. Court takes it under advisement. Record.

NOVEMBER 1. Taylor et ux v. People and Sarah Hickman is dismissed on motion of Lincoln and Lamon, complainants' attorney. In Wilson v. Wilson, divorce is granted on defendant's cross bill, which Lincoln writes. Attorneys are Davis for complainant and Lincoln and Lamon for Mrs. Wilson, defendant. Ibid. Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

NOVEMBER 2. Lincoln writes indictment in People v. Morgan and Craig, charged with setting prairie fire. He signs for Leonard Swett. He also writes and signs, for Swett, indictment for riot of John Armstrong, Reuben Bloomfield, William L. Miner, and William Tremble. Photo.

NOVEMBER 3. Defendants default in George Lamon v. Lamon et al., bill for specific performance. Lincoln & Lamon are attorneys for complainant. Signing "Lincoln & Lamon," Lincoln writes and files replication in Wyatt v. Leonard. Photo. He writes and files amended bill in Knight v. Carter. Original owned by King Hostick, Springfield, Ill.

NOVEMBER 4. Lincoln writes bill in chancery in Lewis et al. v. Lewis et al., Sangamon Circuit Court case, signing Lincoln & Herndon & E. Herndon. Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

NOVEMBER 6. [Mrs. Lincoln buys "5 yds. Lining & @ .70˘ at John Williams' store. H. E. Pratt, 146.]

NOVEMBER 8. Shelbyville. Lincoln takes deposition of Anthony Thornton in Oldham & Hemingway suit. Deponent is "certain the defendant Lincoln has never had anything to do with the collection of the note of W. F. Thornton and Basye, debtors of Oldham, Todd & Co. " William H. Townsend, Abraham Lincoln, Defendant, 28-30.

NOVEMBER 10. Springfield. Lincoln arrives home after more than nine weeks on circuit. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 206.

NOVEMBER 11. Lincoln writes to L. M. Hays: "Inclosed is the draft for one hundred dollars. Absence from home prevented my receiving your letter of the 12th October until yesterday." He writes to T. J. Turner:

"Judge Logan, Kemper's attorney, . . . consents to the within named clerk, taking the deposition. . . on condition that, if you can, you will notify Kemper's lawyer there, of the time & place." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 206.

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NOVEMBER 12. Lincoln takes depositions of Ninian W. Edwards and Eliphalet B. Hawley in Oldham & Hemingway suit. Both swear that so far as they know, neither they nor any member of the firm of Rankin & Edwards ever paid Lincoln "any money belonging to said Oldham, Todd & Co. on any account whatever." Townsend, Lincoln, Defendant, 30-2.

NOVEMBER 14. [First Grand Division of Supreme Court begins its session at Mt. Vernon.]

NOVEMBER 15. Beardstown. Lincoln obtains deposition of H. E. Dummer stating that R. S. Todd placed in his hands for collection debt of $134.21 owed by Robert Lindsey to Oldham, Todd & Co., that he sued and obtained judgment in Cass Circuit Court Oct. 12, 1841, and finally in 1845 collected $50 on judgment, which he paid to Lincoln in 1846. R. S. Todd directed Lincoln to retain this "as his own." Faced with this evidence, Kentucky plaintiffs dismiss suit at next term of Fayette County Court. Ibid., 33; The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 216-17.

NOVEMBER 17. Springfield. Lincoln writes to H. E. Dummer: "While I was at Beardstown, I forgot to tell you that Wm. Butler says if you will give him charge, and full discretion, of a claim in your hands, against George G. Grubb . . . he knows how, and can, and will make something out of it for you. Please write him." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 206-7.

NOVEMBER 18. Lincoln withdraws $400 from his account in Springfield Marine and Fire Insurance Company. Marine Bank Ledger.

NOVEMBER 21. Five of Lincoln & Herndon's cases are called as Sangamon Circuit Court begins its fall term. In two replevin suits — Henderson v. Warfield, and Scott v. Cannon — agreed judgments are entered for plaintiffs, their clients. Taft et al. v. Taft et al., chancery case in which they represent complainants, is dismissed by agreement. Pleas are filed in other cases. Record.

NOVEMBER 22. Lincoln & Herndon have busy day with 17 cases before court. They dismiss seven and win three by default. One is dismissed by their opponents. Pleas are filed and motions entered in others. Ibid.

NOVEMBER 23. Another busy day in court with 12 Lincoln & Herndon cases on docket. In Branch v. Sangamon County, jury finds for plaintiff, their client, and assesses his damages at $140. They lose Martin v. Stafford, assumpsit, when court finds for plaintiff in amount of $449.35. In Williamson v. Williamson, divorce, their bill is taken for confessed. Ibid.

NOVEMBER 25. In Dodge v. Johnson, action on covenant, demurrer filed by defendants is argued and sustained. Lincoln & Herndon are attorneys for plaintiff. In Waddell v. Waddell, their client, complainant, is granted divorce and custody of children on ground of his wife's adultery. Ibid.

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NOVEMBER 26. Two related cases, Jones v. Lowry Lamb & Co., and Lowry Lamb & Co. v. Jones, are referred to arbitrators. Lincoln & Herndon are Jones' attorneys. Pleas are filed in McGraw v. Adams and James Shields v. Watson et al., in both of which they are attorneys for plaintiff. Ibid.

NOVEMBER 28. Lincoln & Herndon's client, Elizabeth Walker, complainant in Walker v. Walker, is granted divorce on ground of desertion. Lincoln & Herndon dismiss Collins v. Morgan, appeal. Six other cases are called but none comes to trial. Logan & Lincoln file appeal to Supreme Court in Spear v. Humphreys, tried in Sangamon Circuit Court Mar. 26. Ibid.

NOVEMBER 29. Lincoln & Herndon win assumpsit suit, Johnson v. McMullen, when jury finds for plaintiff in amount of $200. In Williamson v. Williamson their client is granted divorce because of husband's habitual drunkenness. In Lovelock v. Sangamon County, appeal, before court June 18, their client is awarded $50 damages. Motions or pleas are filed in three other cases. Ibid.

NOVEMBER 30. On Lincoln & Herndon's motion, plaintiff in Popper v. Patton et al. is ruled to file bond for costs. In Hazlett v. Drennan et al. they move appointment of guardian ad litem for infant defendants. On their motion, bill is taken for confessed as to adult defendants. Third case is continued. Ibid.

DECEMBER 1. In Vail et al. v. Pratt, Lincoln & Herndon, for defendant, are allowed appeal to Supreme Court. In Johnson et al. v. Alldridge et al., trespass and assault and battery, jury finds for plaintiffs, their clients, and awards them $97.50 damages. On their motion, petition to enforce mechanics lien, Pilcher v. Cole et al., is taken for confessed. Ibid.

DECEMBER 2. Lincoln & Herndon are attorneys for plaintiff in Williamson v. Springfield Marine and Fire Insurance Co., assumpsit suit. Jury is unable to agree and is discharged. They win chancery case. Gains v. Black et al., by default. Motions and pleas are filed in two other cases. Ibid. Lincoln writes to James F. Joy, Illinois Central attorney, regarding possible action in law case. "I think I can get the hearing of the case postponed to the beginning of February. Can you not be here by that time? Please write me." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 207.

DECEMBER 3. Lincoln & Herndon win two cases by default. The first, Hazlett et al. v. Drennan, is partition suit; second, McDaniel et al. v. McDaniel, involves dower right. Record.

DECEMBER 5. In Cassity v. Chicago & Mississippi Railroad Co., appeal, jury finds for plaintiff and awards $12 damages. Lincoln & Herndon are attorneys for railroad. Pleadings are filed in two other cases. Ibid.

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DECEMBER 6. Lincoln & Herndon enter nonsuit in Johnson v. McMullen. In Popper v. Patton et al. they secure change of venue to McLean County. They lose appeal, McGlasson v. Power, when court affirms decision of lower court awarding plaintiff $32.50 damages. In Cantrall v. Cantrall et al., before court Nov. 23, their client is permitted to sell lands of his lunatic son. Pleadings are filed in five other cases. Ibid.

DECEMBER 7. Defendant in Amos v. Ransom, mechanics lien, is ordered to pay Lincoln & Herndon's client $23. In Spear v. John Hay, ejectment suit, jury finds defendant, their client, not guilty. Lincoln writes instructions to jury. Agreed verdict with leave to appeal to Supreme Court is entered in Coffin et al. v. City of Springfield. Lincoln & Herndon represent complainant. They have four other cases which do not come to trial. Ibid.; Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

DECEMBER 9. State's attorney drops prosecution of two cases of People v. Williams, indictments for murder and assault. Lincoln & Herndon are Williams' attorneys. They dismiss Martin v. Martin, chancery, and agree to submit Snow and Keys v. DeCamp, assumpsit, to arbitrators. They file demurrer to defendant's cross-bill in Shoup v. Owens, and amended bills in McGraw v. Adams, and Sperry v. Sperry. Record.

DECEMBER 10. Lincoln & Herndon's demurrer in Shoup v. Owens is sustained, and after argument, complainant is ordered to recover $581.92. In Blackford et al. v. People, defendants are enjoined from collecting part of judgment, and by agreement are allowed appeal to Supreme Court. Lincoln writes court order. Lincoln & Herndon are attorneys for complainant. They win two other cases, are granted new trial in third, and file pleas in four more. Ibid.; Photo.

DECEMBER 12. Supreme Court meets but adjourns from day to day until Jan. 4, 1854. Record.

DECEMBER 13. Lincoln receives letter from T. J. Turner together with depositions to be used in Adams case, which is docketed for approaching session of federal courts. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 207.

DECEMBER 14. Lincoln replies to Turner's letter: "By my agreement with Logan, made when I filed the Bill last summer, he has the option to continue the cause over this ensuing term, and he now elects to do so. This dispenses with your coming now, even if you should attend the trial when it does come off, which I think you need not do at any sacrifice." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 207-08.

DECEMBER 20. "The United States' District and Circuit Court opened in this city on Tuesday — Judge Drummond present, and all the officers. . . . It is said the docket is quite large, and that the term is likely to be interesting." Illinois Journal, Dec. 22.

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DECEMBER 21. Lincoln writes to T. J. Turner: "We can use Bradshaw as a witness, and we ought, by all means, to do it, if we can have any assurance that he will testify fairly. . . . He can make the matter entirely plain, on all the points, and no one else can. If you conclude to trust him, write me, and I will, at this term, get an order of court to examine him." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 208.

DECEMBER 23. Lincoln and Bowman, representing plaintiff in Jones v. McLean in U.S. Circuit Court, secure verdict for their client in amount of $34.44 and costs. Record.

DECEMBER 24. Complainant in Bank of Missouri v. Galdwell et al., before U.S. Circuit Court Nov. 4, 1852, dismisses his bill against alleged debtors of bank. Ibid.

DECEMBER 26. Lincoln writes to H. E. Dummer: "Butler has just shown me your letter to him concerning the Grubb debt; and, in relation to your intimation that you might be induced to sell it, he desires me to say to you that, in a few days over three months he is sure to get the principal of the debt (without interest) and that . . . he will entertain any proposition you may make, to sell." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 209.

DECEMBER 27. Williams and Lawrence for plaintiff and Browning, Bushnell, and Lincoln for defendant try Northup v. Wallace et al., ejectment suit. Record.

DECEMBER 28. In Northup v. Brown, before U.S. Circuit Court Jan. 28, jury is waived and court finds for plaintiff with one cent damages. Case is ejectment suit. Browning, Bushnell, and Lincoln are counsel for defendant. Court also finds for plaintiff with same damages in Northup v. Wallace et al. Ibid.

DECEMBER 31. Lincoln deposits $2.06 cash in his account at Irwin's store, and is credited with $3.31 on year-end balance. Irwin Ledger and Journal.

1854

JANUARY 4. Springfield. [Supreme Court opens in Springfield.]

JANUARY 6. Lincoln pays $30.50 cash on his carriage account. Obed Lewis Account Books.

JANUARY 9. Lincoln, for complainant, writes bill in chancery in Van Bergen v. Singleton, Sangamon Circuit Court. Photo.

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JANUARY 12. [Illinois State Colonization Society, organized for purchasing freedom of slaves and "colonizing" them in Africa, holds its annual meeting at First Presbyterian Church. Lincoln and Orville H. Browning Quincy have been announced as speakers, but only Browning attend "On account of illness in his family, Mr. Lincoln was not present." Illinois Journal, Jan. 14.]

JANUARY 13. In People ex rel. Stevenson v. Higgins (SC), involving right of trustees of Illinois State Hospital for the Insane to remove superintendent is commenced. Lincoln is one of counsel for Higgins, although his name does not appear in printed report. (15 Ill. 110.) Brown for plaintiff in error is only attorney heard. Record.

JANUARY 14. Brown continues his argument in People ex rel. Stevenson v. Higgins. Ibid.

JANUARY 16. McConnel, one of attorneys for defendants in error, make his argument in Higgins case. Ibid.

JANUARY 17. Higgins case occupies Supreme Court entire day. In morning Lincoln presents case of defendant, and is followed by Edwards for plaintiff. Court takes case under advisement, and later reverses circuit court decision. Ibid., 15 Ill. 110.

JANUARY 23. [In Washington Stephen A. Douglas, chairman of Senate Committee on Territories, reports Kansas-Nebraska Bill.]

JANUARY 25. Lincoln writes to James F. Joy, his associate in impending case of Illinois Central v. McLean County. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 209-10.

JANUARY 26. Lincoln writes W. W. R. Woodbury and William Fithian, Danville, his opinion on legal questions involved in estate about which they inquired. In conclusion he warns: "Better mention this to W. H. Lamon, lest he should, unawares, commit me to the other side." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 210.

FEBRUARY 2. O'Byrne v. Stout, case involving alleged conversion of hog, comes up in Supreme Court. Joseph Gillespie, representing plaintiff, makes his argument, followed in afternoon by Lincoln for defendant. After Lincoln has finished Gillespie speaks second time and court takes case under advisement. Later it reverses Circuit Court decree. Record; 15 Ill. 180.

FEBRUARY 4. Lincoln pays $30 to his carriage maker for sleigh. Obed Lewis Account Books.

FEBRUARY 7. For John Marshall of Shawneetown, Lincoln calls at express office and gets 50 copies of Early Engagements, novel by Mary Frazear, which Marshall has sent him. He places 23 at one book store and 24 at another on consignment, and gives one to each newspaper. Last copy

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he takes home. Mrs. Lincoln reads it half through that evening, and is neatly interested. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 210-11.

FEBRUARY 8. Lincoln writes Marshall his experiences as book salesman. He adds, "The charge at the Express office was only $1.50; I return herewith one dollar, & hold fifty˘ subject to your order. My attention to the matter has been rather a pleasure than a trouble." Ibid.

FEBRUARY 11. In Supreme Court Lincoln argues Johnson v. Donnell, in which right of strict foreclosure is involved. He appears for defendant in error. Record; 15 Ill. 97. He visits legislature, which is considering charter of the Terre Haute & Illinoistown Railroad. Lincoln and other adherents of "state policy" oppose this charter. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 211-12.

FEBRUARY 13. Another of Lincoln's cases, Humphreys v. Spear et al., comes up in Supreme Court. Oral arguments are made by Lincoln for appellant and by Edwards and E. B. Herndon for appellees. Court takes case under advisement, and later hands down decision affirming judgment of lower court. Record; 15 Ill., 275.

FEBRUARY 16. Springfield to Chicago? [Most members of legislature, many Springfield residents, and several editors start to Chicago as guests of Chicago citizens. At 7:00 A.M. they board cars for Bloomington. There they change to Illinois Central. At La Salle they transfer to Rock Island, on which they reach Chicago. Though no evidence connects Lincoln with this excursion, it is likely that he took part in it. Illinois journal, Feb. 20. Mrs. Lincoln buys and charges ($1.50) pair of boys' boots. H. E. Pratt, 146.]

FEBRUARY 17. Chicago? [During morning visitors from Springfield are escorted around city. At five o'clock banquet with many toasts is served at Tremont House. At ten a ball begins. Illinois Journal, Feb. 20.]

FEBRUARY 18. Chicago to Springfield? [Visitors leave Chicago on Aurora ‘extension’ at 8:00 A.M. At noon they reach La Salle, where they dine. Returning through Bloomington, they arrive in Springfield at seven. Ibid.]

FEBRUARY 24. Springfield. In Supreme Court, Johnson v. Donnell, which Lincoln argued Feb. 11, comes up again. Edwards opens for plaintiff, and Lincoln closes for defendant. Court takes case under advisement, and later affirms lower court decision. Record; 15 Ill. 97.

FEBRUARY 25. Pate v. People, action of debt on recognizance, comes before Supreme Court on appeal from Vermilion County. Lincoln argues case for appellant, whom he represented in lower court, and Campbell, state's attorney, appears for appellee. Ultimately court affirms Circuit Court judgment. Record; 15 Ill. 221.

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FEBRUARY 28. Lincoln has very important case in Supreme Court — Illinois Central v. County of McLean. Case involves construction of company's charter exempting it from taxation in return for payment to state of proportion of earnings. Lincoln and Joy argue orally for appellant, Logan and Stuart for appellee. Case is continued (see Jan. 16, 1856). Record; 17 Ill. 291.

MARCH 1. At request of Robert Smith of Alton, Stuart, Lincoln, and Edwards submit lengthy opinion attacking validity of charter of Mississippi and Atlantic Railroad. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 212-16.

MARCH 2. Lincoln writes plaintiff's plea in Patrick Sullivan v. People, in Supreme Court from Macon County. Oglesby acts with Lincoln. Photo.

MARCH 3. Lincoln writes and signs declaration in Harris v. Great Westen Railroad, Sangamon Circuit Court case. Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

MARCH 4. Lincoln argues two cases in Supreme Court: Sullivan v. People, and Stewartson v. Stewartson. In both cases he represents plaintiffs in error. In first he defends right of tavern keeper to sell liquor without license, and in second he contests decree of divorce. He is unsuccessful in both cases. Record; 15 Ill. 45, 223. [U.S. Senate passes Kansas-Nebraska bill.]

MARCH 6. For complainant, Lincoln writes and signs divorce bill in Morgan v. Morgan. He writes and signs chancery bill to divide assets in Taylor, administrator, and Arnold v. Robinson et al. Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

MARCH 8. Lincoln & Herndon file in Sangamon Circuit Court bill of complaint in Rhodes v. Ash et al. Photo.

MARCH 10. Lincoln writes and sends to Bloomington declaration and praecipe in Bishop v. Illinois Central Railroad, signing for "Stuart & Lincoln." Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

MARCH 16. Lincoln pays his carriage maker $11 for varnishing and placing new back panel. Obed Lewis Account Books.

MARCH 20. Spring term of Sangamon Circuit Court commences. Lincoln & Herndon have eight cases called. One case is set for hearing one week later, one is continued, one is dismissed on motion of attorneys for both parties, while five are dismissed at cost of Lincoln & Herndon's clients. Record.

MARCH 21. Jacksonville. Leaving Sangamon work to Herndon, Lincoln goes to Jacksonville to participate in trial of much interest: Selby v. Dunlap. During preceding autumn Selby, editor of "Morgan Journal," printed communication reflecting on Dunlap. In retaliation Dunlap gave him

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severe horsewhipping. Selby sues for damages, and Lincoln is one of Dunlap's counsel. Frank J. Heinl, An Epitome of Jacksonville History, 19; Jacksonville Constitutionalist, March.

MARCH 22. Lincoln "wins" case when jury awards Selby only $300. Illinois Journal, Mar. 24.

MARCH 23. Springfield. Lincoln & Herndon have five cases in Sangamon Circuit Court; three come to trial. In Alsop v. Harrison, jury returns verdict of $228.50. In Crafton v. Doran, court affirms verdict of justice of peace in amount of $47. In both cases Lincoln & Herndon represent defendants. In third case court also finds against Lincoln & Herndon's client. Record.

MARCH 24. Lincoln & Herndon's court work consists mainly of formalities, filing pleas, making motions, etc. Only one of their six cases comes to trial, Williams v. Springfield Marine and Fire Insurance Co. Lincoln & Herndon represent plaintiff, Logan defendant. Jury fails to agree, and case is continued. Ibid.

MARCH 25. Four trials end busy week for Lincoln & Herndon. In Gatton v. Cooley jury finds against their client, plaintiff; in Winters v. Shockey, verdict is for their client, although award is only $10; in Rorex v. Arnold, jury fails to agree. Fourth case, tried by court, results in victory for Lincoln & Herndon's client. Ibid. Lincoln writes affidavit of Thomas Johnson filed in Johnson v. Wickham. In Burch et al. v. Green et al. he writes and signs "Logan, Lincoln & Herndon" to petition for partition, and writes Burch's affidavit, which Burch swears. Photo.; Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

MARCH 27. Eight Lincoln & Herndon cases are called. All are continued except one divorce case, Morgan v. Morgan, in which defendant defaults and Lincoln & Herndon obtain decree for their client. Record. In another divorce case, Lewis v. Lewis, Lincoln writes order of court. Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

MARCH 28. In Blankenbaker et al. v. Ford et al. Lincoln & Herndon, representing complainants, win partition suit. Loose v. Chicago & Mississippi Railroad Company is submitted to two arbitrators, who bring in verdict for plaintiff, whom Lincoln & Herndon represent. Motions are entered in two other cases. Record.

MARCH 29. On last day of Sangamon Circuit Court, Lincoln & Herndon have one case — Moore v. Moore — in which, as attorneys for defendant, they file demurrer. Ibid.

MARCH 31. Lincoln writes George B. Kinkead, attorney of Lexington, Kentucky, acknowledging receipt of letter informing him that Oldham &

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Hemingway v. Lincoln and Edwards has been dismissed by plaintiffs. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, 11, 216-17.

APRIL 1. In response to letter from Jesse Lincoln, Tennessee relative, Lincoln writes long letter relating family history. "As you have supposed, I am the grandson of your uncle Abraham; and the story of his death by the Indians, and of Uncle Mordecai, then fourteen years old, killing one of the Indians, is the legend more strongly than all others imprinted upon my mind and memory." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 217-18.

APRIL 3. [Logan Circuit Court is in session at Lincoln.]

APRIL 4. [While no record of Lincoln's presence in Springfield on this day exists, he is doubtless home voting in city election in which his partner, William H. Herndon, is elected mayor.]

APRIL 5. Lincoln. Parks, Logan, Lincoln & Herndon, representing defendant, file their answer in Turley et al. v. County of Logan. (This case, originally filed Dec. 5, 1853, was brought by principal property owners of town of Mt. Pulaski, who claimed that county seat had been illegally moved to Lincoln.) In their answer, defendant's attorneys claim locatation act was regularly passed. Copy of Record, Sup. Ct. Files.

APRIL 6. In Turley et al. v. County of Logan, defendant files affidavit of Isaac R. Diller, clerk of House of Representatives. Ibid.

APRIL 7. Turley et al. v. Logan County is again before court. Defendant's attorneys move that injunction, granted when case was first filed, be dissolved, and court so orders. Complainants file their replication to answer of defendants, and case is continued. Ibid. Lincoln writes and signs receipt to Mrs. Lucy Scroggin for $50, paying all fees due to date. John T. Stuart also signs. Photo.

APRIL 10. Bloomington. Lincoln attends spring term of McLean Circuit Court. At this time, and at fall term, he attends to "a great variety of little business" for Illinois Central Railroad Co. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 233-34.

APRIL 11. Lincoln represents plaintiff in Woodworth v. Cox, action in debt. Gridley, for defendant, moves to dismiss suit for want of bond for costs. When papers are examined, bond for costs is found among their and Gridley withdraws motion. In two cases against Illinois Central, Lincoln moves court to overrule plaintiffs' depositions, which is done.

APRIL 12. Gridley agrees that judgment be entered against his client for $70.67 debt and $39.82 damages in Woodworth case. In Jackson v. Miller jury returns verdict for plaintiff and assesses his damages at $250. Lincoln

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and Orme are plaintiff's attorneys. Ibid. In Buck v. Allin, action in debt, Lincoln writes defendant's plea. Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

APRIL 13. In Buck v. Allin, plaintiff dismisses suit. Record.

APRIL 14. Snead v. Illinois Central Railroad Co. comes to trial, with Lincoln appearing for company. Jury finds in favor of defendant. Ibid.

APRIL 17. Jury is called in another Illinois Central case, but plaintiff drops suit and case is dismissed. Ibid.

APRIL 20. One of Lincoln's "great variety of little business" is Bishop v. Illinois Central Railroad, trespass. Jury returns verdict for plaintiff and assesses his damages at $583. Holmes, Lincoln, and Stuart are for plaintiff. Ibid.

APRIL 21. Lincoln is solicitor of another railroad, Chicago & Mississippi, in suit called against McLean County Bank and A. Gridley, administrator. Gridley files separate answer to complaint, and Lincoln agrees that administrator's answer stand as bank's answer. Lincoln files "replication to the said answer," and case is continued. Ibid.

APRIL 22. Lincoln and Scott represent four defendants in case involving forfeited recognizance. On behalf of one of defendants they move to quash writ of scire facias, whereupon attorney for People dismisses writ. For another defendant they plead that no such record as writ specifies exists. Court examines record, finds for People, and orders execution for $500 against Lincoln's client. Ibid.

APRIL 24. [Woodford Circuit Court convenes at Metamora, and remains in session all week.]

APRIL 25. Metamora. Lincoln, representing defendant, continues Jackson v. Whorrall on affidavit of his client and at his costs. Ibid. Lincoln, associated with John Clark for defense in Summers v. Willard, writes defendant's plea. Photo.

APRIL 26. Lincoln has three cases in court. In Coventry v. Warwick Banking Co., he argues demurrer. In Gingrich v. Evans et al., he and Clark obtain judgment of $665.47. Moon v. Swearns, in which he is one of plaintiff's four attorneys, goes to jury which finds for plaintiff and assesses his damages at one cent. In Coventry & Warwick Banking Co. v. Whorrall, trespass, Purple and Sanger for plaintiff, Lincoln for defense, Lincoln files demurrer, which court partly sustains, and case is continued. Record.

MAY 1. [Spring term of Tazewell Circuit Court opens at Pekin.]

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MAY 2. Pekin. Lincoln writes and files plea in Keener v. Hainline. He signs Fuller's name as well as his own as defendant's attorneys. Files. He also writes defendant's plea in Hall v. Woodrow. Photo.

MAY 3. Lincoln and Parker are associated in two cases which come to trial. In first, Phillips v. Beal et al., ejectment suit, jury finds for plaintiff, their client, and assesses his damages at one cent. In second. Hall v. Woodrow, the jury fails to agree and is discharged (see May 6, 1854). Lincoln wins another case when suit on alleged debt of $3,000, which he is defending, is dismissed. In several other cases he files pleas. Record; Files.

MAY 4. Although he signs Bush and Gridley as defendants' counsel, Lincoln writes and files plea in Pearl et al. v. Graham et al. Plea alleges that trespass complained of was against common disorderly house in which "drunkennes, idleness, quarrelling, profane swearing, obscenity" and other offenses were permitted, and that in forcibly destroying liquors defendants did no more than was necessary or lawful. Ibid. In Brown et al. v. Ayers, Lincoln writes defendant's affidavit and order of court. Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

MAY 5. One of Lincoln's clients in riot case pleads guilty. Another, whom he is defending on charge of cheating and fraud, defaults, and writ of scire facias is issued. In third case, King v. Gill & Co., jury hears evidence, and is discharged by agreement. Lincoln and Parker for defendant consent to judgment against their client in sum of $504.15 and costs. Record. Lincoln writes defendant's separate answer in Brown et al. v. Ayers, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

MAY 6. Another defendant in Lincoln's riot case pleads guilty. Five plead not guilty. Jury is called, convicts two and acquits three (see May 9, 1854). Hall v. Woodrow, tried May 3, is removed to Peoria County on change of venue. In replevin suit in which Lincoln appears for one of two defendants, case is dismissed against his client. In two other cases motions are entered. Record.

MAY 7. On quiet day in May, possibly Sunday, on which day Lincoln did much of his paper work on circuit, he writes and sends to Metamora list of questions in Jackson v. Whorrall, Woodford Circuit Court case in which he is for defense. Photo.

MAY 8. Lincoln, for respondent, files answer of William B. Doolittle to partition petition of Benjamin S. Prettyman. On behalf of his client he asserts that estate of Ephraim L. Doolittle, which petitioner is administering, is indebted to respondent for from $300 to $500, and that lot he is seeking to sell is only means of payment. Files. In People v. Donnell et al., riot, Lincoln writes demurrer filed for defense by their counsel, Jones, Lincoln, and Purple. Photo.

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MAY 9. In riot case tried May 6 court fines each guilty defendant $9 and costs. Charges against two defendants are dismissed. In forgery case which Lincoln is defending, People v. Benjamin Kellogg, plaintiff is ruled to post $300 bond (see Oct. 7, 1854). Three other cases in which Lincoln is counsel are continued. Record. For plaintiff in Harriott and Gridley v. Tinney, he writes, signs, and files replication. Photo.

MAY 10. In Hamilton v. Haines et al., Lincoln, representing complainant, writes order of court setting aside decree previously rendered and allowing complainant to file amendment to his bill. Order is filed on same day (see Oct. 12, 1854). In Dunham v. Bale and Bale, trover, he writes affidavit which Robert A. Dunham signs. Files. He writes Simeon R. Crosby's affidavit in Shay, use of Crosby v. Rufus and Abner Summers. Photo.

MAY 11. On application of plaintiff, change of venue to Woodford County is ordered in Pearl et al. v. Graham et al., in which Lincoln's plea was filed May 4. Lincoln has five other cases called, but all are continued. He writes decree in Hatch v. Preston & Wightman. Tazewell court adjourns. Record; Files; Photo.

MAY 15. Clinton. DeWitt Circuit Court commences, with Lincoln in attendance. Among other cases occupying his attention are several against Illinois Central, in which he appears for railroad. On first day of term, motions are entered in three trespass suits. Record; The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 233-34.

MAY 16. Lincoln appears in seven cases in which Illinois Central is defendant. Only one comes to trial. That is Gundiff et al. v. Illinois Central, Perce et al., trespass case in which jury finds for plaintiffs and assesses their damages at $98.18. He tells court that he and Moore are defense solicitors in Spencer v. Illinois Central. Lincoln and Moore act for defense in Cole v. Morrisson, Lincoln writing and filing pleas. In Richey v. Adams, for defense, Lincoln writes and files pleas and notice, and composes instructions for jury. Record; Photo.

MAY 18. Lincoln and Stuart defend nine women from Marion, DeWitt County, charged with riot. Their offense consisted in destroying saloon keeper's stock on his refusal to close his place of business. More than a hundred women attend trial. Jury find defendants guilty, but judge lets them off with fine of $2 each. Register, May 27; Record.

MAY 19. Lincoln is again busy with Illinois Central litigation. Seven cases against railroad come before court. In four demurrers are argued, and trespass suit brought by William H. DeBoice is tried by jury. Verdict is for plaintiff, damages assessed at $45. Ibid. Lincoln writes, signs "Moore & Lincoln p. d.," and files pleas in Hill v. Illinois Central and Weaver v. Illinois Central. In Rupert v. Meservey and McKinney he files power of attorney. Photo.

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MAY 20. Lincoln writes William Hutchins' answer in Hutchins v. Hutchins, and part of court decree. Photo.

MAY 22. Urbana. Champaign Circuit Court commences spring session "In attendance was a very respectable number of legal gentlemen of this section of Illinois. We noticed Messrs. Lincoln and Campbell, of Springfield, Messrs. Swett, Scott and Gridley of Bloomington; and Messrs. Davis, Drake and Lamon of Danville." Urbana Union, June 1. [House of Representatives passes Kansas-Nebraska bill.]

MAY 24. Lincoln writes order of court in Myers v. Brown, and petition of William Phillips in Porter et al. v. Busey et al., petition for partition, Photo; Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. Court adjourns. "The amount of business discharged was larger than at any other term of recent date," Urbana Union comments June 1.

MAY 25. Before leaving for Danville, Lincoln writes certificate of purchase made by Isaac Busey May 2, 1831, and collects, from Peter R. Leonard, note of $118.33 made out to Lincoln and Lamon. They assign note to Dashia Wyatt. Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

MAY 26. Danville. Of 11 cases in which Lincoln & Lamon have been retained, one comes to trial, Abdill v. Maxwell, assumpsit, in which court finds against defendant, their client, ordering that plaintiff have judgment for amount of note sued on, and interest. Record. Lincoln drafts four promissory notes in favor of John Villars and mortgage to secure them, which Peter R. Leonard signs. Photo. He writes four notes to Villars, which Leonard signs. He writes, signs, and files defendant's plea in Foster v. Prather. Photo.

MAY 27. Lincoln participates in two jury trials. In first, his client is found guilty of keeping disorderly house and fined $20. In second, jury returns verdict against defendant, whom Lincoln and Lamon represent, and assesses plaintiff's damages at $127.54. Record. He writes, signs for "Lincoln & Lamon p. d.," and files defendant's plea in Samuel and George Titus v. Joseph B. Lamon. Photo. Lincoln and Swett examine Hiram Beckwith and George Lawrence for admission to bar and recommend they be licensed. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 218.

MAY 29. Lincoln and Lamon defend John Armstrong, Reuben Bloomfield, and others charged with riot. State's attorney dismisses charges against all except these two, whereupon jury finds them guilty. Court fines them each $5 and costs. Record. Lincoln writes and files notice and pleas (signed Allen, Lincoln & Lamon) in McFarland v. Layton, debt. Files.

MAY 30. With eight of his cases called, Lincoln has busy day. Three come before juries, but in two cases no agreement is reached. In third,

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verdict is in favor of Lincoln's client. Fourth case is settled by agreement, defendant, whom Lincoln and Lamon represent, consenting to judgment of $423.22. Of remainder, two are tried before court, and two are continued. Record. [In Washington, President Pierce signs Kansas-Nebraska bill.]

MAY 31. Lincoln has five cases. One is complicated chancery suit — Wilson et al. v. Kingsbury et al. — which has been pending for nearly three years. Murphy and Lincoln for complainants obtain court order terminating case. In two cases Lincoln and Lamon obtain judgments for $372 and $261.90 respectively. Fourth case is dismissed, fifth continued. Record. Lincoln writes petition of E. R. Knight in Mattoon v. Knight. Files.

JUNE 1. Divorce case — George Helmick v. Eliza Helmick — constitutes Lincoln's only court work. Complainant dismisses suit at his own costs. Lincoln alone appears for complainant. He writes and signs, for Davis, Lincoln, and Lamon, defendant's plea in Taylor v. Leonard. Record.

JUNE 2. Two of Lincoln's cases are continued. Third — Black et al. v. Black et al., partition suit — is heard "upon motion of petitioners by Lincoln & Lamon their solicitors." Defendants default, and commissioners are appointed. In Lamm v. Bachop, Lincoln writes and files pleas, signing Davis, Lincoln & Lamon. He writes order of court, which Judge Davis signs, in Murphy v. Pearson, chancery. Record; File; Photo.

JUNE 3. Danville to Urbana. Vermilion Circuit Court having adjourned, one of Lincoln's future biographers sees him for first time. Henry C. Whitney passes Lincoln, Davis, Swett, and D. B. Campbell on state road between Danville and Urbana. Traveling in two-seated spring wagon, they are in front of "Bailey," country tavern near county line, when he encounters them. Henry C. Whitney, Life on the Circuit with Lincoln, 29.

JUNE 10. Springfield. Lincoln writes amended bill in Van Bergen v. Singleton, signing "Logan, Lincoln & Herndon for complainant." Photo.

JUNE 12. Sangamon Circuit Court commences four-day term. Ten of Lincoln & Herdon's cases are called. In one — Francis v. Loomis and Taylor — testimony of James H. Matheny is taken. Two cases are continued, and seven dismissed. Record.

JUNE 13. Lincoln's court work consists mainly in entering motions and filing pleas in nine Lincoln & Herndon cases called. In one, however — Eads v. Griffin — defendant defaults, and Lincoln & Herndon obtain judgment for plaintiff in sum of $159.25. Ibid. Lincoln writes M. K. Alexander of Paris, apologizing for his failure to attend to case for him in Clinton in May. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 218-19.

JUNE 14. More important to Lincoln than day's grist of law suits is visit of Ex-President Fillmore. "He was received at the cars by a large concourse

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of citizens," says Register (June 15). "A national salute was also fired. He was introduced to the citizens by Hon. Abraham Lincoln, in reply to whom the ex-president made a brief speech." (See Feb. 16, 1861.)

JUNE 15. Disposal of five cases winds up Lincoln's work in Sangamon Circuit Court. One is Rorex v. Arnold, tried Mar. 25, when jury failed to agree. Now jury returns verdict for plaintiff. Lincoln & Herndon represent defendant. Record. In Mary S. Smith et al. v. William Green et al., chancery, Lincoln writes answer of James C. Conkling, guardian, replication of complainant, and order of court. Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. (See June 18, 1854.)

JUNE 16. Lincoln writes to George B. Kinkead, his attorney at Lexington, Kentucky, anent letter and draft Kinkead recently sent to N. W. Edwards. In answer he writes: "I ran my eye over the contents of your letter, & only have to say you do not seem disposed to compensate yourself very liberally for the separate service you did for me." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 219-20.

JUNE 18. Lincoln, give or take one day, replies to June 15 letter from John Swallow of Postville, Logan County, who asked about legal status of property sold for fraudulent "consideration." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 219.

JUNE 22. Lincoln writes O. L. Davis, Danville attorney, that he has been unable to locate deed Davis asked him to find. "I have just made the desired search, and find that no such deed has ever been here. Campbell, the Auditor, says that if it were here, it would be in his office, and that he has hunted for it a dozen times, & could never find it." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 220.

JUNE 27. Lincoln has new shaft attached to his buggy, and body repaired ($1.75). Obed Lewis Account Books.

JULY 1. About this time, assembling his thoughts for campaign season, Lincoln composes several pages of "fragments" on government and slavery. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 220-23.

JULY 3. [Summer session of U.S. courts opens in Springfield.]

JULY 5. In ejectment suit in U.S. Circuit Court — Morrison v. Briggs — plaintiff's attorneys file declaration and notice. Defendant, whom Logan and Lincoln represent, is ruled to plead in 20 days. Record.

JULY 6. In Martin et al. v. Saunders, U.S. Circuit Court, Stuart, and Edwards for plaintiffs file declaration alleging nonpayment of two promissory notes for $725.20 and $413. Lincoln and Logan for defendant confess judgment in amount of $707.78. Court orders that plaintiffs recover that sum with costs. Ibid.

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JULY 8. Lincoln, representing defendants, files plea in Clark v. Stigleman et al. in U.S. Circuit Court. Ibid. (This case, filed on first day of term, concerned improvement on portable circular sawmill. Plaintiffs, represented by Logan, Stuart, and Edwards, claimed exclusive patent rights in certain Illinois counties, and charge infringement.)

JULY 10. Cassius M. Clay, Kentucky Abolitionist, makes antislavery speech. When officials refuse to permit meeting in state house, Clay speaks outdoors. For two hours Lincoln lies on ground whittling as Clay denounces slavery. Townsend, Lincoln and His Wife's Home Town, 251-54.

JULY 12. Lincoln writes and files Calvin Stigleman's affidavit for continuance in Clark v. Stigleman et al. Files.

JULY 15. Lincoln files defendant's plea in Morrison v. Briggs. Record. Lincoln gives power of attorney to John P. Davies of Dubuque County, Iowa, to locate Iowa land granted Lincoln by Land Warrant No. 52076, 40 acres. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 223-24.

JULY 17. Lincoln writes Edward Seymour of Kaskaskia acknowledging receipt of copy of declaration and notice in Morrison v. Briggs. Lincoln is for defendant. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 224.

AUGUST 7. [Regular train service begins on Alton & Chicago Railroad. Jacksonville Constitutionalist, Aug. 3.]

AUGUST 9. At railroad station Lincoln meets Richard Yates, Anti-Nebraska congressman, returning from Washington to his home in Jacksonville, and talks with him about running for re-election. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 226; Illinois Journal, Aug. 9. (This meeting marks Lincoln's re-entry into politics, caused by repeal of Missouri Compromise, which Lincoln said "aroused him as he had never been before." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, IV, 67.)

AUGUST 11. Lincoln takes mortgage from Ritta Angelica da Silva to Lot 5 in Block 6, Welles and Peck's addition to Springfield. Mortgage is to secure debt of $125. Interest at ten per cent per annum is payable annually. Principal sum is due in four years. (See Sept. 4 and Nov. 24, 1858.) Deed Record PP, pp. 353-54; The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 224-25.

AUGUST 18. In letter to Yates Lincoln recalls their meeting of Aug. 9. "I am disappointed at not having seen or heard from you since I met you more than a week ago at the railroad depot here. I wish to have the matter we spoke of settled and working to its consummation." Lincoln asks permission to announce Yates' candidacy, and encloses draft of notice he wants to insert in "Illinois Journal." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 226.

AUGUST 21. Instead of answering Lincoln's letter, Yates comes to Springfield. (Next day "Illinois Journal" announces Yates' candidacy, although

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worded differently from Lincoln's suggestion. He later wrote that he "took the stump [in 1854] with no broader practical aim or object than to secure, if possible, the re-election of Hon. Richard Yates to Congress." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, IV, 67.) Lincoln writes and signs foreclosure bill in chancery in Robert Irwin & Abraham Lincoln v. Samuel Sidener. Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

AUGUST 22. Lincoln receives letter from Richard S. Thomas in regard to note he and Lincoln hold for collection. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 226.

AUGUST 24. Lincoln writes reply. If owner of note, he says, will agree to take $110 and Lincoln's fee, "settle the matter that way. As to the amount of my fee, take ten dollars, which you and I will divide equally." Ibid.

AUGUST 25. Springfield and Jacksonville. Lincoln, preparing to attend Whig county convention at Winchester on Saturday, goes to Jacksonville, where he stays with Yates. James G. Miner, Abraham Lincoln, Personal Reminiscences, 1-2.

AUGUST 26. Winchester. Scott County Whig convention meets. After business there are calls for Lincoln, who is in audience. "He responded to the call ably and eloquently, doing complete justice to his reputation as a clear, forcible and convincing public speaker." Yates makes short speech. Illinois Journal, Sept. 2; The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 226-27. This is Lincoln's first speech on Kansas-Nebraska Act.

AUGUST 27. Jacksonville. Lincoln spends day with Yates, train schedule preventing him leaving Sunday.

AUGUST 28. Jacksonville and Carrollton. Harris, Democratic candidate for Congress, has challenged Yates to debate at Carrollton. Yates is unable to be present, and writes Harris to that effect. Lincoln carries letter from Jacksonville. Arriving at Carrollton, he speaks in Yates' place, advocating repeal of Nebraska Act but retention of fugitive slave law. Illinois Journal, Register, Sept. I; The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 227.

AUGUST 30. Springfield. Lincoln writes and signs bill of divorce in Mary Sinclair v. John Sinclair. Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

SEPTEMBER 2. Jacksonville. Lincoln, Yates, Harris, and McConnel address political meetings. Yates speaks in afternoon and is followed by Harris; in evening Lincoln speaks at length on Nebraska question and is answered by McConnel. Register, Sept. 6.

SEPTEMBER 4. Springfield. Lincoln has mortgage he took from Ritta Angelica da Silva Aug. 11 recorded. Deed Record PP, 353. Illinois Journal announces that Abraham Lincoln and Stephen T. Logan are candidates for representatives in next General Assembly.

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SEPTEMBER 7. Lincoln writes John M. Palmer of Carlinville, Anti-Nebraska Democrat: "Is it not just to yourself that you should, in a few public speeches, state your reasons, [for opposing Nebraska bill] and thus justify yourself? I wish you would; and yet I say ‘dont do it, if you think it will injure you.’" He also writes to Alexander Morean of Jerseyville, stating that Yates could not visit that area, suggesting Palmer or Gillespie as anti-Nebraska speaker. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 227-28.

SEPTEMBER 8. Lincoln writes to Richard Oglesby in behalf of Yates, discussing latter's drinking habits. Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Original.

SEPTEMBER 9. John Calhoun and Lincoln debate Nebraska question at public meeting in court house. Calhoun leads off with what "Journal" calls able speech, "but if any of his positions were left standing after Mr. Lincoln closed, gentlemen who were present and heard both speeches, could not discover them." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 229-30. Register admits (Sept. 11) that Lincoln, "with his usual ability, made the best of a bad position."

SEPTEMBER 11. Lincoln writes editorial, which "Illinois Journal" publishes, continuing his Saturday debate with Calhoun. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 229-30. [McLean Circuit Court convenes for term of two weeks.]

SEPTEMBER 12. Bloomington. Lincoln addresses German Anti-Nebraska meeting. "The speech was clear and unanswerable, for it was a plain statement of facts, and of sound, strong argument; it was eloquent, for he spoke the deep convictions of truth from a heart warmed with the love of his country, and the love of freedom." Bloomington Pantograph, Sept. 20; The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 230-33.

SEPTEMBER 16. Lincoln appears for petitioner in Blanton and wife v. Withers et al., bill for relief from McLean Circuit Court decree of Apr. Record.

SEPTEMBER 18. [Mrs. Lincoln deeds 80 acres of land in Curran Township, Sangamon County, to Robert Anderson for $1,200. Lincoln joins in deed. Deed Record PP, 530-31.]

SEPTEMBER 20. In Wheeler v. Illinois Central, attorneys argue demurrer to plaintiff's declaration. Court sustains second count in declaration. Lincoln appears for railroad. Record.

SEPTEMBER 23. Lincoln writes Mason Brayman that he has drawn on Illinois Central for $100. "The reason I have taken this liberty is, that since last fall, by your request I have declined all new business against the road, . . . have attended, both at DeWitt and here to a great variety of little business for the Co, most of which, however, remains unfinished, and have received nothing." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 233-34. Blanton and wife v. Withers

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et al. is dismissed by Lincoln. Issue is joined in Chicago & Mississippi Railroad v. McLean County Bank & Asahel Gridley, bill for specific performance, Lincoln for complainant. Court finds for railroad; defendant is ordered to pay trust fund and costs, and granted appeal to Supreme Court. Record.

SEPTEMBER 25. [At Metamora, fall term of Woodford Circuit Court commences.]

SEPTEMBER 26. Douglas, scheduled to speak before Democratic meeting, refuses joint debate with Lincoln which Jesse Fell proposes. Isaac N. Phillips (ed. ), Abraham Lincoln, 52-7. Lincoln listens to Douglas speak in afternoon. "After candle-light" he addresses Whig meeting in courthouse. "Mr. L. spoke of Judge Douglas in a less denunciatory manner than is the custom on such occasions." Register, Sept. 28; Illinois Journal, Sept. 29; The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 234-40.

SEPTEMBER 28. Metamora. In Pearl et al. v. Graham et al., case involving destruction of liquor, from Tazewell on change of venue, Lincoln appears for defendants and obtains change of venue back to Tazewell County. In Jackson v. Whorrall, clerk enters this record: "defendant in person attended by Abraham Lincoln his attorney appeared whereupon the defendant Moves for leave to amend pleas." As defense attorney in Pearl and Pearl v. Kelso et al., trespass, Lincoln petitions for change of venue to Tazewell County. Also changed to Tazewell is Ricketts v. Goings, debt case, Lincoln and W. P. Brown for complainant. Record; Files.

SEPTEMBER 29. Jury hears Davidson v. Burton and returns verdict of $1,700 in favor of plaintiff, represented by Clark, Lincoln, and Manning. In Coventry and Warwick Banking Co. v. Whorrall, record reads: "This day comes the Plaintiff by his attorney N. H. Purple as well as the defendant in person attended by his attorney A. Lincoln." Lincoln enters demurrer, which is sustained. Case is continued at defendant's costs. Also continued at defendant's cost is Common v. Lucas, appeal, Lincoln for appellant. Record.

SEPTEMBER 30. Coventry and Warwick Banking Co. v. Whorrall is continued at cost of defendant, Lincoln's client. Ibid.

OCTOBER 3. Springfield. State Fair is in progress, and politicians make it occasion for meetings. In afternoon Douglas speaks in hall of House. Singleton and Harris follow with short talks. When they have finished, Lincoln announces that he or Trumbull, or both, will answer Douglas next day. Chicago Journal, Oct. 5.

OCTOBER 4. At two o'clock Lincoln takes stand and answers Douglas. He speaks for more than three hours. Douglas is present, interrupts

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occasion ally, and as soon as Lincoln has finished speaks in reply. Illinois Journal, Oct. 5; Register, Oct. 6. Antislavery radicals, under name "Republicans," announce meeting next day. Owen Lovejoy tries to induce Lincoln to attend, but he refuses. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 240-47.

OCTOBER 5. Springfield to Pekin. Lincoln leaves Springfield to attend court in Tazewell County, partly with intention of avoiding entanglement with radicals. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, III, 13.

OCTOBER 6. En route to Pekin. Since there was no railroad connection between Springfield and Pekin, and distance was too great to be covered in one day, Lincoln must have spent most of this day en route. Lincoln writes and sends to Clinton plea and notice in Dye v. Illinois Central. Photo.

OCTOBER 7. Pekin. Lincoln appears for Benjamin Kellogg, Jr., in two cases. In first — Flint v. Kellogg — court finds in favor of plaintiff and assesses his damages at $54.05. In second, forgery case before court May 9, Lincoln writes and files affidavit for continuance. Two other cases are continued. Record; Files.

OCTOBER 9. Lincoln writes order of court, which David Davis signs, permitting complainants in Wilkey et al. v. Prettyman et al. to file bill of revivor. By mutual consent court tries Green v. Glasgow and orders that plaintiff recover $387.45 and costs from defendant, whom Lincoln represents. He also loses chancery suit — ex parte Doolittle — when court decides against petitioner, his client. Ibid.

OCTOBER 10. As defense attorney in heirs of Brown v. Ayers, Lincoln calls witnesses. Photo.

OCTOBER 11. State's attorney dismisses forgery case against Benjamin Kellogg, Jr. Record.

OCTOBER 12. Eight of Lincoln's cases are called. Only one is concluded, Hamilton v. Haines et al., before court May 10. Defendants default, and court decrees that they pay to Lincoln's client amount of their mortgage debt and interest, $2,412.33. After motions are made in several of other cases, all are continued, and court adjourns. Ibid.

OCTOBER 16. Peoria. Lincoln and Douglas meet again. Douglas commences to speak at two o'clock and does not finish until after five. Lincoln takes stand and proposes that meeting adjourn until seven, since his will be extended address. At seven people reassemble, and for three hours Lincoln speaks, substantially as he had at Springfield. Illinois Journal, Oct. 21; Peon & Press, Oct. 18; The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 247-83.

OCTOBER 17. Lacon. Lincoln and Douglas, announced to speak here,

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arrive in town but neither makes address. Lacon Journal, Oct. 11; Herndon & Weik, 300-01.

OCTOBER 19. Springfield. Lincoln returns home. David McCullouch, History of Peoria County, 150.

OCTOBER 24. Urbana. Lincoln arrives for fall term of Champaign Circuit Court. Whitney describes him riding into town "behind his own horse, which was an indifferent, raw-boned specimen, in his own blacksmith-made buggy — a most ordinary looking one." Whitney, 30. In evening Lincoln makes anti-Nebraska speech at court house. Ibid., 215; Urbana Union, Oct. 26.

OCTOBER 25. Notations in Lincoln's hand on judge's docket show that he sits as judge in 11 cases this term. Photo. He writes order of court appointing W. D. Somers guardian ad litem in Porter et al. v. Busey et al., petition for partition continued from May term. Record.

OCTOBER 26. Decatur. Taylor v. Moffett, ejectment, Lincoln for defense, is continued by agreement. Ibid.

OCTOBER 27. Chicago. Lincoln speaks on Nebraska Bill before large audience at North Market Hall. Newspaper comments: "The impression created by Mr. Lincoln on all men, of all parties, was first, that he was an honest man, and second, that he was a powerful speaker. Abraham Lincoln never trims a speech to suit a latitude — he is always the same man." Chicago Journal, Oct. 30; The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 283-84.

OCTOBER 28. Chicago and Urbana. Lincoln returns to Urbana. Ibid.

OCTOBER 29. Urbana to Decatur. Lincoln must have spent entire day driving to Decatur, eastern terminus of Great Western Railroad, which he had to take to get to Naples next day.

OCTOBER 30. Jacksonville and Naples. Lincoln, on his way to Quincy to speak on behalf of Williams, anti-Nebraska candidate for Congress, writes Yates that as he stopped in Jacksonville he learned that the English in Morgan County were dissatisfied about Know-Nothingism. To remedy this he suggests that copies of letter he encloses be placed in hands of "safe friend" in every precinct having substantial number of foreign citizens. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 284.

OCTOBER 31. Naples and Quincy. Lincoln takes stage from Naples to Quincy. It is dark before he reaches there. He meets Abraham Jonas, English Jew who is one of his most faithful supporters. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, IV, 85-6. He writes another letter to Yates, brief, on same subject. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 284-85.

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NOVEMBER 1. Quincy. Lincoln dines and takes tea with Orville H. Browning. In evening he speaks on Nebraska question at Kendall's Hall. Browning, Diary. After speech Lincoln, Jonas, and several others go to "oyster-saloon." Jonas and Lincoln then walk to Quincy House, where they part late at night. Before retiring, Lincoln hunts up stage driver and makes arrangements for his return trip next day. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 285-86.

NOVEMBER 2. Quincy and Naples. Lincoln leaves on stage for Naples "before daylight in the morning." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, IV, 86. [Trip, covering approximately 50 miles, requires full day.]

NOVEMBER 3. Naples and eastward. Lincoln probably takes Great Western from Naples, leaving at 9:00 A.M. and reaching Springfield at I:45 P.M.

NOVEMBER 4. Carlinville? [In his letter of Oct. 31 to Yates Lincoln wrote that he expected "to be back in time to speak at Carlinville on Saturday, if thought expedient."]

NOVEMBER 7. Springfield. Election day. Lincoln is 162nd voter to appear; 587 votes are cast in his precinct. He heads list of candidates, receiving 385 votes, one more than Yates. Lincoln and Logan are elected to legislature. Election Returns. Lincoln writes and files in Sangamon Circuit Court foreclosure bill in Irwin and Lincoln v. Sidener. Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

NOVEMBER 8. Springfield and Clinton. At daylight Lincoln leaves for Clinton, where special term of the DeWitt Circuit Court is held. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 286.

NOVEMBER 9. Clinton. Case which is to have long history is called but continued, Wilson Allen v. Illinois Central Railroad Co. Swett and McKinley represent plaintiff, Lincoln and Moore defendant. Plaintiff claims that in construction of railroad he has been damaged through obstruction of drain and removal of earth. Transcript of Record, Supreme Court Files. Lincoln corrects plea filed in Williams v. Clearwater. Photo.

NOVEMBER 10. Anti-Nebraska legislature having been elected, Lincoln conceives senatorial ambitions. He writes Charles Hoyt of Aurora: "Some friends here are really for me, for the U.S. Senate; and I should be very grateful if you could make a mark for me among your members. Please write me at all events, giving me the names, post-offices, and ‘political position’ of members round about you. Direct to Springfield." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 286. He also writes to John Y. Scammon of Chicago, and writes plea and notice in Lorenzo D. Scott v. Andrew C. Scott, signing "Wickizer & Lincoln." Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

NOVEMBER 11. Clinton and Springfield. Lincoln writes grand jury true bill in People v. A. G. Herndon, and Judge Davis signs. Lincoln writes

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judgment of court in Cushman v. Illinois Central, and Judge Davis signs. Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. Photo. Lincoln writes Jacob Harding of Paris; he suspects that Whig has been elected to legislature from Edgar County. If so, "could you not make a mark with him for me, for U.S. Senator? — I really have some chance." Lincoln returns to Springfield in evening. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 286.

NOVEMBER 12. Springfield. Lincoln writes Browning detailed account of election results. "Yates is beaten from 100 to 150. The whole thing was done in Morgan & Scott counties; in all the rest of the District we did better then we expected. . . . We now understand here that Mr. Williams is beaten also. Schuyler and Brown are said to have played thunder. . . . It looks as if Anti Nebraska will have the H. R. — the Senate doubtful." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 286-87.

NOVEMBER 13. Clinton. Lincoln attends special term of DeWitt Circuit Court. As usual he is concerned with litigation to which Illinois Central is party. He files demurrer in Williams v. Clearwatcr, which is continued. Record.

NOVEMBER 14. Cary v. Illinois Central comes to trial. Jury finds defendant guilty of trespass and assesses plaintiff's damages at $168.53. Dye v. Illinois Central is settled by agreement which includes payment of $100 and costs to plaintiff. Ibid. Lincoln writes agreement. Photo.

NOVEMBER 15. In Cundiff et al. v. Illinois Central, jury finds for defendant. Court overrules motion for new trial. Record. Lincoln acts with Moore for defense in Ryan v. Pierce, Kieth, and Clark, losing case. Photo.

NOVEMBER 16. Two more Illinois Central cases are tried, both before juries. In first case — Law v. Illinois Central — jury finds defendant guilty of trespass and assesses plaintiff's damages at $225. In second, brought by William Spencer, verdict is also for plaintiff, but amount of damages is only $6.50. Lincoln and Wickizer, for defense in Lorenzo Scott v. Joseph Winkel and Andrew Scott, dismiss case by agreement with counsel for plaintiff. Record.

NOVEMBER 17. Clinton and Springfield. Lincoln writes court decree in Billington v. Mattlen et al., chancery to foreclose mortgage. Photo. He reaches home in evening. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 288.

NOVEMBER 20. [Fall term of Sangamon Circuit Court is scheduled to open, but Judge Davis does not appear, and opening is deferred until Tuesday.]

NOVEMBER 21. Springfield. Twelve of Lincoln & Herndon's cases are called, among them one in which Lincoln is principal. This is foreclosure suit, Irwin and Lincoln v. Sidener. Defendant defaults, and court decrees

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that Lincoln recover from Sidener $594.80, principal and interest due on note. Equity of redemption in real estate — E 1/2 of Lot 4 in Block One, Old Town Plat — is barred, and property ordered sold. Record.

NOVEMBER 22. Four of six Lincoln & Herndon cases are continued. Fifth — Welk and Sulver v. Carrigan — is dismissed on motion of plaintiffs, whom Lincoln & Herndon represent. In sixth — Cannan v. Arnold — defendant defaults, and court awards plaintiff, Lincoln's client, property in controversy plus damages of one cent. Ibid.

NOVEMBER 23. Court day is marked by two trials, one before jury, other before court. In both cases verdict is against Lincoln & Herndon's clients, but jury awards damages of only $12.50, court of $23. Another case — Williams v. Springfield Marine and Fire Insurance Co. — is dismissed, each party paying his own costs. Ibid.

NOVEMBER 24. Order of dismissal in Welk and Sulver v. Carrigan, secured Wednesday, is set aside on Lincoln & Herndon's motion. Maxey v. Fuller and Alvord is tried by jury, which returns verdict of $200 in favor of plaintiff, whom Lincoln & Herndon represent. Batterton v. Willis is tried by court and results in verdict of $3.50 for plaintiff, Lincoln's client. Ibid.

NOVEMBER 25. Lincoln & Herndon lose important case when jury returns verdict of $10,000 for plaintiff in Dunlap v. Sayles. Logan, Stuart and Edwards represented plaintiff. In three other cases motions are entered. Ibid. Lincoln writes to N. W. Matheny, clerk of Sangamon Circuit Court, declining office of representative. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 287-88.

NOVEMBER 27. Lincoln writes two important letters. One is to T. J. Henderson, member of House from Stark County, asking for his vote in senatorial election. Other is to Ichabod Godding, asking by what authority he (Lincoln) has been placed on Republican state central committee. He writes Elihu N. Powell of Peoria that, as Powell advised, he declines to serve as representative. He stood for election only to help Yates. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 288-89.

NOVEMBER 28. Lincoln & Herndon have six cases in court. One is jury trial, Fullenwider and Scott v. Arnold. When jury finds for defendant, Lincoln & Herndon, plaintiffs' attorneys, file bill of exceptions. Another case is dismissed by agreement, and balance are continued. Record.

NOVEMBER 29. After disposal of few cases in court, B. S. Edwards announces death of Charles R. Welles, member of bar. Court adjourns, and bar meets in court room. Conkling, Stuart, and Lincoln are appointed committee to bring in resolutions of condolence. Conkling reports resolutions, and meeting adjourns. Record; The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 289-90.

NOVEMBER 30. When court meets at nine o'clock, B. S. Edwards presents resolutions and makes brief eulogy of Welles. He then asks that resolutions

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be inscribed on record and that court adjourn until next day. Judge Davis so orders. Record.

DECEMBER 1. Lincoln & Herndon file amended petition in Evan et al. v. Staley et al. in Sangamon Circuit Court. Photo. To Joseph Gillespie of Madison County Lincoln writes: "I have really got it into my head to try to be United States Senator; and if I could have your support my chances would be reasonably good. But I know, and acknowledge, that you have as just claims to the place as I have; and therefore I do not ask you to yield to me, if you are thinking of becoming a candidate yourself." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 290.

DECEMBER 2. Lincoln's court work consists of entering motion in one case and filing bill of exceptions in another. Record.

DECEMBER 4. Lincoln has another easy day in court. As complainant's solicitors he and Herndon file supplemental bill in one case, while in another they enter motion that defendant be ruled to answer by Feb. 1. Ibid.

DECEMBER 5. The fall term of Sangamon Circuit Court closes. Three Lincoln & Herndon cases are called, but quickly disposed of. Ibid. Lincoln writes divorce decree in Mary Sinclair v. John Sinclair. Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. Mrs. Lincoln buys at John Williams' store $12. 11 worth of assorted cloth, buttons, whalebone, and cord. H. E. Pratt, 146-47.

DECEMBER 6. Lincoln writes John McLean, justice of U.S. Supreme Court, that he understands displacement of present clerk of U.S. Circuit Court is contemplated. He hopes not, for he is very friendly with incumbent. However, if present clerk should be removed, he recommends William Butler. William J. Black, also applicant, "is every way worthy of the office." He writes John T. Stuart's bond as receiver of Mechanics and Farmer's Bank, Springfield, and signs with five others. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 291-92.

DECEMBER 11. In letter to Elihu B. Washburne, Congressman-elect from Galena district, Lincoln writes: "As to my own matter, things continue to look reasonably well. . . . I have not ventured to write all the members in your district, lest some of them should be offended by the indelicacy of the thing — that is, coming from a total stranger. Could you not drop some of them a line?" He writes to Herbert W. Fay, former representative from DeKalb County: "When you were in the legislature . . . either in jest or earnest you suggested me for Senator. My friends are now asking me to make the race. See the representatives and senator of your district and let me know what indorsement I may expect in that locality." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 292-93.

DECEMBER 12. Mrs. Lincoln sends Robert to John Williams' store for two spools silk thread. H. E. Pratt, 147.

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DECEMBER 14. Lincoln writes Washburne again: "So far as I am concerned, there must be something wrong about U.S. Senator, at Chicago. My most intimate friends there do not answer my letters; and I can not get a word from them. Wentworth has a knack of knowing things better than most men. I wish you would pump him, and write me what you get from him. Please do this as soon as you can, as the time is growing short." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 293.

DECEMBER 15. To T. J. Henderson of Stark County, who had written Lincoln that he was not committed, and would vote to prevent slavery extension, Lincoln writes careful letter. "We shall have a terrible struggle with our adversaries. They are desperate, and bent on desperate deeds." With letter he sends copy of his Peoria speech. "You may have seen it before; or you may not think it worth seeing now." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 293-94.

DECEMBER 17. To Leonard Swett of Bloomington Lincoln writes: "I can not learn of a single copy of the Revised Code being here for sale. Sorry; but it seems to be so. Does the Rev. John S. Barger occassi[o]nally cross your path?" The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 294.

DECEMBER 18. In the U.S. Circuit Court Lincoln & Herndon file declaration in Collins et al. v. Cook. Plaintiffs ask damages of $1,000 for failure of defendant to pay two promissory notes of $596.23 and $132.27. Record. Lincoln also writes opinion on question whether Sangamon County or Springfield should support John Fitzgerald, pauper. Photo.; The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 294-95.

DECEMBER 19. In third letter to Washburne, Lincoln tries to overcome objection which one of Washburne's friends — evidently T. J. Turner, Representative-elect from Stephenson County — has offered to his candidacy. Turner has questioned whether Lincoln would be "impartial representative" of whole state. Lincoln answers that he is mortified "that any one should suspect me of an inclination to the contrary." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 295.

DECEMBER 20. Lincoln and Logan lose ejectment case, Morrison v. Briggs, in U.S. Circuit Court. Jury finds for plaintiff, orders that defendant restore property and pay damages of one cent. Record.

DECEMBER 21. Lincoln is concerned with another ejectment case in U.S. Circuit Court, Taylor v. Humphries. In association with Taylor he files declaration, notice, affidavit of service, and bond for costs. In declaration plaintiff alleges that defendant, citizen of Kentucky, has withheld his land and damages him to extent of $5,000. Ibid.

DECEMBER 23. Special election is held to choose Lincoln's successor to legislature. Of 491 voters Lincoln is 38th to appear. Whig candidate, N. M. Broadwell, is defeated. Election Returns.

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[JANUARY I?] Springfield. With selection of U.S. senator impending, Lincoln buys stack of small notebooks and lists members of legislature, labelling each Democrat, Whig, Anti-Nebraska Democrat (D., W., A. N. D. ), or otherwise. His analysis shows, in Senate, 11 Democrats, 9 Whigs, 5 Anti-Nebraska Democrats. In House he finds 30 Democrats, 28 Whigs, 14 Anti-Nebraska Democrats, 1 Nebraska Whig, 1 Abolitionist, 1 vacancy. Lincoln copies this into several notebooks and gives them to friends as guides in senatorial campaigning. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 296-98.

JANUARY 3. Illinois legislature completes organization. Anti-Nebraska members elect speaker and all other officers of House; in Senate they elect secretary and clerk. Lincoln, watching developments with his own candidacy in mind, telegraphs result to E. B. Washbume. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 303.

JANUARY 4. Lincoln writes and signs Lincoln & Herndon to mechanics lien bill in Stigleman, Johnson & Co. v. Paddleford & Co., Sangamon Circuit Court case. Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. Lincoln addresses evening meeting of Colonization Society. He reviews history of slave trade, the society, and apparently intends to have society adopt resolutions, from his draft, for amending Kansas-Nebraska Act. He writes draft for submission to legislature. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 298-301.

JANUARY 5. In Clark v. Stigleman et al. in U.S. Circuit Court, before court at July term, 1854, Lincoln files Calvin Stigleman's affidavit for continuance. Photo. He writes, signs, and swears his own affidavit in Stigleman, Johnson & Co. v. Paddleford & Co. Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

JANUARY 6. In letter to Washburne, Lincoln sums up situation in legislature as it affects his candidacy. "I understand myself as having 26 committals; and I do not think any other one man has ten." But "I do not know that it is much advantage to have the largest number of votes at the start."

Lincoln and B. S. Edwards write legal opinion regarding settlement of estates of Joseph Smith and James Bradford. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 301-04.

JANUARY 12. Lincoln buys pair of gloves and sewing materials for Mrs. Lincoln. H. E. Pratt, 147.

JANUARY 20. [Evening heavy snow, accompanied by strong wind, commences. Illinois Journal, Jan. 23.]

JANUARY 21. Snow and wind continue all day, making travel impossible. Trains are marooned on prairies, telegraph lines are down, no mails arrive, churches abandon services. Ibid. Lincoln, like all residents of Springfield, is snowbound.

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JANUARY 22. Lincoln has two cases in U.S. Circuit Court. In Collins et al. v. Cook, filed Dec. 18, 1854, defendant defaults and Lincoln & Herndon get judgment for $1,453.59 for their clients. In Taylor v. Humphries, ejectment, defendant also defaults, and court orders that Lincoln's client recover property and costs. Record.

JANUARY 23. Travel to and from Springfield is still impossible. Lincoln buys overshoes, small shawl, and for his wife two combs and cotton flannel. H. E. Pratt, 147.

JANUARY 24. First train to reach Springfield in four days comes in from Alton. Snowdrifts continue to bar entrance from north. Illinois Journal, Jan. 25.

JANUARY 25. Logan and Lincoln, representing complainants in Bank of Missouri v. Caldwell et al. in U.S. Circuit Court, file replication. Record.

JANUARY 26. Judgment in Taylor v. Humphries is set aside by agreement, and Logan files defendant's plea. Lincoln writes and files plaintiff's replication. In Bank of Missouri v. Caldwell et al., Logan and Lincoln, now acting together, file motion for appointment of auditor to examine accounts of defendant Galdwell. Motion is argued and auditor appointed. Ibid.; Files.

JANUARY 27. Lincoln buys another "Small Shawl" at John Williams' store. H. E. Pratt, 147.

JANUARY 28. One train from Bloomington forces its way into Springfield — first to arrive from north in more than a week. Illinois Journal, Jan. 29.

JANUARY 31. During afternoon Gillman et al. v. Hamilton et al., case involving trust for benefit of Illinois College, is before Supreme Court. D. A. Smith of Jacksonville, retained with Lincoln by appellants, commences his argument, but court adjourns before he finishes. Record.

FEBRUARY 1. Smith continues his argument in Gillman et al. v. Hamilton et al. Lincoln concludes argument for appellants. At later date court affirms lower court decree. Ibid.; 16 Ill. 225. [Traffic with points north of Springfield on railroad is finally resumed, but with difficulty. Illinois Journal, Feb. 2.]

FEBRUARY 2. Lincoln has another Supreme Court case, People v. Blackford et al., appealed from Circuit Court of Sangamon County. He argues and submits case for appellees, while D. B. Gampbell appears for appellants. Record; 16 Ill. 166.

FEBRUARY 3. Representing defendants in error in Edmunds v. Myers et al., Lincoln argues his last case of term in Supreme Court. Patent rights

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to "horological cradle" — device to relieve mothers of cradle-rocking — are involved. Williams and Lawrence represent plaintiff. Court's decision later reverses lower court decree. Record; 16 Ill. 207.

FEBRUARY 5. Lot 4 in Block One of Old Town Plat — security for which Lincoln held, and which was foreclosed Nov. 21, 1854, is sold at door of court house by master in chancery. Lincoln bids it in for $628.54, that being total debt, interest, and costs. Record.

FEBRUARY 8. Legislature elects Lyman Trumbull U.S. senator. On first ballot Lincoln receives 44 votes, Shields 41 and Trumbull 5, but it is soon apparent that Matteson, not Shields, is real choice of Nebraska men and enough Anti-Nebraska men to elect him. Realizing his own defeat, Lincoln throws votes to Trumbull and elects him on tenth ballot. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 304-06.

FEBRUARY 9. Lincoln writes Washburne explaining how Trumbull's 5 votes triumphed over Lincoln's 44. "It was Govr. Matteson's work. . . . I regret my defeat moderately, but I am not nervous about it. I could have headed off every combination and been elected, had it not been for Matteson's double game — and his defeat now gives me more pleasure than my own gives me pain. On the whole, it is perhaps as well for our general cause that Trumbull is elected." Ibid.

FEBRUARY 13. Trumbull gives victory party. Lincoln's attendance, though unrecorded, can be assumed. Trumbull's election was his handiwork, and to stay away would give Lincoln the appearance of poor loser and lukewarm opponent of slavery extension. Illinois State Historical Library, Springfield, Illinois — John M. Palmer Papers. [Cited as John M. Palmer Papers, Illinois State Historical Library, Springfield,Illinois.]

FEBRUARY 15. Lincoln fetes Anti-Nebraska members of legislature. Journal (Feb. 16) describes event: "A large number of anti-Nebraska members of the Legislature met on yesterday, and partook of a dinner provided by the liberality of Mr. Lincoln, at which there was besides good eating, good speeches made, and excellent sentiments offered. The affair passed off very pleasantly." Lincoln buys castor oil and calomel. H. E. Pratt 151.

FEBRUARY 19. Lincoln & Herndon files in Sangamon Circuit Court petition for partition in May L. Welles, widow of Charles, v. four defendants named Welles & Great Western Railroad. Record. Lincoln has his wheelbarrow repaired ($1) at carriage shop. Obed Lewis Account Books.

FEBRUARY 20. Ritta Angelica da Silva gives Lincoln her promissory note for $125, payable in four years with interest at 10 per cent (see June 9, 1860). To secure note she gives mortgage on Lot 5 in Block Six, Welles and Peck's Addition to Springfield. Record.

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FEBRUARY 21. To W. H. Henderson Lincoln writes: "I am not Senator. I have to content myself with the honor of having been the first choice of a large majority of the fiftyone members who finally made the election." A less good humored man, Lincoln says, would not have permitted his many supporters to surrender to Trumbull's five. "I could not, however, let the whole political result go to ruin, on a point merely personal to myself." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 306-07.

FEBRUARY 24. Lincoln buys pair of boys' boots ($2.75). H. E. Pratt, 147.

FEBRUARY 28. Lincoln files bill in Alexander v. Darneille. Record.

MARCH 1. Robert Lincoln is sent to John Williams' store for half-pound of tea. H. E. Pratt, 147.

MARCH 2. Lincoln and Nathaniel Hay settle long-standing account. Hay takes up note for $200 which he borrowed from Lincoln in Apr., 1849, replacing it with new note for same amount. He gives Lincoln due-bill for $16.80, amount of unpaid interest on note. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 307.

MARCH 3. Lincoln buys pair boys' boots for $1.50 at John Williams' store, and "Pearl Powder" and "Woods Restorative" from his druggist. Williams &Co. Day Book; H. E. Pratt, 151.

MARCH 5. Lincoln pays his carriage maker $43.75 cash on account. Obed

Lewis Account Books. He does paper work in three Sangamon Circuit Court cases: petition to execute deeds in Mary L. Welles et al. v. John Hofferkemp et al.; bill in chancery in Matheny v. Mary L. Welles et al.; bill in Plunket v. Gaines and Cartwright. Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. Photo.

MARCH 7. Lincoln buys bottle of "Lubins Extract" from his druggist. H. E. Pratt, 151.

MARCH 8. Lincoln writes to Dr. William Fithian advice about contemplated litigation. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 307.

MARCH 10. Lincoln apologizes to firm of New York lawyers for not having acknowledged receipt of bond they sent him in December. "When I received the bond, I was dabbling in politics; and, of course, neglecting business," he confesses. "Having since been beaten out, I have gone to work again." He suggests they ask H. E. Dummer of Beardstown to handle work. He then writes Dummer what he has done. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 307-08.

MARCH 15. Lincoln buys 10˘ worth of "Sweet Oil" at his drug store. H. E. Pratt, 151.

MARCH 16. Lincoln writes A. L. Brewer about claim — Kelly v. Estate of Blackledge — which Herndon filed in probate court of Logan County. He

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says that he made special trip to Lincoln last fall, only to find that no action had been taken on claim. On Apr. 2 he will be there for court, and will give special attention to matter. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 308-09.

MARCH 19. Due to failure of judge to appear, opening of spring term of Sangamon Circuit Court is deferred until Tuesday. In Probate Court Lincoln settles claim against estate of C. R. Welles, deceased. Record. He writes Dummer that Stephen T. Logan is willing to stand for election to vacancy on Supreme Court, and that he is anxious not to be beaten if nominated. Lincoln is also anxious for his success. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 309.

MARCH 20. Judge Davis appears, and Sangamon Circuit Court convenes. Forty-four of Lincoln & Herndon's cases are called. In most they represent plaintiffs, and secure rules requiring defendants to answer. Two criminal cases, in both of which they represent defendants, are dropped; in two civil actions they obtain judgments for $385.48 and $109.90. Record.

MARCH 21. Lincoln & Herndon have six cases in court. None comes to trial, although by agreement with opposing counsel several are set for hearing later in term. Record.

MARCH 22. Twenty-three Lincoln & Herndon cases are called in Sangamon Circuit Court. In nine suits judgments are obtained, amounts ranging from $93.25 to $190.08. Others are either dismissed or continued. Ibid.

MARCH 23. Lincoln's court work consists of entering motions and filing pleas in seven cases. Ibid. He joins with Edwards and Stuart in letter to O. H. Browning in regard to Logan's candidacy for Supreme Court. When vacancy became imminent, they say, there seemed to be a universal opinion that Logan was man to fill it. "We shall be glad," they add, "if you will hoist Logan's name, in your Quincy papers." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 309-10.

MARCH 24. Lincoln has busy, though not very successful, day in court. In slander suit jury finds against his client, while court hands down adverse decisions in two cases. Three cases are dismissed for want of bond for costs, and in two others judgments against his clients, for $90.85 and $468.61, are entered. He succeeds in having motion to dismiss case overruled, and wins one case tried by court. Record.

MARCH 26. Three of Lincoln & Herndon's four cases before Sangamon Circuit Court are continued. Fourth, trespass suit entitled Eastman v. Payne, is tried by jury. Lincoln & Herndon represent plaintiff, but jury finds for defendant. Ibid.

MARCH 27. Lincoln & Herndon settle two cases by agreement. Cass v. Staley is dismissed when defendant, whom they represent, agrees to pay $5 of costs. In Jack v. Swope, in which they also represent defendant,

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judgment is entered against their client for $495. Execution is stayed until June term, with leave to defendant to make defense. Ibid.

MARCH 28. In Lawson v. Post et al., with Logan, Lincoln & Herndon representing plaintiff, jury awards damages of $104 75. In another case Lincoln secures divorce on ground that husband is habitual drunkard and has deserted their client. Several other cases are continued after motions are entered and pleas filed. Ibid. In Welles et al. v. Hofferkemp et al., Lincoln writes report of his client, administrix, supplemental petition to execute deeds, and court order for his client to convey real estate. Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

MARCH 29. Two of Lincoln & Herndon's six cases come to trial. In appeal from judgment of justice of peace, court finds for their client and awards damages of $79.95. In Alsop v. North American Insurance Co., jury brings in verdict of $2,000 in favor of plaintiff. Lincoln & Herndon are attorneys for defendant. Record. In Mary Welles et al. v. Julia Welles et al. Lincoln writes two commissioner's reports, answer of N. W. Broadwell, guardian of Julia Welles, and court decree. Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

MARCH 30. Twenty-four members of Springfield bar, among them Lincoln, Logan, Stuart, Edwards, and Conkling, write open letter to David Davis, requesting permission to announce him as candidate for re-election to bench. Illinois Journal, Mar. 31; The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 310. In court a number of Lincoln's cases are called, and two are tried. In appeal entitled Rape v. Levlock court decides against his client, plaintiff; other case is taken under advisement. Record. For third consecutive day, Lincoln writes legal papers for his client Mary L. Welles. In Matheny v. Welles et al. he writes answer of four witnesses named Cummins, report of Mary L. Welles, defendant's answer to bill in chancery (which Herndon signs), answer of W. H. Herndon, guardian of four Welles minors (Herndon signs), and decree of court. Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. Lincoln also composes defendant's plea in Beck v. Chicago & Alton Railroad, and defendant's reply in Tinney v. Frederick et al. Photo.

MARCH 31. Last day of spring term. Two related cases, Irwin v. Lindley and Baker, and Williams v. Lindley and Baker, in both of which Lincoln & Herndon represent defendants, occasion hard-fought legal battle. When issue is finally joined, court awards plaintiffs damages of $1,013.32 and $1,014.48. Lincoln & Herndon take appeal to Supreme Court. Record. Lincoln buys $1.50 pair of boys' boots, and Mrs. Lincoln buys $4.00 "French Collar" and $1.56 worth of lace. H. E. Pratt, 147.

APRIL 2. Lincoln. [No Logan Circuit Court records for this term are known to exist, but Lincoln's presence at spring term is shown by his letters of March 16 and July 27 to A. L. Brewer. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 308, 315-16.]

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APRIL 9. Bloomington. McLean Circuit Court opens with meeting of bar called in consequence of death of D. B. Campbell, state's attorney. John T. Stuart is chosen chairman, W. W. Orme secretary. On Lincoln's motion, committee of A. Lincoln, A. Gridley, C. H. Moore, John Clark, and A. H. Saltonstall is instructed to draft resolutions. Record.

APRIL 10. Lincoln attends to cases for Illinois Central. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 325-26.

APRIL 11. One Illinois Central case in which Lincoln appears is Bishop v. Illinois Central, decided against company Apr. 20, 1854. New trial was granted, and case is continued. Record.

APRIL 17. Eighth Circuit Bar reconvenes and Lincoln presents resolution on death of David B. Campbell. Ibid.; The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 310-11. Judge Davis and John T. Stuart make brief remarks, and meeting adjourns. Illinois Journal, Apr. 27. Lincoln writes and sends to Clinton papers in DeWitt County case: declaration and praecipe in Dungey v. Spencer. Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

APRIL 19. In Ward and Miller v. Illinois Central, jury is sworn, and defendant's attorneys dismiss appeal. Record.

APRIL 21. Springfield. Lincoln, signing firm name, writes and files praecipe in Lewis et al. v. Dawson and Mace in Sangamon Circuit Court. Photo.

APRIL 23. Metamora. Woodford Circuit Court convenes for three days. Lincoln has one case — Denman & Co. v. Builder, appeal — and that is settled by agreement. Judgment for $86.60 is entered in favor of plaintiff, his client, and execution stayed for 90 days. Record.

APRIL 24. Lincoln has seven cases, six of which come to trial. He loses two tried by juries, while three of four tried by court are decided against his clients. Seventh case is settled by agreement, with judgment for $34.18 in favor of Lincoln's client. Ibid.

APRIL 25. Lincoln, representing defendant, wins trespass suit before jury. As solicitor for petitioner he also dismisses divorce case. Record. He writes summary of Coventry and Warwick Banking Co. v. Whorrall. Photo.

APRIL 26. Springfield. Lincoln writes, and signs with 30 attorneys, endorsement of Stephen A. Corneau as Supreme Court clerk. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 311.

APRIL 28. Lincoln has $7 worth of repairs made on buggy (new shaft, singletree and bar, repairing shaft iron, setting four tires, repairing seat) at Lewis' carriage shop. Obed Lewis Account Books.

APRIL 30. Pekin. Spring term of Tazewell Circuit Court commences. Only two of Lincoln's cases are called. In one defendant defaults and

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writ of scire facias is issued; in other, Lincoln and Parker, representing plaintiff, dismiss suit at their client's costs. Record. Lincoln writes and signs "Saltonstall & Lincoln" to cross-bill in Lucy Matthews v. Josiah Matthews. Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — David Davis Papers, Illinois State Historical Library, Springfield, Illinois. Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

MAY 1. Five of Lincoln's cases, continued from fall term, are called. Hitchcock, adm., v. Glasgow, action in debt, is dismissed by plaintiff. Lincoln represents defendant. Ruble v. Cushman, appeal from justice's court in which Lincoln appears for plaintiff, is tried by jury, which finds in favor of plaintiff. Record. Lincoln writes joinder to plea in Rickets v. Goings, in which he acts with Shephert. Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

MAY 2. Lincoln has one case in court. Mark v. Bailey, chancery suit in which he is one of three solicitors representing defendants. Complainants' solicitors dismiss suit as against several defendants, and continue it against others (see May 9, 1856). Record.

MAY 3. Two cases occupy Lincoln in court. In one he represents defendant in action brought to collect promissory note for $98.68. Plaintiff's attorney dismisses suit. Second case, Mickle v. Pike et al., is appeal in which Lincoln represents defendants. Plaintiff drops case against Pike, and jury awards $18.37 damages against Skinner, other defendant. Ibid. [Lincoln's account at John Williams & Co. is charged $3 for "9 yds. Somerset Lawn." H. E. Pratt, 147.]

MAY 4. Sensational case of Pearl et al. v. Graham et al., which commenced in Tazewell Circuit Court year previous, is concluded. Plaintiffs drop case as to four defendants. Remaining 17 defendants stand trial with Lincoln as their attorney. Jury finds six guilty and assesses plaintiffs' damages at $50. Others are found not guilty. Record. Lincoln writes and files affidavit of Benjamin Kellogg Jr. in Flint v. Kellogg. He writes for complainant lengthy bill in Harris Lime Rock Co. v. Samuel B. Harris et al. Photo.

MAY 5. Lincoln defends U. H. Crosby on charge of obstructing road with fence. Jury finds for plaintiff and assesses his damages at $1; Lincoln files bill of exceptions. Record. Lincoln gives Crosby receipt for $5 — "on my fee in his road suit in the Tazewell circuit court." Original, Metamora Court House. He writes defendant's instructions in Gipps v. Grosby (see May 3, 1856). Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — David Davis Papers, Illinois State Historical Library, Springfield, Illinois. Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

MAY 6. Lincoln writes injunction bond in Flint v. Kellogg, which defendant signs. Photo.

MAY 7. Lincoln's only case. People v. Shatter and Shatter, indictment for cheating and fraud, is continued. Record. He files injunction bond in Flint v. Kellogg. Photo.

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MAY 8. Representing plaintiff, Lincoln tries Ricketts v. Goings before jury, which returns verdict of $220 in favor of his client (see Oct.4, 1855). On behalf of petitioner in Opdycke v. Opdycke he secures permission to sell real estate, and writes and files order of court. Record; Photo.

MAY 9. Gill v. McGrew, assumpsit case in which Lincoln is one of plaintiff's attorneys, is dismissed by agreement at defendant's costs. Record. He writes agreement in Ayers v. Brown and Brown. Photo. [Mrs. Lincoln buys and charges $1.58 worth of ribbon. H. E. Pratt, 147.

MAY 10. Norman H. Purple, representing defendant in Ricketts v. Goings, tried Tuesday, enters motion to arrest judgment and set aside verdict. After argument, case is continued. In divorce case — Lucy Matthews v. Josiah Matthews — Lincoln writes and files defendant's cross bill. Record. Lincoln files his bill in Harris Lime Rock Co. v. Harris. Photo.

MAY 11. Lincoln has three cases. One is tried before jury, which fails to agree; another is dismissed; third is continued. Record. Lincoln gives Benjamin Kellogg, Jr. receipt for $50 — "in full balance of all fees, up to this date, and also one dollar and a quarter, to be applied on the next fee." He writes bill of exceptions in Gipps v. Crosby. Photo.; Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

MAY 14. Springfield and Clinton. From Springfield Lincoln answers inquiry regarding term of service of member of his Black Hawk War company. He does not remember whether discharge was given, and does not know where to find company rolls. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 311-12. At Clinton, where DeWitt Circuit Court is in session, Lincoln appears in two cases. Record. Lincoln's account at John Williams' store is charged 10˘ for "Sewing Silk," for which Mrs. Lincoln sent "Son." H. E. Pratt, 147.

MAY 15. Clinton. Williams v. Clearwater is tried by jury, which finds defendant guilty. Record.

MAY 16. In Spencer v. Illinois Central, trespass, jury finds for plaintiff and assesses his damages at $5.33 1/3. Ibid. Lincoln writes and files plea in Campbell v. Warner. He and Moore are for Warner. William H. Hanna, who is suing Whitlock, pays Lincoln $20 retainer. Photo.

MAY 17. Lincoln and C. H. Moore represent Illinois Central Railroad Company in assumpsit case in which jury finds for plaintiff and assesses his damages at $100. Stuart and Edwards represent plaintiff. Record. This is one of cases covered by Lincoln's draft of Sept. 14, 1855 for fees.

MAY 18. On behalf of Milton K. Alexander of Paris, Lincoln files ejectment suit against John Warner, and gets rule on defendant to plead within 20 days. In two other cases Lincoln appears as defendants' attorney, files

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and proves execution of powers of attorney, and confesses judgments for $186.38 and $169.99. Ibid. He writes and files pleas in Fairchild v. Madden, for defendant. In Johnson and Johnson v. Illinois Central he writes and files four pleas, for defendant with Moore. Photo.

MAY 19. Lincoln files defendant's pleas in Fairchild v. Madden. Jury finds Madden guilty. He files defendant's answer in Warner and Moore v. Slatten et al., and executes bond of James Kelly in Kelly v. Evans, executor of Jesse D. Blackledge, deceased. Record; Photo.

MAY 21. Urbana. "May term of the Circuit Court of Champaign Co. is in session in this place this week, Hon. David Davis presiding," Urbana Union notes (May 24). "The lawyers who usually attend the sittings of our court are present on this occasion. The business on the Dockets is of that character that does not require much time — being mostly suits that are not litigated. Several indictments found at the last term come up for trial."

MAY 22. Lincoln writes injunction bond in Brown v. Robinson, which George W. Brown and Edward Ate sign. Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

MAY 23. Lincoln writes chancery bill in Brown v. Robinson. Ibid.

MAY 25. Danville. Vermilion Circuit Court convenes for spring term. Eight of Lincoln's cases are called and quickly disposed. Record. He writes Jacob Harding of Paris "Prairie Beacon": "I should be glad for you to put in your paper of this week, the names of Stephen T. Logon, as a candidate for Judge of the Supreme Court; and of Stephen A. Corneau, for Clerk of the Supreme Court." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 312.

MAY 26. Lincoln has busy day in court. Three of his cases are tried before court, and every verdict is in favor of his clients. In fourth case defendant defaults, and Lincoln obtains judgment for $114.70. Three other cases are dismissed by agreement. Record. Lincoln writes defendant's plea in Jones and Culbertson v. William Allen, signing "Lincoln & Lamon p. d." Photo. [Someone has broken shaft on Lincoln's buggy at home, and new shaft is attached for $1.50. Obed Lewis Account Books.]

MAY 28. Lincoln takes part in four jury trials. In Persons v. Harris, and Persons v. Harris et al., he and Lamon represent defendants. In both cases plaintiffs are awarded damages: $74.50 and costs in first, and $45 and costs in second. Miliken v. Jefferson, in which Lincoln is one of several attorneys for plaintiff, results in verdict for defendant; in Martin v. Frothingham et al. his client is also defeated. Record.

MAY 29. Lincoln and Lamon obtain verdict for $137.89 for plaintiff in Jones et al. v. Madden et al. tried by court. In two other suits defendants

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default, and Lincoln and Lamon obtain judgments. Their other cases are settled by agreement, or dismissed, or continued. Ibid. He writes, signs "Davis, Lincoln & Lamon p. d.," and files pleas and notice in Leonard v. Taylor. Photo.

MAY 30. Lincoln and Lamon have 11 suits for damages against Great Western Railroad Company. All except one are settled by agreement, company paying damages ranging from $50 to $300. In contested case, Lincoln and Lamon obtain verdict for $560 for their client. Record. He writes court order in two railroad cases. Photo.

MAY 31. Lincoln has only two cases, both of which are continued. Record. He writes declaration and notice, for plaintiff, in Gatling v. Prather. He writes court decree in Knight v. Carter. Original owned by King Hostick, Springfield, Ill.

JUNE 1. Court tries Partlow v. Partlow, petition for partition, and finds for plaintiff. Record.

JUNE 2. Lincoln writes and files replication in Clark v. Hoxworth et al. Photo.

JUNE 4. Springfield. From Nathaniel Hay of Springfield Lincoln buys 2,000 bricks for foundation of fence. Hay's bill is $16. Files of Hay Estate, Probate Court. Election to fill vacancy on Supreme Court, and on "Maine Law" prohibiting sale of intoxicants is held. Returns are not available, but there can be little question that Lincoln voted.

JUNE 7. Lincoln writes Henry C. Whitney: "Logan is worse beaten than any other man ever was since elections were invented —- beaten more than 1200 in this county. It is conceded on all hands that the Prohibitory law is also beaten." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 313.

JUNE 11. Summer term of Sangamon Circuit Court opens with Judge Emerson on bench in place of David Davis. Lincoln & Herndon have 20 cases, 11 of which are dismissed or continued. In most others defendants default, and Lincoln & Herndon secure judgments for their clients. Four of these are for Jacob Bunn, Springfield grocer, and one — $190 in amount — is for Herndon himself. Record. Lincoln writes agreement filed in Correll et al. v. McDaniell et al. He and Herndon are for defendant. Photo.

JUNE 12. Bunn v. Jackson, in which Lincoln & Herndon represent plaintiff, is tried by court, which finds for plaintiff and awards damages of $451.25. Among their other cases are two criminal actions. In first — indictment for selling whiskey without license — their clients default and their bond is declared forfeit. In second — manslaughter — they file affidavit for continuance, which is allowed. Record.

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JUNE 13. Only one of Lincoln & Herndon's eight cases comes to trial. That is Booth and Allen v. Vandusen, appeal from justice of peace. Court tries case, and affirms judgment of Justice of Peace Court in sum of $44.10. Lincoln & Herndon represent plaintiff. Ibid.

JUNE 14. Lincoln & Herndon file pleas in two cases. In third, Robbins et al. v. Taylor, they argue demurrer. Court takes matter under advisement. Ibid.

JUNE 15. Court overrules Lincoln & Herndon's demurrer in part and sustains it in part. Aside from this, their court work is limited to securing continuances in two cases. Ibid.

JUNE 16. Robbins et al. v. Taylor is settled by agreement, judgment for $110 and costs entered against defendant, Lincoln's client. Rusk v. Shoup, appeal from justice of peace, is tried by jury of six, which returns verdict for defendant, whom Lincoln & Herndon represent. Pleas are filed in several other cases. Ibid.

JUNE 18. Lincoln's court work takes little time. In one case agreement to refer question to master in chancery is made; in second suit master files his report. Ibid.

JUNE 19. Lincoln is one of defendants' solicitors in Correll et al. v. McDaniell et al., suit to break will. Jury tries case, but is unable to agree and is dismissed (see Nov. 30). Another case, in which Lincoln & Herndon appear for plaintiff, is settled by agreement, defendant paying $35 and costs. Organ and Kessler, defendants in liquor case who defaulted on June 12, put up $100 for their appearance next term. Ibid.

JUNE 20. One chancery suit. Smith et al. v. Westenberger, is Lincoln & Herndon's court work for day. As solicitors for complainants they file amended bill. Respondent makes no defense, and is ordered to pay complainants $126, and to execute deed for land. Ibid.

JUNE 21. Lincoln & Herndon file pleas and enter motions in six cases. In seventh, Hall v. Crouch, they argue demurrer which defendant's attorneys filed. Demurrer is overruled, and defendant is given leave to plead. Ibid.

JUNE 22. Ten of Lincoln & Herndon's 12 cases are continued. Two are tried by court. In Freeman & Co. v. Tenny et al., defendants, whom they represent, are ordered to pay plaintiff $77.93. In Noble v. Gaines, appeal from justice's court, court finds for defendant, their client. Ibid. Z. A. Enos, Sangamon County surveyor, completes survey of 36-acre tract near northwest Springfield which Lincoln is handling for Mrs. Maria L. Bullock of Lexington, Ky., Mrs. Lincoln's aunt. Surveyor's Record B, 172.

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JUNE 23. Lincoln, acting for Mrs. Maria Bullock, sells farm land at public auction for sums aggregating $1,427.92 1/4. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 323-25. In court, defendants in two chancery suits default, and Lincoln & Herndon secure orders for partition. As complainant's solicitors they dismiss third case, while fourth — their last — is continued. This is final day of summer term. Record.

JUNE 25. Lincoln receives $143.68 in cash from purchasers of Bullock land. Acting as attorney for Mrs. Bullock, he deeds two tracts to purchasers, John Connelley and Nathaniel Hay, taking their notes in payment. Out of cash he pays costs of sale, which aggregate $42.70. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 313, 323-25.

JUNE 27. Lincoln sends Mrs. Bullock certificate of deposit at Clark's Exchange Bank for $101, balance of cash collected Monday. Ibid.

JUNE 29. Bloomington. Lincoln registers at Matteson House. Bloomington National Flag, July 6. [Matteson House was shortly afterward called Pike House. Lincoln is probably on his way to Chicago, and stops off in Bloomington. Lincoln's account at Corneau & Diller, drugs, is charged 25˘ for bottle of vermifuge. H. E. Pratt, 151.]

JULY 2. Chicago. U.S. Circuit and District Courts for new Northern District of Illinois convene. Judges McLean and Drummond preside. "The dockets are heavy, and include many important cases." Chicago Democratic Press, July 2. Lincoln attends session. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 314.

JULY 3. Clark v. Stigleman et al. transferred from Springfield on creation of Northern District, is sent back by agreement of attorneys. Lincoln represents plaintiff. Record. [Lincoln's account at John Williams' store is charged 25˘ for thread and "doz. Button Molds," and his drug store account is charged 15˘ for castor oil. H. E. Pratt, 147, 151.]

JULY 5. Lincoln sends $480 to Aaron L. Chapin, president of Beloit College, which Judge Davis gave him to deposit in Chicago bank to Ghapin's credit. He sends deposit certificate. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 314.

JULY 6. [Mrs. Lincoln buys $18.40 worth of wallpaper at John Williams', and spends 80˘ at drug store for cream of tartar, soda, and soda water. H. E. Pratt, 147, 151.]

JULY 7. [Sometime during session of U.S. courts in Chicago Lincoln goes to Rockford, where he studies reaper manufactured by Manny & Co. He has been retained for defense in McCormick v. Manny & Co., and during June had interview with P. H. Watson, prominent patent lawyer of Washington, D.C., in regard to case. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 314.]

JULY 9. Chicago Democratic Press reports: "Lawyers from Abroad. — The following are among the legal gentlemen now in attendance upon the

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United States Courts sitting in this city: Messrs. Abraham Lincoln, O. H. Browning, Archibald Williams, Joel Manning, B. S. Edwards, Chas. Ballance, E. N. Powell, Judge H. M. Weed, A. L. Merriam, J. K. Cooper, N. H. Purple, W. F. Brian, Judge Drury, and Hon. James Grant."

JULY 10. Lincoln writes Charles Hoyt of Aurora: "The U.S. Court is in session here now; and we have succeeded, by agreement with Edwards, in getting your case, and the three Rock-Island cases, dismissed, with leave to the plaintiff to reinstate them by the next term, if he desires." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 314. Another of Lincoln's cases, Taylor v. Humphries, before U.S. Circuit Court at Springfield in Jan., is sent back to Southern District. Record.

JULY 11. Lincoln has important case, Forsythe v. Peoria. He and Williams represent plaintiff, Browning defendant. After court they take tea with R. S. Blackwell. Browning, Diary.

JULY 12. Arguments commence in Forsythe v. Peoria. Ibid.

JULY 13. Arguments in Forsythe v. Peoria are concluded, and Judge McLean charges jury strongly in favor of defendant. Jury is still out when court adjourns. Ibid.

JULY 14. Lincoln and Williams lose their case, for jury brings in verdict for defendant. Ibid.

JULY 18. Springfield. Lincoln returns home, and is busy in U.S. Circuit Court. With Logan, he files exceptions to auditor's report in Bank of Missouri v. Caldwell et al. On their motion, leave is given to take further testimony. Defendant Ryan is also ordered to answer by first Monday in Sept. [Sept. 3] Record.

JULY 21. Robert Lincoln fetches half-pound of gunpowder tea from John Williams' store. H. E. Pratt, 147.

JULY 23. Lincoln reminds P. H. Watson that he has not forwarded papers in McCormick v. Manny. He secured copies of bill and answer at Chicago, but he asks Watson to send evidence as fast as possible. "During August, and the remainder of this month, I can devote some time to the case, and, of course, I want all the material that can be had." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 314-15.

JULY 27. Z. A. Enos, Sangamon County surveyor, completes survey of more of Mrs. Bullock's land, at Lincoln's request. Photo. Lincoln writes Charles Ballance of Peoria: "Your letters of the 23rd. & 24th., the first having nothing, and the other $20 in it, are both received. Money is always acceptable to me; but when I left Chicago, I was not in ‘extremis’ on that subject. Browning has written me that the court was hung in our Hall case." He also writes to Anson L. Brewer about status of Kelly v. Blackledge, Logan County estate case. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 315-16.

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AUGUST 1. Lincoln, representing Maria L. Bullock, buys land for Springfield real estate addition from Elijah lies. Record. He writes, for defendant, notice to take depositions in Tinney v. Ingwerson et al. Photo.

AUGUST 4. Lincoln buys more land, for Mrs. Bullock, from heirs of Matheny, paying $50. Record; The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 323-25. He deeds to Elijah Iles his own equity (for legal services) in Mrs. Bullock's land, and writes Mrs. Bullock's certification, with Josiah Francis signing as witness. He appends surveyor's certification also. He writes petition and notice in Jane Allen, administrator of Robert Allen, deceased v. Robert Allen Jr., signing "Lincoln & Herndon for Petitioner." He adds his affidavit that he delivered true copy to defendant. Record; Photo.

AUGUST 6. Lincoln writes demurrer in Doyle et al. v. Lewis et al. in U.S. Circuit Court, and signs Logan's name as well as his own. Brown University Library, Providence, Rhode Island. — Original.

AUGUST 9. Lincoln receives letter from Owen Lovejoy of Princeton. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 316. He also has execution of Stigleman, Johnson and Guild against Manning A. Bruce levied on land which Bruce had mortgaged, and files certificate of levy for record. Herndon later (Sept. 1857) gets judgment by default for $138.05. Harvard University Library, Cambridge, Massachusetts. — Original; Record.

AUGUST 10. Lincoln purchases paper of "Horse Powder" at drug store. H. E. Pratt, 151.

AUGUST 11. Lincoln answers Lovejoy's letter. Lovejoy has evidently advocated fusion of opponents of Nebraska Democracy into one party, but Lincoln fears it is premature. In his opinion no such movement can succeed unless it is joined by remnants of Know-Nothingism, and he believes that party still has hopes of success under their own organization. "Just now . . . I fear to do any thing, lest I do wrong." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 316-17.

AUGUST 13. Lincoln writes newspaper advertisement of sale of land, Mrs. Bullock's, at public auction Saturday afternoon. Ibid.

AUGUST 15. In letter to George Robertson, former member of Congress, now professor at Transylvania College, Lincoln foreshadows his "House Divided" speech. He is convinced that there is no prospect of peaceful emancipation, and is afraid country is no longer united on abstract principle of liberty. "Our political problem now is, ‘Can we, as a nation, continue together permanently-forever-half slave, and half free?’" The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 317-18. Robert Lincoln brings home from John Williams' store half-pound of gunpowder tea charged (63˘) to his father's account. H. E. Pratt, 147.

AUGUST 17. Lincoln writes amendment to chancery bill in Van Bergen v. Singleton, signing "Logan, Lincoln & Herndon for complainant." Photo. Lincoln buys paper of "Horse Powder" at drug store. H. E. Pratt, 151.

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AUGUST 18. Acting for Mrs. Bullock, Lincoln has several lots sold in Bullock's Addition to Springfield sold. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 323-25. Mrs. Lincoln buys and charges dress goods at John Williams' store. H. E. Pratt, 147.

AUGUST 19. For James Kelly of New Lisbon, Ohio, Lincoln writes power of attorney authorizing Lincoln & Herndon or either of them to do anything necessary in case of Blackledge in Logan County. He sends document for Kelly's signature. Original owned by Mrs. Edna Orendorff MacPherson, Springfield, Ill.

AUGUST 20. For Mrs. Bullock, Lincoln deeds lots purchased at Saturday's sale to four different persons, taking notes from all except Elijah lies, who paid in cash. He pays costs of sale, $38.10, and gives Matheny's heirs $50 for quit-claim deed, removing cloud from title. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 323-25; Record.

AUGUST 21. Lincoln sends John L. Miller of Metamora bill of complaint, with note: "Herewith is the Bill. Fill in the names of the arbitrators in the blank left for that purpose. Also, get copies of your deed and bond, as indicated in the bill, mark them (A) & (B) and file them with the Bill." He makes deposition that he is "the identical Abraham Lincoln, who was Captain of a company . . . in the war with the British band of Sacs . . . . A. D. 1832," for obtaining additional bounty under act of Congress of Mar. 3, 1855. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 319.

AUGUST 24. Lincoln writes long letter on slavery in politics to his old friend Joshua Speed. He defines his position as no more than opposing "the extension of slavery," yet admits unwillingness to disturb institution where it already exists. His political classification is disputed point. "I think I am a whig; but others say there are no whigs, and that I am an abolitionist. . . . I am not a Know-Nothing. That is certain." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 320-23.

AUGUST 27. Lincoln sends Maria Bullock certificate of deposit at Clark's Exchange Bank, Springfield, for $106.90, part of proceeds of lot sale Aug. 20. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 323-25.

AUGUST 28. Isaac Lindsay borrows $600 from Lincoln. Ten per cent per annum is rate of interest, and note calls for payment of principal in 12 months. Mortgage Book I, 69.

AUGUST 31. Lincoln writes Mrs. Bullock detailed account of business transacted for her. He sends her $2.08, balance of money in his hands. "The notes are in my hands, & the mortgages are at the Recorders office subject to my control. They are all in your name." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 323-25.

SEPTEMBER 1. Concerned about failure of associate counsel in McCormick v. Manny to keep him informed of developments, Lincoln writes Manny & Co., asking whether case is to be heard Sept. 20, as originally planned.

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The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 325. To secure loan made Tuesday, Isaac Lindsay and wife give Lincoln mortgage on two lots in business section of Springfield. Mortgage Record I, 69. Lincoln buys box of pills from his druggist. H. E. Pratt, 151.

SEPTEMBER 3. [Lincoln. Logan Circuit Court convenes.]

SEPTEMBER 4. [Sometime during week Lincoln tries Kelly v. Blackledge, in regard to which he wrote A. L. Brewer Mar. 11. Defendant contests case, but Lincoln obtains judgment for his client for full amount. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 326.]

SEPTEMBER 5. Lincoln attends sheriff's sale resulting from Stigleman et al., v. Bruce. He writes memorandum of sales. Photo.

SEPTEMBER 6. Carlinville. Lincoln has important case in Macoupin Circuit Court, brought from St. Clair County on change of venue, Clark and Morrison v. Page and Bacon. Trumbull and Koerner represent complainants, Lincoln and Underwood defendants, St. Louis bankers and financiers. Lincoln writes order of court which gives both parties leave to amend their pleas filed and continues case (see Feb. 18, 1856). Record; Files.

SEPTEMBER 10. Bloomington. [Forecasting his autumn activities to Lovejoy Aug. 11, Lincoln wrote: "I can be seen . . . at Bloomington at any time from the 10th. to the 17th. of September."]

SEPTEMBER 11. Lincoln has trespass case in McLean Circuit Court, Goff v. Illinois Central. By agreement case is submitted to court. Court takes it under advisement. Damages of $275 are later awarded plaintiff. Record.

SEPTEMBER 13. Lincoln writes and sends to Metamora bond in Moore v. Clark, signing "Gridley & Lincoln for appellant." Photo.

SEPTEMBER 14. Lincoln draws on James F. Joy, through Theron Pardee, for $150. This represents fee of $10 each for 15 cases against Illinois Central which Lincoln had handled in McLean and DeWitt counties since Sept. 1854. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 325.

SEPTEMBER 15. [Lincoln's account with Corneau & Diller, drugs, is charged 75˘ for box of "Lubins Extract" and 40˘ for box of "Ox Marrow." H. E. Pratt, 151.]

SEPTEMBER 17. Springfield. Lincoln writes court order in Jane Allen, administrator v. Robert Allen Jr. Photo. He then leaves for Cincinnati.

SEPTEMBER 18. En route.

SEPTEMBER 19. Cincinnati. Lincoln writes to James F. Joy of Illinois Central Railroad, who has responded to Lincoln's Sept. 14 draft on

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company as though he never heard of Lincoln. Joy telegraphed Lincoln on 17th, who received it at railroad depot. "I ran to the Telegraph office and answered briefly, and was near being left by the cars." He recapitulates his railroad services. "The charge I made was very reasonable." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 326.

SEPTEMBER 20. [McCormick v. Manny, set for hearing at Cincinnati to suit Judge McLean, commences. Distinguished counsel represent both parties — Edward M. Dickerson and Reverdy Johnson for McCormick; George Harding, Edwin M. Stanton, and Lincoln for Manny. Lincoln is prepared to make strong effort to win case. William M. Dickson, "Lincoln at Cincinnati," Harper's New Monthly Magazine, LXIX, 62.]

SEPTEMBER 21. [Harding and Stanton, unfavorably impressed with Lincoln's appearance, ignore him, and he does not participate in trial. Though feeling rebuff keenly, he remains in Cincinnati approximately a week. "Freed from any care in the law case that brought him here, it was to him a week of relaxation," wrote his host, William M. Dickson, Cincinnati lawyer and husband of Mrs. Lincoln's cousin. Ibid.]

SEPTEMBER 22. [Lincoln visits points of interest in Cincinnati. One such is estate of Nicholas Longworth, where he becomes interested in grounds and conservatories. He meets Longworth, who has no idea of his visitor's identity. Ibid.]

SEPTEMBER 24. [One day Lincoln spends visiting suburbs of Cincinnati — Walnut Hills, Mount Auburn, Clifton, and Spring Grove Cemetery. He becomes interested in statuary on large estate he visits, and is mortified that he cannot identify one. Ibid. In Springfield, estate of Dempsey Tucker pays Lincoln & Herndon $10 for services. Probate File.]

SEPTEMBER 25. [Another day Lincoln devotes to county and city courts, spending entire morning in Room No. 1 of Superior Court, where eccentric jurist and wit, Bellamy Storer, presides. Lincoln enjoys proceedings immensely and says to his companion: "I wish we had that judge in Illinois. I think he would share with me the fatherhood of the legal jokes of the Illinois bar." Dickson, 62.]

SEPTEMBER 26. [This is probably day on which Lincoln leaves for home. He says to his hostess: "You have made my stay here most agreeable, and I am a thousand times obliged to you; but in reply to your request for me to come again I must say to you I never expect to be in Cincinnati again. I have nothing against the city, but things have so happened here as to make it undesirable for me ever to return." Ibid.]

OCTOBER 1. Springfield. U.S. Court for Southern District of Illinois holds its first session, with Samuel Treat on bench, Lincoln has one case, Doyle

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v. Lewis. He and Stephen T. Logan represent complainants, Stuart and Edwards defendants. Attorneys agree to continuance. Record.

OCTOBER 2. Pekin. Lincoln writes affidavit of Benjamin Kellogg in Flint v. Kellogg (filed next day). Photo.

OCTOBER 3. In Tazewell Circuit Court, in session for fall term, Lincoln writes and files replication in Abbey v. Abbey. Instead of signing his own name, he writes "Saltonstall, p. q. " at end of plea. Photo.

OCTOBER 4. Lincoln has two cases. Ricketts v. Goings, in which he secured judgment for plaintiff May 8, only to have it set aside two days later, is dismissed by agreement at defendant's costs. In Opdycke v. Opdycke, also before court in May, he obtains order for sale of real estate, and writes and files order himself. Record; Files. He writes court order also in Harris Lime Rock Co. v. Harris et al. Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. [Lincoln's drug store account is charged for three sticks of "Cough Candy." H. E. Pratt, 151.]

OCTOBER 5. Lincoln appears for defendant in Prettyman v. Yacle and Prettyman v. Stoltz. Both are continued on plaintiff's motion. Record.

OCTOBER 6. Lincoln wins divorce case, Lucy Matthews v. Josiah Matthews, continued from spring term. Jury finds defendant, whom Lincoln represents, not guilty and finds complainant guilty of desertion. Riley v. Wallace, in which Lincoln appears for defendant, is tried before court, who takes it under advisement. Third case is continued. Ibid. Lincoln writes and signs replication in Harris Lime Rock Co. v. Harris et al. Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

OCTOBER 8. Springfield. Clark v. Stigleman et al. comes before U.S. Court for last time. With Stuart and Edwards appearing for plaintiff and Lincoln & Herndon for defendants, jury finds for plaintiff and assesses his damages at $2,700. Record.

OCTOBER 9. Lincoln deposits $198 in his account at Springfield Marine and Fire Insurance Co. — first deposit he has made in two years. Marine Bank Ledger.

OCTOBER 10. Lincoln writes John Loughborough, surveyor general at St. Louis, asking for "statement of each quarter Section, and fractional quarter Section, upon which, by Brown's survey, any Peoria French claim is laid?" Lincoln, who wants information for law suit, is answered by return mail, and charged $4. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 326.

OCTOBER 11. Lincoln writes and sends to Pekin answer of Alfred B. Harris, guardian, in Harris Lime Rock Co. v. Harris et al. Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

OCTOBER 13. Lincoln apparently mails $4 fee to St. Louis surveyor general. Photo.

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OCTOBER 15. Clinton. DeWitt Circuit Court convenes. By agreement of counsel, ejectment suit which Lincoln filed at May term on behalf of Milton K. Alexander of Paris is continued. In Dungey v. Spencer, he has defendant ruled to plead Tuesday morning. He is for plaintiff in both. Record.

OCTOBER 16. Emery v. Illinois Central, in which Moore and Lincoln represent defendant, is continued. In Dungey v. Spencer, defendant, represented by McKinley and Weldon, files demurrer which is sustained as to two counts and overruled as to third. On Lincoln's motion defendant is ruled to plead by two o'clock. Ibid.

OCTOBER 17. In Wilson Allen v. Illinois Central, jury finds for plaintiff and awards damages of $762.55. Lincoln and Moore appear for railroad. Lincoln and Moore also represent defendants in assumpsit case, Drybread v. Clearwater and Lowry. After filing bill of discovery, they move that plaintiff be ruled to answer, and that further action be stayed until he does so. Ibid. Lincoln writes and files plea in Spencer v. Illinois Central. He and Moore, as usual, are for defendant. Photo.

OCTOBER 18. Dungey v. Spencer comes to trial. Plaintiff, whom Lincoln represents, dark-skinned Portuguese married to Spencer's sister, sues for damages because Spencer called him Negro. Jury finds the defendant guilty and assesses plaintiff's damages at $600. By agreement defendant releases all errors in record, and in return plaintiff releases $400 of judgment. People v. Isaac Wyant, murder, with which Lincoln is later associated, opens as accused pleads not guilty. Record.

OCTOBER 19. Defendant's affidavit is filed in People v. Wyant, and case continued. Wyant is sent to Tazewell County jail. Ibid.

OCTOBER 20. Lincoln, representing petitioner, argues divorce case entitled Stout v. Stout. Court grants petition, but orders petitioner to pay all costs. Question of alimony is continued (see May 15, 1856). Lincoln writes decree of court. Ibid. In Allen v. Illinois Central, Lincoln writes bill of exceptions and instructions to jury. Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

OCTOBER 22. Urbana. "The fall term of our Circuit Court is now in session at this place. The Docket is very large and will not be half disposed of . . . . The time for holding the Circuit Court in this county ought to be extended by the legislature and probably will be at another session. The attendance at court is pretty large — a fair amount of lawyers — the usual ones in attendance here." Urbana Union, Oct. 25.

OCTOBER 23. On behalf of defendant, Lincoln writes plea, which he signs "Coler & Lincoln," in Burgess v. Vannatta. Plaintiff claims damages for alleged negligence of defendant in caring for sheep. Lincoln writes and

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files bill of exceptions and affidavit for change of venue from Vermilion County in People v. High, larceny. He writes two indictments, signing "Lamon Pro tem," in People v. Lyster, larceny, and People v. Percival, cohabitation with daughter. Photo.

OCTOBER 25. Litigation is so great that Champaign Circuit Court adjourns at midnight. Urbana Union, Nov. 1.

OCTOBER 26. En route, Urbana to Danville. Since there is no rail connection, Lincoln must have spent day traveling from Urbana to Danville.

OCTOBER 27. Danville. Lincoln has two cases in Vermilion Circuit Court. One is dismissed by agreement; other is continued. Record. He writes and sends to Paris affidavit of W. M. Snyder in Wolfe v. Snyder. Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

OCTOBER 29. Eleven of Lincoln & Lamon's cases are called. One is settled when defendants, whom Lincoln represents, agree to pay $150 and costs. In another — McCallom v. Allen — defendant's attorneys, among them Lincoln, file petition to transfer case to U.S. Court at Springfield, and then withdraw petition. Other cases are dismissed, settled, or continued. Record. Lincoln writes indictment in People v. Griffith, altering agreement, for Lamon as prosecuting attorney, who signs. Photo.

OCTOBER 30. Lincoln writes decree of court in Clark v. Hoxworth et al. Photo. Douglas is scheduled to speak before Democratic rally, but illness compels him to break engagement. Lincoln was to have replied. Dams to Rockwell, Dec. 27, 1855, transcript in possession of Mrs. Harry E. Pratt, Springfield, Ill.; Register, Nov. 6.

OCTOBER 31. Lincoln speaks on political situation. "While I am writing this," says Democratic correspondent of Register, "ex-congressman Lincoln is speaking in the court house by invitation of the fusionists here, who are, that is a few of them, as bitter and unreasonable against Judge Douglas as any can be found in the state. Mr. Lincoln just suits them." Register, Nov. 6. Agreement written by Lincoln that parties in Catling et al. v. Great Western Railroad agree to submit case to judge in vacation is filed, and case continued. Record. Lincoln's drug store account is charged for soda, cream of tartar, and bottle of liniment. H. E. Pratt, 151.

NOVEMBER 5. Springfield. In letter to Isham Reavis, who applied for student's position in his law office, Lincoln says that he is gone too frequently to make study with him advantageous. He advises Reavis to get books and read them without instruction. He writes A. L. Brewer of outcome of case he tried for him in Logan County in Sept., and tells him that defendants talk of going to Supreme Court. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 327.

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NOVEMBER 6. At election for city officials Lincoln is 285th voter. Election Returns.

NOVEMBER 8. Lincoln writes and files declaration in Nancy J. Pea v. Greenberry Williams in Sangamon Circuit Court. Breach of promise is alleged, and damages of $2,000 are sought. Photo.

NOVEMBER 19. Sangamon Circuit Court convenes. Six of Lincoln & Herndon's cases are called. In two cases motions are entered, two others are set for hearing later in term, and two are continued until next year. Record.

NOVEMBER 20. Lincoln & Herndon, representing defendant, enter motion to dismiss Moore v. Weir. After argument, judge takes matter under advisement. As plaintiff's attorneys they move to dismiss slander suit, Preston v. Townsend, at their client's costs. In two other cases they obtain judgments for $132.69 and $326.77. Several other cases are set for trial or continued. Ibid.

NOVEMBER 21. Court overrules Lincoln & Herndon's motion in Moore v. Weir, and gives plaintiff leave to file new appeal bond. Bullard v. Haddix, another appeal in which Lincoln & Herndon represent defendant, is settled by agreement, judgment for $50 being entered against their client. In Whited v. Whitney et al. defendants default, and Lincoln & Herndon obtain judgment for $132.69 for their client. Ibid.

NOVEMBER 22. Lincoln has important case, Farmers' & Mechanics' Bank of Springfield v. Stockdale. Plaintiff, represented by Stuart and Edwards, is bringing suit for $5,000 due on account; defendant, through Lincoln & Herndon, pleads payment. Jury decides in favor of plaintiff. Illinois State Journal, Nov. 22. In Green v. Dikeman and Fullenwider, defendants default, and Lincoln & Herndon obtain judgment for $132.99 for Dikeman. Record. In Stigleman, Johnson & Co. v. Paddleford et al. Lincoln writes and has sworn two affidavits of witnesses, and files memorandum of agreement to admit such evidence. He also writes memorandum of history of company. Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

NOVEMBER 23. Two of Lincoln's cases are called, one dismissed, one continued. Record.

NOVEMBER 24. Lincoln withdraws $37 from his account at Springfield Marine and Fire Insurance Company. Marine Bank Ledger.

NOVEMBER 26. In seven different cases in which Lincoln & Herndon represent plaintiffs, defendants default and judgments are obtained. Four of judgments, ranging in amount from $87.65 to $562.75, are in favor of Jacob Bunn. In Tinney v. Ingwerson, in which Lincoln & Herndon appear for defendant, jury is called, and then on plaintiff's motion jury is dismissed and case continued. Record.

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NOVEMBER 27. People v. Organ and Kessler, before court at June term, is dismissed by state's attorney. Lincoln & Herndon represent defendants, who are charged with selling whiskey without license. In Bunn v. Singer defendant defaults, and plaintiff, whom Lincoln & Herndon represent, is awarded damages of $487.78. Four other cases are set for trial later in term. Ibid.

NOVEMBER 28. Lincoln & Herndon lose case when jury finds for plaintiff in Penny v. Purviance and assesses his damages at $318.75. In two other cases in which they appear as counsel, motions are entered, and continued. Ibid.

NOVEMBER 30. Correll v. McDaniel, will case which resulted in no verdict June 19, is tried again. Lincoln & Herndon represent defendants. Jury finds that paper in question is not McDaniel's will, and they lose case (see Apr. 25, 1857). Ibid.

DECEMBER 1. One case, dismissed on their motion, represents Lincoln & Herndon's court work. Ibid.

DECEMBER 3. [Third week of Sangamon Circuit Court commences. Regular term is extended two weeks in effort to clear docket.]

DECEMBER 4. Moore v. Weir, in which court ruled against them Nov. 21, ends in victory for Lincoln & Herndon when jury brings in verdict for defendant, whom they represent. They lose Hall v. Crouch, also tried before jury. Third case is continued. Ibid.

DECEMBER 5. Three of Lincoln & Herndon's cases come to trial. In all of them they represent defendants, and in all of them verdict is in favor of plaintiffs. In two cases, however — Bowers v. Livengood, and Johnson v. Roach and Roach — damages are small ($16.25 and $10 respectively). In third suit. Turner v. Kreigh, court finds for plaintiff in sum of $67.37. Ibid.

DECEMBER 6. Lincoln & Herndon have two cases, both of which are settled by agreement. First, appeal in which they appear for defendant, is dismissed when their client agrees to pay all costs except plaintiff's witnesses. Second, action in assumpsit in which they represent plaintiff, ends when defendant agrees that judgment for $206.23, amount of notes and interest sued on, shall be entered against him. Ibid. Lincoln writes and has sworn three witness affidavits (and files them Dec. 12) in Correll et al. v. McDaniel et al. Photo.

DECEMBER 7. By agreement of attorneys, Moore v. Alsop and Hickox is set for hearing Monday. Pea v. Williams goes to jury, which brings verdict for plaintiff and assesses his damages at $211. Lincoln & Herndon

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represent plaintiff. Record. Mary L. Welles gives Lincoln power of attorney for heirs of Charles Welles in Mahoney v. Welles heirs. Photo.

DECEMBER 8. "Now at this day comes Abraham Lincoln and enters the appearance of the said Defendants herein," records clerk when chancery case of Mahoney v. Welles is called. Two other cases are set for trial following week, and third continued until next term. Record.

DECEMBER 10. In preparation for motion for new trial in Correll v. McDaniel, in which jury decided against him Nov. 30, Lincoln writes summary of case, and files motion for new trial. Photo. He wins Moore v. Alsop and Hickox when jury brings in verdict for plaintiff and assesses his damages at $130. Record.

DECEMBER 11. Lincoln loses trespass case, Lindley v. Merriman, when jury finds defendant not guilty. Livengood v. Beaumont, appeal in which he appears for plaintiff, is tried by court. Court finds for defendant and awards damages of $5. Ibid. Lincoln writes and signs assignment of errors in Mayers and Mayers v. Turner (SC). Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

DECEMBER 12. Lincoln writes Joshua Speed, acknowledging his letter of Dec. 7 and deed from P. S. Loughborough to Lawrence Young. Because of conflicting engagement he declines to handle business, and suggests Speed write H. C. Whitney of Urbana. Lincoln writes James M. Loughborough, telling him of deed he received from Speed, and that he has refused case. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 328.

DECEMBER 13. In court two of Lincoln's cases come to trial. In Cory v. Pennyman, jury finds for plaintiff, whom he represents, and assesses damages of $35. In other case he also gets favorable verdict. Record.

DECEMBER 14. Lincoln & Herndon have six cases in court. Jury is waived in Lewis v. Busher, in which they represent defendant, and court finds for plaintiff in sum of $1,096.10, part of debt on which suit was brought. Potter et al. v. Ritter is settled by agreement, judgment for $353.37 being entered against defendant, their client. Third case is dismissed, and three are continued. Ibid.

DECEMBER 15. Lincoln & Herndon try to rescue two cases. In Hall v. Crouch, in which jury decided against them Dec. 4, they enter motion for new trial. When that is overruled they move for arrest of judgment. Overruled again, they file bill of exceptions. In Lewis v. Busher also they file bill of exceptions. Motions are entered in several other cases. Ibid.

DECEMBER 17. Court convenes for last day of term. Twenty-two Lincoln & Herndon cases are called, but except for two or three terminated by filing reports, all are continued until next term. Ibid. Lincoln & Herndon

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collect $10 from estate of Isaac Smith. Probate File. Lincoln writes and signs assignment of errors in Hildreth v. Turner (SC). Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

DECEMBER 19. Lincoln withdraws $107.36 from his account at Springfield Marine and Fire Insurance Co. Marine Bank Ledger. He writes $41.72 check to W. W. Watson & Son. Photo.

1856

JANUARY 7. Springfield. [Supreme Court convenes in Springfield. Owing to detention of trains by cold weather, judges are not all present until Wednesday morning. "A full quota of lawyers are already in attendance, from the different parts of the Division." Illinois State Journal, Jan. 9.]

JANUARY 8. Lincoln, representing defendants in error, enters motion for rehearing in Edmunds v. Myers et al. in Supreme Court. In this case, heard Feb.3, 1855, court decided against Lincoln's clients. Involved were patent rights to cradle which, "being wound up, would rock itself until it run down, and to save the continual labor to mothers and nurses, of rocking the cradle." Lincoln's motion is denied. Record; 16 Ill. 207.

JANUARY 11. James F. Joy, representing Chicago, Burlington & Quincy Railroad Co., files in Supreme Court application for mandamus commanding Isaac G. Wilson, judge of 13th Circuit, to appoint commissioners to appraise property in Aurora which railroad wants for shops, stations, etc. He urges Lincoln, resisting application, to take up motion as soon as possible. Lincoln is not ready, and gets off until the 14th. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 328-29.

JANUARY 12. Lincoln spends day preparing his argument in mandamus case. Ibid.

JANUARY 13. Again Lincoln spends entire day in case of C. B. & Q. v. Wilson. Ibid.

JANUARY 14. Day is taken up with arguments in mandamus case. Lincoln writes Charles Hoyt, one of Aurora property owners: "We occupied the whole day, I using the larger part. I made every point, and used every authority sent me by yourself & by Mr. Goodrich; and, in addition, all the points I could think of, and all the authorities I could find myself. . . . . I do not think I could ever have argued the case better than I did." Ibid.

JANUARY 16. Supreme Court allows Joy's motion for mandamus. "Our case is decided against us, . . . " Lincoln writes. "Very sorry for the

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resuit; but I do not think it could have been prevented." Ibid. Lincoln makes opening argument in rehearing of famous tax case, Illinois Central v. County of McLean, first heard Feb. 28, 1854. Record; The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 328-29.

JANUARY 17. Logan continues argument in Illinois Central case. James F. Joy, for railroad, concludes argument and submits case. Court takes it under advisement. Record. (Later court reverses trial court, thus sustaining Lincoln and Joy. 17 Ill. 291.)

JANUARY 18. Lincoln cashes $53.64 check at Springfield Marine and Fire Insurance Co. Original owned by A. W. Hannah, Springfield, Ill.

JANUARY 21. Supreme Court, in Martin and Booth v. Rives, overrules motion Lincoln filed Jan.9. Record. Lincoln is one of 49 signers of petition to governor for pardon of James H. Lee, sentenced at last term of Sangamon Circuit Court for stealing $26. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 329-30. [Lee is pardoned three days later. Photo.]

JANUARY 22. Preparing for next session of U.S. Circuit Court, Lincoln files notice to Browning and Bushnell of Quincy, attorneys for plaintiffs in Dudley and Dudley v. Crosthwaite, that commission to take deposition will be issued on Mar. 3 (first day of term). Files. "For value received" Lincoln assigns his interest in Springfield lot acquired through foreclosure in 1855 to Isaac Lindsay. Payton Abstract Co., Book 3, 217.

JANUARY 24. In Supreme Court argument is commenced in Moore v. Vail, appeal from Morgan County, ejectment. D. A. Smith of Jacksonville opens argument for appellants. Record.

JANUARY 25. McConnel and Grimshaw continue argument for appellee in Moore v. Vail. Lincoln concludes for appellants. Court takes case undter advisement. Ibid. (Judgment of lower court is later affirmed. 17 Ill. 185.)

JANUARY 29. Lincoln writes and files praecipe and enters himself as security for costs in Aspinall v. Lewis et al. in Sangamon Circuit Court. Photo; The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 331-32. He also writes bill of complaint. Photo.

FEBRUARY 2. Arguments in McConnel v. Delaware Mutual Insurance Co. (SC) are commenced. McConnel owned business which, under former owner, had been destroyed by fire. After paying claim, company discovered evidence of arson, and seeks to recover. McConnel, acting as his own attorney, commences argument, followed by D. A. Smith. Record.

FEBRUARY 4. Lincoln, representing company, continues argument in McConnel v. Delaware Mutual Insurance Co. Grimshaw, for appellant, concludes during afternoon. Court takes the case under advisement. Ibid. (Eventually decree of lower court is affirmed. 18 Ill. 228.)

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FEBRUARY 5. Lincoln has case in Supreme Court — Turley et al. v. County of Logan — involving legality of removal of county seat from Mt. Pulaski to Lincoln. Stuart argues and submits case for plaintiffs in error, Lincoln for defendant in error. Court holds removal valid. Record; 17 Ill. 151.

FEBRUARY 6. Supreme Court continues to command Lincoln's time. Today's question, involved in Hildreth v. Turner, is one of validity of consideration for which promissory note was given. Lincoln and Logan argue case — Lincoln for appellants, Logan for appellees. Record. (Court later affirms judgment of court below. 17 Ill. 184.)

FEBRUARY 7. Lincoln's work in the Supreme Court ends for term with arguments in two cases, Davis v. Scarritt, and Manning v. Warren. In first, involving question of partnership, he appears for defendant in error; in second, concerning operation of statutes of limitation in courts of equity, he represents appellant. He loses both cases. Record; 17 Ill. 202, 267; Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

FEBRUARY 11. Lincoln writes Levi Davis that Manning and Glover v. Warren et al., appeal from Jersey County, has been decided by Supreme Court "on the Statute of Limitations." He sends abstract. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 330. Lincoln writes notice regarding change of road on western edge of Springfield. Photo.

FEBRUARY 13. Lincoln announces expiration of his Chicago & Alton railroad pass and asks for another. "Says Tom to John ‘Heres your old rotten wheelbarrow’ Ive broke it, usin on it ‘I wish you would mend it, case I shall want to borrow it this arter-noon.’ Acting on this as a precedent, I say ‘Heres your old "chalked hat" I wish you would take it and send me a new one, case I shall want to use it the first of March’." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 330.

FEBRUARY 14. Lincoln writes G. U. Miles regarding tract of land in Menard County. After stating facts as he understands them, he adds; "The reason I write you is, that I can not understand, from the Major's letter, precisely what your difficulty is . . . . Please write me; and return me this letter, as it will save me hunting up the facts again." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 330-31.

FEBRUARY 15. Lincoln writes Elihu N. Powell what he has done in Aspinall case. He finished checking facts "and filed the declaration Q. E. D." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 331-32.

FEBRUARY 17. Out of patience, Lincoln replies to letter from Miles, who has mortgage on land worth $1,200 to secure debt of $203.41. "Suppose I foreclose," he asks, "you will bid the same; if nobody bids more, all will be well; but somebody will bid more; and then how will you stand? You will have to let the land go for that sum; or bid higher, and advance the cash for all above that sum. Don't you see?" The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 332.

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FEBRUARY 18. Lincoln writes Gustave Koerner of Belleville: "You left here sooner than I expected; else I should have asked you on what terms you settled your fee in the case [Clark and Morrison v. Page and Bacon, tried Sept. 6, 1855], in connection with which we met at Carlinville last fall. I think you said you had no objection to tell me. If you have not, please write me at once, as I wish to regulate my claim somewhat by yours." Ibid.

FEBRUARY 21. To George P. Floyd, for whom he had drawn papers in connection with leasing hotel at Quincy, Lincoln writes: "I have just received yours of 16th, with check on Flagg & Savage for twenty-five dollars. You must think I am a high-priced man. You are too liberal with your money. Fifteen dollars is enough for the job. I send you a receipt for fifteen dollars, and return to you a ten-dollar bill." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 332-33.

FEBRUARY 22. Decatur. Illinois Anti-Nebraska editors gather in meeting which marks beginning of Republican party in Illinois. After meeting, 30 or 40 attend dinner. Among them is Lincoln, "who seems to be ready," Democratic Register comments (Feb. 25) "at the tap of the fusion drum, on all occasions. He was toasted in connection with the fusion candidacy for governor, to which he modestly responded." Richard Oglesby of Decatur toasts Lincoln as "our next candidate for the U.S. Senate." Lincoln, replying, said he was in favor of that, adding that he was in much the position of a man attacked by a robber who demanded his money. "I have no money," said the victim; "but if you will go with me to the light, I will give you my note." If Lincoln were let off from making speech, he would give his note. Lincoln is not let off. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 333.

FEBRUARY 29. Springfield. Lincoln buys sweet oil (15˘) at Corneau & Diller, druggists. H. E. Pratt, 151.

MARCH 1. [Peoria "Republican" proposes Lincoln for governor. Fulton Democrat (Lewiston, Ill. ), Mar. 1.]

MARCH 3. Lincoln represents Chicago, Alton & St. Louis Railroad Co. in three cases in U.S. Circuit Court on first day of term. Three different plaintiffs, Henry Hotchkiss, New Haven County Bank, and Brown et al. file declarations alleging debts of $50,000, $101,870 and $252,143.66 respectively. Lincoln files pleas on behalf of railroad. Record.

MARCH 4. Lincoln appears in U.S. Circuit Court again in connection with railroad finances. This time Herndon files declaration of Bacon, plaintiff. Lincoln enters appearance of Ohio & Mississippi Railroad Co., defendant, and files their note and power of attorney to confess judgment. He then confesses indebtedness of $312,133.35 with interest of $256.54. Ibid.

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MARCH 6. Lincoln writes legal opinion on pre-emption question for Illinois Central. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 333-35.

MARCH 10. Lincoln, representing defendant, files demurrer in U.S. v. William Wilson in U.S. Circuit Court. Beatty v. Luiville, Lincoln for defendant, is decided by court against defendant and damages of $414.21 are assessed and $16.95 costs. Record.

MARCH 11. Lincoln and William J. Allen, district attorney, argue demurrer in Wilson case. Court takes question under advisement. Ibid.

MARCH 12. Lincoln has injunction case in U.S. Court, Doyle et al. v. Lewis et al. Lincoln and Logan for plaintiffs and Stuart and Edwards for defendants argue defendants' demurrer. Again court withholds its opinion. Ibid.

MARCH 13. Court overrules Lincoln's demurrer in Wilson case and gives him permission to file pleas, which he does. Ibid.

MARCH 17. In U.S. Circuit Court, juries award damages in three cases against Chicago, Alton & St. Louis Railroad in which Lincoln appeared Mar. 3. Hotchkiss is awarded $50,000 and damages of $1,496.55; the New Haven County Bank $101,873.40 and damages of $5,557.93; Brown et al. $252,145.73 and damages of $5,379.03. In U.S. v. Wilson, Lincoln and Allen argue plaintiff's demurrer. Ibid.

MARCH 18. In U.S. Circuit Court Lincoln loses U.S. Wilson. Jury finds defendant indebted to plaintiff for $5,000 and damages of $5,000, but court orders debt discharged on payment of damages only. In Sangamon Circuit Court, Lincoln & Herndon have 19 cases. Three defendants default, and other cases are continued. Ibid.

MARCH 19. Taylor v. Humphries, continued from July 10, 1855, is tried by jury in U.S. Circuit Court. Lincoln and Taylor represent plaintiff, Logan defendant. Verdict of jury, which Lincoln writes, finds plaintiff owner of premises in question and assesses his damages at one cent. Ibid.

Files. In Sangamon Circuit Court, Lincoln & Herndon obtain judgments in five cases. Record.

MARCH 20. Lincoln & Herndon have seven cases in Sangamon Circuit Court. In two cases defendants default, and clerk assesses damages at $155.08 and $160.87. Other cases are continued. Ibid.

MARCH 21. One assumpsit case — Talbot and Anderson v. Campbell — is Lincoln & Herndon's work in Sangamon Circuit Court. Defendant, represented by Stuart and Edwards, agrees that judgment for $176.70 be entered against him in favor of Lincoln & Herndon's client. Ibid. Lincoln

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writes to Judge John D. Caton of Illinois Supreme Court, vouching for C. H. Moore of Clinton as surety under supersedeas. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 336.

MARCH 22. Two trials mark day for Lincoln & Herndon in Sangamon Circuit Court. Ingwerson v. Tinney, in which they appear for plaintiff, is tried before court; in Case v. Virden, Conkling and Conkling for plaintiff and Lincoln & Herndon for defendant, argue demurrer. Court takes both under advisement. In two other suits defendants default and Lincoln & Herndon obtain judgments. Record.

MARCH 24. Lincoln & Herndon have two divorce cases. In James Enos v. Phoebe Enos they file defendant's answer and cross bill. In Elzena Ray v. Sandford Ray they obtain decree for petitioner on ground of desertion. Ibid. Lincoln also writes opinion concerning validity of land titles in Beloit, Wis. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 336-39.

MARCH 25. In Circuit Court Lincoln & Herndon appear for plaintiff in Bliss v. Stevens, appeal from judgment of justice of peace. Stuart & Edwards and White & Shutt represent defendant. Jury is called, but after evidence is presented and arguments made, Lincoln & Herndon move case be dismissed. Of their other cases, two are dismissed by agreement and two are continued. Record.

MARCH 27. In Case v. Virden, court sustains demurrer argued Mar.22. Lincoln & Herndon for defendant file affidavit and enter motion for continuance. By agreement with plaintiff's attorneys, they are given leave to file additional pleas. Ibid.

MARCH 28. Ingwerson v. Tinney, tried before court Mar. 22, is argued second time. Court finds for plaintiff, whom Lincoln & Herndon represent. Defendants default in two assumpsit cases, and juries of inquiry award damages of $147.41 and $188.05 to clients of Lincoln & Herndon. Ibid.

MARCH 29. On last day of spring term, Logan and Stuart & Edwards, representing defendant in Ingwerson v. Tinney, enter motion for appeal to Supreme Court. Ibid. Lincoln pays $8.50 cash on his carriage account. Obed Lewis Account Books.

MARCH 31. [Logan Circuit Court convenes at Lincoln.]

APRIL 1. Lincoln writes petition for Supreme Court review of James Busher v. Thomas Lewis, administrator of Joseph Busher. Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

APRIL 2. Lincoln. For plaintiff in Lander v. Loreme, Lincoln has defendant ruled to answer by July 1. Record.

APRIL 3. Patterson v. Stenett, Lincoln for defense, is tried by court, which finds for plaintiff with $322.66 judgment. Ibid.

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APRIL 5. Lincoln draws up arbitration award in Webster v. Angell and Rhodes, which Judge Davis and John T. Stuart sign. Photo.

APRIL 7. Bloomington. One of six defense lawyers in Fleming v. Rogers and Crothers, Lincoln writes and files defendants' answer. Defense is ruled to plead Wednesday. Also ruled to answer Wednesday are parties in Clarissa Bishop v. James Bishop et al., petition for partition. Lincoln, for complainant, moves appointment of Stuart as guardian ad litem of minor defendants. Lincoln for plaintiff in third case. Pike v. Shaffer, is ruled to plead Thursday. Record; Photo.

APRIL 8. Lincoln writes and files certificate of publication in Bishop v. Bishop. Record.

APRIL 9. Lincoln writes, signs, and files his affidavit in Fleming v. Rogers and Grothers. Photo.

APRIL 10. Defense attorneys in Fleming v. Rogers and Crothers move continuance. Plaintiff's lawyers get leave to amend declaration. Record.

APRIL 12. Court grants petition in Bishop v. Bishop, and commissioners are appointed to make partition and report Apr. 18. Ibid. [Lincoln deeds Lots 11 and 12, Evans' Addition to City of Bloomington, to Francis Thomas. Mrs. Lincoln joins in deed, which is acknowledged before James H. Matheny, clerk of Sangamon Circuit Court. Deed Book 27 (McLean County), 686.]

APRIL 16. Lincoln appears for Illinois Central in Bishop v. Illinois Central. He withdraws defendant's plea. Court orders that plaintiff recover $470 from defendant in accordance with terms of agreed arbitration award. Record.

APRIL 17. Pike v. Shaffer is before court. Defense files affidavit and moves to continue, which is granted. Ibid.

APRIL 18. Lincoln writes and signs amended declaration in Pike v. Shaffer. Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — David Davis Papers, Illinois State Historical Library, Springfield, Illinois. Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

APRIL 21. Lincoln, for complainant in Blanton et al. v. Withers et al. files replication, and case is continued. Record.

APRIL 22. Metamora. Lincoln wins two jury trials. In Finley et al. v. Robinson, appeal from judgment of justice of peace, Lincoln represents defendant. Moon v. Clark, appeal, Lincoln and Shope for plaintiff obtain verdict for $702. Third case is continued. In Davenport v. Davenport et al. Lincoln files defendants' answer and files deed of trust as exhibit. Lincoln, Purple, and Clark defend People v. Thompson, murder. Jury finds accused guilty and sentences him to eight years in pentitentiary. Ibid.; Photo.

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APRIL 23. Five of Lincoln's cases are called, but only one comes to trial, Hammers et al. v. Herron, with Shope, Powell and Lincoln representing plaintiffs and Purple defendant. Jury finds no damages, but plaintiffs are ordered to pay costs. In one of four cases, all continued, "Abraham Lincoln Esqr" is appointed guardian ad litem. Record.

APRIL 25. Davenport v. Davenport et al., petition for dower, Lincoln for defendant, is continued by agreement at cost of parties. Ibid.

APRIL 28. Pekin. Tazewell Circuit Court convenes. Lincoln writes and files affidavit of Thomas Alsop, one of defendants in Weyrich et al. v. Alsop et al. Case involves promissory note given in part payment for sawmill. Lincoln, for defense, takes ground that sawmill cannot cut 3,000 feet per day, as plaintiffs expressly warranted. Ibid.; Files.

APRIL 29. In Stephens v. Veimount et al., in which Lincoln and Parker represent defendants, jury finds their clients not guilty of forcible entry and detainer. In criminal case — People v. Shaffer and Shaffer — Lincoln obtains order setting aside defendants' default and forfeiture of bond on payment of all costs to date. Defendants post new bonds of $500 each for appearance next term. Indictment is for cheating and fraud. Record.

APRIL 30. Lincoln files bill in chancery and affidavit in Snell v. Prettyman. Bill is signed "Fuller & Lincoln." Files.

MAY 1. Lincoln replies to letter from Nicholas H. Ridgely of Springfield directing him to clear flaw in title of land on which Springfield Gas Works stands. "It is all right now, I think." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 340.

MAY 2. In Beath v. Hainline, appeal from justice of peace, jury is dispensed with, and court decrees that judgment of lower court be affirmed for $20. Plaintiff is ordered to pay one third of costs in Circuit Court, defendant all other costs. Lincoln represents plaintiff. Record.

MAY 3. Lincoln wins case when, after jury has been called, plaintiff in Gipps v. Crosby dismisses suit. (This is case Lincoln lost May 5, 1855. Case had gone to Supreme Court, and been remanded to Circuit Court for retrial.) Ibid.

MAY 5. In Roberts v. Harkness, jury finds that defendant does not owe plaintiff as alleged. Lincoln, one of defendant's counsel, writes instructions to jury. Record; Files.

MAY 7. Lincoln loses Graham v. Robinson when court decided that defendant is not indebted to plaintiff, whom he represents, and orders his client to pay costs. In Opdycke v. Opdycke, which appears on docket almost every term, Lincoln files another order for sale of real estate. Ibid.

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MAY 8. Lincoln, for complainant, agrees that previous default in Harris Lime Rock Co. v. Harris et al. be set aside. Fuller enters appearance of all defendants and agrees to file answer before Aug. 1 and to waive all objecttions to depositions filed in case. Record. Lincoln writes court order to that effect. Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — David Davis Papers, Illinois State Historical Library, Springfield, Illinois. Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

MAY 9. In Davis v. Scales, jury is called but discharged. Lincoln represents defendant. Mark v. Bailey, chancery suit before court May 2, 1855, terminates when report of master in chancery is approved. Lincoln is one of complainant's counsel. Lincoln writes agreement in Denniston v. Dorsett, assumpsit. Tazewell Circuit Court adjourns. Record; Photo.

MAY 10. Lincoln's name heads list of signers of call for county convention to be held in Springfield May 24 for electing delegates to state Anti-Nebraska convention at Bloomington May 29. Journal, May 10; The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 340. When conservatives protest, Herndon, who has signed Lincoln's name without permission, writes his partner, and receives telegram sanctioning his act. Herndon & Weik, 311. [Mrs. Lincoln buys $588 worth of wallpaper at John Williams' store. H. E. Pratt, 148.]

MAY 12. Clinton. Spring term of DeWitt Circuit Court commences, Lincoln appears in two cases continued from fall term. Emery v Illinois Central, in which he and Moore represent railroad, is settled by agreement, plaintiff paying costs. Alexander v. Warner is dismissed by Lincoln as plaintiff's attorney. Record.

MAY 13. Moore and Lincoln appear in court as attorneys for defendants in Drybread v. Clearwater and Lowry. Suit is dismissed by agreement, each party paying half costs. Lincoln files plea and demurrer in Lisk v. Morford. Weldon is associated with him for defense. Ibid.; Photo.

MAY 14. In Lisk v. Morford, demurrer Lincoln filed is argued and sustained. Record.

MAY 15. Stout v. Stout, divorce case in which Lincoln appears for the petitioner, is called and continued. (Divorce granted Oct. 20, 1855; alimony is yet to be settled.) Ibid.

MAY 16. Shelbyville. Lincoln writes and files pleas and rejoinder in Terre Haute and Alton Railroad Co. v. Daniel Earp, signing "Thornton & Rice p.d." Files.

MAY 17. [Lincoln's account at John Williams' store is charged $250 for "2 White Chambers." H. E. Pratt, 148.]

MAY 19. Urbana. Circuit Court of Champaign County convenes for spring term, with larger attendance of lawyers than usual. "Hon. A. Lincoln of Springfield" heads list. Urbana Union, May 22.

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MAY 20. Trial of Spink v. Chiniquy, from Kankakee on change of venue, commences. Spink, layman in Catholic Church, has charged Chiniquy, his priest, with slander from pulpit. Case has aroused much interest, and many of Chiniquy's parishioners attend. Norton, Davis, and Starr are counsel for plaintiff, Osgood, Lincoln, and Paddock for defendant. Ibid., May 29. [Mrs. Lincoln buys hat ($1), ribbon, elastic, and pair "small Congress Garters" at John Williams' store. H. E. Pratt. 148.]

MAY 21. Chiniquy case occupies court all day. "Plaintiff brought up among his witnesses another priest who was impeached by the opposite party, whose witnesses swore they would not believe him under oath." Urbana Union, May 29.

MAY 22. Chiniquy case monopolizes court until evening, when term ends. Jury fails to bring verdict and is discharged. Ibid. So little business has been transacted that special term of court is called for next month. Ibid., May 22.

MAY 23. Chiniquy signs note written by Lincoln: "Urbana, May 23 — 1856 Due A. Lincoln fifty dollars, for value received — C. Chiniquy." Photo.

MAY 24. Danville. Lincoln and Lamon have nine cases in Vermilion Circuit Court. One case, appeal from justice of peace, comes to trial and is decided in favor of their client. Their other cases are continued or dismissed by agreement. Record. [In Springfield, convention elects Lincoln delegate to state Anti-Nebraska convention at Bloomington May 29. Illinois State Journal, May 26.]

MAY 26. Court tries Paris v. Littler (Lincoln and Lamon for defendant) and awards plaintiff $35 and costs. Clapp v. Turner et al., in which they represent defendant, is settled by agreement, plaintiff obtaining judgment for $216.14 and costs. In Selson v. Lamon and Turner, they enter appearance of defendants but make no defense. Court awards plaintiffs damages of $324.67. Ibid. Lincoln writes indictment in People v. Tucker, signing "Lamon atty pro tem." Original owned by King Hostick, Springfield, Ill.

MAY 27. Danville and Decatur. Lincoln starts for Bloomington convention, arriving in Decatur by train late in afternoon. There is no train to Bloomington until next day; he puts up at Oglesby House, walks about town with others bound for convention, and recounts his early experiences in Macon County. Whitney, 73-5; McLean County Historical Society, Bloomington, Illinois. — Trans., Ill, 91-2.

MAY 28. Decatur and Bloomington. Early in morning Lincoln leaves by train for Bloomington. There he goes to home of David Davis. In evening, crowds gather before Pike House, and Lincoln leads off with speech. Palmer, Wentworth, Washburne and others follow. Illinois State Journal,

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29; Register, May 31; Chicago Democratic Press, May 30; Whitney, 73-4; The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 340-41.

MAY 29. Bloomington. Convention convenes at 10 A.M. Lincoln attends as delegate from Sangamon County. He serves on nominating committee and is nominated as presidential elector. Climax of meeting comes when business is finished and he addresses delegates. "When he concluded, the audience sprang to their feet, and cheer after cheer told how deeply their hearts had been touched." Illinois State Journal, June 3, 4; The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 341.

MAY 30. Springfield. Lincoln reaches home and reads accumulated mail. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 341-42.

MAY 31. He writes Page & Bacon, St. Louis banker-merchants, about difficulty with U.S. marshal for Southern Illinois. Ibid.

JUNE 2. U.S. District Court convenes for summer term. Lincoln & Herndon have one case — Dudley & Dudley v. Crosthwaite — which is continued by agreement with opposing counsel. Record.

JUNE 4. Decatur. Lincoln appears for defendant, with Thornton, in Overholt and Squier v. County of Christian, change of venue from Christian County. Case involves Taylorville courthouse, county claiming foundations were made too shallow. Signing himself "Member of the Bar," Lincoln writes petition in People v. Longnecker, murder, change of venue from Piatt, asking dismissal of case tried twice without verdict. Fourteen attorneys join, and case is dismissed. He delivers afternoon political speech at courthouse. Ibid.; Photo; Illinois State Chronicle (Decatur), June 5.

JUNE 5. Overholt and Squier v. Christian County is tried by jury, which finds for plaintiffs and assesses $657.87 damages. Lincoln writes pleas and jury instructions. Record; Photo.

JUNE 6. Lincoln writes order of court in Overholt and Squier v. Christian County. Gatling et al. v. Great Western Railroad is continued. Photo.; Record. Lincoln learns of Buchanan's nomination. First reaction is not favorable to Anti-Nebraska prospects, since "a good many whigs, of conservative feelings, and slight pro-slavery proclivities, withal, are inclining to go for him, and will do it, unless the Anti-Nebraska nomination shall be such as to divert them." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 342-43.

JUNE 7. Decatur and Springfield. Lincoln appears briefly in court, then leaves for Springfield. In Overholt and Squier v. Christian County he successfully moves appeal to Supreme Court. Reaching Springfield, he writes and files defendant's affidavit in Freeman and Bright v. Merriman in U.S. Circuit Court (see July 26). Record. Then he writes to Senator

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Trumbull on politics. To defeat Buchanan, he says, nominate conservative, and suggests Judge John McLean of U.S. Supreme Court. He warns of danger of disregarding old Whig conservative sentiment. "I think I may trust you to believe I do not say this on my own personal account." He will go for anyone not "platformed" on ground he considers wrong. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 342-43.

JUNE 9. Springfield. Summer term of Sangamon Circuit Court is scheduled to commence, but Judge Davis does not appear, and opening is deferred. Record. To Joshua F. Amos, administrator of estate of Nathaniel Hay, deceased, Lincoln submits explanation of claim he has against estate. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 343-44.

JUNE 10. Court convenes, and Lincoln & Herndon appear in many cases. Record. Evening meeting to ratify Bloomington nominations is held at court house. "Hon. A. Lincoln took the stand and pronounced the most logical and finished argument against the evils to be apprehended from the continued aggressions of the slave power, that it has ever been our good fortune to listen to." Illinois State Journal, June 11; The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 344-45.

JUNE 11. Lincoln & Herndon, attorneys for plaintiff, settle case in circuit court when defendant in Currier v. North American Insurance Co. confesses Judgment in sum of $1,000 and costs. Second suit is dismissed on motion of plaintiff, whom they represent, and third is continued. Record. John Hay's affidavit, written by Lincoln on 10th, in McBride v. Hay, is filed. Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — David Davis Papers, Illinois State Historical Library, Springfield, Illinois. Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

JUNE 12. In Cass v. Showers, defendant defaults and Lincoln & Herndon obtain Judgment of $215.23 for plaintiff. Bunn v. Bays, in which they also represent plaintiff, is settled by agreement, judgment for $100 being entered against estate of Bannister Bays. Third case is continued. Record.

JUNE 13. On last day of summer term, Lincoln & Herndon have two cases in court-divorce case, in which they secure decree for their client, complainant; and assumpsit suit settled by agreement, $550.45, judgment being entered against defendant. Lincoln & Herndon appear for plaintiff. Ibid.

JUNE 17. Urbana. Special term of Champaign Circuit Court convenes at Urbana. Lincoln is present for entire term. Whitney, 78-81. [Robert collects pair garters at John Williams' store, and Lincoln's account is charged $2.25. H. E. Pratt, 148.]

JUNE 18. Lincoln writes defendant's affidavit in People v. Edward Barrett. Photo.

JUNE 19. [In Philadelphia, where first Republican National Convention is in session, Lincoln's name is presented for Vice-Presidency. He receives

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110 votes, but William L. Dayton of New Jersey is nominated as Fremont's running mate.]

JUNE 20. Chicago paper containing proceedings of Philadelphia convention reaches Urbana. When shown vote for Vice-President, Lincoln jocularly remarks that there must be some mistake — there is a great man named Lincoln in Massachusetts, and he must be the one for whom votes were cast. Whitney, 80. [Robert Lincoln brings home $1 pair of slippers from John Williams' store. H. E. Pratt, 148.]

JUNE 22. [Lincoln's account at John Williams & Co. is charged $1.25 for buggy whip. Ibid.]

JUNE 23. Lincoln writes plaintiff's declaration in J. S. Stevens v. S. H. Stevens. Photo. Lincoln addresses evening political meeting. "He heartily endorses the nomination of the gallant Fremont, and as elector in this state, will, during this campaign, we are told, devote considerable of his time to the work. As a persuasive and convincing speaker the equal of Mr. Lincoln can not be found." Urbana Union, June 26.

JUNE 27. Springfield. Lincoln thanks John Van Dyke for his kind notice of him in Philadelphia convention. "When you meet Judge Dayton present my respects, and tell him I think him a far better man than I for the position he is in, and that I shall support both him and Colonel Fremont most cordially." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 346. It would have been easier for us, I think, had we got McLean," Lincoln writes Trumbull. Horace White, The Life of Lyman Trumbull, 69.

JUNE 30. In U.S. Circuit Court Lincoln appears for defendant in Eads and Nelson v. Ohio & Mississippi Railroad Co. Case is argued all day. Record.

JULY 1. Court decides for plaintiffs in railroad case, involving seizure of 43 railroad cars. Defendant, says court, owes $3,480.72 and charges of $454.60. Court allows appeal. Ibid.

JULY 4. Princeton. Republicans celebrate Fourth with large rally for Fremont and Bissell, candidates for President and governor. Party newspapers estimate crowd at ten thousand. Lincoln, Ebenezer Peck, Joseph Knox, Owen Lovejoy and others speak. Illinois State Journal, July 7; The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 346-47.

JULY 7. Springfield? Lincoln has Obed Lewis make minor repairs (25˘) on his buggy. Obed Lewis Account Books. He writes David Davis deploring defeat of Leonard Swett of Bloomington for Congress, and nomination of Owen Lovejoy. Photo.

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JULY 9. Springfield. To Henry C. Whitney Lincoln writes his opinion of Republican nomination in Bloomington congressional district. "It turned me blind when I first heard Swett was beaten, and Lovejoy nominated; but after much anxious reflection, I really believe it is best to let it stand. This, of course, I wish to be confidential." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 347.

JULY 10. Lincoln replies to letter from James Berdan in which plan to unite Fremont and Fillmore vote against Buchanan is outlined. "A union of our strength, to be effected in some way, is indispensable to our carrying the State against Buchanan." After suggesting alternative plan, Lincoln promises to confer with party friends in Chicago when he goes there on 15th. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 347-48.

JULY 12. Lincoln writes belated reply to letter from James W. Grimes inviting him to speak in Iowa. He apologizes for delay, saying invitation "plagued" him. "I am superstitious. I have scarcely known a party, preceding an election, to call in help from the neighboring states, but they lost the state." Nevertheless, if Democrats have called in "foreign" speakers, he will be glad to come. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 348.

JULY 14. Lincoln writes and files $500 bond signed by officials, for appeal, of Ohio & Mississippi Railroad. Photo.

JULY 15. Springfield and Chicago. Lincoln goes to Chicago "to attend to a little business in court." He expects to be there two weeks. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 348. Anticipating his arrival, Chicago Democratic Press hopes "he will consent to address the people upon the great political issues of the day. Should his arrangements permit him to meet the universal wish of the people of Chicago, the time and place of the meeting will be announced."

JULY 17. Dixon. Lincoln is principal speaker at ratification meeting. Correspondent describes him: "He is about six feet high, crooked-legged, stoop-shouldered, spare-built, and anything but handsome in the face." But "as a close observer and cogent reasoner, he has few equals and perhaps no superior in the world. His language is pure and respectful, he attacks no man's character or motives, but fights with arguments." Amboy (Illinois) Times, July 24.

JULY 18. Sterling. Lincoln speaks at another Fremont and Bissell meeting. "A grand rally," Chicago Democratic Press (July 17, 19) characterizes it. Lincoln speaks here for old time's sake. Robert L. Wilson, one of the Long Nine, invited him. Illinois State Historical Library, Springfield, Illinois — Trans, 1908, 323-26.

JULY 19. Chicago. Lincoln addresses evening open-air meeting at Dearborn Park. Republican paper terpis his speech "unanswerable," but Democratic correspondent refers to it as "the same old sterotyped one he got up some time since, about tearing down the fence and letting in the cows, etc.,

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etc. To those who have heard it before, it was very dry and prosy, and with those who have not heard it, it made no impression whatever." Register, July 24. Another Democratic reporter declares crowd so small that Lincoln begins by saying he is not accustomed to "addressing such small gatherings." Chicago Times, July 22; The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 348-49.

JULY 22. Galena. On or about this day Lincoln drafts several pages of campaign argument. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 349-53. [In Metamora, Lincoln's bill in John T. Saltonstall v. Sally Ann Saltonstall is filed. He is for complainant. Photo. Lincoln has written National Kansas Committee declining to accept. appointment as member because of other engagements. Convening at Buffalo July 9 and 10, Lincoln was chosen, and notified July 16 by letter from William F. Amy, Chicago. On July 22 Arny writes Jesse Fell of Normal that Lincoln declines and recommends Fell. Illinois State Historical Library, Springfield, Illinois — Jesse W. Fell Papers, Illinois State Historical Library, Springfield, Illinois, W. F. Amy to Lincoln, July 16, 1856; Amy to Fell, July 22, 1856.]

JULY 23. Lincoln addresses evening political meeting, speaking from balcony of DeSoto House. "His speech was almost wholly argumentative," said North-Western Gazette (July 25). "In a clear, connected and masterly manner he traced the history of slavery aggression . . . and pointed out, like a true statesman, the consequence of permitting the curse to spread itself over our immense territories." During day Lincoln writes editorial replying to one he read yesterday in Galena's Democratic paper which alleges that unnaturalized foreigners cannot legally vote in presidential elections. "This is a grave error," he answers. Lincoln hands his sheet to H. H. Houghton, editor of Galena Weekly North-Western Gazette, who prints it anonymously July 29. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 353-56.

JULY 25. Oregon City. Lincoln addresses "monster meeting." Chicago Democrat, Aug. 2.

JULY 26. Chicago and Springfield. Lincoln returns home. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 356. He writes H. P. Merriman, client, requesting legally correct description of lands at issue in Freeman and Bright v. Merriman, for which he filed papers in U.S. Circuit Court June 7. File.

JULY 28. Springfield. Lincoln writes Artemas Hale, Massachusetts Whig, his opinion of Fremont's prospects in Illinois and Indiana. Opposition to Buchanan is undoubtedly in majority in both states, but division between Fremont and Fillmore "places both states in some danger." He thinks danger greater in Illinois than Indiana, and hopes some way may be found of inducing Fillmore men not to throw away their votes. He tells B. Clarke Lundy of Putnam County that prior engagement prevents acceptance of speaking invitation. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 356-57.

AUGUST 1. Lincoln, Yates, Herndon, and Jayne sign note to John M. Palmer: "It is our judgment that whether you do or do not finally stand

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as a candidate for Congress, it is better for you to not to publicly decline for a while. It is a long time till the election; and what may turn up no one can tell." Ibid., II, 357.

AUGUST 2. Lincoln writes to Joseph Gillespie about prospect of collecting nine-year-old judgment against "Bradford & Brother, or Bradford & Son or some firm name having Bradford in it." He hopes to meet Gillespie at Alton in three days, en route to stump speech at Paris via Alton. Ibid. Lincoln talks politics with Richard Yates, saying he is confident Fremont will carry Illinois. Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Lyman Trumbull Papers, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C., Yates to Trumbull, Aug. 3, 1856. Meeting to organize Fremont and Dayton Club is held at courthouse. "Mr. Lincoln being called upon, explained the object of the meeting, and made a graphic and forcible statement of the true issue in the impending struggle. His remarks were very happy, frequently interrupted by applause and sounds of laughter." Illinois State Journal, Aug. 4.

AUGUST 4. Herndon writes Trumbull: "Lincoln this moment has gone south east — down to Coles, Edgar &c will go further south." Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Lyman Trumbull Papers, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. Before leaving, Lincoln writes John Bennett letter in which he argues that vote for Fillmore is really vote for Buchanan. Choice is between Fremont and Buchanan, and unless Fillmore men prefer latter, they must vote for Fremont. He writes to H. G. Wells of Michigan, offering to take stump at Kalamazoo Aug. 27, if he can get there. "I can not promise positively." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 358-59.

AUGUST 5. En route. Lincoln takes morning Springfield & Alton train, arriving in Alton about noon. He boards next train east toward Terre Haute, alighting at Paris after dark. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 357.

AUGUST 6. Paris. Lincoln, Matson of Indiana, and H. P. H. Bromwell address large Fremont meeting. (Bromwell is candidate for Congress.) "Much enthusiasm prevailed, and the meeting promised a rousing majority on behalf of Edgar County for Fremont." Illinois State Journal, Aug. 13: Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Lyman Trumbull Papers, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C., Archer to Trumbull, Aug. 11; The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 359.

AUGUST 7. Grand View. Lincoln and Bromwell speak at Fremont meeting. Ibid. One who attends both meetings writes Trumbull that "a good impression has been made particularly in the Fillmore wing." Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Lyman Trumbull Papers, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C., Marshall to Trumbull, Aug. 7.

AUGUST 8. Charleston. Nearly 6,000 people attend Fremont and Bissell meeting. Archer, Bromwell, and Lincoln are listened to "with marked attention and approbation." Illinois State Journal, Aug. 13.

AUGUST 9. Shelhyville. Lincoln takes part in debate under Democratic auspices. S. W. Moulton opens with Democratic address and challenges Lincoln to answer his argument. Lincoln speaks for three hours — "all about

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‘freedom,’ ‘liberty’ and niggers." Anthony Thornton follows, answering Lincoln "in an able manner." According to Democratic paper, it was "a great gathering." Register, Aug. 19; The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 359.

AUGUST 10. Shelbyville and en route. [On 11th Lincoln writes that he has just returned from Shelbyville. Under conditions prevailing it was almost impossible to make trip in one day; therefore he must have started on 10th.]

AUGUST 11. En route and Springfield. Lincoln writes Trumbull that he has just returned from speaking in Edgar, Coles, and Shelby counties. "Our whole trouble along there has been & is Fillmoreism. . . . I think we shall ultimately get all the Fillmore men, who are realy anti-slavery extension — the rest will probably go to Buchanan where they rightfully belong; if they do not, so much the better for us." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 359-60.

AUGUST 12. Springfield. [Lincoln writes Aug. 19 that he had been absent from Springfield four days. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 360. He must have been at home on 12th, 13th, and part of 14th.]

AUGUST 14. Springfield — and en route? [To reach Polo by next evening, Lincoln must have left Springfield during day.]

AUGUST 15. Polo. Lincoln arrives in Polo during evening and spends night. John D. Campbell, Personal Recollections of Abraham Lincoln, 1-3.

AUGUST 16. Oregon and Polo. In morning Lincoln and three friends drive to Oregon. Large crowd gathers at public square, and "then moved to a beautiful grove on the banks of Rock River. After partaking of a repast prepared by the ladies of Ogle County . . . the people listened to most excellent speeches from Hon. Ab. Lincoln, and Hon. John Wentworth." Lincoln returns to Polo after meeting. Ibid.; Chicago Democratic Press, Aug. 22.

AUGUST 17. Polo. Lincoln stays here part of day, then starts back to Springfield. Campbell, 1-3.

AUGUST 18. En route and Springfield. [Lincoln's remark in his letter of 19th to Dubois — "I have been absent four days" — indicates that he reaches home this evening.] The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 360.

AUGUST 19. Springfield. Lincoln replies to letter from Jesse K. Dubois urging him to speak in Lawrenceville and southeastern Illinois. He says that Trumbull will go there after middle of Sept., and that he "will strain every nerve to be with you and him. More than that I cannot promise now." Ibid.

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AUGUST 21. Lincoln writes H. G. Wells at Kalamazoo, accepting speaking engagement. Ibid.

AUGUST 26. En route and Chicago. Lincoln spends night at Matteson House, and leaves for Kalamazoo early next morning. Ibid.

AUGUST 27. Kalamazoo, Michigan. Crowd estimated at 10,000 gathers for Republican demonstration. One of speakers at five different stands is Lincoln. "He made a very fair and argumentative address", opposition paper comments, "but was far too conservative and Union loving in his sentiments to suit his audience; and upon one occasion at least, his hearers protested in emphatic tones against his views." Michigan History Magazine, V, 287-88; The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 361-66.

AUGUST 28. Kalamazoo and Chicago. Lincoln returns by rail to Chicago. Thomas Q. Starr, Lincoln's Kalamazoo Address, 18-24.

AUGUST 30. Petersburg. Lincoln addresses "a very large and attentive audience" with "most telling effect." Illinois State Journal, Sept. 4. He reviews history of Nebraska bill, and appeals to Fillmore men to vote for Fremont and defeat Buchanan. Register, Sept. 4; The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 366-68.

SEPTEMBER 1. [Logan Circuit Court convenes at Lincoln. Lincoln & Herndon, although docket does not show on which days, appear for plaintiff in three cases and for defendant in one. Record.]

SEPTEMBER 2. Lincoln. Republican meeting, attended by large delegation from Atlanta, is held during evening. "Mr. Lincoln made a speech most triumphantly vindicating the nationality [patriotism] of the supporters of Col. Fremont." Illinois State Journal, Sept. 4. Lincoln has new shaft bar put on his buggy ($1.75). Obed Lewis Account Books.

SEPTEMBER 3. [Mrs. Lincoln charges bonnet, ribbon, silk, shoes, slippers, and combs to her husband's account ($8.77) at John Williams & Co. H. E. Pratt. 148.]

SEPTEMBER 4. Atlanta. During evening Lincoln addresses "a very large and enthusiastic crowd" on political situation. Illinois State Journal, Sept. 4.

SEPTEMBER 6. Jacksonville and Springfield. Afternoon Fremont mass Meeting is held in courthouse yard at Jacksonville. Lincoln, first speaker, appeals to antislavery Democrats not to vote for Buchanan. At four o'clock Springfield delegation leaves to attend Kansas meeting that evening at Springfield. After addresses by Lincoln, Conkling, and Robbins, meeting adjourns until night of 8th. Ibid., Sept. 8; The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 368-73.

SEPTEMBER 7. Springfield. Lincoln writes J. B. McFarland of Lafayette,

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Indiana, declining invitation to speak at Tippecanoe battleground Oct. 1-3. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 373.

SEPTEMBER 8. Lincoln completes form letter telling Fillmore men that every vote for Fillmore helps elect Buchanan. This is lithographed to simulate personal letter from Lincoln, dated, signed, marked "Confidential" and mailed for next eight weeks. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 374-75. Fremont supporters again assemble at courthouse. Lincoln, Francis, John B. Weber, Cullom and others speak. "There was manifested by the meeting a general and very decided feeling of indignation against the recently reported outrages in Kansas Territory, and against the Administration for aiding and abetting them." Illinois State Journal, Sept. 9.

SEPTEMBER 9. Bloomington. In McLean Circuit Court, which convened on 8th, Lincoln appears in Bishop v. Illinois Central, continued from spring term. Court orders case dismissed at defendant's costs. Lincoln represents company. Record.

SEPTEMBER 10. Lincoln writes and files affidavit of Eli Crothers in Fleming v. Crothers et al. He moves for continuance, which is granted at defendants' costs. Ibid.; Photo.

SEPTEMBER 11. Lincoln writes praecipe and notice in Clarissa Bishop v. Edmund and Jane Ross. Photo.

SEPTEMBER 12. Pike v. Shaffer, Lincoln for plaintiff, is continued at plaintiff's costs. William Reynolds and Asabel Fuller v. Abraham Steele, Ephriam Platt, Franklin Price, and Alfred B. Davidson, trespass, is tried by jury. Lincoln, for defense, gets acquittals for Steele and Price, while Platt and Davidson are found guilty and assessed $600 damages. Record. Lincoln and T. Lyle Dickey address Republican meeting in Major's Hall. Lincoln speaks with "great eloquence and power. He showed up the position of the Fillmore party in fine style, both as to its prospects of success, and as to the propriety of supporting a candidate whose greatest recommendation . . . is that he is neutral upon the one only great political question of the times. Bloomington Pantograph, Sept. 17; The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 375; Sherman D. Wakefield, How Lincoln Became President, 71-2.

SEPTEMBER 14. Springfield. Lincoln writes Robert Boal, promising to be at Lacon Sept. 30 if possible. He also urges Frederick Hecker, exiled German revolutionist of St. Clair County, to speak in Springfield on 25th, "when we expect to have a large mass-meeting." He declines invitation to speak in Iowa on 23rd. Iowa is safe, but in Illinois "much hard work is still to be done." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 375-76.

SEPTEMBER 16. Bloomington. Democrats hold large rally. During afternoon Lincoln and Swett attend meeting. In evening, while Democratic

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speakers are holding forth at Pike House, Lincoln speaks at Major's Hall. "A most masterly speech, in which he tore the day-time speeches of the Bucks at their great meeting into ribbons," Bloomington Pantograph (Sept. 24) reports.

SEPTEMBER 17. Urbana. All-day Fremont rally is held. In morning crowd assembles in grove east of Urbana and hears speeches by Herndon, Lovejoy, Scott, and Norton. "A most sumptuous repast was then served up by the ladies of Urbana, after which the people again assembled at different stands." Lincoln and Fithian speak from one stand, Wilson (of Indiana) and Bross from other. Chicago Democratic Press, Sept. 22.

SEPTEMBER 18. Vandalia and en route. Traveling through Vandalia toward points south, Lincoln pauses briefly to observe Democratic meeting on square. Lincoln notes what speaker, his old friend "Long Jim Davis" says, and thinks up replies for his own use on 23d, at Republican rally. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 377.

SEPTEMBER 19. Lawrenceville. Lincoln has promised to speak today if he can possibly get there, and doubtless does since he speaks at Olney next day. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 360, 376.

SEPTEMBER 20. Olney. Lincoln, Douglas, and others appear at rally. According to Democratic reporter, Lincoln's crowd is so small he soon gives up. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 376.

SEPTEMBER 21. En route. "I saw the ‘four’ [Trumbull, Douglas, Lincoln, Ebenezer Peck] on the cars next day," writes "Q", Olney correspondent who reported Saturday's meeting, "seated vis a vis, speaking of the things of Saturday in no uncomplimentary manner." Missouri Republican, Sept. 24.

SEPTEMBER 23. Vandalia. Fremont meeting is held at old State House. Speaking starts at one o'clock. Lincoln, who arrives after meeting has opened, is second speaker. "He demonstrated that the Republicans are walking in the ‘old paths’ — read the recorded sentiments of Washington, Jefferson and others, and dwelt at length upon the position of Henry Clay, (now quoted against him,) the Nestor of the old Whig party." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 377-78. [At Taylorville, Christian County Commissioner's Court orders Lincoln paid $50 fee in Squier and Overholt v. Christian County. Record.]

SEPTEMBER 24. Decatur. Republicans meet during morning in grove near town. Bross of Chicago "Democratic Press," J. C. Vaughn, and John Wentworth speak before dinner, and afterward Trumbull takes stand. "We were compelled to leave him speaking in order to mail this letter. He was to be followed by Mr. Lincoln." Chicago Democratic Press, Sept. 27. Lincoln's speech is exhortation to Fillmore men. This concludes outdoor meeting.

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At candlelight at courthouse Republicans hear Lawrence Weldon of Clinton, recent convert, and Owen Lovejoy. While he speaks, Democrats throw eggs through windows. Illinois State Chronicle, Oct. 2.

SEPTEMBER 25. Springfield. In morning delegates to Bloomington convention, Lincoln among them, meet at state house and nominate John Wood for lieutenant governor. In afternoon thousands gather in grove west of town and listen to several speakers. At night state house is crowded. Lincoln makes first speech. "Never was he so powerful, so strong in argument, so convincing in logic." Wentworth and Edwards follow. Illinois State Journal, Sept. 26.

SEPTEMBER 27. Lincoln answers letter from J. M. Sturtevant, President of Illinois College, urging him to become candidate for Congress. "Let me assure you," he says, "that I decline to be a candidate for congress, on my clear conviction, that my running would hurt, & not help the cause. I am willing to make any personal sacrafice, but I am not willing to do, what in my own judgment, is, a sacrafice of the cause itself." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 378-79.

SEPTEMBER 28. En route and Peoria. Lincoln reaches Peoria on his way to Lacon rally. Peoria Weekly Republican, Oct. 3.

SEPTEMBER 29. Peoria and Lacon. Lincoln boards 11 A.M. train for Lacon. Ibid.

SEPTEMBER 30. Lacon. Lincoln and Owen Lovejoy address meeting of Marshall County Republicans. Crowd, estimated at 2,000, includes delegation of several hundred from Henry who made trip in 64 wagons headed by Henry Brass Band. Henry (Ill. ) Courier, in Chicago Journal, Oct. 6.

OCTOBER 1. En route to Alton.

OCTOBER 2. Alton and Springfield. State Fair, in progress at Alton, is occasion for large Fremont demonstration. Lincoln speaks in afternoon to audience in front of Presbyterian Church. "He made, as he always does, an earnest, argumentative, patriotic and exceedingly able speech." After Lincoln's speech, meeting adjourns until evening, but he leaves for home on evening train. Chicago Journal, Oct. 6.

OCTOBER 3. Springfield. In Gray v. French, pending in Supreme Court, Lincoln makes and files affidavit concerning paternity of child. He also writes and files assignment of errors. Privately owned.

OCTOBER 4. Tremont. Republicans have announced that Lincoln will speak, and he presumably does so. Peoria Weekly Republican, Oct. 3.

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OCTOBER 6. Pekin. Lincoln, representing respondent, writes and files answer of Thomas Snell in partition suit of Prettyman v. Snell in Tazewell Circuit Court. Files. Lincoln collects $50 fee in Harris Lime Rock Co. v. Harris. Photo.

OCTOBER 7. Ottawa. Fremont mass meeting is held in afternoon. Lincoln and Trumbull speak at one stand, Lovejoy and Bross at another, and German orators at third. After speaking, crowd enjoys meal provided by citizens. Yates speaks at courthouse in evening. Chicago Journal, Oct. 8.

OCTOBER 8. Joliet. Fremont rally draws large crowd. Speakers address crowd from four stands. At stand No, One, Trumbull leads off. "Mr. Lincoln succeeded him in a speech that echoed the universal heart, while the stands two, three and four were also invested with listening crowds, that ever and anon, sent up a chorus of cheers, like the first full notes of victory." Ibid., Oct. 9.

OCTOBER 9. Peoria. Morning processions mark opening of Republican rally. Trumbull, Lincoln, and Bross speak in afternoon. Democratic paper, attempting to scatter discord, remarks that "Mr. Trumbull's speech contrasted very unfavorably with that of Lincoln, and made some of the Republicans regret the bargain which sent Trumbull to the senate instead of Lincoln." Peoria Press, Oct. 15; The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 379.

OCTOBER 11. [Lincoln's account with John Williams & Co. is charged $1 for pair of slippers, and his drug store account is debited 15˘ for pills. H. E. Pratt, 148, 151.]

OCTOBER 13. Clinton. Republicans mark opening of DeWitt Circuit Court with political rally. "The day was cold, gloomy, windy and dusty, and in consequence, the procession, though respectable in numbers, was not what it otherwise would have been. Speeches were made in the afternoon and evening by Judge Scott, Judge Dickey, Hon. A. Lincoln, L. Swett, Esq., L. Weldon, Esq., of Clinton, and Mr. Rosette of Springfield." Bloomington Pantograph, Oct. 22.

OCTOBER 15. [Cases involving Lincoln are called in DeWitt Circuit Court, but record does not show that he takes part.]

OCTOBER 18. Belleville. Lincoln, Trumbull, Koerner, Bissell, and others address Republican meeting. "The palm . . . belongs to Mr. Lincoln; his was the speech of the day," Republican newspaper comments. Democratic paper jibes at him for closing his speech with remark, "God bless the Dutch." Belleville Advocate (R), Oct. 22; St. Clair Tribune (D), Oct. 25; The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 379-80.

OCTOBER 20. Urbana. Lincoln writes court order dismissing Spink v. Chiniquy by agreement. Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — David Davis Papers, Illinois State Historical Library, Springfield, Illinois. Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. Lincoln addresses evening meeting

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at courthouse. "He directed his remarks, for the most of the time to the subject of the constitutionality of Congressional legislation upon the subject of slavery in the territories, and showed from a long line of illustrious precedents in legislation that it is proper and has been practiced by those who made the Constitution." Urbana Union, Oct. 23.

OCTOBER 21. Urbana and West Urbana (Champaign). Lincoln writes bond for costs in Warner v. Nicewarner. Photo, He writes Abraham Jonas that he cannot be at Quincy on 23rd — he is so "hobbled" with case that he cannot leave. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 380. In evening Lincoln, Swett, and Hogg speak at meeting in West Urbana. "We were not present but understand much interest and enthusiasm were manifested by the entire audience." Urbana Union, Oct. 23.

OCTOBER 22. Urbana. At fall term of court "attendance of legal gentlemen was pretty large, including the following gentlemen: A. McWilliams and Hon. A. Lincoln, of Springfield; Messrs. Swett and Packard of Bloomington," and others. Ibid.

OCTOBER 23. Atlanta. Republican rally is held. "The procession was a large and fine one, with an abundance of flags and banners, and the Mt. Pulaski brass band was on hand with some good music. As many of the crowd as could hear, assembled in Union Hall, and were eloquently addressed by Mr. Bromwell, candidate for Congress and Fremont Elector for the District, and Hon. A. Lincoln." Lincoln speaks again in evening. Bloomington Pantograph, Nov. 5.

OCTOBER 27. Pittsfield. Lincoln addresses Republican meeting. "It was decidedly the largest gathering of people that ever occurred here. It was at least twice as large as the late Douglas demonstration. Lincoln and Trumbull were both here and made telling speeches." Pittsfield Free Press, Oct. 30.

OCTOBER 28. Springfield. Lincoln sends apologies to J. M. Ruggles of Havana for not attending Republican meeting there today. He has just returned from Pike County. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 380.

OCTOBER 29. Herndon makes principal speech at Freemont and Bissell meeting held at courthouse. "After Mr. H. concluded, he was followed by a brief speech from the Hon. A. Lincoln, who made a candid appeal to every opponent of the sham Democracy to cast his vote for Fremont and Dayton, Bissell and Wood, and the whole Anti-Nebraska ticket." Illinois State Journal, Oct. 30.

OCTOBER 31. Yates addresses another Republican meeting at courthouse. After more than two hours, "Mr. Lincoln followed in his usual happy and forcible manner." Ibid., Nov. 1.

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NOVEMBER 1. Jacksonville. Thousands attend Fremont and Bissell meeting. "The Hons. A. Lincoln, W. H. Herndon, Swett and others addressed the crowd from different stands." Ibid., Nov. 3.

NOVEMBER 4. Springfield. Election Day. Lincoln is 226th voter at Poll No. Two. Regardless of mud and cold, disagreeable weather, large crowd turns out. "We heard of a number of fights upon the streets, between drinking rowdies, but around the polls, everything was quiet and decorous." Ibid., Nov. 5; Election Returns.

NOVEMBER 11. Lincoln receives letter from R. M. Ewing of Petersburg enclosing clipping from "Menard Index" reprinting purported article from N.Y. "Tribune." Article is spurious. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 381.

NOVEMBER 12. Lincoln writes Ewing that although "Index" forgery was "very malicious and wicked," he does not believe much can be done about it. "If you had a local paper there to simply denounce it as a forgtry, that would be well enough; but I doubt whether anything else can be done with it, to advantage." Ibid.

NOVEMBER 13. Acting for Mrs. Lincoln's aunt, Maria L. Bullock, Lincoln gives J. F. Amos, administrator of estate of Nathaniel Hay, receipts for $479.79 and $490.50. He deposits $970 to his account at the Springfield Marine and Fire Insurance Co. Money is Mrs. Bullock's. Lincoln writes Richard Thorne of Ottawa, reporting victory of state ticket by 6,000 to 7,000 majority. He draws on Thorne for $20 to pay "some little expense bills [that] are on me." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 381-82.

NOVEMBER 14. Lincoln writes and files declaration and bond for costs in Henderson v. Weed in U.S. Circuit Court. The Abraham Lincoln Association, Springfield, Illinois. [Files and records on deposit at Illinois State Historical Library, Springfield, Illinois.] — Files; Pierpont Morgan Library, New York City. — Original.

NOVEMBER 17. Fall term of Sangamon Circuit Court commences. Lincoln & Herndon have five cases. Two are dismissed by agreement; three are continued. Record.

NOVEMBER 18. Ten Lincoln & Herndon cases are called, but only one is contested. Mills et al. v. Whitney and Taylor. Lincoln & Herndon represent plaintiff. White and Shutt defendant. After jury is sworn, evidence presented, and arguments made, plaintiffs take nonsuit. Ibid. Lincoln writes S. W. Whitehouse's deposition in Lamb & Co. v. Hill. He writes bond of defendants to support bastard child of Martha A. Morris in Morris v. Meacham and Meacham. He writes court order. Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.; Photo.

NOVEMBER 19. Murder case comes to trial. Theodore Anderson and Jane Anderson are charged with murder, in May, 1856, of George Anderson, uncle of Theodore and husband of Jane. Logan, Lincoln, and Rosette

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represent Theodore Anderson; Stuart and Edwards, Lewis, and Campbell appear for Jane Anderson. Most of first day of trial is taken up with selection of jury from panel of 240. Illinois State Journal, Nov. 20, 22.

NOVEMBER 20. Testimony in Anderson trial commences. Several witnesses are examined and cross-examined. Ibid., Nov. 22.

NOVEMBER 21. In Anderson trial witnesses are examined with reference to bottle of strychnine found in Theodore Andersen's trunk, and relations between Theodore and Mrs. Anderson. Ibid., Nov. 24.

NOVEMBER 22. Jury and counsel visit Anderson home and view spot where Anderson was found dead. Examination of witnesses resumes. Prosecution tries to bring out improper relations between Theodore and Mrs. Anderson, but without success. Ibid., Nov. 24, 25.

NOVEMBER 24. Linder joins prosecution of Anderson case. Most of day is taken up with examination of Doctors Lord and Fowler, physicians who attended Anderson before his death, and conducted post mortem examination. They testify that they found strychnine in stomach of deceased, but give their opinion that death was caused by blow on head. Ibid., Nov. 25, 26. Curtis J. Norton gives Lincoln power of attorney in Hoppin v. Norton. Photo. Lincoln writes to Jonathan Haines, Pekin reaper manufacturer, instructing him how to take depositions of witnesses not present. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 382.

NOVEMBER 25. Doctors Ryan and Bell testify that Anderson died of strychnine poisoning. Defense witnesses testify to good character of both defendants, and establish alibi for Theodore. Others testify that Anderson's death was caused by blow on back of head as he emerged from privy. Illinois State Journal, Nov. 26, 27.

NOVEMBER 26. Phebe Todd, sister of deceased, is star witness for defense. In addition to supporting Theodore's alibi, she testifies that on one night during Anderson's illness, she — not Mrs. Anderson — gave him his medicine. Doctors Wallace and Goltra testify that Anderson was killed by blow. Testimony closes at noon. McWilliams makes opening speech for prosecution. Ibid., Nov. 27, 28. "Son" takes home "Glass Lantern," and Lincoln's account with John Williams & Co. is charged $1. H. E. Pratt, 148.

NOVEMBER 27. Arguments in Anderson case continue. Stuart takes up morning and Edwards afternoon, for defense. Illinois State Journal, Nov. 28.

NOVEMBER 28. McWilliams for state and Lincoln for defense take up entire day in Anderson case. Ibid.

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NOVEMBER 29. Not until 9:00 P.M. are arguments in Anderson trial concluded. Logan closes for defense, Linder for prosecution. After deliberating several hours, jury brings in verdict of not guilty. Ibid., Nov. 28, Dec. 1.

DECEMBER 1. Lincoln sits on bench in place of David Davis. Forty-five cases come before him. None is contested, however, and his work is limited to entering decrees and orders. Record; Photo.

DECEMBER 2. Lincoln & Herndon have two cases in Circuit Court. Lamb & Co. v. Hill, in which they represent defendant, is referred to arbitrators, who find for plaintiff in sum of $823.10. In other case Lincoln & Herndon, plaintiff's attorneys, are given leave to file amended bill. Record.

DECEMBER 3. Two of Lincoln & Herndon's cases are tried by court. In McConnel et at. v. Young, appeal from justice of peace, court finds for plaintiff in sum of $35.96. Roll v. Wochner, appeal, court takes under advisement. In both cases Lincoln and his partner appear for defendants. Ibid.

DECEMBER 4. Defendants default in Burrell v. Ward et al. and court orders bill taken for confessed. Lincoln & Herndon represent complainant. Ibid.

DECEMBER 5. In Bryan v. Jones, trespass case in which Rosette represents plaintiff, and Lincoln & Herndon, France, and Campbell for defendant, jury finds defendant guilty and assesses plaintiff's damages at $200. Roll v. Wochner is argued again. Court finds for plaintiff and assesses damages at $60.95. Ibid.

DECEMBER 9. Chicago. Lincoln has patent case, Durfee and Green v. Sherman and Bay, in U.S. Circuit Court. Complainants, owners of patent for steam dredging machine, seek injunction to restrain defendants from operating another dredging machine on ground of infringement. Beckwith represents complainants, Goodrich and Lincoln defendants. Chicago Journal, Dec. 10.

DECEMBER 10. Three hundred Republicans banquet at Tremont House. "Every luxury which the most fastidious palate could desire . . . was present in bounteous profusion and enjoyed with peculiar unction." Lincoln makes first of many speeches when he responds to toast: "The Union — the North will maintain it — the South will not depart therefrom." Illinois State Journal, Dec. 13; The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 383-85.

DECEMBER 11. October term of U.S. Circuit Court adjourns, court holding dredge patent case under consideration. Chicago Journal, Dec. 13.

DECEMBER 13. Springfield. Lincoln receives letter from O. H. Browning asking for document Browning thinks he has. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 386.

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DECEMBER 14. Lincoln makes "long hunt" for paper Browning wants but fails to find it. Ibid.

DECEMBER 15. Lincoln writes Browning. In addition to explaining his failure to locate paper — "I have no recollection of ever having had it" — he tells him that several Republicans believe "a sort of party State address" should be got up, and that "it has been suggested that you could draw up such a thing as well if not better than any of us. Think about it." Ibid. He buys pair of "Kid Gloves" at John Williams & Co. and is charged $1. H. E. Pratt, 148.

DECEMBER 16. Lincoln withdraws $970 he deposited Nov. 13. This is Mrs. Bullock's money, which Lincoln pays to "Francis & Pariell." Marine Bank Ledger. In Circuit Court, three Lincoln & Herndon cases are called and continued. Record. Lincoln exchanges gloves for another pair costing 25˘ more. H. E. Pratt, 148.

DECEMBER 18. In Hinzey v. Jacobs, appeal from justice's court, jury finds for plaintiff in sum of $20. Lincoln & Herndon represent defendant. Four other cases of theirs are called, but all are continued with orders or filing pleas. Record.

DECEMBER 19. Appearing for plaintiffs, Lincoln & Herndon move that three cases be dismissed. Ibid.

DECEMBER 20. Springfield bar meets. Stephen T. Logan is called to chair, and J. B. White is elected secretary. E. B. Herndon states that James H. Matheny is about to retire as circuit clerk, and that his long, efficient service merits recognition. He presents resolutions commending Matheny, which are adopted. Lincoln pays Matheny graceful tribute. Illinois State Journal, Dec. 24; The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 386.

DECEMBER 22. Circuit Court adjourns after its longest session. New England Society celebrates 236th anniversary of landing of Pilgrims with supper at Concert Hall. After supper come many toasts, interspersed with music and remarks by J. H. Matheny, William Jayne, Erastus Wright, Lincoln, and others. Illinois State Journal, Dec. 24.

DECEMBER 25. Lincoln writes Robert Boal of Lacon in interest of Boal's candidacy for speakership of House. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 387.

DECEMBER 31. Citizens in favor of establishing female seminary in Springfield meet. John T. Stuart is appointed president. Stuart, Lincoln, and Mr. McKeever of Pennsylvania speak, and general discussion follows, It is resolved that committee of one from each ward be appointed to inquire further into matter. Illinois State Journal, Jan. I, 1857.

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1857

JANUARY 2. Springfield. Lincoln gives Nathaniel Coffin receipt for fees for legal services to Illinois College. The Abraham Lincoln Association, Springfield, Illinois. [Files and records on deposit at Illinois State Historical Library, Springfield, Illinois.] — Files.

JANUARY 4. Republican members of legislature caucus in Lincoln & Herndon office. Phillips, 104.

JANUARY 5. [Legislature and U.S. Circuit Court convene in Springfield.]

JANUARY 6. Lincoln writes testimonial for "American Statesmen," new book handed to him by T. V. Webb, canvasser for Derby & Miller, New York publishers. Lincoln & Herndon subscribed to book. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 388. [Springfield session of Supreme Court commences.]

JANUARY 7. In U.S. Circuit Court Lincoln files plaintiff's declaration in Baker v. Baker. B. S. Edwards for defendant confesses to judgment for $1,300, amount of debt, plus $48.07 damages and costs. On motion of plaintiff's attorneys, Lincoln and Smith, new trial is granted in Coffin v. Palmer et al., ejectment. Record. Lincoln buys and charges $1 pair of slippers at John Williams & Co. H. E. Pratt, 148.

JANUARY 10. In Eddy et al. v. Handsby et al. in U.S. Circuit Court, plaintiffs file declaration alleging nonpayment of promissory note for $1,384.20. Lincoln appears for defendants, files power of attorney, and confesses judgment in sum of $895.21. Court orders that plaintiff recover this amount from defendant. On Lincoln's motion, Henderson v. Weed is dismissed by agreement, at defendant's costs. Record.

JANUARY 12. William H. Bissell, first Republican governor of Illinois, is inaugurated. Evening celebration is held. Gustave Koerner makes first speech. Lincoln is among those who follow him. "The speeches were all characterized by great good feeling, and the enthusiasm of the audience often vented itself in rounds of applause." Illinois State Journal, Jan. 13.

JANUARY 13. In Tallman v. Harvey, ejectment case in U.S. Court, Lincoln and Clark file plaintiff's declaration. On their motion defendant is ruled to plead in 20 days. Original owned by James A. Jones, Springfield, Ill.

JANUARY 14. Lincoln writes and files affidavit of S. R. Rowan, defendant in case in U.S. Court. Affiant says that when he was shown papers in case he saw no bond for costs, and that Lincoln and John A. McClernand are his attorneys. Ibid. "Son" is sent to John Williams store for two 25˘ cards of buttons. H. E. Pratt, 148.

JANUARY 16. Lincoln mails affidavit to circuit clerk at Bloomington to be

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filed in his suit against Illinois Central for collection of fee. Affidavit states that plaintiff desires to take depositions of Norman B. Judd, Isaac N. Arnold and Grant Goodrich of Chicago; Archibald Williams and O. H. Browning of Quincy; Norman H. Purple of Peoria, and Stephen T. Logan of Springfield to be read in evidence. Photo.

JANUARY 19. In case in which he wrote affidavit for Rowan Jan.14 Lincoln himself makes affidavit that he has no knowledge of bond for cost having been filed and that he has seen none in papers in case. Original owned by James A. Jones, Springfield, Ill.

JANUARY 20. "During the entire week the trial of Erastus Wright has been progressing in the U.S. Court. . . . The trial has been largely attended and much interest manifest by people from every part of the State. The U.S. attorney Mr. William J. Allen has managed the case in a very able manner The defense, Messrs. Logan, Lincoln and McClernand have made an able defense." Jacksonville Sentinel, Jan. 23.

JANUARY 22. Lincoln & Herndon, for complainants, publish notices that bills of complaint have been filed in two cases in Sangamon Circuit Court:

Driskell v. Gilman et at. and Hall v. Lacey et al. Register, Feb. 27.

JANUARY 23. Mr. and Mrs. Ninian W. Edwards give large party, which Mr. and Mrs. Lincoln probably attend. Browning, Diary. "Son" brings home "1/2 lb. Tea & @ $1.25." H. E. Pratt, 148.

JANUARY 24. Lincoln is occupied in Supreme Court entire day. Representing plaintiff in error, he moves that Busher v. Lewis be dismissed. Following that, McConnel v. Delaware Mutual Insurance Co., before court in 1856, is reargued. Appellants argue orally, but Lincoln and Dummer for appellees file written arguments. Court decides case in their favor. Record.

JANUARY 26. Lincoln has three cases in Supreme Court. In Curtiss v. Gill he appears for defendant in error and confesses errors assigned. Gray v. French et al. is continued. Arguments are commenced in Phelps v. McGee, but case is continued until next day. Ibid. In evening Illinois State Colonization Society holds its annual meeting. Lincoln is elected one of 11 managers. Illinois State Journal, Jan. 28.

JANUARY 27. Lincoln, representing appellant, makes concluding argument in Phelps v. McGee. Breach of contract to deliver corn is involved. Court finds for Lincoln's client. Argument commences in Dudley and Dudley v. Crosthwaite in U.S. Court, ejectment suit in which Lincoln & Herndon represent defendant. Case is continued. Record.

JANUARY 29. Lincoln buys gelatine at his drug store. H. E. Pratt, 151.

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JANUARY 30. In Supreme Court Lincoln argues two cases. In one — County of Christian v. Overholt et al., in which contract for construction of curthouse is involved — Lincoln and Logan appear for appellant. Court takes case under advisement, and later reverses Circuit Court. In Laughlin Marshall, Lincoln appears for defendant in error. After arguments, pliaintiff dismisses case. Record.

FEBRUARY 2. Further hearing in Dudley and Dudley v. Crosthwalte occupies court until adjournment. Browning and Bushnell represent plaintiff Lincoln & Herndon defendant. Ibid.

FEBRUARY 3. Arguments in Dudley and Dudley v. Crosthwaite are concluded, and court takes case under advisement. Ibid.

FEBRUARY 5. Mr. and Mrs. Lincoln give large party. Five hundred are invited, but owing to rain and bridal party in Jacksonville on same evening, only 300 attend. Orville H. Browning calls it "a large and pleasant party." Browning, Diary. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 388.

[FEBRUARY 6. The Lincolns are busy socially almost every evening. Sandburg and Angle, 198.]

FEBRUARY 7. On motion of plaintiffs attorneys, Lincoln and Smith, Coffin v. Palmer et al. is continued in U.S. Circuit Court. Record.

FEBRUARY 9. First issue of Springfield "Republican" appears and copy is left at Lincoln residence. Reproached with having subscribed to "another worthless little paper," Lincoln answers evasively, "I have not directed the paper to be left." Mrs. Lincoln orders carrier to make no more deliveries. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 389-90.

FEBRUARY 11. Lincoln is visited by Clifton H. Moore, his Clinton "partner," who brings depositions notice for Phares v. Jennings and Oatman, Dewitt Circuit Court case, incomplete for lack of first names of parties. Lincoln cannot supply them, and writes inquiry which he mails to defendants. Ibid., II, 389. Lincoln buys 15˘ worth of olive oil at his drug store. H. E. Pratt, 151.

FEBRUARY 12. Lincoln replies to firm of attorneys in Paris who sent claim against Illinois Central. "I have been in the regular retainer of the Co. for two or three years;" he writes, "but I expect they do not wish to retain me any longer." He adds that he is going to Chicago on 21st and will ascertain his status. If discharged, as he expects, he will be glad to handle claim. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 389.

FEBRUARY 13. Mr. and Mrs. Lincoln attend party at governor's mansion. In every respect it was a delightful and magnificent entertainment,

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Governor and Mrs. Bissell doing the honors of host and hostess with an ease, and grace which attracted and pleased all who were present. . . . Through out the evening, a fine brass and string band discoursed most delicious music and the dancers kept the cotillions filled until a late hour." Illinois State Journal, Feb. 16.

FEBRUARY 16. Mrs. Lincoln writes her sister Emilie: "Within the last three weeks there has been a party almost every night and some two or three grand fetes are coming off this week." Sandburg and Angle, 198.

FEBRUARY 17. In letter to Lyman Trumbull, Herndon says Lincoln is with him in office, and quotes Lincoln's analysis of apportionment bill pending in legislature. Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Lyman Trumbull Papers, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

FEBRUARY 19. Lincoln receives complaining letter from John E. Rosette lawyer and editor of Springfield Republican. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 389-90.

FEBRUARY 20. Lincoln writes Rosette: "Your note about the little paragraph in the Republican was received yesterday, since which time I have been too unwell to notice it." (Apparently "Republican" had commented on Mrs. Lincoln's rejection of paper.) Lincoln explains circumstances, adding that while he had not favored new paper, he intended to subscribe. Ibid.

FEBRUARY 21. Springfield to Chicago? [On Feb. 12th Lincoln wrote that he intended to go to Chicago on 21st. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 389.]

FEBRUARY 23. Chicago? [Sometime during this week Lincoln has conference with officials of Illinois Central. Contrary to his expectation, he is continued in company's retainer. Ibid.]

FEBRUARY 28. Chicago. Lincoln makes principal address at Republican meeting held at Metropolitan Hall to ratify nominations for municipal offices. John Wentworth, candidate for mayor, follows him. "The utmost enthusiasm prevailed." Chicago Democratic Press, Mar. 2; The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II; 390-91.

MARCH 2. [Spring term of DeWitt Circuit Court convenes. Hemdon writes Trumbull: "Mr. Lincoln has gone to Chicago — was a little unwell when he left but suppose him well ere this." Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Lyman Trumbull Papers, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.]

MARCH 4. En route to Springfield. Lincoln is recognized on train by Alfred Hyde, convict being taken to Alton penitentiary, who asks about obtaining pardon. Lincoln is impressed by Hyde's "gentlemanly appearance" and his claim of friendship with Senator Daniel S. Dickinson of New York. Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Robert Todd Lincoln Collection of the Papers of Abraham Lincoln, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C., Hyde to Lincoln, Mar. 25, 1858; The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 535.

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MARCH 6. Springfield. Lincoln pays $5 docket fee in Henderson v. Week, and signs U.S. court fee book. Fee Book.

MARCH 7. Lincoln deals with Springfield business preparatory to departure on circuit. Illinois State Historical Library, Springfield, Illinois — Richard Yates Papers, Illinois State Historical Library, Springfield, Illinois, George T. Brown to R. Yates, Mar. 5, 1857.

MARCH 10. Clinton. Lincoln is engaged in criminal case in DeWitt Circuit Court. With Moore and Tupper, he defends Larry Bowen, Patrick Kinney, and Thomas O'Connell, charged with larceny. Jury finds Bowen guilty, but exonerates others. Bowen is sentenced to year in penitentiary. Record.

MARCH 11. [Mrs. Lincoln buys pair of slippers at John Williams & Co. H. E. Pratt, 148.]

MARCH 12. Lewis v. Phares, assumpsit suit, is tried. Moore and Swett represent plaintiff, Weldon and Lincoln defendant. After jury is summoned, plaintiff submits to nonsuit. Record. Lincoln writes and files defendant's affidavit in Hamblin and Grant v. Lisenby, and court adjourns. Photo.

MARCH 14. Springfield. Lincoln concurs in legal opinion which Logan has written at request of Zimri A. Enos. Opinion concerns compensation of county surveyor. Hertz, Lincoln, 700-02.

MARCH 16. Lincoln. Logan Circuit Court convenes for two-week term at Lincoln. Record. Lincoln draws up petition for pardon of John Hibbs, Logan County citizen sentenced to two years for manslaughter in 1856, and collects signatures. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 394-95.

MARCH 21. Springfield. On behalf of Maria L. Bullock, Mrs. Lincoln's aunt, Lincoln releases two mortgages, given by Patrick Keily and Nathaniel Hay. In margin of Deed Record opposite both instruments he writes: "Satisfied in full, March 21, 1857, Maria L. Bullock. By A. Lincoln, Attorney in fact." Deed Record.

MARCH 24. Lincoln enters himself as security for plaintiffs costs in Saltonstall v. Eads and Eads in U.S. Circuit Court. Original owned by James A. Jones, Springfield, Illinois.

MARCH 25. Lincoln. Johnson v. Bean and Turley, Lincoln & Herndon for plaintiff, is dismissed at defendant's costs. Webster v. Rhodes and Angell, Lincoln, Herndon, and Parks for plaintiff, is also dismissed, each party paying his costs. Record. [Filed in Danville is bill in Davenport v. Sconce and Don Carlos, which Lincoln corrected and evidently mailed. Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.]

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MARCH 28. Lincoln & Herndon represent plaintiff in Lanham v. Lorence chancery. Record.

MARCH 29. En route to Peoria.

MARCH 30. Peoria and Metamora. Lincoln spends night at Peoria House Proceeding to Metamora, he represents defendant in Lncy Ann Davenport v. Lucy Davenport et al., bill for dower. Case, which had been dismissed on plaintiffs motion, is reinstated and continued. Peoria Democratic Union Mar. 30; Record.

MARCH 31. Bloomington. Lincoln opens case of Isaac Wyant, charged with murder, for state, and defendant's attorneys outline their defense. That Wyant killed Anson Rusk is not contested, defense resting its case on alleged insanity of accused. Bloomington Pantograph, Apr. 15. [Mrs. Lincoln buys drilling and muslin at John Williams' store. H. E. Pratt 148.]

APRIL 1. Day is taken up with examination of witnesses in Wyant case. Bloomington Pantograph, Apr. 15. [In Springfield, Lincoln's buggy is repaired at his carriage shop. Obed Lewis Account Books.]

APRIL 2. Again examination of witnesses occupies court for entire day. Bloomington Pantograph, Apr. 15.

APRIL 3. Arguments commence in Wyant case. Hogg opens for prosecution and Orme and Swett follow for defendant. Court adjourns before Swett finishes. Ibid.

APRIL 4. Swett speaks all morning. Lincoln, making concluding argument for prosecution, commences at one o'clock and does not finish until six, when case is given to jury. Shortly after midnight jury returns verdict of acquittal. Ibid.; Wakefield, 74-8.

APRIL 6. Springfield. For Jesse K. Dubois, auditor, Lincoln writes legal opinion on duty of auditor under new bank law passed at last session of legislature. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 393. Mrs. Lincoln buys and charges 16 pounds cotton batting. H. E. Pratt, 148.

APRIL 7. Lincoln, Herndon, and prominent Missouri politician — probably Frank Blair — have conversation in Lincoln's office regarding Republicanism in border states in 1860. They plan to have Republican party endorsed by "Missouri Democrat" of St. Louis, then by Louisville "Journal," then by some paper, to be selected later, in Virginia. Newton, 114, 124.

APRIL 13. Metamora. Lincoln writes report of commissioners and court decree in Saltonstall v. Saltonstall. Photo.

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APRIL 14. [Mrs. Lincoln buys $3.31 worth of calico and chintz. Pratt, 148.]

APRIL 15. Pekin. Lincoln draws up agreement between Benjamin S. Prettyman and Thomas Snell settling suits pending in Tazewell Circuit Court. Photo.

APRIL 21. Urbana. Lincoln writes to Thomas Meharry of Pleasant Hill, Ind., giving opinion of Meharry's claim to land in Vermilion and Champaign County. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 393-94.

APRIL 22. Springfield. Lincoln returns to Springfield, arriving during evening. Illinois State Journal, Apr. 24.

APRIL 23. Lincoln appears in Sangamon Circuit Court for first time during term. Case for which he returned is Browning v. City of Springfield, in which plaintiff sues for damages by reason of injury sustained through faulty sidewalk. Lincoln & Herndon represent plaintiff, McClernand and E. B. Herndon defendant. Court takes case under advisement, later awarding plaintiff $700. Ibid.

APRIL 24. Lincoln participates in two cases in Circuit Court. In Stigleman et al. v. Johnson et al., jury of inquiry assesses damages of plaintiffs, whom Lincoln & Herndon represent, at $1,504.55. In chancery case, McGraw v. Adams, exceptions are ordered filed by Apr. 30. Lincoln & Herndon appear for complainant. Ibid., Apr. 25.

APRIL 25. Lincoln makes last stand in Correll et al. v. McDaniel et al. will case in which jury found against him Nov. 30, 1855. On technical grounds, Lincoln & Herndon resist complainants' motion to enter decree, but their objections are overruled. Ibid., Apr. 27. Lincoln writes court order. Photo.

APRIL 27. Lincoln writes agreement filed in Correll et al. v. McDaniel et al., signing "Conkling, Lincoln & Herndon for defts for whom they have filed answer." Photo.

APRIL 30. Danville. Lincoln writes part of indictment in People v. Littler. Original owned by King Hostick, Springfield, Ill.

MAY 1. Lincoln and Lamon represent plaintiff in trover case, Shumate v. Payton. After jury is sworn, plaintiff submits to nonsuit, and defendant is given execution for costs. Lincoln and Lamon also win Wyatt v. Leonard, assumpsit, when defendant defaults and is assessed $146.92 and costs. Record.

MAY 6. Johnson et al. v. Snow et al., chancery case in which Lincoln and Lamon represent complainants, is continued with leave to complainants to amend their bill. Ibid.

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MAY 7. Urbana. Lincoln reaches Urbana to watch interests of Illinois Central, writing judgment in Hays & Co. v. Illinois Central. Photo.

MAY 8. Danville. Lincoln writes, and David Davis signs, bill of exceptions in McDonald et al. v. Great Western Railroad Co., appeal from assessment for right of way. Photo. [Lincoln's petition for pardon of John Gibbs, endorsed by Judge Davis, is delivered to Gov. Bissell. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II 394-95.]

MAY 9. Springfield. On returning to Springfield, Lincoln's first duty is to visit land office in connection with two pre-emption claims sent him by Joseph Brackett. He declines invitation to speak in Minnesota during coming campaign, and files declaration in Wainright et al. v. Curtis et al. alleging nonpayment of promissory note for $1,322.83, in U.S. Circuit Court. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 395-96; Record.

MAY 16. Lincoln files praecipe, declaration, and bond for costs in Eshrick Black & Co. v. Tobias, Hittle & Co. with clerk of U.S. Circuit Court. Suit is brought to enforce payment of note for $831.78, executed by defendants. Record. He also deposits $200 to his account at the Springfield Marine and Fire Insurance Co., and collects $225 from Joshua F. Amos, administrator of Nathaniel Hay. Marine Bank Ledger; The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 395.

MAY 18. To Joseph W. Brackett of Rock Island Lincoln writes account of his visit to land office May 9. There was no record in office to show quantity of land preempted and he failed to get business concluded. Register was perplexed "because of the peculiarity of the case and consequently he put me off from time to time till now." He encloses certificates. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 395-96.

MAY 19. Mrs. Lincoln buys 36 yards of "Buff Linen" and "1 3/4 yds. Bobbinet," charging $9.44 to Lincoln's account at John Williams & Co. H. E. Pratt, 148.

MAY 20. Mrs. Lincoln returns buff linen and buys 36 yards of "Cotton Damask," and another yard of bobbinet. Ibid.

MAY 21. Chicago. Lincoln, described by Chicago Journal as "the successor of Stephen A. Douglas in the U.S. Senate," is in Chicago. Chicago Journal, May 22.

MAY 27. Danville. Lincoln appears for defendant in Leverick v. Leverick, case in Vermilion Circuit Court in which appointment of conservator is sought. Jury finds defendant insane, and Richard Leverick is appointed conservator. Record.

MAY 28. Springfield. Lincoln writes to Jonathan Cooper and Hugh

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Reynolds, Peoria lawyers, about law case on which he expects court action soon, Eshrick, Black & Co. v. Tobias, Hittle & Co. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 396.

JUNE 1. In U.S. Circuit Court two of Lincoln's cases are called — Wainbright et al. v. Curtis et al., and Eshrick, Black & Co. v. Tobias, Hittle & Co. Defendants are ruled to plead by Wednesday. Record.

JUNE 2. Lincoln writes Messrs. Cornell, Waite & Jameson of Chicago that register of land office has declined to enter land which they wished. He has made memorandum of facts and has deposited $400 in gold with Jacob Bunn, who will hold it subject to their order. "Now, if you please," he concludes, "send me ten dollars as a fee." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 396-97. Two of his cases in U.S. Circuit Court are continued. Record.

JUNE 3. In both cases called on the Ist defendants default, and Lincoln obtains judgments for his clients. In Eshrick, Black & Co. v. Tobias, Hittle & Co. amount is $867.26; in Wainwright et al. v. Curtis et al. two judgments, one for $1,104.25, other for $620.52, are entered. Two other cases are continued. Ibid. Mrs. Lincoln buys yard goods and buttons. H. E. Pratt, 149.

JUNE 4. Saltonstall v. Eads and Eads, foreclosure suit in which Lincoln entered himself as security for costs Mar. 24, is called in U.S. Circuit Court. Defendants default, and court orders foreclosure and sale of lands within 20 days unless note for $3,122.59, to secure which mortgage was given, is paid. Record.

JUNE 8. Ejectment suit, Tallman v. Harvey, occupies U.S. Circuit Court for most of day. Clark and Lincoln represent plaintiff, while Ives and Thompson and McClernand and E. B. Herndon appear for defendant. After hearing evidence and arguments, court takes the case under advisement (see June 7, 1858). Ibid.; Files.

JUNE 9. Lincoln writes Charles A. Purdy that register of land office "says the way for you to get your Patents, is to send these Receipts or Certificates to the General Land Office, with your address, and the Patents will be forwarded directly to your address. Accordingly, I inclose the Receipts to you." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 397.

JUNE 10. Logan and Lincoln, representing defendant, file affidavit in Gale v. Morgan County Bank in U.S. Court. Plaintiff has brought suit to recover $ 10,000 from defendant. Record. Lincoln writes and files declaration in Gilbert v. Read et al. Plaintiff asks damages of $3,000 because he had been suspended from Shurtleff College. Illinois State Historical Library, Springfield, Illinois — Original.

JUNE 11. Lincoln, with McClernand, is court appointed defense attorney in U.S. v. Andrew J. Sloan, charged with stealing mail. Accused pleads

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not guilty but is convicted and sentenced to two years in penltentiary. Record.

JUNE 12. In response to invitation of grand jury of U.S. Court Douglas speaks in state house. "The representative hall was a perfect jam — a very large number of ladies were present on the occasion. We were pleased to see in attendance, Col. W. H. Herndon, the Hon. A. Lincoln, the Hon. S. M. Cullom and many other prominent men in the republican party." Register, June 15.

JUNE 13. Lincoln buys two pounds of cream of tartar at Corneau & Diller drugs. H. E. Pratt, 151.

JUNE 15. [McLean Circuit Court convenes for special term at Bloomington. Judge Norton presides in place of Judge Davis.]

JUNE 18. Bloomington. Lincoln's suit against Illinois Central for his fee in famous McLean County tax case is called in McLean Circuit Court. No one appears for defendant, so jury, after hearing Lincoln's evidence assesses his damages at $5,000, amount sued upon. Parties in Pike v. Shatter, in which Lincoln appears for plaintiff, agree that trial shall be set for June 23. Record.

JUNE 22. Pike v. Shaffer is again continued by agreement. Record.

JUNE 23. On motion of defendant's attorney, verdict in Lincoln's suit against Illinois Central is set aside. Jury is again called, and again finds for plaintiff, this time for $4,800. (Lincoln had forgotten $200 retainer.) Court overrules defendant's motion for new trial. Defendant is allowed appeal to Supreme Court, but this appeal is never taken. Record; The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 397-98.

JUNE 26. Springfield. Issue is joined before jury in Coffin v. Palmer et al. in U.S. Circuit Court, Lincoln and Smith for plaintiff. Court adjourns before arguments are finished. Record. Lincoln speaks in House of Representatives. His speech is answer to that of Douglas delivered two weeks earlier. Directing his argument mainly against Dred Scott decision, which Douglas had sustained, he maintains that it was "erroneous," and urges that it not be accepted as precedent. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 398-410.

JUNE 27. Lincoln loses Coffin v. Palmer et al. when jury decides that defendants are not holding land belonging to plaintiff. Record.

JUNE 29. To Orville H. Browning, Lincoln writes: "When I went to Bloomington . . . I saw Mr. Price and learned from him that this note was a sort of ‘insolvent fix-up’ with his creditors — a fact in his history I have not before learned of." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 410.

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JULY 3. Lincoln draws agreement by which ten men pledge $500 "to be used in giving circulation, in Southern and Middle Illinois, to the newspaper published at St. Louis, Missouri, and called ‘The Missouri Democrat’" Money is to be paid to John G. Nicolay as soon as he shall furnish evidence indicating successful termination of undertaking. Seven men besides Lincoln sign agreement. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 410. [In Decatur, Lincoln's case (for plaintiff, with Prather), Galting et al. v. Great Western Railroad, is argued before court and taken under advisement. Record.]

JULY 7. Chicago. U.S. Circuit Court convenes with Judges McLean and Drummond on bench. Chicago Democrat reports that "Honorables O. M. Hatch, Secretary of State, Jesse K. Dubois, State Auditor, Senator Trumbull A. Lincoln, W. H. Bailhache, of the Springfield Journal, and other notables, are at the Tremont House."

JULY 8. Lincoln collects from Chicago Dock & Canal Co. $100 "atty fees" and $100 for "services." Photo. "At night Bushnell, Lincoln & myself went to the theatre," Orville H. Browning records, "& heard Burton in the Toodles — His acting is very fine — that is it does not appear like acting at all — He is much the finest comedian I have ever seen." Browning, Diary.

JULY 9. Chicago Democrat (July 11) contains item relating to case in which Lincoln is later to make one of his best arguments. "In the U.S. Circuit Court, now in session in this city, the case of the steamer Effie Afton v. The Rock Island Bridge Company was called up, and on motion was continued to some future day. The parties are endeavoring to have a day fixed for the trial of the case before Judge McLean."

JULY 11. [Mrs. Lincoln buys cloth and thread at John Williams & Co. H. E. Pratt, 149.]

JULY 13. At night Lincoln and Browning again attend theater, this time to see Burton play Captain Cuttle in "Dombey and Son." "This is very admirable — Mrs. Burton did Susan Nipper, the black eyed one very well — The others were hum drum." Browning, I, 294.

JULY 15. Case of Peter S. Hoes v. James Barclay et al., ejectment suit, comes to trial in U.S. Circuit Court. Williams, Lawrence, and Williams represent plaintiff, Logan and Lincoln defendants. Chicago Democrat, July 16.

JULY 16. Trial of Hoes v. Barclay continues. Ibid., July 17.

JULY 17. Lincoln and Logan lose case when verdict for plaintiff is returned in Hoes v. Barclay. Ibid., July 21.

JULY 18. Chicago and Springfield. Lincoln returns home. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 410-11.

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JULY 19. Springfield. Lincoln replies to letter from Gustave Koerner Summarizing status of litigation affecting Ohio and Mississippi Railroad Co., he adds: "Will you please remember that our Sangamon Circuit Court commences Augt.10 — when I suppose our Quo Warranto case will come up, and when I shall be glad to have the benefit of your legal assistance." He writes to Lyman Porter & Co., Lafayette, Ind., merchants that he can no longer regularly attend court in Tazewell County. He tells William H. Young, lawyer, that he and Herndon can join in case, but Lincoln will be in Chicago much of next term. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 410-12.

JULY 20. Lincoln writes B. C. Lundy that his speech of June 26 is available in pamphlet form at "Illinois Journal" office. "What you say about our party doing something this year," he adds, "is perfectly right. . . . I believe you are in the Peoria Senatorial district — a district that has to be very thoroughly cultivated — outside of it, up your way does not need much." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 412. He buys two bottles of vanilla extract at drug store. H. E. Pratt, 151.

JULY 21. On margin of Deed Record, opposite mortgage from John Connelly to Maria L. Bullock, Lincoln writes: "Satisfied in full, July I, 1857, Maria L. Bullock, by her attorney in fact A. Lincoln."

JULY 22. [Sangamon Circuit Court convenes in special term with sensational murder trial, People v. Forsyth, attracting crowds of lawyers. Illinois State Chronicle, July 23.] But Lincoln is not among them. He and Mrs. Lincoln depart for New York.

JULY 24. Niagara Falls, N. Y. Mr. and Mrs. Lincoln are registered at Cataract House, Niagara Falls. Lincoln Lore, No. 319.

JULY 29. New York. Sending some speeches to Theodore Parker, Herndon writes: "Mr. Lincoln has gone to New York or he would have sent them to you himself." Newton, 123. In New York, Lincoln writes note, which James Primm signs, Primm promising to pay $200 in 30 days, plus 10 per cent annual interest, for "value received." Photo.

JULY 30. [On Sept. 20 Mrs. Lincoln alluded to eastern trip as follows: "The summer has so strangely and rapidly passed away. Some portion of it was spent most pleasantly in traveling East. We visited Niagara, Canada, New York and other points of interest." Katherine Helm, The True Story of Mary, Wife of Lincoln, 122-23.]

AUGUST 1. [In Bloomington, McLean Circuit Court orders sheriff to execute judgment of $4,800 against Illinois Central in favor of Abraham Lincoln. Record.]

AUGUST 3. ["Son" brings home from John Williams' store half-pound of tea. H. E. Pratt, 149.]

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AUGUST 5. Springfield. Lincoln, back home, follows up his letter of July 20 to B. C. Lundy with advice as to best method of working for election of legislators in Peoria senatorial district. He recommends alphabetical lists of voters in each precinct or township. "Let all be so quiet that the adversary shall not be notified." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 412-13.

AUGUST 10. Summer term of Sangamon Circuit Court commences. "The grand jury was organized, the docket called and a number of motions of various kinds and for various objects were made. Nothing of any general interest to the reader transpired." Register, Aug. 11.

AUGUST 11. People ex rel. Koerner et al. v. N. H. Ridgely et al., case about which Lincoln wrote Gustave Koerner July 19, is called and continued. (Appointment of Koerner and others as trustees of State Bank of Illinois was involved.) Murder case — People v. John Brunthouse — is set for trial next day. Wyatt and Lincoln & Herndon are defendant's attorneys. Record; Register, Aug. 13.

AUGUST 12. Morning is taken up with calling docket, making motions, and continuing cases. In afternoon defendant's attorneys in Brunthouse case take change of venue to Macoupin County, and court adjourns. Register, Aug. 13, 14. Lincoln deposits $4,800, fee for which he sued Illinois Central, in Springfield Marine and Fire Insurance Co. Marine Bank Ledger.

AUGUST 15. Lincoln writes R. E. Williams, Bloomington lawyer, in regard to case to be tried there in autumn. "I well remember the transaction; but as Bakewell will need no lawyer but you, and as there is likely to be some feeling, and both the parties are old friends of mine, I prefer, if I can, to keep out of the case. Of course I will not engage against Mr. Bakewell." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 413. Lincoln has $3 worth of repairs made on his buggy. Obed Lewis Account Books.

AUGUST 17. Lincoln writes to James W. Grimes, Iowa Republican, about this time, that he cannot campaign in Iowa, unless incidentally to trial in Chicago that may last months. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 413-14.

AUGUST 18. Lincoln writes part of petition for pardon of Moses Loe, whom he defended for manslaughter in DeWitt Circuit Court in 1853, and signs. Photo; The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 414.

AUGUST 20. Lincoln deposits $200 in his bank account. Marine Bank Ledger.

AUGUST 22. Lincoln writes and mails to Lincoln declaration and praecipe in Stigleman, Johnson & Co. v. Bruce & Young. Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

AUGUST 28. Lincoln writes check for $200 to Joel A. Matteson. Photo.

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AUGUST 31. Lincoln withdraws $4,800 — deposited Aug. 12 — from Springfield Marine and Fire Insurance Co. Marine Bank Ledger.

SEPTEMBER 1. Chicago. [On Sept. 20 Mrs. Lincoln wrote: "Mr. L. is not at home, this makes the fourth week, he has been in Chicago. Sandburg & Angle, 201. Lincoln must have been in Chicago during first week of Sept.]

SEPTEMBER 8. Trial of "Effie Afton" case — Hurd et al. v. Railroad Bridge Co. — commences in U.S. Circuit Court before Judge McLean. Plaintiffs' attorneys are H. M. Wead, T. D. Lincoln, and Corydon Beckwith; N. B. Judd, Joseph Knox and A. Lincoln represent defendant. Wead opens case, Judd replies, and T. D. Lincoln answers Judd. Chicago Press, Sept. 9.

SEPTEMBER 9. Reading of depositions takes up most of day in "Effie Afton" case. Judd and A. Lincoln object to question asked deponents, and after considerable argument, Judge McLean rules that part of question is improper. Ibid., Sept. 10.

SEPTEMBER 10. Presentation of depositions by T. D. Lincoln takes up most of day. Ibid., Sept. 11. In Eddy et al. v. Handsby and Logan, case in which plaintiff sues for collection of note for $1,384.20 and damages of $1,500, Lincoln files power of attorney and confesses judgment for $895.21. Judgment Record.

SEPTEMBER 11. T. D. Lincoln continues to read depositions. Chicago Press, Sept. 12.

SEPTEMBER 12. Plaintiffs' attorneys continue to present evidence, adding oral testimony to depositions. Capt. Orrin Smith of Galena, one of their important witnesses, testifies and is cross-examined by Joseph Knox. Lincoln takes little part in proceedings, merely interrupting one witness to ask him to explain part of his testimony by referring to map. Ibid., Sept. 14, 15.

SEPTEMBER 13. Lincoln writes Jesse K. Dubois, auditor, that several people have complained about Dubois not enforcing banking laws. He hopes Dubois will explain. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 414.

SEPTEMBER 14. T. D. Lincoln reads depositions throughout morning. In afternoon oral testimony is presented. Chicago Press, Sept. 15, 16.

SEPTEMBER 15. Plaintiffs' testimony is concluded during morning. One defense deposition is read, but owing to defense not being fully prepared, court adjourns early. Several defense witnesses testify. Ibid., Sept. 16.

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SEPTEMBER 16. Defense witnesses continue to offer testimony. Ibid., Sept. 17, 18.

SEPTEMBER 17. Defense occupies day in presentation of testimony. Ibid., Sept. 18.

SEPTEMBER 18. Defense presents depositions in morning, oral testimony in afternoon. Ibid., Sept. 19.

SEPTEMBER 10. T. D. Lincoln objects when Judd offers in evidence comparative statement of business done on railroad and river. T. D. Lincoln, Knox, A. Lincoln, and Wead argue question. McLean decides that no evidence of this kind can be offered to impair right of navigating river. Plaintiffs offer rebutting testimony. Ibid., Sept. 21.

SEPTEMBER 20. Mrs. Lincoln writes to Emily Todd Helm about her trip to New York. "I often laugh," she says, "& tell Mr. Lincoln that I am determined my next husband shall be rich." This throws light on Lincoln's mysterious eastern trip, suggesting pleasure tour taken on strength of large fee won from Illinois Central. Sandburg & Angle, 201; Helm, 122-23.

SEPTEMBER 21. Judd offers to let case go to jury on instructions of court without argument, but McLean requests it be argued. Wead makes opening argument for plaintiffs, taking up most of day. Knox follows, but court soon adjourns. Chicago Press, Sept. 22.

SEPTEMBER 22. Knox continues his argument throughout morning. In afternoon Lincoln commences and speaks for balance of day. Ibid., Sept. 23, 24; The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 415-20.

SEPTEMBER 23. Lincoln concludes his argument. T. D. Lincoln, for plaintiffs, speaks balance of day. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 420-22; Chicago Press, Sept. 25.

SEPTEMBER 24. T. D. Lincoln speaks most of morning, and Judge McLean's charge takes up most of afternoon. Jury retires. At eight o'clock they report that they stand nine to three, and that there is no prospect of agreement. Court dismisses them. Ibid., Sept. 25.

SEPTEMBER 26. Springfield. Lincoln deposits $400 in his bank account. Marine Bank Ledger.

SEPTEMBER 27. Lincoln gives his partner, William H. Herndon, check for $23. Original owned by Mrs. Mary Edwards Brown, Springfield, Ill.

SEPTEMBER 28. Lincoln writes two more checks — one for $11 to John Hutchinson, other for $10 to Bailhache and Baker, publishers of "Illinois State Journal." Lincoln loans Jacob Ruckel $500 and takes mortgage,

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he draws himself, to secure debt. Interest is 10 per cent per annum and loan is to run one year (see Nov. 27, 1858, Nov. 18, 1860). Photo; CIV, II, 422-23.

SEPTEMBER 29. Lincoln files Jacob Ruckel mortgage for record. He releases mortgage Daniel E. Ruckel had given him Aug. 15, 1851, to cover debt of $300. Record. To Samuel Briggs, Lincoln writes legal opinion concerning organization of town of Delavan. "The five dollars is a sufficient fee." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 423.

SEPTEMBER 30. In letter to Richard Yates, Lincoln recommends J. Q. Johnson as competent political organizer. "And now, let me say," he concludes, "I wish you could make up your mind to come to the Legislature from Morgan next term. You can be elected, and I doubt some whether any other friend can. It will be something of a sacrafice to you; but can you not make it?" The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 424. Lincoln receives $500 legal fee for services to Mississippi Bridge Co. in "Erne Afton" case. Starr, 114.

OCTOBER 6. In Hedrick v. Merry, Smith et al. in U.S. Court, Lincoln files declaration asking damages of $10,000 for alleged failure of the defendants to deliver 400 head of cattle (see Jan. 8, 1858). Files.

OCTOBER 7. Metamora. In Woodford Circuit Court, which opened on 5th for six-day term, Lucy Ann Davenport v. Lucy Davenport et al., Lincoln for defense, is continued at plaintiff's costs on plaintiff's motion. Record.

OCTOBER 8. [Lincoln and 28 other Whigs have signed call for county convention Oct. 19 to select delegates to "Mass convention," which Springfield Whig paper publishes today. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 424-25. His drug store account is charged 25˘ for bottle of "Carminative." H. E. Pratt, 151.]

OCTOBER 9. Lahr v. Sweams, trespass vi et armis, Lincoln with Shope and Davidson for plaintiff, is tried by jury, which finds for plaintiff with $20 and costs against defendant. Record.

OCTOBER 10. Lincoln and Grove represent defendant in People v. Melissa Goings, charged with murdering her husband, Roswell, with stick of firewood. During trial defendant disappears, causing Lincoln to be accused of encouraging her to depart. "I did not run her off," Lincoln is alleged to have replied. "She wanted to know where she could get a good drink of water, and I told her there was mighty good water in Tennessee." In Lahr v. Blair, trespass, Lincoln is for plaintiff with Davidson and Shope. He writes part of replication. Case is dismissed by agreement at defendant's cost. In Saltonstall v. Saltonstall, Lincoln writes John Saltonstall's answer. Record; Photo.

OCTOBER 13. Clinton. Lincoln has case in DeWitt Circuit Court, fall term of which commenced Oct. 5. With Swett and Orme he appears for

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plaintiff in Lewis Bunn v. John Spencer, assumpsit. Moore represents defendant. fury fails to agree, and case is continued. Record.

OCTOBER 14. Lincoln writes answer of Abram Emery in Humphries et al. v. Emery and Woodward. Photo.

OCTOBER 15. Lincoln writes, signs, and files pleas in two cases in which he is associated with Clifton Moore, Woodward v. Illinois Central, and Powers, Lemon & Co. v. Beers. Photo.

OCTOBER 16. Lincoln writes and files affidavit in Dockum v. Phares, and another in Smith, Murphy & Co. v. Woodward and Beam. He writes bill for discovery in Kelly v. Snell. Photo; Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

OCTOBER 19. Urbana. Fall term of Champaign Circuit Court convenes. Lincoln attends entire week. Lincoln, Sims, and Sheldon file declaration in Dinsmore v. Newell. Photo.

OCTOBER 22. Lincoln writes and files interpleaders of defendant in Pepper v. Shouse, signing "Coles, Sim & Sheldon & Lincoln for interpleaders." Photo.

OCTOBER 23. [On one day this week Lincoln writes undated plea for defendant in Keeton v. Dunn. Photo.]

OCTOBER 24. Editor of Urbana "Constitution" writes: "Among the notables who have attended our Court the past week, Hon. A. Lincoln stuck up prominently. We regret to say that his eyesight is failing him seriously: tall as he is, he appears to be entirely unable to see far enough to get a glimpse of that U.S. Senatorship." In court, Lincoln writes amendment to bill in Dean v. Kelly, Campbell, and Simpson, injunction case, and writes complainant's affidavit. Injunction is granted on condition complainant gives bond for $1,000 penalty and pays costs and damages. Record; Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

OCTOBER 25. Springfield. Lincoln writes Koemer about quo warranto case before court Aug. 11 — People ex rel. Koerner et al. v. Ridgely et al. "I want your authority, at my discretion," he says, "to pass the case over the next term of the Supreme Court. I can not mention the reason now; but there is a reason which I believe you will appreciate, when you come to know it." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 425.

OCTOBER 26. [Vermilion Circuit Court convenes at Danville. In Springfield, Sangamon Circuit Court commences second week of its fall term. In Danville, Spencer v. White, Beckwith and Lincoln for plaintiff, is ordered tried morning of 29th. Record. Beckwith must have managed this, for Lincoln could hardly have arrived in time. Lincoln's drug store account is charged 15˘ for ounce of "Syrup Ipecac." H. E. Pratt, 151.]

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OCTOBER 29. Danville. Lincoln wins Spencer v. White when defendant withdraws plea and plaintiff is awarded $168.16 and costs. Record.

OCTOBER 30. In Martin v. Underwood, Lincoln writes demurrer, signing "Davis, Harmon & Lincoln." Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — David Davis Papers, Illinois State Historical Library, Springfield, Illinois. Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

OCTOBER 31. Lincoln writes and signs his own affidavit in Davenport v. Sconce and Don Carlos, and writes review of case. Ibid.

NOVEMBER 2. Lincoln for plaintiff and Voorhees for defendant argue demurrer which Lincoln filed in slander case of Nancy M. Martin v. Achilles M. Underwood. After argument, defendant withdraws five pleas and files plea of not guilty. Plaintiff joins issue thereon, whereupon defendant files affidavit and moves for continuance, which court orders. Record. [Corneau & Diller puts on Lincoln's account another ounce of "Syrup Ipecac." H. E. Pratt, 151.]

NOVEMBER 3. Springfield. At election for county officers, justices of peace and constables, Lincoln is 289th voter. Election Returns.

NOVEMBER 7. Danville. Lincoln takes note for $80 from Milton Davis of Vermilion County. Maturity date is Dec. 25, 1857, interest rate 10 per cent per annum (see Mar. 28, 1859). Inventory Lincoln Estate. He writes pardon petition for George High, sentenced in 1855 to three years in Champaign Circuit Court for horse stealing. Twenty-seven Vermilion County citizens sign. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 426.

NOVEMBER 9. Springfield. Lincoln adds his own endorsement to petition for George High's pardon, and takes documents to Gov. Bissell, who issues pardon. Ibid.

NOVEMBER 11. Lincoln writes and files replication of Carlow Buffom in Buffom v. Stockdale in Sangamon Circuit Court. He signs partnership name, Lincoln & Herndon. Original owned by Mrs. Edna Orendorff Macpherson, Springfield, Illinois.

NOVEMBER 14. Representing plaintiff in Bank of Commerce v. Emporium Real Estate & Mfg. Co. in U.S. Circuit Court, Lincoln files bond for costs, declaration, notice, and protest. Nonpayment of promissory notes totalling $20,000 is alleged. Record. Lincoln informs correspondent that it is impossible for him to attend courts in Coles or Edgar, or any counties in Judge Harlan's circuit. He therefore declines to undertake "Railroad suits. . . . I should be very pleased to oblige you if I could." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 426.

NOVEMBER 16. [In Cass Circuit Court, Beardstown, People v. William Armstrong, murder, change of venue from Mason County, opens when state's attorney moves court to issue writs. Record.]

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NOVEMBER 19. [William Armstrong is brought before bar. Defense moves accussed be admitted to bail. Motion is denied. Ibid.]

NOVEMBER 20. Beardstown. Lincoln has case in Cass Circuit Court. With Shaw, he represents defendant Jonathan Gill in divorce case. Jury finds for complainant. Ibid.

NOVEMBER 21. Lincoln and Dummer appear for complainant in Sprague v. Illinois River Railroad Co. Court orders injunction dissolved and bill dismissed. By agreement, decision is to be reviewed at next term of Supreme Court, and injunction is retained until decision is rendered (see Feb. 4, 1858). Lincoln joins defense in People v. Armstrong, moving prisoner be admitted to bail. Motion is argued and denied. Ibid.

NOVEMBER 24. Springfield. Notice for dedimus and interrogatories in Gale v. Morgan County Bank in U.S. Circuit Court, drawn by Lincoln, is served on Stuart and Edwards, plaintiff's attorneys. Files.

NOVEMBER 25. Lincoln files his notice for dedimus and interrogatories in Gale v. Morgan County Bank with clerk of U.S. Circuit Court. Photo. Lincoln writes Jonathan Haines, client, asking him to meet him in Chicago next week. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 426-27.

NOVEMBER 27. Lincoln writes Joseph Brackett regarding pre-emption claims he had tried to file May 9. "I have been to the Land Office two or three times about it, and, for the last time, this morning. The Register will not receive and file the pre-emption proofs as you desire. He conceives it to be his duty to refuse." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 427.

NOVEMBER 28. Chicago. Lincoln goes to Chicago for case which is to begin Dec. 1. He expects to be away from Springfield one week. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 426.

NOVEMBER 29. Lincoln talks politics with Norman B. Judd, stating that he thinks Douglas is losing ground in northern Illinois. Library of Congress, Washington, D. C. — Lyman Trumbull Papers, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C., Judd to Trumbull, Nov. 30, 1857.

NOVEMBER 30. Lincoln writes Lyman Trumbull to ask him to serve notice on party to law suit. "What think you of the probable ‘rumpus’ among the democracy over the Kansas constitution? I think the Republicans should stand clear of it. In their view both the President and Douglas are wrong; and they should not espouse the cause of either, because they may consider the other a little farther wrong of the two." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 427-28.

DECEMBER 7. Springfield. In U.S. Circuit Court, Lincoln files praecipe for nine cases brought by S. C. Davis & Co., wholesale merchants of St. Louis. All are brought to enforce payment of notes given for merchandise. Files.

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DECEMBER 8. In three more Davis & Co. cases Lincoln files bills of complaint. Ibid.

DECEMBER 9. In cases filed Dec. 7, Lincoln files declarations. Ibid

DECEMBER 11. In still another Davis case — defendant is John B. Miller — Lincoln files declaration and bond for costs. Declaration alleges nonpayment of two promissory notes, each for $1,608.90. Ibid.; Record.

DECEMBER 12. Lincoln enters himself as security for costs in Keith and Thornton v. Burt in U.S. Circuit Court. Plaintiffs sue on $2,000 debt. Record; Bond owned by James A. Jones, Springfield, Ill.

DECEMBER 14. Bloomington. McLean Circuit Court convenes for winter term. Lincoln's attendance is indicated by letter he writes Dec. 18 in which he states that he received letter on "coming home from Bloomington last night." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 428.

DECEMBER 17. Bloomington and Springfield. Lincoln, for plaintiff with Hanna and Scott in Matthew T. Scott Jr. v. St. Louis, Alton, and Chicago Railroad, secures order that defendant answer declaration on 22d. Record. He reaches home in evening, and finds letters from Whitney and Trumbull. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 428.

DECEMBER 18. Springfield. To Whitney Lincoln sends legal opinion, and adds note deploring attacks on "Long John" Wentworth by Chicago newspapers. In letter to Trumbull he summarizes local political situation. "Nearly all the democrats here stick to Douglas; but they are hobbling along with the idea that there is no split between him and Buchanan." Ibid., II, 428-29.

DECEMBER 19. Lincoln files praecipe in Davis et al. v. Dwyer in U.S. Circuit Court. Files.

DECEMBER 21. Bloomington. Lincoln writes his friend Jesse K. Dubois, auditor, advising him to accept $90,000 from Illinois Central in temporary settlement of disputed claim for taxes due state. "I do not write this as a lawyer seeking an advantage for a client; but only as a friend, only urging you to do, what I think I would do if I were in your situation. I mean this as private and confidential only, but I feel a good deal of anxiety about it." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 429.

DECEMBER 23. Lincoln loses Pike v. Shaffer when Jury finds defendant not guilty. Court orders him discharged and assesses damages against plaintiff, Lincoln's client. Record.

DECEMBER 24. [McLean Circuit Court adjourns until Dec. 28.]

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DECEMBER 26. [One of the Lincoln boys brings home from John Williams' store a pair of "Linen Kid Gloves." H. E. Pratt, 149.]

DECEMBER 28. "What does the New-York Tribune mean by it's constant eulogising, and admiring, and magnifying Douglas?" Lincoln writes Trumbull from Bloomington, where he is still attending McLean Circuit Court. If the "Tribune" continues to praise him to its thousands of Illinois readers, defections will result. "I am not complaining. I only wish a fair understanding." He also writes to William H. Davenport, client, explaining why Davenport v. Sconce and Don Carlos has been delayed in Vermilion Circuit Court. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 429-30.

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JANUARY 2. Springfield. In U.S. Circuit Court Lincoln files declaration in James Emmett v. James A. Barrett. Plaintiff is suing to collect promissory note for $4,816.61. Files.

JANUARY 4. U.S. Circuit Court convenes with Samuel H. Treat on bench. Lincoln enters motions in several cases. Record. In name of Lincoln & Herndon, he signs order promising to pay G. W. Hawes & Co. $2 on receipt of copy of State "Gazetteer of Illinois" for 1858 and 1859. Privately Owned.

JANUARY 5. To Robert A. Kinzie of Chicago Lincoln writes: "I suppose you are aware that Johnson and Jones are at law about a portion of the made land attached to your addition to Chicago & and [sic] on the North side of the Harbor. I have been engaged, as an attorney on Jones' side; and if you have no objection to do so, I shall be obliged if you will answer the following questions. . . ." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 430-31. Lincoln writes assignment of errors in Supreme Court case of McDaniel et al. v. Correll et al., signing "Conkling & Lincoln & Herndon." Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

JANUARY 6. Lincoln appears in U.S. Circuit Court in two cases. In Taylor and Davis v. Young, he and Davis, defendant's attorneys, confess judgment in sum of one cent damages and costs. In S. C. Davis & Co. v. Allen and Allen, Lincoln files plaintiff's replication. Record.

JANUARY 7. Lincoln writes and signs petition to review Brundage v. Camp in Sangamon Circuit Court. Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

JANUARY 8. In U.S. Circuit Court seven of cases Lincoln is handling for S. C. Davis & Co. of St. Louis come up for trial. In all of them defendants default, and judgments ranging from $700 to more than $5,000 are

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obtained. Hedrick v. Merry, Smith et al., which Lincoln filed Oct. 6, 1857, is dismissed by agreement. He also takes default in Bank of Commerce case which he filed Nov. 14, 1857. Record.

JANUARY 9. Lincoln enters motion in another Davis & Co. case. Ibid.

JANUARY 11. In Supreme Court Lincoln, Herndon, and J. T. Cooper representing plaintiff in Kester v. Stark et al., obtain leave to file additional errors. Clerk's Docket. In U.S. Circuit Court, Gollett v. Armour in which Lincoln & Herndon appear for defendant, is settled by agreement In Emmett v. Barrett Lincoln files demurrer. Ibid.

JANUARY 12. Court hears argument on Lincoln's demurrer in Emmett v. Barrett. In Powell v. Kern, Purple and Lincoln file declaration and have defendant ruled to plead in 20 days. Davis & Co. v. Miller is called, defendant defaults, and Lincoln, representing plaintiff, obtains judgment for $1,635.97. Ibid. Lincoln enters himself as security for costs in Powell v. Kern. Photo.

JANUARY 13. In Supreme Court Lincoln, representing defendant in error, argues People v. Witt, action of debt, (later reversed and remanded). Docket; 19 Ill. 169. Gale v. Morgan County Bank comes to trial in U.S. Circuit Court. Jury is sworn and trial commences. At adjournment it is continued until next morning. Record. Lincoln writes to Linder and Bromwell, Charleston attorneys, about case in which he is assisting them. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 431.

JANUARY 14. Trial of Gale v. Morgan County Bank takes up entire day, and is continued until following morning. Record. Plaintiff is attempting to recover $10,000 from defendant. Lincoln and Logan appear for bank.

JANUARY 15. In U.S. Circuit Court Lincoln handles matters of minor importance in connection with three cases, and is again busy in trial of Gale v. Morgan County Bank, which again is continued until next day. Ibid.

JANUARY 16. Jury finds for defendant in Gale v. Morgan County Bank (see Feb. 8, 1858). Ibid.

JANUARY 18. U.S. Circuit Court sustains Lincoln's demurrer in Emmett v. Barrett, argued Jan. 12. Ibid.

JANUARY 19. Lincoln writes Joseph Gillespie to "come right up" about embarrassing case in Supreme Court — People ex rel. Lanphier and Walker v. Hatch. Case involved reapportionment act passed in 1857. Gov. Bissell had signed it inadvertently, then crossed off his name. Democrats bring suit to compel secretary of state to certify act. Case involves politics and Lincoln's senatorial ambitions, for reapportionment changed districts to

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Republican disadvantage. Lincoln also telegraphs George T. Brown, Alton Republican, to send Gillespie "at once. Don't fail[.]" The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 432; 19 Ill. 283. Lincoln & Herndon file bill in chancery in Sangamon Circuit Court in Doup v. Gibson and Primm et al. Photo.

JANUARY 22. Lincoln writes and files affidavit in U.S. v. Reinback in U.S. Court. John T. Richards, Lincoln the Lawyer — Statesman, 204.

JANUARY 25. In Lawrence v. Coler in U.S. Circuit Court, Lincoln, appearing for plaintiff, confesses defendant's plea of misnomer and obtains leave to amend his declaration and writ. Suit seeks to enforce payment of bill of exchange for $2,900, with interest and damages. Record.

JANUARY 26. Lincoln, representing respondent, files answer in People ex rel. Lanphier and Walker v. Hatch, about which he wrote Gillespie Jan. 19. Ibid.

JANUARY 27. Lincoln & Herndon appear for defendant in Isaac Smith v. John H. Smith (SC), appeal from Bond County. Written argument by Herndon is submitted. Ibid.

JANUARY 28. Two Davis & Co. cases come to trial in U.S. Circuit Court. In Davis & Co. v. Saunders and Saunders, W. J. Allen for defendants withdraws his plea and defaults; Lincoln obtains judgment for $666.70. In Davis & Co. v. Allen and Allen, Jury is waived and trial takes place before court. Verdict for plaintiff ($2,886.25) results. Ibid.

FEBRUARY 1. Lincoln has two cases in Supreme Court: Laughlin v. Marshall, and Illinois Central v. Morrison. First case, which involved two certificates of deposit totalling $1,000, he argues on behalf of Marshall. (Court affirms decision of trial court.) In second case, in which Lincoln and Ficklin appear for railroad, Ficklin makes opening argument. Record; 19 Ill. 390.

FEBRUARY 2. Ficklin continues his argument in Illinois Central v. Morrison; Green and Constable follow for appellees, and Lincoln concludes for appellants. Case involved right of railroad to restrict its liabiity as common carrier. Supreme Court reverses decision of lower court. Record; 19 Ill. 136. People ex rel. Lanphier and Walker v. Hatch is argued. Lincoln appears for Hatch. Record.

FEBRUARY 3. Lincoln loses case in Supreme Court when motion for mandamus in People ex rel. Billings v. Bissell is refused. Case involved famous McAllister & Stebbins bonds, relator trying to compel governor to issue new bonds covering arrears of interest. Ibid.; 19 Ill. 229. In U.S. Circuit Court Lincoln argues demurrer in Gilbert v. Rose et al. Record. Herndon writes Senator Trumbull that he and Lincoln are certain Supreme

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Court will uphold Gov. Bissell in political reapportionment case Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Lyman Trumbull Papers, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

FEBRUARY 4. Sprague v. Illinois River Railroad Co., which Lincoln tried at Beardstown Nov. 21, 1857, comes for hearing in Supreme Court. Case is argued by Lincoln for appellant and Logan and Smith for appellees. Question at issue is effect of amendment to railroad company's charter on liability of stockholders. Record; 19 III. 174.

FEBRUARY 5. Argument in Sprague v. Illinois River Railroad Co. is continued by Logan and concluded by Lincoln. Lincoln wins case when court reverses McDaniel et al. v. Correll et al., which he tried twice in Sangamon Circuit Court. Kester v. Stark is argued and taken under advisement while Brundage v. Camp, in which Lincoln appears for Brundage, is reversed and remanded. 19 Ill. 226, 328; 21 Ill. 330. In U.S. Circuit Court, Lincoln files power of attorney in Millikan and Martin v. Dean and Dalbey, and confesses judgment for $3,842.71 and costs. The Abraham Lincoln Association, Springfield, Illinois. [Files and records on deposit at Illinois State Historical Library, Springfield, Illinois.] — Files.

FEBRUARY 6. Court affirms decision of Cass Circuit Court in Sprague v. Illinois River Railroad Co. Six other cases in which Lincoln is concerned are before court, including two not in published reports: Mary Ann Gray v. Matilda French et al. and James Welsh v. William P. Welsh. This is last day of Supreme Court term. Record.

FEBRUARY 7. Lincoln writes Gillespie again: "Yesterday morning the Court overruled the Demurrer to Hatch's Return in the Mandamus case [People ex rel. Lanphier and Walker, and Walker v. Hatch] . . . so I suppose the matter is ended." He adds that court held that governor had right to scratch off his name as long as bill was in his custody. He also writes to two other lawyers reporting legal victories. He tells Gustave Koerner what judges "unanamously declared," privately, on reapportionment case, and informs Henry E. Dummer of success in Sprague v. Illinois River Railroad Co. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 432-33.

FEBRUARY 8. Gale v. Morgan County Bank, which Lincoln and Logan, representing defendant, won Jan. 16, is again called in U.S. Circuit Court. Attorneys argue plaintiff's motion for new trial, and court "takes time to consider." Record.

FEBRUARY 9. In Emmett v. Barrett defendant's atorneys, McClernand and E. B. Herndon, move for continuance. Lincoln & Herndon appear for plaintiff and argue motion. Ibid.

FEBRUARY 10. Lincoln & Herndon have four cases in U.S. Circuit Court. In Emmett v. Barrett, continued from yesterday, court grants continuance (see July 6, 1858). In Lawrence v. Coler, before court Jan. 25, defendant defaults, and Lincoln & Herndon take judgment for $1,716.72. Two cases are Davis & Co. suits, which court refers to master in chancery. Ibid.

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FEBRUARY 11. In Davis & Co. v. Campbell and Hundley, and Davis & Co. v. Kinney, referred to master in chancery, master reports indebtedness of $1,077.50 and $1,044.73 respectively. Lincoln & Herndon get court order for foreclosure and sale. Ibid.

FEBRUARY 14. En route to Chicago.

FEBRUARY 15. Chicago. "Mr. Lincoln is now in Chicago," writes John O. Johnson of Springfield to Senator Trumbull, "left here yesterday and will return by Saturday next." Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Lyman Trumbull Papers, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. [U.S. Circuit Court denies motion for new trial in Gale v. Morgan County Bank. Record.]

FEBRUARY 18. Lincoln talks politics with Norman B. Judd, who has just returned from Washington. "He says Douglas is dead — feels bad, is gloomy, miserable, knows he is lost." Newton, 143. Judd tells Lincoln that if he wants to be senator, he must personally canvass central Illinois. Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Lyman Trumbull Papers, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C., Judd to Trumbull, Apr. 19, 1858.

FEBRUARY 19. Springfield. Lincoln writes Edward G. Miner recommending G. A. Sutton for superintendent of addition to Insane Asylum. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 434. He deposits $344.64 in his account at Springfield Marine & Fire Insurance Co. Marine Bank Ledger.

FEBRUARY 23. In Henry B. Rankin's autograph book Lincoln writes: "Today, Feb. 23, 1858, the owner honored me with the privilege of writing the first name in this book." He also writes S. C. Davis & Co., St. Louis wholesale merchants, explaining cases in U.S. Circuit Court. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 434-35. Lincoln writes $300 check payable to "Selves" on Lincoln & Herndon's joint account at Springfield Marine & Fire Insurance Co. Original owned by Springfield Marine Bank.

FEBRUARY 24. Lincoln pays $8.50 cash on his account at Lewis carriage shop. Obed Lewis Account Books.

FEBRUARY 26. In U.S. Circuit Court case of Cochran and Hall v. Camp et al., Lincoln endorses plaintiffs' notice of application for dedimus: "We acknowledge service of the above on this 26 day of Feb. 1858 Lincoln & Herndon for defts who have answered." Files.

FEBRUARY 27. John O. Johnson visits office of Lincoln & Herndon and they read letter Johnson has received from Senator Trumbull. Late in 1857 Lincoln hired Johnson as political organizer. Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Lyman Trumbull Papers, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C., Herndon to Trumbull; The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 424-29.

MARCH 1. Clinton. DeWitt Circuit Court convenes.

MARCH 3. Lincoln writes and files demurrer in Allen v. Illinois Central, signing "Moore & Lincoln p. d." Record.

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MARCH 4. On Lincoln's motion, sheriff's return in Allen v. Illinois Central is quashed. Ibid.

MARCH 8. Clinton and Springfield. Lincoln sits as judge pro-tem on 20 cases in DeWitt Circuit Court, writing "Judge's Remarks" in judge's docket Ibid. Returning to Springfield by train, he receives $250 from Daniel Doup for whom he has chancery case on file, and writes receipt. Photo. He writes Owen Lovejoy, Abolitionist-Republican of Princeton: "I have just returned from court in one of the counties of your District, where I had an inside view that few will have who correspond with you. . . . Your danger has been that democracy would wheedle some republican to run against you without a nomination, relying mainly on democratic votes. . . . I think it is not expected that you can be beaten for a nomination; but do not let what I say, as to that, lull you. Now, let this be strictly confidential." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 435-36.

MARCH 9. En route to Chicago?

MARCH 10. Chicago?

MARCH 11. Chicago. Lincoln writes Solon Cummins that land case on which he has been intermittently engaged since 1850 has been won in U.S. Circuit Court. Ibid.

MARCH 12. En route to Springfield?

MARCH 18. Lincon. Lincoln files plea in Hickey v. Hamilton et al. He signs "Goodrich & Lincoln" as defendants' attorneys. Files.

MARCH 22. Lincoln writes to Gov. Bissell requesting pardon for Samuel Jones and his son James, convicted last week of stealing five shoats. Lincoln knows little of case, but Jones' neighbors want him pardoned. He encloses letters of Judge Davis, Lamon, prosecuting attorney, and members of bar, supporting petition. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 436.

MARCH 24. Lincoln writes on politics to O. M. Hatch, secretary of state, Springfield, suggesting state Republican convention. Photo.

MARCH 26. Lincoln and Lacey represent defendant in Hildreth v. Gill, which is continued by agreement. Record.

MARCH 27. Lincoln and Springfield. Lincoln and Goodrich represent defendants in Brummer et al. v. Brummer, Brummer, and Packer, bill to correct mortgage deed. Report submitted is approved and ordered recorded. Ibid. In Springfield, Lincoln finds among his mail letter from Jonathan Haines of Pekin, client in reaper patent litigation, and one from

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Alfred Hyde, convict. He writes to Haines about two law suits, one pending, another prospective. "I really can not find time to prepare such a suit, until the Spring courts are over." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 436-37. Hyde reminds Lincoln of seeing him on train Mar. 4, 1857, and asks his assistance in seeking pardon. Lincoln files Hyde's letter until Aug., when he writes Daniel Dickinson of New York about him. Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Robert Todd Lincoln Collection of the Papers of Abraham Lincoln, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C., Hyde to Lincoln, Mar. 25, 1858; The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 535.

MARCH 30. Metamora. Lincoln writes and files plea of confession and avoidance on behalf of bondsman of Melissa Goings, who disappeared during her trial. People v. Goings and Beck, Oct. 10, 1857. Photo.

MARCH 31. Acting with Shope for plaintiff in Forney v. Blakslee et al., Lincoln agrees to defendants' pleas. Photo.

APRIL 1. Lincoln writes plaintiff's answer and replication in Forney v. Blakslee et al. Photo.

APRIL 2. Declaration and demurrer are filed in Forney v. Blakslee et al. Latter is overruled, and case continued. Record.

APRIL 5. Bloomington. Second week of McLean Circuit Court commences. Lincoln is announced to address Young Men's Association tomorrow evening. Bloomington Pantograph, Apr. 5.

APRIL 6. Lincoln lectures on "Discoveries and Inventions" at Centre Hall. "The first half of the lecture displayed great research and a careful study of the Bible. . . . The latter half was brimfull of original thought. The whole forcibly reminded us of his legal arguments, wherein he first states the facts in a clear and simple manner, and then reasons from those facts backward and forward to cause and effect." Ibid., Apr. 9; The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953. II, 437-42.

APRIL 8. [Herndon is in Chicago part of this week, probably at Lincoln's suggestion, conferring with "leading Republicans" on calling state convention and giving battle to Douglas. They decide to call convention. Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Lyman Trumbull Papers, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C., Herndon to Trumbull, Apr. 12.]

APRIL 10. [Lincoln is associated with Gallagher, Wait, and Oglesby for plaintiff in Ayers v. Dudley, Macon County attachment suit. Record does not show whether he attended court in person. Record.]

APRIL 12. Urbana. Champaign Circuit Court convenes at Urbana. "I was appointed by the court," writes Lincoln on pardon petition to Gov. Bissell, "to defend in part the above named David Thompson. I thought at the time his conviction was wrong, and I am now clearly of opinion he ought to be pardoned. I have recently been at Woodford [County]; and the universal sentiment there seems to be in favor of his pardon." Photo.; The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 442-43.

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APRIL 13. Lincoln writes declaration in Dean v. Bernard. Plaintiff has three other lawyers, Davis, Swett, and Whitney. Defendant also has four lawyers, Somers, Coles, Sim, and Sheldon, who move to dissolve injunction Later in day plaintiff's attorneys move dismissal of suit at his costs, which court orders. Record.

APRIL 16. Springfield. Lincoln signs fee book receipting docket fee of $10 in Baker v. Baker, tried in Jan. 1857. Fee Book.

APRIL 17. Lincoln writes and files declaration and praecipe (signed Browning & Bushnell, Lincoln & Herndon) in Mary Macready v. City of Alton in U.S. Circuit Court. Plaintiff seeks to collect $5,000 for injuries incurred as result of alleged neglect of Alton to keep its streets safe (see June 22, 1858). Files.

APRIL 19. Bloomington? Scott v. St. Louis, Alton, & Chicago Railroad, Lincoln, Hanna, and Scott for plaintiff, is continued on defendant's motion. Record.

APRIL 20. Springfield. Lincoln receives letter from Chicago charging that Elihu B. Washburne is urging re-election of Douglas. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 443.

APRIL 21. Two Democratic conventions — Douglas and Buchanan wings of party — meet in Springfield. Lincoln and other Republicans are on hand to observe. In evening Republican conference is held in state library. Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Lyman Trumbull Papers, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C., G. T. Brown to Trumbull, Apr. 21, 1858. Lincoln sums up: "The democracy parted in not a very encouraged state of mind. . . . Our friends . . . parted in high spirits." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 443-44. Lincoln reads letter Herndon received from Washburne saying he is not for Douglas. "Did him good —" writes Herndon to Washburne. Lincoln "sends you back his best respects and says all is right." Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Elihu B. Washburne Papers, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C., Herndon to Washburne, Apr. 21, 1858; C. H. Ray to Washburne, Apr. 21, 1858.

APRIL 22. Urbana. On this and two following days Lincoln takes Judge Davis's place on bench at Champaign Circuit Court. He makes notes in judge's docket on 76 chancery and 62 common law cases. Record; Photo.

APRIL 23. To T. A. Marshall of Charleston Lincoln writes: "I wish you, G. W. Rives of Edgar, and O. L. Davis of Vermilion, to co-operate in getting a Senatorial candidate on the track, in your District. Davis is here, and agrees to do his part. The adversary has his eye upon that district, and will beat us, unless we also are wide awake. . . . I am most anxious to know that you will not neglect the matter." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 443.

APRIL 24. Lincoln ends his service on bench by ordering plea in abatement in Chadden v. Beasley et al. stricken. "Defendants who are served now at 8 o'clock P.M. of the last day of the term ask to plead to the merits

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which is denied by the Court on the ground that the offer comes too late. . . ." Judgment for plaintiff is rendered. Docket.

APRIL 25. [Lincoln's statement in his letter of Apr. 26 to Washburne — "I am here at this time, but I was home during the sitting of the two Democratic conventions" — shows he did not return to Springfield for week-end. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 443-44.]

APRIL 26. Lincoln writes Washburne that several Chicago Republicans suspect Washburne of advocating Republican support of Douglas rather than candidate of their own in senatorial contest. Lincoln writes, he explains, only because Washburne will probably hear this from others. "I am satisfied you have done no wrong, and nobody has intended any wrong to you." Ibid.

APRIL 27. Danville. Lincoln is attending Vermilion Circuit Court, which convened Monday. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 445.

APRIL 29. Lincoln writes and signs replication and amends bill in Davenport v. Sconce and Don Carlos. Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

MAY 1. Lincoln writes receipt: "Received, May I, 1858, of William Spencer, by the hand of H. W. Beckwith, twenty-five dollars in full of all fees in said Spencer's cases in the Vermilion Circuit Court against Hamilton White, and generally, in full of all demands up to date. A. Lincoln." Photo.

MAY 6. Beardstown. Lincoln arrives and registers at Dunbaugh House. Barton, I, 311; The Abraham Lincoln Association, Springfield, Illinois. [Files and records on deposit at Illinois State Historical Library, Springfield, Illinois.] — Mrs. H. E. English to H. E. Pratt, July 19, 1941.

MAY 7. Lincoln clears Duff Armstrong, son of his old friend Jack Armstrong, of murder charge. He discredits testimony of state's star witness by showing, with almanac, that there could not have been sufficient moonlight for witness to have seen events he described in detail. Lincoln, in return for past favors, offered his services free. Barton, I, 311; Record.

MAY 8. En route and Springfield. Waiting in Great Western station at Jacksonville for train to Springfield, stretched out on two seats, Lincoln encounters Henry Stryker, lawyer, also bound for Springfield. Stryker asks Lincoln's advice on how to handle law case. Lincoln makes suggestions, Stryker follows them and wins case. At his office, Lincoln looks through accumulated mail. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 445-46; The Abraham Lincoln Association, Springfield, Illinois. [Files and records on deposit at Illinois State Historical Library, Springfield, Illinois.] — Mrs. H. E. English to H. E. Pratt, July 19, 1941.

MAY 10. Springfield. Lincoln begins answering his mail. "Mark me down on your side," he notes on letter from Dr. Julius Lehmann of Bloomington, who has written about case against Herman Schroeder. He returns

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Lehmann's letter, and on Jan. 8, 1859 wins $5,000 judgment for him Jonathan K. Cooper of Peoria, who wrote asking Lincoln's help in getting George Phelps appointed prosecuting attorney, is told that two others are ahead of Phelps, whom he does not know. Photo. He writes to Washburne: "I have just reached home from the circuit, and found your letter of the 2nd. and for which I thank you. . . . I must repeat that I think the thing did not originate in malice to you, or to any one; and that the best way all round is to now forget it entirely." To J. M. Lucas of Washington he writes of "curious state" of politics. Democrats are disposed to stick to Douglas, but are horrified at prospect of following him out of party The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 444-46.

MAY 11. Lincoln writes to Joseph Means, farmer, in reply to questions about land tenure. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 446.

MAY 13. Lincoln receives another letter from Washburne. Ibid., II, 447.

MAY 15. To Washburne Lincoln writes: "I think our prospects gradually, and steadily, grow better; though we are not yet clear out of the woods by a great deal. There is still some effort to make trouble out of ‘Americanism.’" He answers last of accumulated mail by replying to J. F. Alexander of Greenville, Ill., who invited him to speak in Bond County. After waiting week, Lincoln decided he can make no definite engagement this early. "When I once begin making political speeches I shall have no respite till November. The labor of that I might endure, but I really can not spare the time from my business." Ibid., II, 446-47.

MAY 17. Lincoln files praecipe and signs bond for costs in Mark Hamilton v. Jesse Cooper in U.S. Circuit Court. Files.

MAY 18. Alton and Edwardsville. Lincoln and Mark W. Delahay go from Alton to Edwardsville, where Lincoln makes "fine Republican speech." Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Lyman Trumbull Papers, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. Delahay to Trumbull, May 22; The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 447.

MAY 20. Springfield. Lincoln, representing plaintiff, files replication in Macready v. Alton in U.S. Circuit Court. (He filed declaration Apr. 17.) Files. He writes opinion concerning right to planks taken from land owned by W. B. Warren. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 454.

MAY 22. In U.S. Circuit Court Lincoln files praecipe in Davis v. Monical and Monical. Files. He writes William H. Davenport about state of Davenport's land case in Vermilion Circuit Court. Ibid., II, 454-55.

MAY 26. Lincoln files declarations in three cases in U.S. Circuit Court: Anderson et al. v. Robinson (see June 23); Hamilton v. Cooper (see June 19); and Davis & Co. v. Monical and Monical. Nonpayment of promissory notes and bill of exchange is alleged, and damages of $4,000, $3,000, and $1,200 respectively are sought. Files.

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MAY 27. Lincoln writes to Washburne again. He is worried about political affairs which "just now bear a very mixed and incongruous aspect." Local sign indicate reconciliation between Douglas and Buchanan, but rumor from Chicago has it that Douglas will assume Free-Soil ground and assail Buchanan when he returns to Illinois. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 455.

MAY 28. In Joyner v. Bowen and Marvel in U.S. Circuit Court Lincoln files separate answer and affidavit of defendant Daniel Bowen. Validity of land title is involved. Lincoln pleads statute of limitations. Files. He writes to I. S. Piper opinion on debt question. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 455-56.

JUNE 1. Lincoln is increasingly concerned over possibility of Douglas being adopted by Republican party outside Illinois. This is subject of letters to Charles L. Wilson of Chicago "Journal" and S. A. Hurlbut of Belvidere. To Wilson he adds: "No combination has been made with me or proposed to me, in relation to the next Presidential candidate. The same thing is true in regard to next Governor of our State." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 456-57. He writes mortgage assigning possible proceeds of Christian County case of Barrett v. heirs of McDonald et al. Photo.

JUNE 4. Lincoln informs W. H. Gray that it will be impossible for him, on account of business in U.S. Court, to attend Republican meeting in Clinton County. "The delegates you appoint will meet a large and good convention here. . . . . Our prospects appear cheering everywhere." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 457-58.

JUNE 7. U.S. Court convenes, and hands down decision in Tallman v. Harvey, argued June 8, 1857. Court finds that plaintiff, whom Lincoln and Clark represent, is owner of premises in question, and assesses his damages at one cent. Record.

JUNE 8. Lincoln, representing defendant, files plea, notice, and affidavit in Van Brunt et al. v. Madux in U.S. Circuit Court. Plaintiffs sue for damages by reason of alleged failure of defendant to deliver I,000 hogs on contract. Ibid.

JUNE 9. Lincoln receives letter from Samuel Wilkinson of Farmington, Fulton County, asking whether Republicans and Buchanan Democrats have combined to defeat Douglas. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 458. Mrs. Lincoln buys $1.49 worth of yard goods. H. E. Pratt, 149.

JUNE 10. Lincoln answers Wilkinson: "I know of no effort to unite the Reps. & Buc. men, and believe there is none. Of course the Republicans do not try to keep the common enemy from dividing; but, so far as I know, or believe, they will not unite with either branch of the division." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 458. U.S. v. Louis Reinback, indictment for stealing from mails, McClernand, Lincoln & Herndon for defense, is tried by jury, but arguments are not concluded. Record.

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JUNE 11. Lincoln writes Ward Hill Lamon advising against running independent candidate against Lovejoy in his district. "As to the inclination of some Republicans to favor Douglas, that is one of the chances I have to run, and which I intend to run with patience. I write in the court room. Court has opened, and I must close." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 458-59. Argument is concluded in U.S. v. Reinback, and jury finds Lincoln's client not guilty Record.

JUNE 12. U.S. v. Jonas D. Hertzler, charged with stealing from mails Lincoln for defense, comes before U.S. Court. Parties agree to try case on 22d. Ibid.

JUNE 14. In Van Brunt et al. v. Madux in U.S. Circuit Court, in which Lincoln filed defendant's plea June 8, attorneys agree that trial take place June 28. Ibid.

JUNE 15. Republican leaders hold evening meeting at state library. Lincoln reads speech he intends to deliver on his expected nomination next day. Almost all advise against radicalism of the "house divided" paragraph, but Lincoln's determination to deliver it remains unshaken. Ward H. Lamon, The Life of Abraham Lincoln, 398.

JUNE 16. State Republican convention meets in House of Representatives, and unanimously resolves "that Abraham Lincoln is the first and only choice of the Republicans of Illinois for the U.S. Senate." Convention adjourns to meet at 8 P.M. when Lincoln, reading from manuscript, delivers "House Divided" speech. E. E. Sparks (ed.), Lincoln-Douglas Debates, 22; The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 461-69.

JUNE 19. Lincoln writes to Sydney Spring and Andrew McCallen about candidates for legislature in their districts. He writes to James W. Somers, Urbana attorney, on law case. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 469-70. In U.S. Circuit Court Hamilton v. Cooper, in which Lincoln filed declaration May 26, is called. Defendant defaults, and judgment for $2,289.15 is awarded plaintiff. Record.

JUNE 21. Wiggins Ferry Co. and John Trendley v. Steamer Ocean Spray, salvage, Lincoln & Herndon for plaintiff, is called, and commissioners appointed to take testimony and report. Ibid.

JUNE 22. Mrs. Mary Macready of New York, whose damage suit against Alton Lincoln filed Apr. 17, calls on Lincoln. Lincoln asks O. H. Browning, associated with him in case, if he can be on hand at next term if case should be continued. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 470. William Cline gives Lincoln his promissory note for $750 at 10 per cent, payable in one year. As security Lincoln takes mortgage on 95 acres. U.S. Court hears testimony in Wiggins Ferry Co. v. Ocean Spray, and decides that plaintiffs did in fact salvage ship. Wreck is ordered sold by court marshal Aug. 25. Record.

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JUNE 23. Lincoln writes careful letter to John L. Scripps clarifying his speech of 16th. To Trumbull in Washington he reports local political situation. He thinks Republican state ticket will be elected without difficulty but that it will be very hard to carry legislature. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 471-72. In U.S. Circuit Court Lincoln takes judgment for $2,665.39 in Anderson et al. v. Robinson, filed May 26. Record.

JUNE 24. "Your letter enclosing the attack of the Times upon me was received this morning," Lincoln writes Henry C. Whitney. "Give yourself no concern about my voting against the supplies, unless you ar[e] without faith that a lie can be successfully contradicted. There is not a word of truth in the charge, and I am just considering a little as to the best shape to put a contradiction in." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 472.

JUNE 25. To Joseph Medill of Chicago "Tribune" Lincoln writes elaborate denial of charge made by Chicago "Times" that he voted against supplies during Mexican War. He also writes A. Campbell of La Salle, asking whether his offer of $500 for political purposes, made in 1856, still holds good. "I see clearly that such a privilege would be more available now than it was then." Lincoln receives $200 draft from James W. Somers, Urbana attorney, which he at once pays to court on judgment awarded June 11, 1858, in Thompson, White, and Pryor v. Wilson and Park. He reports this to Somers, and writes page on politics. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 473-75; Judge's Docket.

JUNE 28. Lincoln, representing defendant, files affidavit for continuance in Van Brunt et al. v. Madux in U.S. Circuit Court. U.S. v. Hartzen is tried. Witnesses are few and evidence brief. Jury finds accused not guilty on two counts, guilty on one. Lincoln reads testimonial letter from Danville citizens, and judge pronounces light sentence, two years in penitentiary. Record; Chicago Times, July 7.

JUNE 29. Mary Macready v. Alton comes to trial in U.S. Circuit Court. Jury is sworn, and trial proceeds to adjournment, when case is continued until next day. Record.

JUNE 30. In Macready v. Alton jury returns verdict for Mrs. Macready and awards damages of $300. Ibid. Lincoln writes to committee of German Republicans, 7th Ward, Chicago, declining with regret invitation to address them July 5. Letter, which closes with eloquent salute to "Our German Fellow-Citizens," is read "with great cheering and three times three . . . for our next Senator" at July 5 meeting, and published in Chicago Tribune July 7. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 475; Illinois State Historical Library, Springfield, Illinois — O. M. Hatch MSS., H. Kreismann to Hatch, July 6 [cited as Lyman Trumbull Papers, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.]

JULY 1. Lincoln writes and files affidavit, signed by Manuel Eyre: "Manuel Eyre, being first duly sworn states on oath that in the case of

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Mary Macready vs The City of Alton the plaintiff has paid to Margaret Brown, on witness fee, the sum ten dollars and seventyfive cents." Files.

JULY 2. Lincoln sends Robert Moseley of Paris "a little article" he wants published in "Prairie Beacon" next week. "Besides my own recollection, I have carefully examined the Journals since I saw you; and I know the editor will be entirely safe in publishing the article. Get it into the first paper." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 483. Mrs. Lincoln buys two fans at John Williams' store, then sends Robert for pair of white gloves. H. E. Pratt, 149.

JULY 3. Jacksonville. Pioneer Fire Company, Merritt's Cornet Band German Turners, and several hundred Springfield residents go to Jacksonville to celebrate. Program includes parade in morning, barbecue at noon balloon ascension in afternoon, and fireworks after dark. Lincoln accompanies party and is accorded place of honor. Illinois State Journal, July 6.

JULY 4. Springfield. For many days Lincoln has been listing 1856 election results as guides to campaigning to win legislature. His calculations are completed before July 16. He concludes that, in House, 17 districts can be ignored as hopeless. "Struggle for the following." He lists 19 districts, with figures, analysis, and recapitulation. In Senate, "we must struggle for" six districts. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 476-81.

JULY 5. Union Fire Company of Jacksonville returns visit of Pioneers. Dinner is served at 2:30 at St. Nicholas Hotel. Lincoln, guest of honor, is called on for toast and responds: "‘The Pioneer Fire Company.’ May they extinguish all the bad flames, but keep the flame of patriotism ever burning brightly in the hearts of the ladies." Illinois State Journal, July 7; The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 483. Lincoln & Herndon win Davis et al. v. Gibson, chancery, when defendant defaults in U.S. Circuit Court. Record.

JULY 6. Lincoln has several cases in U.S. Circuit Court. In Emmett v. Barrett, continued from Feb. 10, Lincoln files demurrer for plaintiff. In Keith and Thornton v. Burt, defendant defaults and jury assesses damages of plaintiff, whom he represents, at $ I,311.43. Defendant in Davis & Co. v. Gibson also defaults, and Lincoln gets order for foreclosure unless $927.87 is paid in 20 days. Ibid.; Files.

JULY 7. Emmett v. Barrett is submitted to court on Lincoln's demurrer, and court considers. Record. He writes John J. Crittenden that it is rumored he is anxious for re-election of Douglas and Harris. He hopes not, but if so, he wants to know it. "The confirmation would pain me much, but I should still continue your friend and admirer." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 483-84.

JULY 8. "Mr. Lincoln was here a moment ago," Herndon writes Trumbull, "and told me that he had just seen Col. Dougherty. . . . He told Lincoln that the National Democracy intended to run in every county

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and district a National Democrat for each and every office. Lincoln replied, ‘If you do this the thing is settled’. . . . Lincoln is very certain as to Miller's and Bateman's election . . . but is gloomy and rather uncertain about his own success." White, 89.

JULY 9. Chicago. Lincoln, in Chicago for U.S. District Court, listens to Douglas deliver opening speech of his senatorial campaign from balcony of Tremont House. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 484.

JULY 10. Speaking also from Tremont House, Lincoln answers Douglas. "The audience assembled to hear Hon. Abraham Lincoln. . . was, in point of numbers, about three-fourths as large as that of the previous evening, when Douglas held forth, and in point of enthusiasm, about four times as great. Chicago Tribune, July 12; The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 484-502.

JULY 12. "Delightful day — Cool & pleasant," Browning records in his diary. "Lincoln & I took tea with Guerdon S. Hubbard." Browning, Diary.

JULY 14. Chicago and Springfield. Lincoln arrives home on evening train. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 502.

JULY 15. Springfield. Lincoln writes Gustave Koerner that he has just returned from Chicago, and describes meetings there. Admitting that Douglas's reception was very large and imposing, he believes "we could have voted him down in that very crowd. Our meeting, twenty four hours after, called only twelve hours before it came together and got up without trumpery, was nearly as large, and five times as enthusiastic." He writes William H. Hanna of Bloomington that, "no accident preventing," he will be on hand following afternoon. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 502-03.

JULY 16. Springfield and Bloomington. From Springfield Lincoln writes Joseph Gillespie, stressing importance of capturing Fillmore vote of 1856. In evening he is in Bloomington listening to Douglas. As soon as Douglas finishes, loud calls go up for Lincoln. After some hesitation he declines to speak. "This meeting," he says, "was called by the friends of Judge Douglas, and it would be improper for me to address it." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 503-04; Sparks, 50.

JULY 17. Atlanta and Springfield. Lincoln is in Douglas's audience at morning speech in nearby Atlanta. Calls for him ring out when Douglas finishes, but he again declines to take advantage of Democratic meeting. Douglas speaks again in afternoon at B. S. Edwards' grove, Springfield. In evening Lincoln speaks at state house, devoting his speech mainly to refutation of Douglas's charges of disunion sentiments, resistance to the Dred Scott decision, and Negro equality. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 504-21; Sparks, 52-4.

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JULY 19. Decatur? Lincoln & Herndon $1,294.80 judgment in Ayers v. Willard, Macon County attachment case, when defendant fail to appear. Record.

JULY 20. Springfield. Marshalling his resources for campaign, Lincoln writes Henry E. Dummer of Beardstown about his fee in Sprague v. Illinois River Railroad. "I am now in need of money. Suppose we say theamount shall be $50 —? . . . . Please get the money and send it to me and while you have pen in hand, tell me what you may know about politics, down your way." He writes to John Mathers, Jacksonville Republican, agreeing that offensive tactics against Douglas are superior to defensive. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 521-22.

JULY 21. En route to Chicago. Lincoln's absence is shown by fact that he does not read Gillespie's letter of July 18 until his return night of 24th. Ibid., II, 523.

JULY 22. Chicago. Lincoln confers with Republicans on challenging Douglas to debate. Chicago "Times" says his business is to form alliance with anti-Douglas Democrats (Danites). Ibid.; Chicago Times, July 24.

JULY 24. Chicago and Springfield. Lincoln writes to Douglas, challenging him to series of joint debates. Judd delivers letter to Douglas, who thinks it over, then by letter accepts, designating seven cities, each in congressional district where neither has spoken, as places where debates should be held. By evening Lincoln is back in Springfield. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 522.

JULY 25. Springfield. Lincoln catches up on his correspondence. To Gillespie he writes encouragement: "I do hope you are worse scared than hurt, though you ought to know best. We must not lose that district." "I write this mostly because I learn we are in great danger in Madison," he writes Koerner. "It is said half the Americans are going for Douglas; and that slam will ruin us if not counteracted." He writes George W. Woods of Macoupin County that he cannot make appointment for speech until debates are scheduled. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 523-24.

JULY 27. Clinton. Douglas speaks in afternoon. Lincoln is present, and announces, after Douglas had concluded, that he will speak in evening at courthouse. He does so before moderate crowd. Frank E. Stevens, The Life of Stephen A. Douglas, 556; Sparks, 108; The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 525-27.

JULY 28. Clinton (or Decatur), and Springfield. Lincoln and Douglas dine together, either at Clinton or Decatur. Later Lincoln returns to Springfield, where he finds Douglas's letter accepting his challenge and naming seven places of debates, subject not mentioned at dinner. Sparks, 68.

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JULY 29. Monticello. Lincoln and Douglas meet on road about two miles from Monticello. Douglas, having spoken there, is on his way to Bement; Lincoln is going to Monticello. Lincoln has his reply to Douglas's letter accepting his challenge, and asks latter to wait until he compares it with copy, but Douglas refuses. Lincoln proceeds to Monticello, makes speech, and that night sends his reply to Douglas. Ibid., 66-8; The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 527-30.

JULY 30. Springfield. Correspondent of Illinois State Register, writing from Monticello July 29, reports: "It was expected that he [Lincoln] would remain here for a day or two, or follow Senator Douglas to Paris, but he left suddenly on the midnight train for Springfield." (By "midnight train" Great Western, which Lincoln would have taken at Bement, is indicated.)

JULY 31. Lincoln writes Douglas accepting latter's terms for debates. He also writes to Henry Asbury, anticipating Douglas's stand during the campaign: Douglas cares nothing for South, but will attempt to hold Illinois by every means. If pressed on power of territorial legislature to exclude slavery he will answer that slavery cannot exist without "protective territorial legislation." He writes John C. Bagby of Rushville, declining to speak there Aug. 21, as he debates Douglas at Ottawa on that date. He will try to send Trumbull. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 530-31. Lincoln buys "trimming" for his wife at John Williams' store. H. E. Pratt, 149.

AUGUST 2. Lincoln is busy at his desk. He writes eight brief letters. "Pardon me for not writing a longer letter," he tells Henry Whitney. "I have a great many letters to write." One is to B. C. Cook of Ottawa, warning against nominating extreme abolitionists as candidates for Congress and legislature in that district. Others go to Gillespie, J. T. Eccles, and J. F. Alexander regarding speeches in their towns. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 532-35.

AUGUST 3. Lincoln answers request of W. H. Grigsby for position in his office. "My partner, Mr. Herndon, controls our office in this respect, and I have known of his declining at least a dozen applications like yours within the last three months." He writes Daniel S. Dickinson of New York regarding Alfred Hyde, convict he met in spring of 1857 while Hyde was being taken to penitentiary at Alton. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 535-36.

AUGUST 4. Carlinville. Lincoln is in town for several hours. During evening he talks politics with John M. Palmer. Carlinville Free Democrat, Aug. 5; W, II, 536.

AUGUST 5. Springfield. Lincoln writes Palmer, promising to speak in Carlinville Aug. 31. He also writes Dummer at Beardstown that he does not understand Republican party to be committed to "no more slave states." All "prefer" that there be no more, but many feel under obligation to admit slave states from Texas should any present themselves. Ibid. Mrs. Lincoln buys yard goods. H. E. Pratt, 149.

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AUGUST 6. Lincoln informs Koerner that in response to many requests he is having his late speeches printed. "Journal" is printing 7,000 copies of speech of July 17, and he has made arrangements in Chicago for publication in German. "Please write me, on receipt of this, and let know if you have any news from Madison," he concludes. "Every place seems to be coming quite up to my expectation, except Madison " The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 536-37.

AUGUST 9. Lincoln writes briefly to Joseph O. Glover, mayor of Ottawa on politics. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 537. He writes regrets to his friend D. A. Cheever of Tremont, that previous engagement prevents acceptance of speaking invitation and suggests S. C. Parks of Lincoln as speaker. University of Illinois Library, Urbana, Illinois. — Original. He buys 10˘ plaster at his drug store. H. E. Pratt, 152.

AUGUST 10. Chicago visitor calls on Lincoln and writes: "Mr. Lincoln leaves tomorrow evening for Beardstown, where he will throw some of his hot shot into the Douglas camp, and charge home upon the doughface." Chicago Tribune, Aug. 12. Lincoln writes Albert Parker: "As to politics I am doing what I can for the cause." He asks Parker to attend Republican meeting at Tremont on 14th and mingle with his old friends. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 538.

AUGUST 11. Springfield and Naples. Lincoln writes to Alexander Sympson of Carthage that he will be at Augusta on 25th. "Things look reasonably well. Will tell you more fully when I see you." He tells Daniel A. Cheever of New Hampshire that his latest Springfield speech has been printed, and sends 250 copies. If more are needed, he can write to J. O. Johnson in Springfield. Ibid. On evening train Lincoln goes to Naples on Illinois River, whence he can easily reach Beardstown next morning.

AUGUST 12. Beardstown. Lincoln commences intensive campaigning. In morning he arrives from Naples on steamer Sam Gaty. Several hundred admirers, with two bands and two military companies, give him enthusiastic reception at wharf and escort him to National Hotel. Shortly after 2 P.M. he mounts stand and speaks for two hours. Chicago Tribune, Aug. 17; The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 538-41.

AUGUST 13. Havana. Beardstown citizens give Lincoln sendoff as he takes passage for Havana. Arriving there in afternoon while Douglas is speaking, he is met at wharf by crowd and escorted to residence of Francis Law. Illinois State Journal, Aug. 20; Chicago Tribune, Aug. 20.

AUGUST 14. Lincoln takes stand at 2 P.M. and speaks for two hours. William Kellogg, congressman from district, follows him. "The day has been extremely warm, but delegations from quite a distance are here. Delegation from Bath asks Lincoln to speak there Monday, and he accepts. Ibld.; The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 541-43.

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AUGUST 16. Bath. Lincoln, in his speech, reminisces. He calls attention to presence on platform of several men who were in same company with him in Black Hawk War, and reminds audience that 22 years ago he staked out town of Bath, then a wooded wilderness. Chicago Tribune, Aug. 21. "A large crowd assembled here to hear Lincoln today, and all pronounce it a good day's work." Illinois State Journal, Aug. 21; The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 543-44.

AUGUST 17. Lewistown and Canton. "There are six thousand in and around the public square, at this moment, listening to Abraham Lincoln, who is quietly, coolly, but boldly and manfully discharging his arguments at the crowd. . . . He was brought over from Havana this morning by Messrs. Walker and Proctor, two good Republican citizens. . . . Lincoln goes with Kellogg to Canton tonight." Illinois State Journal, Aug. 21; The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 544-47.

AUGUST 18. Peoria. Democratic correspondent chronicles Lincoln's arrival: "Mr. Lincoln arrived this evening, and took rooms at the Peoria House — he looks jaded. I take it he has no hope — he is evidently disappointed in the feeling here — he is to reply to Senator Douglas on tomorrow afternoon." Register, Aug. 23. [Mrs. Lincoln buys yard of linen. H. E. Pratt, 149.]

AUGUST 19. During morning Lincoln attends Republican congressional convention for fourth district. At 2 he commences speaking from stand on east side of town square. Heavy shower interrupts speech and scatters crowd. He concludes in nearby hall. Illinois State Journal, Aug. 21.

AUGUST 20. Morris. In order to enter Ottawa on debate day, Lincoln spends night in Morris, arriving during evening. Register, Aug. 24. [Mrs. Lincoln buys and charges ($1) pound of tea. H. E. Pratt, 149.]

AUGUST 21. Ottawa. First joint debate takes place. Lincoln arrived on railroad with crowd from Cook and Will counties, and is escorted to Mansion House. Town seethes with people — at least 10,000 hear debate. Douglas opens at 2:30. At conclusion Lincoln's admirers carry him off on their shoulders. In evening he hears Lovejoy speak at court house. Register, Illinois State Journal, Aug. 24; The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, III, 1-37. [Mrs. Lincoln buys and charges soap and coffee, then sends "Son" for eight pounds of sugar. H. E. Pratt, 149.]

AUGUST 22. Lincoln and Lovejoy remain in Ottawa as guests of Mayor wover. To J. O. Cunningham, Lincoln writes his impressions of previous day's encounter: "Douglas and I, for the first time this canvass, crossed swords here yesterday; the fire flew some, and I am glad to know I am yet alive. There was a vast concourse of people — more than could [get] near enough to hear." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, III, 37.

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AUGUST 23. Henry. Lincoln addresses meeting, having boarded 3 A.M. train at Ottawa. Herndon & Weik (1892 cd. ), II, 108; Chicago Tribune, Aug. 24; Ottawa Republican, Aug. 23. He writes Ebenezer Peck of Chicago asking Peck and Judd to meet him at Freeport to discuss question technique Douglas introduced at Ottawa. Photo.

AUGUST 24. Galesburg. Lincoln, en route to Augusta, arrives at 3:30 on Peoria train. Crowd gathers at Bancroft House, and he makes short speech. Crowd escorts him to station, where he takes train for Augusta. Chicago Tribune, Aug. 26.

AUGUST 25. Augusta and Macomb. Republican congressional convention meets in Augusta in morning. At 2 Lincoln speaks in Gatlin's Grove near town. About I,200 hear him. In evening he speaks in courthouse at Macomb, addressing himself to Clay Whigs. His manner, conversational rather than formal, is very effective. Chicago Tribune, Aug. 28; Augusta Eagle, Dec. 8, 1932; Plymouth Locomotive, Aug. 28; The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, III, 37-8.

AUGUST 26. Macomb and Amboy. Lincoln checks out of Randolph Hotel at Macomb in morning. Randolph Hotel Room Book. Before leaving town, T. P. Pearson, photographer, makes ambrotype of him. The Abraham Lincoln Association, Springfield, Illinois. [Files and records on deposit at Illinois State Historical Library, Springfield, Illinois.] — Statement of Jacob Thompson. In afternoon he goes to Amboy where he makes short speech and stays night. Ibid., Letter of Charles E. Ives, Feb. 7, 1927

AUGUST 27. Freeport. Second joint debate takes place. Lincoln arrives at 10 on special train from Amboy and Dixon. Crowd escorts him to Brewster House, where he responds to reception speech of T. J. Turner. At 2 he rides to scene of debate in connestoga wagon drawn by six white horses. Afternoon is cold and dismal, but passes without rain. Illinois State Journal, Aug. 30, Sept. I; The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, III, 38-76.

AUGUST 28. El Paso and Peoria. Changing from Illinois Central to Peoria & Oquawka, Lincoln has hour's wait in El Paso. Crowd gathers, and he makes short speech. He is on his way to Peoria. Chicago Tribune, Sept. 3.

AUGUST 29. Pekin. "Lincoln arrived here on Sunday evening, en route for Tremont." Register, Sept. 4.

AUGUST 30. Tremont. Tazewell County Republican convention, called to nominate candidate for House, meets in Tremont. Lincoln attends. At I:30 he is escorted to steps in front of courthouse, where he is introduced by John A. Jones. He speaks for two hours, and is followed by William Kellogg, Republican candidate for Congress. Chicago Tribune, Sept. 2; The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, III, 76-7.

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AUGUST 31. Carlinville. Lincoln arrives by train, and is conducted to American House. At 3 crowd assembles in Morton's Grove, where Lincoln holds them with "honest, logical and telling speech." He is followed by John M. Palmer. Carlinville Democrat, Sept. 2; The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, III, 77-81.

SEPTEMBER 1. Springfield and Decatur. Lincoln, en route to Clinton leaves Springfield at 9 P.M. for Decatur to take Illinois Central for Clinton. He forgets his promise to wake Horace White, "Tribune" reporter, at Decatur, and White is carried to Indiana line. Lincoln is much amused when White appears in Clinton after meeting is over. Herndon & Weik, II, 111.

SEPTEMBER 2. Clinton. Coming up from Decatur on morning train, Lincoln is forced by citizens of Clinton to go on to Wapella so they can escort him back to Clinton with procession. Bloomington Pantograph calls Clinton meeting "one of the largest and most enthusiastic political gatherings that we have seen since the days of "Tippecanoe and Tyler too." Chicago Tribune, Sept. 6; Illinois State Journal, Sept. 7; The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, III, 81-4.

SEPTEMBER 3. Bloomington. Lincoln writes Dr. William Fithian that he will be in Danville Sept. 22, day after Douglas is to speak there. "My recent experience shows that speaking at the same place the next day after D. is the very thing — it is, in fact, a concluding speech on him." He asks Fithian to "give full notice to all surrounding counties." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, III, 84-5. In Bloomington Lincoln is guest of David Davis. Illinois State Journal, Sept. 7.

SEPTEMBER 4. At 2 court house bell rings, procession forms, proceeds to Davis home, and escorts Lincoln to town square. He addresses large crowd. Ibid.; The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, III, 85-90; Wakefield, 87-91. Returning to Springfield, he stops off in Lincoln and attends Douglas meeting, but does not speak. Stringer, I, 223-24.

SEPTEMBER 5. Springfield. Lincoln enjoys day of rest, except for talking politics with callers. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, III, 90.

SEPTEMBER 6. Springfield and Monticello. Before resuming his travels Lincoln writes to John G. Bagby, discouraged legislative candidate: "That wont do. You must be elected." Bagby should contact Chicago campaign headquarters for help. Ibid. Lincoln is escorted from Decatur to Monticello by trainload of followers. On road from Bement to Monticello delegation from latter place meets them and escorts Lincoln into town. After dinner Lincoln speaks for nearly three hours. Chicago Tribune, Sept. 9.

SEPTEMBER 7 Mattoon and Paris. In morning Lincoln speaks to audience of I,000. He proceeds to Paris by train, arriving at 3 and speaking

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until 5 P.M. Owen Lovejoy addresses meeting in evening. Ibid., Sept. 8, 11; Herndon & Weik, II, 112; The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, III, 90-1.

SEPTEMBER 8. Hillsboro. Lincoln reaches Hillsboro in evening. On his way there, while his train stands at Shelbyville station, crowd discovers him and salutes him with three cheers. Arriving at Hillsboro, he is escorted to home of J. T. Eccles. Chicago Tribune, Sept. 14.

SEPTEMBER 9. During morning Lincoln receives "constant stream of old friends" at Eccles home. In afternoon he speaks for two hours under circus tent after circus performance. His platform is circus wagon, and he talks above rain drumming on canvas. Ibid.; Register, Sept. 10; Illinois State Historical Library, Springfield, Illinois — Journal. XIII, 229.

SEPTEMBER 10. Hillsboro and Alton. Republicans escort Lincoln to station and send him on his way "with three rousing cheers." He spends night at Alton. Chicago Tribune, Sept. 14.

SEPTEMBER 11. Alton and Edwardsville. Lincoln speaks at Edwardsville at 1 P.M., after morning trip from Alton. Horace White, reporter, is impressed by "the quiet autumn day in the quaint old town; the serious people clustered around the platform; Joseph Gillespie officiating as chairman," as by few other meetings of campaign. Herndon & Weik (1892 ed. ), II, 114. Lincoln speaks at Highland in evening. Chicago Tribune, Sept. 15; The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, III, 91-6; Illinois State Historical Library, Springfield, Illinois — Transcript of statement of Joseph Gillespie. [Mrs. Lincoln buys five pounds of coffee. H. E. Pratt, 149.]

SEPTEMBER 12. Highland and Greenville. From Highland Lincoln goes to Greenville, "where unusual preparations have been made to receive him." Chicago Tribune, Sept. 15.

SEPTEMBER 13. Greenville. Lincoln speaks from 1 to 3 P.M. at Colcord's Grove west of town. Afterward ice cream is served on lawn of Presbyterian parsonage. Greenville Advocate, Feb. 13, 1928; The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, III, 96.

SEPTEMBER 14. Jonesboro. Lincoln arrives during evening. Donati's comet, appearance of which causes much excitement, is plainly visible. "Mr. Lincoln greatly admired this strange visitor, and he and I sat for an hour or more in front of the hotel looking at it," wrote Horace White. Herndon & Weik, II, 119; Chicago Tribune, Sept. 17.

SEPTEMBER 15. Third joint debate takes place. Douglas comes up from Cairo with several carloads of supporters. Audience is smallest of series. White wrote: "The country people came into the little town with ox teams mostly, and a very stunted breed of oxen, too. Their wagons were old-fashioned and looked as though they were ready to fall in pieces." Herndon & Weik, II, 118; The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, HI, 102-44.

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SEPTEMBER 16. Centralia. State Fair is in progress. Lincoln arrives at noon and stops at Centralia House. Douglas is also in town. Neither speaks, but crowds gather when they appear at fair grounds. Lincoln takes refuge in Illinois Central superintendent's office and writes three letters. He asks Washburne if, as Douglas charged at Jonesboro, Washburne has been opposing admission of new slave states. He tells Martin P. Sweet that, at Jonesboro, in a long, involved sentence, he found himself saying something about Sweet that might sound disparaging in the hands of "those villainous reporters Douglas has with him. . . . I write this to assure you that nothing can be farther from me than to feel, much less, intentionally say anything disrespectful to you." He writes Joseph Gillespie urging action to unite Republicans and "Americans" in Madison County. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, III, 144-45; VIII, 416. Lincoln takes evening northbound train on his way to Charleston for fourth debate. Herndon & Weik, II, 118; Chicago Tribune, Sept. 20; Greenville Advocate, Sept. 23.

SEPTEMBER 17. Mattoon. Lincoln arrives at 6 A.M. Both he and Douglas spend day and night in Mattoon. Whitney, 464-65; Chicago Tribune, Sept. 21.

SEPTEMBER 18. Charleston. Fourth joint debate takes place. Giant processions escort both principals from Mattoon to Charleston. Lincoln is taken to Capitol House, where H. P. H. Bromwell makes reception speech. Lincoln responds. Thousands crowd city, among them several carloads from Indiana. Lincoln opens debate at 2:45. Ibid.; The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, III, 145-201.

SEPTEMBER 19. Lincoln visits Coles County relatives and friends, spending night with A. H. Chapman, son-in-law of Dennis Hanks. Coleman, 185-86.

SEPTEMBER 20. Sullivan. Finding that Douglas is to speak at 1 P.M., Lincoln postpones his meeting from 2 to 3, and writes note in pencil to Douglas. Lincoln's supporters, escorting him to rally, interrupt Douglas, and brawl is narrowly averted. Register, Sept. 23; The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, III, 201.

SEPTEMBER 21. Danville. Lincoln arrives on 6 P.M. train from west. Procession forms and escorts him in open carriage to home of Dr. William Fithian. In response to calls, he speaks briefly. Chicago Tribune, Sept. 24.

SEPTEMBER 22. Lincoln speaks. "We had a fine and altogether satisfactory meeting," he writes next day. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, III, 202.

SEPTEMBER 23. Danville and Urbana. Before leaving town, Lincoln writes Judd suggesting German speaker be sent to Vermilion County. "I believe we have got the gentleman, unless they overcome us by fraudulent voting. . . . How can we prevent it?" Ibid. He reaches Urbana about 3, while Douglas is speaking, and is escorted to Mr. Bradley's

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residence, where many visit him. "As I write," correspondent says, "the Danville band and the Urbana band are giving him a fine serenade, and hundreds of Republicans, many of them old Henry Clay and Webster Whigs, are in procession." Illinois State Journal, Sept. 27.

SEPTEMBER 24. Urbana. Lincoln makes evening speech. At Evart House he spends about 20 minutes explaining his statement that "a house divided against itself cannot stand." William Bross, Chicago editor, follows him. Chicago Tribune, Sept. 28.

SEPTEMBER 25. Springfield. Lincoln returns Saturday evening. Learning of his arrival, Republican Clay Club serenades him. Lincoln appears and thanks his friends "for this renewed manifestation of their regard for the principles he defends." He retires amid "deafening cheers," followed by an old friend, Henry Chew, who tells him of his need for furniture to begin housekeeping and lack of money. Lincoln writes note saying that if anyone will give Chew $25 worth of furniture, and Chew does not pay by Jan. I, Lincoln will. He is obliged to do so in Feb. 1859. Illinois State Journal, Sept. 27; The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, III, 202-03. [Mrs. Lincoln buys five pounds of coffee ($1). H. E. Pratt, 149.]

SEPTEMBER 27. Springfield and Jacksonville. At 7 A.M. procession forms on town square and escorts Lincoln to Great Western station. Train reaches Jacksonville at 11. Besides Springfield delegation, many are present from Cass and Scott counties. In afternoon, following F. P. Blair Jr. of St. Louis, Lincoln speaks. Illinois State Journal, Sept. 28, 29; Chicago Tribune, Oct. I; Jacksonville Sentinel, Oct. 1. Lincoln finds time to write defendants' answer in Mershon v. Oliver and Milner, Logan County case. He signs "Lincoln & Parks p. d.," and evidently mails document to Samuel Parks. Photo.

SEPTEMBER 28. Winchester. Large delegation goes from Jacksonville to Winchester. Lincoln is late, but overtakes escort. "His horses were white with sweat and he and his friends were black with dust." Lincoln speaks at meeting west of town, and barbecue follows. Illinois State Journal, Oct. 2; The Abraham Lincoln Association, Springfield, Illinois. [Files and records on deposit at Illinois State Historical Library, Springfield, Illinois.] — Statement of E. F. Lomelino, Ms. He writes original verse in autograph album of Rosa Haggard, daughter of Winchester hotel proprietor. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, III, 203.

SEPTEMBER 29. Lincoln spends day in office of John Moses, going over several volumes of "Congressional Globe" which Moses has indexed. In evening he speaks at court house. The Abraham Lincoln Association, Springfield, Illinois. [Files and records on deposit at Illinois State Historical Library, Springfield, Illinois.] — Moses, "Lincoln at Winchester," Ms. Chicago Tribune, Oct. 5.

SEPTEMBER 30. Winchester and Pittsfield. Before leaving hotel Lincoln composes verse for Linnie Haggard and writes it in her autograph album. Winchester Republicans escort him to Florence on Illinois River,

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where party from Pittsfield meets him. He is taken to residence of Col. Ross, east of town, where he spends night. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, III, 204; The Abraham Lincoln Association, Springfield, Illinois. [Files and records on deposit at Illinois State Historical Library, Springfield, Illinois.] — Statement of W. C. Dickson, Aug. 5, 1928, Ms.

OCTOBER 1. Pittsfield. In afternoon Lincoln is driven in wagon drawn by six black horses from Ross home to town square, where he speaks for two hours. Ibid. After meeting, Calvin Jackson, photographer, makes two ambrotypes of him. Frederick H. Meserve, The Photographs of Abraham Lincoln, 46. Tradition has it that Lincoln and J. K. Moore start for Naples, and spend night at home of Aaron Tyler. The Abraham Lincoln Association, Springfield, Illinois. [Files and records on deposit at Illinois State Historical Library, Springfield, Illinois.] — Letter of E. S. Hoyt, Mar. 3, 1929.

OCTOBER 2. Naples and en route? [If Lincoln goes to Naples today it is doubtless to take packet north for speaking appointments. He could have gone from Naples to Peoria by boat in 18 hours. The Abraham Lincoln Association, Springfield, Illinois. [Files and records on deposit at Illinois State Historical Library, Springfield, Illinois.] — Letters of E. S. Hoyt, Aug. 11, 1928, Mar. 3, 1929.]

OCTOBER 4. Metamora and Peoria. Lincoln speaks at Metamora. He also apparently discusses with state's attorney case against bondsman of Melissa Goings, defendant who disappeared during her trial Oct. 10, 1857. Case is dismissed next day on state's attorney's motion. Illinois State Journal, Sept. 2; Diary of John Gipps, Peoria, Ms. Lincoln stays night at Peoria House. Peoria House Register; The Abraham Lincoln Association, Springfield, Illinois. [Files and records on deposit at Illinois State Historical Library, Springfield, Illinois.] — Letter of P. G. Rennick, Oct. 14, 1933.

OCTOBER 5. Peoria and Pekin. Lincoln and Kellogg leave Peoria on steamer Nile at 10 A.M. and arrive at Pekin at 11. Procession escorts them to residence of J. Wagonseller. In afternoon Lincoln is escorted to town square. Introduced by Judge Bush, he speaks most of afternoon. Kellogg speaks in evening while Lincoln travels. He returns to Peoria on steamer Minnesota, which stopped at Pekin so Capt. Detweiller and crew could hear speech. Learning that Lincoln is bound for Peoria, captain insists on taking him. "The steamer had no sooner left the dock than Lincoln was up on the hurricane deck with him, where they had a long and pleasant chat all the way to Peoria." At Peoria House Lincoln is serenaded by Sushisky's Apollo Band. Peoria Transcript, Oct. 6, 20; The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, III, 206-07.

OCTOBER 6. Peoria and Knoxvllle. Lincoln arrives from Peoria by train, wearing "a big gray shawl, and a somewhat rusty stovepipe hat," carrying carpetbag, during violent evening storm. Metamora Herald, Aug. 31, 1931

OCTOBER 7. Galesburg. Fifth joint debate takes place. Lincoln arrives shortly before noon, escorted by large procession. He is conducted to home of Henry R. Sanderson, where reception speech is made by T. G. Frost and banner presented by Miss Anna Hurd. At 2 Lincoln and

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Douglas are escorted to grounds in four-horse carriages driven abreast. Debate is held on Knox College campus. Galesburg Democrat, Oct. 9; The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, III, 207-44.

OCTOBER 8. Toulon. Delegation headed by T. J. Henderson meets Lincoln, coming from Kewanee, and escorts him to Virginia Hotel. In afternoon he speaks in town square, and returns to Kewanee. The Abraham Lincoln Association, Springfield, Illinois. [Files and records on deposit at Illinois State Historical Library, Springfield, Illinois.] — Statement of Samuel M. Adams, Aug. 4, 1927.

OCTOBER 9. Oquawka and Burlington. Escort with brass band meets Lincoln at Oquawka Junction (now Gladstone) and takes him to home of S. S. Phelps. At 1 P.M. he is escorted to stand in business section, where he speaks for hours. After meeting he leaves for Burlington, Iowa, for evening speech at Grimes' Hall. Oquawka Spectator, Oct. 4; Burlington Hawkeye, Oct. 11; Henry E. Huntington Library, San Marino, California — William H. Herndon Papers, Henry E. Huntington Library, San Marino, California, J. W. Grimes to Herndon, Oct. 28, 1866.

OCTOBER 10. Burlington. Lincoln spends Sunday at home of James W. Grimes. In afternoon he borrows writing materials and spends hour and a half outlining his Quincy speech. Ibid., Statement of W. J. McSurly, in Presbyterian Advancement. 24, 1929.

OCTOBER 11. Monmouth. Preparations for meeting Lincoln on Oquawka road are cancelled by heavy rain Sunday, but crowd is so large he is forced to speak outside as planned in spite of mud. He is welcomed at stand by Dr. Gilbert, Monmouth Republican Glee Club sings, and Lincoln speaks for three hours. Chicago Tribune, Oct. 15; The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, III, 244-45.

OCTOBER 12. Macomb? [Lincoln's name and that of C. R. Hume, candidate for legislature, appear in Randolph Hotel room book under date of Oct. 13. Probably they spend night.]

OCTOBER 13. Quincy. Sixth joint debate takes place. Lincoln arrived on morning train from Macomb. Crowd meets him at depot and escorts him to residence of O. H. Browning. Debate occupies afternoon. Republicans end day with "splendid torchlight procession." Illinois State Journal, Sept. 16; The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, HI, 245-83.

OCTOBER 14. En route, Quincy to Alton. Lincoln and Douglas take passage on steamer City of Louisiana, reaching Alton at dawn next morning. Chicago Tribune, Oct. 18.

OCTOBER 15. Alton. Seventh joint debate takes place. Steamer White Cloud brings up several hundred from St. Louis, and many come from Springfield and Carlinville on special train. Among them is Mrs. Lincoln, who stays with Lincoln at Franklin House. Debate takes place in afternoon at south front of City Hall. Chicago Tribune, Oct. 18; Gustave Koerner, Memoirs, II, 66; The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, III, 283-325.

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OCTOBER 16. Springfield and Lincoln. Lincoln arrives at noon on train from Springfield, and delivers afternoon speech. S. C. Parks, attorney, introduces him. He speaks for two hours. Illinois State Journal, Oct. 18. Lincoln's account with John Williams & Co. is charged for nine pounds of sugar and five pounds of coffee. H. E. Pratt, 149.

OCTOBER 17. Springfield. [Lincoln's presence at home is obvious inference from his speech in Lincoln yesterday and departure by train for Naples tomorrow morning.]

OCTOBER 18. Springfield, Naples, and Meredosia. Before resuming his travels, Lincoln writes to James N. Brown, Sangamon County politician, explaining his position on race question. Alighting from train at Naples, he meets "about fifteen Celtic gentlemen, with black carpet-sacks in their hands." This worries him. He fears Democrats may secure enough fraudulent votes to carry doubtful districts. He inquires where they are going, but can learn nothing definite. He speaks at Naples in afternoon, and at nearby Meredosia after dark, remarking about Irishmen probably imported to vote against him. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, III, 327-29.

OCTOBER 19. Mount Sterling, and Rushville. Arriving for speech, Lincoln hears another rumor which worries him, that 400 Irish are to be brought into Schuyler County to work on some new railroad and to be voted Democratic. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, HI, 329-30. After speech he travels across country to Rushville in buggy driven by Charles H. Sweeney, law student. Illinois State Historical Library, Springfield, Illinois — Trails., 1903, 239-30; The Abraham Lincoln Association, Springfield, Illinois. [Files and records on deposit at Illinois State Historical Library, Springfield, Illinois.] — Letter of S. B. Caddis, July 29, 1959.

OCTOBER 20. Rushville. Lincoln delivers afternoon speech. He is evening guest of W. H. Ray, and "the hospitable mansion . . . is thronged with the old friends and admirers of Mr. Lincoln." Chicago Tribune, Oct. 23. Reception over, he writes his worries about fraudulent voting to Judd. Can some way to head it off be devised? If so "we shall carry the day." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, III, 329-30.

OCTOBER 22. Carthage. Lincoln speaks before large crowd. Some 2,000 ladies are in procession which passes house where he is staying. "Mr. Lincoln was in admirable spirits and voice," writes Chicago "Tribune" correspondent, "and gave us the best speech ever made in Hancock County." Chicago Tribune, Oct. 26; The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, III, 330-31. [Lincoln's buggy, little used by him this fall, is fitted with new doubletree, plus stay and bolt repairs ($1.75). Obed Lewis Account Books.]

OCTOBER 23. Fountain Green, Dallas City, and La Harpe. Lincoln visits relatives, speaks at Dallas City in afternoon, where steamboats from Oquawka and Fort Madison, Iowa bring delegations to swell crowd, and delivers evening speech at La Harpe Methodist Church. The Abraham Lincoln Association, Springfield, Illinois. [Files and records on deposit at Illinois State Historical Library, Springfield, Illinois.] — Statements

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of W. E. Barton, Nov. 24, 1926, Jacob Thompson, Nov. 12, 1926, Jonathan Smith, Mar. 16, 20, 1929; Oquawka Spectator, Oct. 28.

OCTOBER 24. Blandinsville. Lincoln writes letters. To John Moses he says: "Throw on all your weight. Some things I have heard make me think your case is not so desperate as you thought when I was in Winchester. Put in your best licks." He cautions Alexander Sympson to beware of deal between Douglas and Buchanan Democrats in Hancock County. He reports to Judd on prospects in Hancock, where he spoke three times: "Tight, with chances slightly in our favor." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, III, 332.

OCTOBER 25. Macomb. Escorted by procession, Lincoln arrives about noon, and is taken to Randolph House. In spite of rain, he speaks for two hours to large crowd at town square. Chicago Tribune, Oct. 28; The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, III, 333.

OCTOBER 26. Macomb and Vermont. During part of day Lincoln rests at Randolph House. Bill for his room, $2.50, is charged to Lincoln Club. Later Col. Hamer drives him to Vermont. The Abraham Lincoln Association, Springfield, Illinois. [Files and records on deposit at Illinois State Historical Library, Springfield, Illinois.] — Randolph House room book; Statement of Jacob Thompson, Nov. 12, 1926.

OCTOBER 27. Vermont. Lincoln makes speech in rain, standing under umbrella, to crowd of "more than one thousand." The Abraham Lincoln Association, Springfield, Illinois. [Files and records on deposit at Illinois State Historical Library, Springfield, Illinois.] — J. W. Procter, to J. R. B. Van Cleave, Van Cleave Mss.; Illinois State Journal; Nov. 2.

OCTOBER 28. Chicago. Lincoln makes hurried visit. "Mr. Lincoln was at the Tremont House a few moments . . . on his way to speak at Petersburg," reports Chicago Democrat. Sparks, 529.

OCTOBER 29. Petersburg. Lincoln speaks to "large and enthusiastic assembly." Later, at flag station 20 miles west of Springfield, he and Henry Villard, reporter, take refuge from storm in box car. Lincoln tells Villard that as youth his highest political ambition was to be elected to legislature. Now his wife insists he will be senator and President too. "Just think of such a sucker as me as President!" Henry Villard, Memoirs, I, 96; Menard Index, Nov. 4; The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, III, 333.

OCTOBER 30. Springfield. Giant Republican rally takes place. Chicago Tribune reporter writes that "speaking was out of the question. Lincoln tried it, and though he held at all times an audience of 5,000 or more, something more demonstrative than his convincing and unimpassioned oratory was needed to satisfy the eager crowd." Day ends with torch-light processions and noise. Chicago Tribune, Nov. 2. Learning that canard is circulating that he was once a Know-Nothing, Lincoln writes to Edward Lusk of Meredosia that, as he said in his speech there, charge is false. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, III, 333-35.

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NOVEMBER 1. Decatur. Lincoln closes campaign with speech near his first home in Illinois. "It will please Mr. Lincoln's friends," writes Petersburg reporter who heard him Friday, "to know that he has passed through the tremendous labors of this canvass with his health and strength unimpaired." Menard Index, Nov.4; Jesse W. Weik, The Real Lincoln, 276; Kyle, 98-9.

NOVEMBER 2. Springfield. Election day. "We are gratified to state," comments Illinois State Journal (Nov. 3), "that the election . . . passed off as usual, without any disturbance. The rain fell almost incessantly throughout the entire day, and the streets were in a horrid condition." Street fights are not as numerous as expected. By sundown, however, city prison is nearly full.

NOVEMBER 3. Lincoln writes to Gov. Bissell endorsing pardon petition of Judge Davis and Ward H. Lamon for Orin B. Jones, in prison for larceny. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, III, 335.

NOVEMBER 4. Feeling defeat keenly, Lincoln writes to John J. Crittenden of Kentucky, who advocated re-election of Douglas. "The emotions of defeat, at the close of a struggle in which I felt more than a merely selfish interest, and to which defeat the use of your name contributed largely, are fresh upon me; but, even in this mood, I can not for a moment suspect you of anything dishonorable. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, III, 335-36.

NOVEMBER 6. Lincoln resumes law practice. Representing defendant in Gothard v. Caldwell in Sangamon Circuit Court, Lincoln & Herndon agrees that judgment be entered against their client for $23 and costs. Record.

NOVEMBER 8. Lincoln & Herndon win two cases in Sangamon Circuit Court. In Chamblin v. Springfield Marine & Fire Insurance Co. jury finds for plaintiff, their client, and assesses his damages at $1,000. In Clinton v. Snow and Robbins, in which they also represent plaintiff, defendants withdraw plea and court assesses Clinton's damages at $205.88. Ibid. Lincoln writes letter of introduction to Horace Greeley for John G. Nicolay of Springfield, who "wishes an arrangement to correspond" for Greeley's paper. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, III, 336.

NOVEMBER 9. In Circuit Court Lincoln & Herndon file amended petition in Huntington v. Huttenhausen, which is continued on their motion. Record.

NOVEMBER 10. Lincoln gives Isaac Larrance, designer of new postal map, endorsement: "Having hastily examined ‘Larrance's Post-office Chart’ and considered the principle upon which it is arranged, I think it will prove a great convenience to Post-Masters and others whose business lead them to search for particular localities upon maps." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, III, 336.

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NOVEMBER 12. In Irwin v. Willis in Sangamon Circuit Court jury finds for plaintiff and assesses his damages at $349. Lincoln & Herndon represents Irwin. Record.

NOVEMBER 15. Sangamon Circuit Court in People ex rel. Koerner v. Ridgely et al. enters decree in favor of defendants. Appeal to Supreme Court is taken (see Jan. 24, 1859). Lincoln has three other cases. He writes Judd, asking him to draw new apportionment bill and commence work for its passage. Otherwise Trumbull will be defeated. Ibid.; The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, III, 336-37.

NOVEMBER 16. Lincoln writes Judd again, this time in answer to request for campaign funds. "I have been on expences so long without earning anything that I am absolutely without money now for even household purposes." But, since "I had the post of honor, it is not for me to be over-nice," and asks Judd to put him down for $250. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, II, 337.

NOVEMBER 17. Lincoln angrily replies to letter from S. G. Davis & Co. complaining that lands of owners against whom judgments were won have not been sold. After describing what had already been done, Lincoln washes his hands of Davis business by offering to surrender it to anyone they name. "I believe we have had, of legal fees . . . one hundred dollars. I would not go through the same labor and vexation again for five hundred." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, III, 338.

NOVEMBER 18. Lincoln prepares for next term of U.S. Circuit Court. In response to request of Galiup and Hitchcock, Chicago attorneys, he files praecipe, declaration, and bond for costs in Palmer et al. v. Magill et al. Suit is brought to enforce payment of two bills of exchange, each $1,000, drawn on Dubuque & Pacific Railroad Co. Files.

NOVEMBER 19. "I am glad I made the late race," Lincoln writes to his old friend A. G. Henry. "It gave me a hearing on the great and durable question of the age, which I could have had in no other way; and though I now sink out of view, and shall be forgotten, I believe I have made some marks which will tell for the cause of civil liberty long after I am gone." To Henry Asbury, E. A. Paine, and Anson Miller, political supporters, he writes encouragement. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, III, 339-40.

NOVEMBER 20. Lincoln asks C. H. Ray of Chicago Tribune to send him two copies of papers containing reports of debates — he wants to preserve them in scrap book. "I believe, according to a letter of yours to Hatch you are ‘feeling like h—ll yet.’ Quit that. You will soon feel better. Another ‘blow-up’ is coming; and we shall have fun again." "The fight must go on," he tells M. M. Inman. With O. M. Hatch and Jesse K. Dubois, he signs letter to Newton Bateman, elected superintendent of education Nov. 2, requesting help in paying off party debt. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, III, 341-42.

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NOVEMBER 24. Ritta Angelica da Silva, from whom Lincoln took mortgage Aug. 11, 1854 to secure loan of $125, pays obligation in full. Hertz, Lincoln, 737.

NOVEMBER 25. Lincoln writes Joel A. Matteson, former governor of Illinois and now interested in Chicago & Alton Railroad, regarding suit involving road in which Lincoln & Herndon had been retained. "It has so happened," Lincoln writes, "that, so far, we have performed no service in the case; but we lost a cash fee offered us on the other side." He suggests compromise by which fees may be settled. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, III, 342.

NOVEMBER 26. Lincoln deposits money received from Ritta da Silva at Marine & Fire Insurance Co., and releases mortgage on record. Record; Marine Bank Ledger. He also writes Dr. B. C. Lundy predicting another "blow up" in Democracy. Douglas managed to get support both as best instrument to break down and uphold slave power. "No ingenuity can keep this deception . . . up a great while. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, III, 342.

NOVEMBER 27. On Ruckel mortgage, made Sept. 28, 1857, Lincoln makes endorsement: "Nov. 27 — 1858. Received on the within fifty dollars, being first year's interest." Photo.

NOVEMBER 30. Lincoln writes Henry C. Whitney requesting that he procure for him two sets of Chicago "Tribune" containing debates with Douglas. To William McNeely of Petersburg, who asked him to take case in Supreme Court, Lincoln writes, "I will attend to it." He writes Samuel C. Davis & Co. again, suggesting how to sell lands company had been awarded. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, III, 342-43.

DECEMBER 2. In response to proposal that he take young man into his office as student, Lincoln writes James T. Thornton: "I am absent altogether too much to be a suitable instructor for a law-student. When a man has reached the age that Mr. Widner has, and has already been doing for himself, my judgment is, that he reads the books for himself without an instructer. That is precisely the way I came to the law." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, III, 344.

DECEMBER 7. In Cochran and Hall v. Camp et al. in U.S. Circuit Court, Lincoln, for Lincoln & Herndon, signs agreement: "It is hereby agreed that the testimony of the above witnesses may be taken upon oral interrogatory by the parties or their agents without filing any written interrogatories." Files.

DECEMBER 8. Lincoln replies to letter of consolation from H. D. Sharpe: "I think we have fairly entered upon a durable struggle as to whether this nation is to ultimately become all slave or all free, and though I fall early in the contest, it is nothing if I shall have contributed, in the least degree, to the final rightful result." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, III, 344.

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DECEMBER 9. Lincoln prepares for ensuing term of U.S. Circuit Court. In Ambos v. Barrett et al. he files bond for costs, praecipe, and declaration while in Ambos v. Barrett and Barrett he files bill to foreclose mortgage. Both cases involve indebtedness of Barrett and others to Columbus Machine Manufacturing Co. of Columbus, Ohio (see Feb. 14, 1859). Files.

DECEMBER 10. In another case in U.S. Circuit Court, Stoddard v. Ball Lincoln files bond for costs, praecipe, and declaration. Case concerns distribution of proceeds of sale of Stoddard's Addition to St. Louis. Ibid. Mrs. Lincoln buys and charges ribbon. H. E. Pratt, 149.

DECEMBER 11. To Lyman Trumbull Lincoln writes his estimate of political situation. Douglas is still uppermost in his thoughts. He believes majority of Democratic politicians will try to kill him politically, but he is afraid they will not try the most effective way, which would be to outvote him in national convention. If they try to push slave code on him, he will appeal for Republican support, and must not receive it. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, III, 344-45.

DECEMBER 12. "I write merely to let you know that I am neither dead nor dying," Lincoln tells Alexander Sympson in letter explaining that he has completely recovered from his defeat. As to Democrats, "I have an abiding faith that we shall beat them in the long run. Step by step the objects of the leaders will become too plain for the people to stand them." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, III, 346.

DECEMBER 14. Lincoln finishes preliminary work on another case in U.S. Circuit Court when he signs bond for costs and files declaration and praecipe in Hamilton v. Maloney, suit brought on $447 bill of exchange. Files.

DECEMBER 19. Lincoln urges William Fishback, young lawyer who handled foreclosure proceedings in S. C. Davis & Co. cases for Lincoln & Herndon, to return from Arkansas to Illinois. "Unless your prospects are flattering where you are," he says, "or your health will not permit, I wish you would return and take charge of this business." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, III, 346.

DECEMBER 21. Bloomington. At Bloomington, where McLean Circuit Court is in session, Lincoln writes in autograph book of George Perrin Davis, son of Judge David Davis: "My young friend, George Perrin Davis, has allowed me the honor of being the first to write his name in this book." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, III, 347.

DECEMBER 22. Scott v. St. Louis, Alton, & Chicago Railroad, with Lincoln, Hanna, and Scott for plaintiff, is tried by jury, which awards plaintiff $2,170. Record.

DECEMBER 25. Springfield. Lincoln writes to Henry G. Whitney acknowledging receipt of "Tribunes" he asked for Nov. 30. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, III, 347.

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DECEMBER 27. In U.S. Circuit Court Lincoln files praecipe and declaration in Harrison v. Green. Plaintiff sues for $2,000, alleging damage when defendant failed to deliver hogs for which he contracted and paid. Files.

DECEMBER 28. $2,219.43 is deposited to joint account of Lincoln & Herndon at Springfield Marine & Fire Insurance Co. Marine Bank Ledger.

DECEMBER 30. Bloomington. Lincoln writes legal opinion in case of will of John Franklin, Sr. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, III, 347-48.

DECEMBER 31. [Mrs. Lincoln buys, "per Robert," pair of kid gloves at John Williams' store. H. E. Pratt, 149.]

1859

JANUARY 3. Springfield. Lincoln writes Maria L. Bullock regarding debts due her on lands he sold for her in 1855. "It annoys me to have to say that I can not collect money now. I now believe the quickest way I can get your money is for me to buy the debts of you, as soon as I can get in any money of my own to do it with." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, III, 348. Lincoln & Herndon collect $289.91 from former sheriff John Cook on execution of Chambers v. Inslee, which they won for plaintiff, and Lincoln signs receipt. Photo.

JANUARY 4. U.S. Courts and Supreme Court convene in Springfield. On Lincoln's motion Charles S. Zane is admitted to practice in federal courts. Illinois State Journal, Jan. 5. Lincoln & Herndon appear in three cases in U.S. Court, but their activity is confined to entering motions. Record. Lincoln votes in congressional election. Election Returns. He writes assignment of errors in People ex rel. Koerner v. Ridgely et al., (SC). Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. Robert buys and charges to his father's account 10 pounds of sugar ($1) at C. M. & S. Smith, general store. H. E. Pratt, 154.

JANUARY 5. In U.S. Circuit Court Lincoln & Herndon get judgments in two cases filed preceding year: Davis & Co. v. Monical and Monical, in which plaintiff is awarded $937.07, and Hamilton v. Maloney, in which $444.28 is awarded. In People v. Illinois Central — important case in Supreme Court — time to plead is extended on Lincoln's motion. Record. [Legislature elects Douglas to U.S. Senate.]

JANUARY 6. Lincoln writes legal opinion on methods of dividing land sections into quarters. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, III, 348-49. He also has case in U.S. Circuit Court — Van Brunt et al. v. Madux — which, by agreement, is set for trial Jan. 11. Record. He writes and files defendants' answer in People v.

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Moore et al., (SC), suit to collect $200,000 from McLean County collector. Photo. Robert buys and charges four pounds of candles ($1) at Smith's store. H. E. Pratt, 154.

JANUARY 7. Lincoln files separate answer of David Davis, one of defendants in Lawrence et al. v. Shaffer et al. in U.S. Circuit Court. Ownership of lot in Bloomington is involved. Files. Herndon writes checks for $100 and $229.34 on firm's account in Marine & Fire Insurance Co. Original owned by Springfield Marine Bank.

JANUARY 8. Lincoln writes W. H. Wells, regretting that he cannot send copy of his debate with Douglas at Freeport. "All dallying with Douglas by Republicans, who are such at heart, is, at the very least, time, and labor lost; and all such, who so dally with him, will yet bite their lips in vexation for their own folly." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, III, 349. Lincoln attends vocal concert by Mrs. Mozart at Cook's Hall. Illinois State Journal, Jan. 11. Lincoln buys gallon of syrup at Smith's store. H. E. Pratt, 154.

JANUARY 10. Lincoln, with 51 others, signs letter to Mrs. Mozart expressing appreciation of her concert, and asking her to sing again on her return from Jacksonville, which she does Tuesday. Illinois State Journal, Jan. 11; The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, III, 350. Mrs. Lincoln buys 8-pound turkey (80˘) at Smith's store. H. E. Pratt, 154.

JANUARY 11. Lincoln is busy in U.S. Court. In Southworth et al. v. Petzer, defendant, whom Lincoln & Herndon represents, is ruled to plead by Jan. 12. Lincoln files his plea and notice. In Van Brunt et al. v. Madux, jury is sworn. Trial proceeds until adjournment. Record; Files.

JANUARY 12. Lincoln loses Van Brunt et al. v. Madux when jury finds for plaintiffs and assesses their damages at $2,320. He files bill of exceptions so that case may be taken to U.S. Supreme Court. Ibid. Lincoln buys "Isinglass" and "Red Gelatine" at his drug store. H. E. Pratt, 152.

JANUARY 13. In Lawrence et al. v. Shaffer et al., court hears evidence and argument on complainants' motion for injunction. Campbell and Cullom appear for complainants, Lincoln & Herndon for defendants. Court overrules motion. Record. Robert buys and charges six pounds of sugar ($1) at Smith's store. H. E. Pratt, 154.

JANUARY 14. Robert brings home five dozen eggs ($1) from Smith's store. Ibid.

JANUARY 15. Lincoln writes $15.70 check to "Canedy & Johnston," druggists, and one for $50.91 to "Condell Stockdale & Co.," dry goods merchants. Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Original. Robert charges ($1) gallon of syrup at Smith's store. H. E. Pratt, 154.

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JANUARY 17. U.S. Circuit Court appoints McClernand and Lincoln defendant's lawyers in U.S. v. Swerrengen, counterfeiting. Defendant pleads not guilty, but jury finds him guilty, and he is sentenced to three years and fined $30. Record. Robert fetches home 75˘ umbrella from Smith's store. H. E. Pratt, 154.

JANUARY 18. Lincoln & Herndon win Wiggins Ferry Co. and Trendley v. Steamer Ocean Spray when U.S. Court awards plaintiffs lien on salvaged ship, amounting to third of $940 for which wreck was sold Aug. 25, 1858, less court costs. Record. Lincoln buys cough remedies at Diller's Drug store. Day Book, Diller's Drug Store.

JANUARY 19. Lincoln, in Supreme Court, appears for Illinois Central in six suits in which railroad is defendant. All are continued (see Jan. 14, 1860). Record.

JANUARY 21. Lincoln has two cases in Supreme Court — People v. Moore et al., and Trustees, etc. v. Allen et al. In first case Lincoln, for defendants, withdraws his demurrer and defaults. In second, in which validity of sale of school lands is involved, Lincoln makes argument for defendants. Court later decides for defendants. Ibid.; 21 III. 120. He writes two clients about law case. Opponents demand case be continued or dismissed. "Write me at once which shall be done." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, III, 350.

JANUARY 24. People ex rel. Koerner et al. v. Ridgely et al., decided in favor of defendants by Sangamon Circuit Court Nov. 15, 1858, comes before Supreme Court. Lincoln appears for appellants, McClernand and Logan for appellees. Question at issue is power of governor to dismiss trustees of state bank. Court takes case under advisement, and later affirms lower court decision. Record.

JANUARY 25. As plaintiffs' attorney Lincoln dismisses two cases in U.S. Circuit Court — Palmer et al. v. Magill et al., and Harrison v. Green. Ibid. He writes testimonial letter for Samuel M. Hitt, who is traveling east on business. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, III, 350-51. He attends banquet commemorating 100th anniversary of birth of Robert Burns. After dinner Lincoln and others respond to toasts, while "mountain dew" and "a large number of mysterious looking bottles" circulate freely. Illinois State Journal, Jan. 27; Greenville Advocate, Feb. 10. Smith's store sells gallon of syrup on Lincoln's account and 11 pounds of sugar, which Robert takes home. H. E. Pratt 154.

JANUARY 26. Robert collects box of blacking at Smith's store. H. E. Pratt 154.

JANUARY 27. Lincoln buys hairbrush, soap, and "Lubins Extract" at his drugstore. Ibid., 152.

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JANUARY 28. Robert takes home 40˘ pair of shoes from Smith's store. Ibid., 154.

JANUARY 29. Lincoln writes Trumbull. After complimenting him on speech he makes request. "When you can find leisure, write me your present impressions of Douglas' movements. Our friends here from different parts of the State, in and out of the Legislature, are united, resolute, and determined; and I think it is almost certain that we shall be far better organized for 1860 than ever before." Another speech has arrived, delivered by Israel Washburn, Maine congressman, sent by his brother, Elihu Washburne, Illinois congressman. Lincoln writes to sender, praising speech. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, III, 351.

JANUARY 31. In People v. Illinois Central, parties agree that on Aug. 13, 1857 defendant filed with auditor list of stock, property, and assets. Case, in which Lincoln is one of counsel for railroad, involves method of assessing road's property for taxation. 27 Ill. 64. Lincoln & Herndon appear for defendant in Sangamon Circuit Court when jury is summoned to fix damages in People v. Moore. Jury sets figure at $14,284.11. Record. With two other lawyers, Lincoln examines and certifies Henry I. Atkins for admission to bar. He writes opinion for officials of Bureau County. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, III, 352-55. He buys "Red Gelatine," "Cooper Isinglass," and cream of tartar at his drug store, while Robert fetches six pounds of sugar from Smith's store. H. E. Pratt, 152, 154.

FEBRUARY 1. Lincoln writes M. W. Delahay, now living in Kansas, that he expects to visit Council Bluffs during year. He cannot tell just when, for he must keep close watch on court business. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, III, 355. In Supreme Court, People v. Illinois Central is called. Attorneys file agreed case, to be argued at Ottawa (see July 14, Jan. 12, 1860). Record. Robert buys paper of tacks (10˘) at Smith's store. H. E. Pratt, 154.

FEBRUARY 2. The Lincolns entertain. Browning, in Springfield for court sessions, writes in his diary: "Cloudy, foggy, muddy, dismal day. . . . At large party at Lincoln's at night." Browning, Diary. Robert buys 15˘ "Watch Guard" and charges to Lincoln's account. H. E. Pratt, 149.

FEBRUARY 3. To Trumbull Lincoln writes letter prompted by recent article hinting at rivalry between them. "Any effort to put enmity between you and me, is as idle as the wind. . . . I can not conceive it possible for me to be a rival of yours, or to take sides against you in favor of any rival." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, III, 355-56. Lincoln deposits $50 at his bank. Marine Bank Ledger.

FEBRUARY 4. Robert gets syrup, sugar, and candles at Smith's store. H. E. Pratt, 154.

FEBRUARY 5. In U.S. Circuit Court Lincoln files declaration in

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Ammidown v. Keyes, suit brought to collect note for $6,662.59. Files. Lincoln buys four pounds of starch at Comeau & Diller. H. E. Pratt, 152.

FEBRUARY 8. In Ammidown v. Keyes leave is granted Lincoln & Herndon, attorneys for plaintiff, to withdraw note on which suit is brought. Record. Lincoln writes $1.47 check to Sangamon County tax collector. Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Original. Robert pays $6 to Smith's store for three loads of wood. H. E. Pratt, 154.

FEBRUARY 9. Lincoln & Herndon take continuance when Davis & Co. v. Mace is called in U.S. Circuit Court. Record.

FEBRUARY 10. Southworth et al. v. Petzer comes to trial in U.S. Circuit Court. By agreement jury is waived and case submitted to court. Verdict is for plaintiffs, whose damages are assessed at $507.12. Lincoln & Herndon represents defendant. Ibid. Lincoln pays $1.75 to John F. Baker, through his account at Smith's store, for load of wood. H. E. Pratt, 154.

FEBRUARY 11. Jacksonville. Lincoln lectures on "Discoveries and Inventions." Address, delivered in Congregational Church, is sponsored by Phi Alpha Society of Illinois College, which had elected Lincoln honorary member. "Journal" says of Lincoln's address: "It was received with repeated and hearty bursts of applause." After lecture Lincoln is guest of honor at tea party given by Dr. Owen M. Long at his home. Illinois State Journal, Feb. 14; The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, III, 356-63; Heinl, 20; The Abraham Lincoln Association, Springfield, Illinois. [Files and records on deposit at Illinois State Historical Library, Springfield, Illinois.] — Mrs. H. E. English to H. E. Pratt, July 19, 1941.

FEBRUARY 14. Springfield. Lincoln collects $1,000 as part payment of claim on which he brought suit in U.S. Circuit Court, Ambos v. Barrett et al., filed Dec. 9, 1858. On back of copy of several promissory notes he writes: "Received, Feby 14. 1859, on the within one thousand dollars, for which a receipt was this day given J. A. Barrett, by Lincoln & Herndon —" Files. Lincoln buys bottle of castor oil at his drug store, and Robert gets 11 pounds of sugar at Smith's. H. E. Pratt, 152, 154.

FEBRUARY 15. Lincoln pays $129 on his account with C. M. Smith, Springfield merchant who married Mrs. Lincoln's sister. He deposits $60 in his bank account. C. M. Smith Account Book; Marine Bank Ledger.

FEBRUARY 16. Lincoln credits payment of $50 on two promissory notes made by A. and J. Haines of Pekin which he holds. Notes, probably legal fees, are for $200 each, and were due Oct. 15, 1858 and Jan. I, 1859. He deposits money at Springfield Marine & Fire Insurance Co. Lincoln Estate Inventory; Marine Bank Ledger. He writes two checks: $10 to "C. Loch," bootmaker; $2.16 to "P. A. Dorwin & Co.," tinware and stove merchants. Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Original.

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FEBRUARY 17. Robert takes home set of knitting needles from Smith's store. H. E. Pratt, 154.

FEBRUARY 18. Counsel in People v. Illinois Central stipulate that in event of passage of bill now before legislature there should be no revaluation of property of company, nor appeal from 1857 assessment. Counsel for state agree to remove limit of $13,000,000 and leave valuation entirely to court. Lincoln is one of attorneys for railroad. 27 Ill. 66. He buys cough remedies at his drug store. H. E. Pratt, 152.

FEBRUARY 19. Lincoln deposits $40 in his personal bank account. Marine Bank Ledger.

FEBRUARY 21. Lincoln delivers his "Discoveries and Inventions" lecture at Concert Hall. "His theme . . . was handled in a masterly manner, and, was appreciated by the handful gathered to hear him." Illinois State Democrat, Mar. 5; Illinois State journal, Feb. 21.

FEBRUARY 22. Lincoln deposits $625 at Marine & Fire Insurance Co. Marine Bank Ledger. He writes $10.50 check to "Kingsley North & Co." Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Original. He writes Gov. Bissell's veto message on apportionment bill recently passed by legislature. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, III, 364-65.

FEBRUARY 24. Robert buys and charges sugar, tacks, syrup and candles to A. Lincoln's account at Smith's general store. H. E. Pratt, 154.

FEBRUARY 26. Lincoln writes bill of complaint in Rockwell et al. v. Dubois et al. Hertz, Lincoln, 734-50.

FEBRUARY 28. Chicago. Lincoln is in Chicago. Mrs. Lincoln writes note to O. M. Hatch, who intends to be in Chicago, asking him to tell Lincoln that Tad is ill, and doctor fears pneumonia. She would be comforted if Lincoln were to return. The Abraham Lincoln Association, Springfield, Illinois. [Files and records on deposit at Illinois State Historical Library, Springfield, Illinois.] — Files.

MARCH 1. Chicago Republicans celebrate victory in today's municipal election. In evening they meet at headquarters, where speeches are made by Lincoln, Leonard Swett, and A. W. Mack. "They were received with repeated rounds of applause." Chicago Tribune, Mar. 2; The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, III, 365-70.

MARCH 2. "At last I am here to give some attention to the suit of Haines and Haines vs. Talcott and others," Lincoln writes P. H. Watson, opposing counsel in case. He suggests an arrangement by which litigation may be shortened, and asks Watson to write to him at Springfield. "Make any suggestions of your own with the same frankness as I have done." Ibid., III, 370-71.

MARCH 3. Springfield. Lincoln writes advice to Hayden Keeling, client. "I do not think there is the least use of doing any more with the law suit.

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I only do not think you are sure to gain it, but I do think you are sure to lose it. Therefore the sooner it ends the better." Ibid.

MARCH 4. Lincoln writes Delahay again in regard to visit to Kansas. "It will push me hard to get there without injury to my own business; but I shall try to do it, though I am not yet quite certain I shall succeed." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, III, 271-72. He deposits $250. Marine Bank Ledger.

MARCH 7. Decatur? [DeWitt Circuit Court convenes at Clinton, and Macon Circuit Court at Decatur. Illinois State Chronicle, Decatur, reports (Mar. 7), Lincoln in town. Robert buys 11 pounds sugar at Smith's store. H. E. Pratt, 154.]

MARCH 10. [Mrs. Lincoln buys and charges three pounds of coffee at Smith's. Ibid.]

MARCH 11. Clinton. Lincoln writes, signs, and files defendant's answer in Harrison v. Wellen. He is acting with Hill. In same case he writes, signs, and files answer of DeWitt C. Jones. He writes, signs, and files answer of same client in Merriman and Woodward v. Jones et al. Photo.

MARCH 12. Springfield. Lincoln pays his account with C. M. Smith ($407.72) in full. C. M. Smith Account Book. He deposits $40 in his bank account. Marine Bank Ledger.

MARCH 14. Lincoln, with 12 others, signs call for Mar. 21 Springfield Republican convention. Illinois State Journal, Mar. 14; The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, HI, 372.

MARCH 15. Clinton. Second suit of Wilson Allen v. Illinois Central comes to trial. Damages of $2,000 are sought in compensation for alleged obstruction of drain. Jury finds for plaintiff in sum of $286. Lincoln appears for railroad. Record.

MARCH 17. Lincoln writes and files replication, cross bill, and answer of Solomon F. Lewis in chancery case of Lewis v. Hall et al. He also writes answer of O. L. Davis, guardian ad litem, and decree of court. Photo.

MARCH 18. Lincoln writes and files replication and pleas in Bennett v. Williams, signing "Moore, p.d." Photo.

MARCH 19. Springfield. Lincoln writes $22.50 check to "J. W. Fracketton, Treasurer &c." Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Original. Robert gets 10 pounds of sugar and four pounds of candles at Smith's store. H. E. Pratt, 154.

MARCH 21. Springfield and Lincoln. Lincoln deposits $112.50 at Marine & Fire Insurance Co., and writes $6 check to "Woods & Henkle," tailors. Marine Bank Ledger; Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Original. He then boards train to Lincoln, where, in Logan Circuit Court, he writes and files defendant's answer in

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Engle and Durfee v. Reed. Photo. [Mrs. Lincoln buys two pairs of boots yard goods and shirt at Smith's store ($17.63). H. E. Pratt, 154-55.]

MARCH 22. Lincoln. Lincoln draws bill in chancery in Day v. Skinner et al. He also draws affidavit, which Joshua Day signs. Photo. In court Lincoln and Dugger represent defendant in Bell v. McPheeter, which is dismissed at plaintiff's costs. Record.

MARCH 23. Lincoln writes and files pleas in Gritz v. Deskins, in which he and Parks act for defendant. He writes affidavit of William Oliver filed in Mershon v. Oliver and Milner. Photo.

MARCH 24. Lincoln is attorney for Abraham Nash, alias Yankee Sullivan charged with assault with intent to kill. By agreement bail is increased to $1,000, and change of venue to Sangamon County granted. Record. He writes and files pleas for defendants in Loomis v. Beverly et al., and in Classon v. McFarland. In first case he acts with Parks, in second with Estabrook. Photo. [Mrs. Lincoln buys more yard goods ($2.75) at Smith's. H. E. Pratt, 155.]

MARCH 26. Lincoln writes long letter to William A. Ross regarding debates publication. "I would really be pleased with a publication substantially as you propose," he says, then outlines his idea of proper scope of work. "I am here now, attending court; and seize a moment to answer yours, which I ought to have done sooner. Let me hear from you again." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, III, 372-74. In court Lincoln files power of attorney from defendants and confesses judgment against them in Blong v. W. C. Taylor & Co. for $8,428.77, amount of note sued on and interest. Photo. [Robert buys shoes, yard goods, and sewing materials for his mother at Smith's store. H. E. Pratt, 155.]

MARCH 28. Springfield. Lincoln acknowledges W. M. Morris's invitation to lecture at Galesburg. "I regret to say I can not do so now; I must stick to the courts awhile." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, III, 374. He deposits $50 in his bank account. Of this, $30 represents payment on promissory note for $80 which he holds, made Nov. 7, 1857 by Milton Davis of Vermilion County and due Dec. 25, 1857. Lincoln Estate Inventory. He writes $28.64 check to J. G. Hull, china and glassware merchant. Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Original. Smith's store delivers, by dray, 32 pounds of "Java Coffee" to Lincoln's residence. H. E. Pratt, 155.

MARCH 29. Lincoln. Lincoln files separate answer of J. T. McCoy in Campbell et al. v. Blatchford and McCoy in Logan Circuit Court. Files. He writes and files affidavit and motion for new trial for defendant in Howser v. Palmer, "mule replevin case." Photo. [Mrs. Lincoln buys sewing materials at Smith's store. H. E. Pratt, 155.]

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MARCH 30. Gleeson v. Jones et al. Lincoln writes answer of James H. Matheny, guardian ad litem, replication, and court decree. Photo. [Mrs. Lincoln buys more sewing materials at Smith's and boys hat and pair of shoes ($4.59). H. E. Pratt, 155.]

MARCH 31. Lincoln files bill and affidavit in Day v. Skinner et al. which he drew Mar. 22. He also writes and files order of court by which case is continued. Files. He writes and files demurrer in Smith v. Bowman Sewell, in which he and Parks are for plaintiff. Photo.

APRIL 1. Campbell et al. v. Blatchford and McCoy is tried by jury, which finds for plaintiffs in sum of $1,155.55. Lincoln and Lacey represent defendants. Lincoln files praecipe and declaration in Foster v. Cosby. Record; Files. He writes and files, for defendants, pleas in Goltra v. Ewing et al. and Davis & Co. v. Burt, acting with Parks. Photo. [On unspecified day this month Lincoln pays $5 by check to "Dr. P. Moran." Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Original.]

APRIL 2. Goltra v. Ewing et al. is continued. Thompson v. Crane, Lincoln and Lacey for plaintiff, is tried by jury, which awards their client $45.80 plus part of costs. Lincoln also sits as judge on 33 cases. Record; Photo. [Mrs. Lincoln buys another boy's hat. H. E. Pratt, 155.]

APRIL 4. Springfield and Bloomington. Lincoln makes $50 bank deposit. Marine Bank Ledger. With two Bloomington lawyers, he signs letter to Gov. Bissell recommending Charles J. Beattie of Livingston County as 20th Judicial Circuit prosecuting attorney. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, III, 374. Lincoln's account is charged 380 for "Flannel for Gun Cover," which Robert buys at John Williams' store. He purchases four dozen eggs at Smith's. H. E. Pratt 149, 155.

APRIL 6. Bloomington. Lincoln declines, on ground of other engagements, invitation from H. L. Pierce and others to attend meeting in Boston Apr. 28 in honor of birth of Thomas Jefferson. In his letter he argues that Republicans, rather than Democrats, are Jefferson's true disciples. Although in Bloomington, Lincoln datelines letter "Springfield," evidently so that Boston committee will not mislocate his residence. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, III, 374-76. In court he represents plaintiffs in Browning and Bushnell v. Price and Fell, assumpsit. Court tries case and awards plaintiffs $370.82 damages. Record. [Robert buys half-pound of tea at Smith's store. H. E. Pratt, 155.]

APRIL 8. In court Lincoln is occupied with case involving Bloomington Gas Light and Coke Co., which had been sold under mechanic's lien. Lincoln is one of counsel for purchaser, who is resisting motion to set aside sale. Bloomington Pantograph, Apr. 13. In evening Lincoln is scheduled to lecture on Inventions, but audience is so small engagement is cancelled. Ibid., Apr. 6, 9, 13; Illinois State Historical Library, Springfield, Illinois — Journal, XXVIII, 96-7; Wakefield, 101-02.

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[Robert buys six bars of lead and charges to his father's account at John Williams & Co. H. E. Pratt, 149.]

APRIL 9. [Robert buys sugar and candles at Smith's store. Ibid., 155.]

APRIL 10. Bloomington and Springfield. Lincoln reaches home in evening. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, III, 376.

APRIL 11. Springfield. Lincoln writes Koemer: "The meeting of the Central committee was at Bloomington, and not here. I was there attending court; and in common with several other outsiders, one of whom was Judge Trumbull was in conference with the committee, to some extent." He drafted resolution protesting "against any distinction between native and naturalized citizens, as to the right of suffrage," but was called from meeting room while matter was being discussed, forgot it, and does not know what committee did. He writes and signs, with two other executive committeemen of the 4th Ward Republicans, call for ward meeting Apr. 13 to nominate alderman candidate. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, III, 376-77.

APRIL 13. [Mrs. Lincoln buys and charges ribbon at Smith's store. H. E. Pratt, 155.]

APRIL 14. Bloomington. Court adjourns in afternoon and Lincoln, with bar, attends funeral of Mrs. Ward Hill Lamon. Bloomington Pantograph, Apr. 20. [Lincoln's account at Smith's store is charged 50˘ for tacks and peck of potatoes, H. E. Pratt, 155.]

APRIL 16. Springfield. In response to letter from T. J. Pickett, Rock Island editor, asking permission to propose his name as presidential candidate, Lincoln writes: "I must, in candor, say I do not think myself fit for the Presidency. I certainly am flattered, and gratified, that some partial friends think of me in that connection; but I really think it best for our cause that no concerted effort, such as you suggest, should be made." He writes Williams and Packard, Bloomington lawyers, about law case. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, III, 377-78. Mrs. Lincoln charges 16 yards silk at Smith's store. H. E. Pratt, 155-56.

APRIL 18. [Champaign Circuit Court convenes for spring term.]

APRIL 19. Urbana. Lincoln writes plaintiffs plea in Champaign County v. West Urbana that defendant be ruled to plead by Apr. 25. Record. [Mrs. Lincoln buys yard goods, buttons, thread, and comb at Smith's store. H. E. Pratt, 155-56.]

APRIL 20. Six cases in ejectment, in which Lincoln and firm of Coler, Sims, & Sheldon represent plaintiffs, are dismissed on motion of plaintiffs and at their costs. Record.

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APRIL 21. People v. Patterson, manslaughter, is tried by jury, which finds accused guilty. He is sentenced to three years. Lincoln and Swett act for defense. Ibid. [Robert brings home sugar and cinnamon from Smith's. H. E. Pratt, 156.]

APRIL 23. [Mrs. Lincoln buys tablecloth, two kinds of silk, and pins at Smith's. Ibid.]

APRIL 25. Lincoln collects fee for services in Patterson case in form of note for $60 from William and Golden Patterson (paid Feb. 1866 to Lincoln's estate). Lincoln Estate Inventory.

APRIL 26. [Mrs. Lincoln buys more sewing materials and $5 silk hat at Smith's. H. E. Pratt, 156.]

APRIL 27. Lincoln calls on editor of "Central Illinois Gazette" in West Urbana (Champaign), who notes visit: "We had the pleasure of introducing to the hospitalities of our sanctum a few days since the Hon. Abraham Lincoln. Few men can make an hour pass away more agreeably." Central Illinois Gazette, in Illinois State Journal, May 12; Henry E. Huntington Library, San Marino, California — William H. Herndon Papers, Henry E. Huntington Library, San Marino, California, J. W. Scroggs to Herndon, Oct. 3, 1866. In court Lincoln writes praecipe and answer of guardian ad litem in Mary Ann Hillman v. heirs of Oliver Hillman, petition for partition. Photo. [Mrs. Lincoln buys more sewing materials at Smith's. H. E. Pratt, 156.]

APRIL 28. Lincoln argues attachment case. Pepper v. Shouse et al., in Circuit Court. With Coler, he represents defendants, while Somers and O. L. Davis appear for plaintiff. Court decides for plaintiff. Record.

APRIL 29. Springfield. Lincoln returns from circuit, and deposits $100 in Marine & Fire Insurance Co. Marine Bank Ledger. In People v. Abraham Nash, alias Yankee Sullivan, change of venue from Logan County, Sangamon Circuit Court overrules motion of defendant's attorneys, made Apr. 27, that case be stricken from docket. Defense then moves indictment be quashed. Record.

APRIL 30. Lincoln wins People v. Nash alias Sullivan when motion to quash indictment is argued and allowed. Ibid. Lincoln writes to Salmon P. Chase of Ohio on 1858 campaign. "Of course I would have preferred success; but failing in that, I have no regrets for having rejected all advice to the contrary, and resolutely made the struggle." Had Republicans gone for Douglas, "the Republican cause would have been anihilated in Illinois, and, as I think, demoralized, and prostrated everywhere for years, if not forever." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, III, 378. Mrs. Lincoln sends Robert to Smith's store to exchange hats and to buy sugar, shoes, and crockery. H. E. Pratt 156.

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MAY 2. Lincoln credits another payment on A. & J. Haines notes, and deposits $50 in his bank account. Illinois State Historical Library, Springfield, Illinois — Lincoln Estate Inventory; Marine Bank Ledger.

MAY 3. Danville. In Vermilion Circuit Court, which convened May a Lincoln writes and files plea and notice in Erastus French v. Michael Courtney. He is for defendant. Files.

MAY 4. [Mrs. Lincoln buys and charges at Smith's three kinds of cloth ($14.05). H. E. Pratt, 156.]

MAY 6. [Mrs. Lincoln buys sugar, candles, table linen, and male neckwear at Smith's store. Ibid.]

MAY 7. Griffith v. J. E. Davis, in which Lincoln and Beckwith appear for defendant, is tried by court. Verdict is for plaintiff in sum of $1,051.94, amount of note on which suit was brought. Record. [Mrs. Lincoln buys silk at Smith's store. H. E. Pratt, 156.]

MAY 9. French v. Courtney is tried by court. Lincoln appears for defendant. Court awards plaintiff $424.66, amount of his note and interest. Record. Lincoln writes court order continuing Davenport v. Sconce and Don Carlos, which Judge Davis signs. Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Herndon-Weik Collection, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

MAY 11. Two of Lincoln's cases are continued. Record. [Mrs. Lincoln buys yard goods at Smith's, and sends Robert for 10 pounds of sugar. H. E. Pratt, 156.]

MAY 12. Springfield. [Kinkannon v. West, chancery action in which Lincoln and Lamon represent complainant, is continued. Record.] Lincoln arrives home from circuit, and buys yard goods and straw hat at Smith's store. Mrs. Lincoln sends Robert for 4 3/4 yards more. H. E. Pratt, 156-57.

MAY 13. Lincoln buys soap, bay rum, camphor, magnesia, and handkerchief perfume at his drug store. Ibid.

MAY 14. Lincoln urges Mark W. Delahay not to permit Kansas Republicans to lower party standard. "In my judgement such a step would be a serious mistake — would open a gap through which more would pass out than pass in. And this would be the same, whether the letting down should be in deference to Douglasism, or to the southern opposition element." He cannot attend Kansas convention. Lincoln sends same letter to two other Kansas Republicans, and writes briefly to Peter H. Watson of Cincinnati about patent case. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, III, 378-80.

MAY 16. Lincoln writes $38.80 check to H. C. Myers, commission merchant. Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Original.

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MAY 17. In response to query from Dr. Theodore Canisius for his views on recent Massachusetts law raising qualifications for suffrage — aimed at naturalized citizens — Lincoln writes: "As I understand the Massachusetts provision, I am against it's adoption in Illinois, or in any other place, where I have a right to oppose it." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, III, 380.

MAY 18. Robert buys water bucket at Smith's. H. E. Pratt, 157.

MAY 19. Mrs. Lincoln buys $2 silk "mitts" at Smith's. Ibid. May 20. Robert buys candles at Smith's. Ibid.

MAY 21. Lincoln files praecipe in McCallum et al. v. Illinois River Railroad Co. in U.S. Circuit Court. Files. He deposits $24.75 at bank. Marine Bank Ledger. He spends $2 on buggy repairs (setting axle and repairing doors), and charges $1.50 for bottle of tonic ("Allen's Restorative") at his drug store, and buys ink, hair dressing, and perfume. Obed Lewis Account Books; H. E. Pratt, 152. Mrs. Lincoln buys two silk collars at Smith's. Ibid., 157.

MAY 22. Lincoln draws up praecipe in Gaylord et al. v. Lansing et al. for U.S. Circuit Court. At bottom of sheet he writes: "Mr. Herndon, please file this in the morning." Herndon does so. Files.

MAY 23. Robert buys tea at Smith's. H. E. Pratt, 157.

MAY 25. Lincoln and 60 others sign call for Old Settler's convention in Springfield June 1. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, III, 381.

MAY 26. Lincoln & Herndon present Nicholas H. Ridgely with fee bill for $450 — "to services in the Gas Light Works and in defending the same at Law vs. Gibson." "We may want to draw on you to get the money in a day or two." Photo. Robert buys 10 pounds of sugar at Smith's, H. E. Pratt, 157.

MAY 27. To Samuel W. Fuller of Tazewell County Lincoln writes: "In thinking over the Farni case it seems to me the push by the plaintiffs will be to prove that the bond sued on was, in fact, accepted; and that the injunction was dissolved, not for want of a sufficient bond, but for want of Equity in the Bill. That, I think, is the point for us to guard." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, III, 381.

MAY 28. In response to inquiry from governor, auditor, and treasurer of Illinois, Lincoln and Logan write legal opinion as to official duty under recent act "in relation to the payment of the principal and interest of the State debt." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, III, 381-83. He files declaration in Gaylord et al. v. Lansing et al. in U.S. Circuit Court. Files.

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MAY 30. Lincoln becomes owner of German newspaper and draws contract with Theodore Canisius for its management. Recognizing that "Illinois Staats-Anzeiger" of Springfield is Lincoln's property, contract grants Canisius free use of paper for publication purposes on condition that paper supports Republican party. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, III, 383.

JUNE 2. Lincoln writes to John S. Wolfe of Carlinville that he may use his name as reference "if J. M. Palmer says so." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, III, 384.

JUNE 3. Chicago. [On May 30 Jonathan Haines of Pekin wrote Lincoln letter not received until June 9. Ibid. Lincoln would have received it by June 3 had he been in Springfield, where someone charges to Lincoln's account at Diller's Drug Store $2 for "bot. brandy." Day Book, Diller's Drug Store.] Robert buys 11 pounds of sugar and silk cravat at Smith's. H. E. Pratt, 157.

JUNE 6. Willie Lincoln writes Springfield friend, Henry Remann, that he and his father are in Chicago. "This town is a very beautiful place," he says. "Me and father have a nice little room to ourselves . . . . The weather is very fine here." Photo.

JUNE 7. [That Lincoln's visit to Chicago was unexpected is indicated by affidavit he files June 14 in Clark v. Jones. This case is called June 7 and Judgment awarded plaintiff by default. In his affidavit of 14th Lincoln States that he was defendant's attorney and was unexpectedly absent from Springfield June 6, 7, and 8. Files. Lincoln's drug store account is charged for almond extract, and Robert buys six pounds of sugar at Smith's general store. H. E. Pratt, 152, 157.]

JUNE 9. Springfield. Lincoln answers letter from Jonathan Haines: "I do believe it would be better all round to let me surrender both your cases to some lawyer at Chicago. I really can not give them proper attention." To Salmon P. Chase Lincoln protests action of Ohio Republican convention in calling for repeal of fugitive slave law. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, III, 384-85. In evening the Lincolns entertain. Browning Diary. Mrs. Lincoln buys 16 yards of "Grenadine" ($32) and ice cream salt at Smith's store. H. E. Pratt, 157.

JUNE 10. Lincoln & Herndon have three cases in U.S. Circuit Court. In Clark v. Jones, in which their client defaulted when case was called June 7, they enter motion to set aside judgment. In Ryland et al. v. Linder and Tremble, in which, as defendant's attorneys, they were ruled to plead by this day, rule is extended to June 13. In Butler et al. v. Bell et al. Lincoln files plea of actio non. Record; Files. Robert buys six dozen eggs at Smith's. H. E. Pratt, 157.

JUNE 11. In U.S. Circuit Court Lincoln is busy with Cochran and Hall v. Camp, in which he represents defendant. He takes deposition of Irwin

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Camp, defendant, and opens and examines deposition of plaintiff's witnesses. Then he moves for continuance, and files affidavit in support of motion. Files. He deposits $225 in his bank account. Marine Bank Ledger. Mrs. Lincoln buys cloth and boys' socks at Smith's. H. E. Pratt. 157.

JUNE 13. In Ryland et at. v. Linder and Tremble, Lincoln files plea of general issue. He files praecipe in Howland v. Peoria & Hannibal Railroad Co. Files. He buys $2 bottle of brandy at his drug store. Day Book, Diller's Drug Store. Mrs. Lincoln returns pair of socks to Smith's, and buys more cloth. H. E. Pratt, 157.

JUNE 14. Lincoln files documents in U.S. Circuit Court: declaration in Howland v. Peoria & Hannibal Railroad; and, in Clark v. Jones, his own affidavit and that of defendant. Files. He takes tea at home of Jesse K. Dubois along with Browning, Williams, Grimshaw, and others. Browning, Diary.

JUNE 15. Lincoln informs Henry A. Clark that cases of Gochran and Hall v. Camp, and against Morrison, have been continued. "I have never had any definite arrangement with any one about a fee in these cases; and the consequence is I am bothered with them every court, without understanding any thing about them." He sends draft in payment for Chicago "Press & Tribune" for another year. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, III, 385.

JUNE 16. In U.S. Circuit Court Lincoln files plaintiff's declaration in Pearl v. McKnight et al. — suit brought to collect on two promissory notes for $250 each. Files.

JUNE 17. Lincoln files declaration in Lee and Murphy v. Adams, suit to collect overdue bill for merchandise. In two other cases, Rice v. Wing, and Whiting v. Mudge, Lincoln, Logan, and Gillespie enter motion for rule on plaintiffs to join in demurrer by June 21. Files; Record. Robert buys 11 pounds of sugar at Smith's. H. E. Pratt, 157.

JUNE 18. Lincoln finally reopens Clark v. Jones. Court orders that defendant, whom Lincoln represents, be permitted to plead, that judgment shall stand, although no execution is to issue until further order. Lincoln files plea and notice. Record; Files. He spends $4.25 on carriage, repairs. Obed Lewis Account Books.

JUNE 20. In U.S. Circuit Court Beaver v. Taylor and Gilbert is submitted without argument and taken under advisement. Lincoln appears for defendant. Illinois State Journal, June 21. In response to request from Salmon P. Chase, Lincoln gives his opinion on legality of fugitive slave law, and argues against introduction, in Republican national convention, of plank calling for repeal. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, III, 386. Lincoln & Herndon collect $20 for services to David Westfall estate. Probate File.

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JUNE 21. Disgusted with demands of plaintiffs in Ambos et al. v. Barrett, Lincoln writes Charles Ambos; "I would now very gladly surrender the charge of the case to anyone you would designate, without charging anything for the much trouble I have already had." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, III, 386-87. He argues demurrers in Rice v. Wing (see Jan. 3, 1860) and Whiting v. Mudge, continued from June 17. Record. Robert buys paper of pepper at Smith's. H. E. Pratt, 157.

JUNE 22. Court overrules defendants' demurrers in two cases argued yesterday. Lincoln appeared for defendants. Record.

JUNE 23. In Ryland et al v. Linder and Tremble, continued from June 13, court finds for plaintiffs in sum of $919.72. Ibid. To Nathan Sargent Lincoln argues against lowering party standard. Any recession from opposition to spread of slavery will be fatal to party, for it will cost North and gain nothing South. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, III, 387-88.

JUNE 24. Lincoln files praecipe and bond for costs in Allen and McGrady v. Illinois River Railroad Co. in U.S. Circuit Court. Files. He writes Dave Walker of Ottawa that prior engagement prevents him attending July 14 rally. "I am compelled to economise time this year." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, III, 388.

JUNE 25. Lincoln has his carriage painted, new silk curtains and glass hooks attached, and top oiled, for $19.50. Obed Lewis Account Books.

JUNE 27. Lincoln charges "Tripoli" (15˘) to his drug store account, and Robert charges 11 pounds of sugar to Lincoln's account at Smith's. H. E. Pratt, 152, 157.

JUNE 28. Lincoln has two cases in U.S. Circuit Court. Gaylord et al. v. Lansing et al., in which he represents plaintiffs, is settled by agreement, plaintiffs consenting that judgment for $1,080.31 be entered against them, and defendants agreeing that execution be stayed six months. In Howland v. Peoria and Hannibal Railroad Co., Lincoln argues defendant's demurrer. Record.

JUNE 29. Court overrules demurrer in Peoria and Hannibal Railroad case. Lincoln, plaintiff's attorney, dismisses Davis & Co. v. Mace at his client's costs. Ibid. Mrs. Lincoln buys 30 1/2 yards "Lawn" at Smith's. H. E. Pratt, 157.

JUNE 30. Lincoln moves that Emmett v. Barrett, before court often during 1858, be dismissed at costs of plaintiff, his client. Record. Mrs. Lincoln buys handkerchiefs, edging, and needles at Smith's, H. E. Pratt, 157.

JULY 1. In Pearl v. Knight et al. filed June 16, and Lee and Murphy v. Adams, filed June 17, Lincoln gets judgments for $538.89 and $3,461.32

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respectively. Whiting v. Mudge, argued June 21, is submitted to court, and after testimony and argument, is taken under advisement. In Allen and McGrady v. . Illinois River Railroad Lincoln files declaration alleging debt and damages of $800,000. Record, Files.

JULY 2. Peoria and Hannibal Railroad case comes up again. It is continued, but on Lincoln's motion defendant is ruled to plead in 20 days, or plaintiff is to have judgment by default. Record.

JULY 3. Lincoln asks editor of "Central Transcript," Clinton, to put him on subscription list, promising to pay at fall court. He then criticizes article in recent issue against Republicans of northern Illinois, whom Lincoln defends. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, III, 389-90.

JULY 4. Atlanta. Lincoln attends Fourth of July rally. "An immense multitude of people assembled early, and were marshalled in procession to the grove. . . . The Declaration was read by Dr. W. S. Kirk and the oration delivered by Hon. J. H. Matheny. Hon. A. Lincoln was present and made a few remarks in reply to Mr. Sylvester Strong, who then and there presented him with a walking cane." Illinois State Journal, July 9.

JULY 5. Springfield. Lincoln is back at work in U.S. Circuit Court. Butler et al. v. Bell et al., in which he represents defendants, is tried before jury, which finds for plaintiffs with $3,155.19 damages. Record.

JULY 6. Lincoln writes Schuyler Colfax of Indiana regretting missing him at Jacksonville July 4. He urges him to guard against tendency of local Republicans to advocate measures locally popular that will do harm elsewhere. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, III, 390-91. In U.S. Court Lincoln files pica and notice in Edgerton et al. v. Stapleford. Files.

JULY 7. In two more cases in U.S. Court, Bischop et al. v. Day, and Bischop et al. v. Harrison, Lincoln has defendants ruled to plead by July 8. Record. Mrs. Lincoln buys two boys' hats, pair of boys' gaiters, handkerchiefs, and thread at Smith's. H. E. Pratt, 157.

JULY 8. In both suits called preceding day defendants default, and Lincoln gets judgments for his clients, with damages of $542 and $255.94 respectively. Record. He writes $3.70 check to E. R. Wiley, clothier, and $2.87 to "Joseph Vere." Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Originals.

JULY 9. In U.S. Circuit Court two of Lincoln's cases terminate. McCallum v. Illinois River Railroad is dismissed at plaintiff's costs. Edgerton et al. v. Stapleford is tried by court, and Judgment for $1,989.34 entered against defendant, Lincoln's client. Record. Robert buys n pounds of sugar at Smith's. H. E. Pratt, 157.

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JULY 11. Lincoln, Logan, and Hatch, "as friends of yours and of the people," urge James Miller, treasurer, to pay nothing "under any possible circumstances" on new McAllister and Stebbins bonds. Lincoln sends copy of his German paper, "Illinois Staats-Anzeiger," to Frederick C. W. Koehnle of Lincoln and John Capps of Mount Pulaski. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, III, 391-92. Court decides Whiting v. Mudge, tried July I, in favor of plaintiff, and assesses damages of $517.41. Lincoln represents defendant. Record.

JULY 12. Mrs. Lincoln buys box, 66 pounds of soap, wash bowl, and five kinds of cloth, hiring dray to deliver order. H. E. Pratt, 158.

JULY 13. Lincoln files joinder to defendant's plea in Howland v. Peoria and Hannibal Railroad in U.S. Circuit Court. Files. Lincoln buys 75˘ pair of suspenders at Smith's store. H. E. Pratt, 158.

JULY 14. Springfield and en route. J. K. Dubois, O. M. Hatch, John Moore, S. T. Logan, William Butler, and Lincoln start on trip over Illinois Central Railroad. Their business is assessment of road's property in connection with case filed in Supreme Court Feb. 1. Illinois State Journal, July 15.

JULY 18. [Robert buys vinegar at Smith's store. H. E. Pratt, 158.]

JULY 20. Chicago. Chicago Tribune notes that Lincoln, Logan, Dubois, and their families, and others of Illinois Central party, are at Tremont House. [Robert buys 20˘ comb at Smith's before departure. H. E. Pratt 158.]

JULY 22. Springfield. Lincoln reaches home in evening after absence of nine days. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, III, 393.

JULY 23. Lincoln writes D. T. Jewett of St. Louis about case in U.S. District Court: "I find Judge Treat has decided in your favor, rendering judgment for $517.00 & costs. You will have to advance the cost before execution will issue. So says the clerk." Ibid. Robert buys 11 pounds of sugar at Smith's. H. E. Pratt, 158.

JULY 25. Robert buys 22 pounds of sugar at Smith's. Ibid.

JULY 27. To Samuel Galloway, Republican lawyer of Columbus, Ohio, Lincoln writes about Ambos et al. v. Barrett which he is handling in U.S. Circuit Court. "My chief annoyance with the case now is that the parties at Columbus [plaintiffs] seem to think it is by my neglect that they do not get their money." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, III, 393-94.

JULY 28. Lincoln writes Galloway again, on politics, having received from him "very complimentary, not to say flattering" letter favoring Lincoln as Republican nominee for President. He warns against tendency of some

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Republicans to swing toward popular sovereignty. "I must say I do not think myself fit for the Presidency." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, III, 394-95. He deposits $250 in Marine & Fire Insurance Co. Marine Bank Ledger.

JULY 29. Lincoln writes to Thomas H. Gory on how to become Republican nominee for Congress. He declines Nathan B. Dodson's invitation to deliver "agricultural address" at Morris, Ill. "This year I must devote to my private business." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, III, 395-96. He writes check for $88.70 to I. B. Curran, jeweller, who recently advertised "New and Elegant Stock of Watches." Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Original. Robert buys six chickens at Smith's for 15˘ each. H. E. Pratt, 158.

JULY 30. Mrs. Lincoln buys five yards cotton flannel at Smith's. Ibid.

AUGUST 1. Lincoln attends preliminary examination in case which has aroused wide interest, People v. Harrison. Harrison is accused of murder of Greek Crafton, Sangamon County ne'er-do-well. White, McClernand, and Broadwell appear for prosecution; Lincoln, Herndon, Logan, and Hay are for defense. Because of absence of two important witnesses, examination is adjourned. Illinois State Journal, Aug. 2.

AUGUST 2. Lincoln is busy all day with Harrison case. Examination lasts until six o'clock. Court is crowded with spectators. Ibid., Aug. 3. Robert buys blacking brush at Smith's. H. E. Pratt, 158.

AUGUST 3. Attorneys occupy day in summing up evidence in Harrison case. Broadwell makes opening statement for prosecution; Logan and Lincoln follow for defense, and McClernand closes for state. Harrison is bound over for trial, bail set at $10,000. Illinois State Journal, Aug. 4.

AUGUST 4. Robert buys two dozen nutmegs at Smith's. H. E. Pratt, 158.

AUGUST 5. Lincoln writes $92.66 check to "Ruckel & Johns," dealers in wallpaper, paint, and glass. Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Original. Mrs. Lincoln buys dozen buttons at Smith's. H. E. Pratt, 158.

AUGUST 6. Lincoln pays $24 by check to George W. Ghatterton, jeweller. Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Original. He buys and charges ($1.50) toilet powder and soap on his drug store account. Mrs. Lincoln buys shoes, buttons, comb, and brush at Smith's. H. E. Pratt, 152, 158.

AUGUST 8. Mrs. Lincoln buys goods and thread at Smith's. Ibid.

AUGUST 9. Springfield and en route. Lincoln and O. M. Hatch leave on business and pleasure trip to Iowa. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, III, 397. Lincoln's business is examination of land in Council Bluffs owned by Norman B. Judd, who apparently proposed to convey this land to Lincoln as security for debt, and

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Lincoln wanted to see property before consenting. [Mrs. Lincoln buys $3.75 hoop skirt at Smith's. H. E. Pratt, 158.]

AUGUST 10. En route and St. Joseph, Mo. [If Lincoln and Hatch go to Council Bluffs by route of return, they travel to Quincy by rail, cross river there and proceed by rail to St. Joseph. Probably they stay night at St. Joseph.]

AUGUST 11. St. Joseph and en route. Lincoln and Hatch take steamer Campbell for Council Bluffs.

AUGUST 12. Council Bluffs, Iowa. Lincoln and Hatch reach Council Bluffs and stop at Pacific House. They go sightseeing with N. S. Bates and W. H. M. Pusey, formerly of Springfield. At Cemetery Hill north of town they view countryside north, south, and west. Lincoln, learning that Grenville M. Dodge, railway construction engineer, is registered at Pacific House, chats with him for two hours on hotel porch about western railroads. Lincoln accepts invitation to speak on "the great political issues of the day" following evening. Chicago Tribune, Aug. 20; Annals of Iowa, IV, 460-62; speech of Grenville M. Dodge in Hist. of the Union Pacific Railroad (pamphlet, 1919), 22.

AUGUST 13. Lincoln addresses large audience at Concert Hall. Council Bluffs "Nonpareil" comments: "The clear and lucid manner, in which he set forth the true principles of the Republican party — the dexterity with which he applied the political scalpel to the Democratic carcass — beggars all description at our hands." Following Lincoln, Judge Test of Council Bluffs, formerly of Indiana, speaks, followed by reception at home of W. H. M. Pusey, which virtually everyone in town attends. Council Bluffs Nonpareil, Aug. 20; The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, III, 396-97; Annals of Iowa, IV, 260-62. [Lincoln's drug store account is charged for soap and "Hair Balsom," and Mrs. Lincoln buys six handkerchiefs at Smith's. H. E. Pratt, 152, 158.]

AUGUST 14. Lincoln attends First Presbyterian Church services in Concert Hall. He dines at home of Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Officer, former Springfield residents. Council Bluffs Nonpareil, Aug. 14, 1921.

AUGUST 15. Council Bluffs and en route. [Lincoln and Hatch must have left for St. Joseph in late afternoon or evening. Their stay is longer than planned, as steamboat runs aground up river.]

AUGUST 16. St. Joseph. Lincoln and Hatch arrive on steamer Campbell and stop at "Planters." Citizens call to pay their respects. In evening Lincoln visits office of St. Joseph "Journal." "In personal appearance," writes editor, "he looks like any other ‘six-foot’ Kentuckian, and is very

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affable in manners." Journal, Aug. 19. [Mrs. Lincoln buys yard goods and 11 pounds of sugar at Smith's. H. E. Pratt, 158.]

AUGUST 17. St. Joseph and en route. Lincoln and Hatch start on their return trip, leaving St. Joseph by rail.

AUGUST 18. Springfield. Reaching home, Lincoln finds letters. One invites him to speak before Wisconsin Agricultural Society Sept. 30 at Milwaukee. He writes D. J. Powers he dislikes to decline, but can scarcely spare time from his practice. "I will write you definitely on the Ist. day of September, if you can safely delay so long." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, III, 397. Lincoln's account at John Williams & Co. is charged $2.50 for two pairs of "Heavy Drawers," and Mrs. Lincoln buys table cloth, napkins, and handkerchiefs at Smith's. H. E. Pratt, 140, 158.

AUGUST 19. Lincoln writes Daniel Rohrer of St. Paul that he must regretfully decline invitation to take stump in Minnesota, for he must spend fall in courts. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, III, 397. He tells his friend D. A. Cheever that he cannot recommend editor for Tremont Republican paper, and suggests he inquire at Bloomington and Chicago. University of Illinois Library, Urbana, Illinois. — Original.

AUGUST 20. Another pair of heavy drawers is charged to Lincoln's account at John Williams & Co. Mrs. Lincoln exchanges napkins at Smith's, and buys pair of gloves. H. E. Pratt, 149, 159.

AUGUST 22. Robert buys pocket knife and yard goods at Smith's. Ibid., 159.

AUGUST 23. Lincoln's account at Williams & Co. is charged $2.10 for six "French Towels." Ibid., 149.

AUGUST 24. Lincoln, Dubois, and Browning discuss rumor that Miller, treasurer, contemplates resigning. He has promised not to, but Dubois and Lincoln have little faith in that, and suspect governor already has his resignation. Browning, Diary.

AUGUST 27. Lincoln writes answer of Caleb K. Lucas in Reed et al. v. Lucas et al., Logan County case, signs "Lincoln & Herndon, for Respondent," and dispatches it to Lincoln. Photo.

AUGUST 31. Trial of P. Q. Harrison for murder commences in Sangamon Circuit Court. Counsel has changed since preliminary examination. White, Palmer, Broadwell, and Cogdale appear for prosecution; Lincoln, Hemdon, Logan, and Cullom are for defense. Afternoon is spent examining prospective jurors. Illinois State Journal, Sept. 1. Mrs. Lincoln buys buttons at Smith's store. H. E. Pratt, 159.

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SEPTEMBER 1. Lincoln is busy all day with Harrison case, taking active part in examination and cross-examination of witnesses. Illinois State Journal, Sept. 2. He takes promissory note of N. B. Judd for $3,000 bearing interest at 10 per cent. Illinois State Historical Library, Springfield, Illinois — Lincoln Estate Inventory.

SEPTEMBER 2. Lincoln is still busy with Harrison case. He and Logan argue technical points of evidence, and their contentions are sustained by court. Peter Cartwright, famous circuit-riding preacher and grandfather of defendant, gives spectacular testimony for defense. Court sits in evening as Logan and Cullom sum up for Harrison. Illinois State Journal, Sept. 3.

SEPTEMBER 3. Harrison trial is concluded. Lincoln makes concluding defense argument, "examining the evidence with great skill and clearness, discussing the law and replying to the positions assumed by the prosecution with a subtle and resistless logic, and frequent illustrations of singular fitness." Jury brings in verdict of not guilty. Ibid., Sept.5. Lincoln draws up agreement of lot owners in Hutchinson's Cemetery appointing John Hutchinson superintendent, and signs with 18 others. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, III, 399. He writes $7.67 check to "W. P. McKinnie," farmer. Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Original.

SEPTEMBER 6. Lincoln acknowledges Peter Zinn's invitation to speak in Cincinnati. "I shall try to speak at Columbus and Cincinnati; but can not do more." He writes Hawkins Taylor of Iowa that he will not attend Sept. term of U.S. Court in Keokuk. He is constantly compelled to decline invitations, but is "really tempted" to speak in Ohio. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, III, 399-400. At Diller's Drug Store Lincoln buys bottle of "Dead Shot," popular bedbug remedy, bottle of perfume, pint of spirits of camphor, and ounce of glycerine. Day Book, Diller's Drug Store. He writes $5 check to "W. Gerthousen." Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Original. Mrs. Lincoln buys boys' cap, yard goods, buttons, and silk thread at Smith's. H. E. Pratt, 159.

SEPTEMBER 7. Lincoln deposits $50 in his bank account, and writes $1.75 check to D. J. Boynton, furnace and stove dealer. Marine Bank Ledger; Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Original. Mrs. Lincoln buys "1 Tidie," and returns it next day. H. E. Pratt, 159.

SEPTEMBER 9. Mrs. Lincoln buys six pounds sugar, five pounds coffee, candles, and nutmegs at Smith's. Ibid.

SEPTEMBER 10. Lincoln buys box of "Wright's Pills" (cathartic) from his druggist. Day Book, Diller's Drug Store.

SEPTEMBER 12. Lincoln credits $50 payment on promissory note of A. and J. Haines, and deposits money in his account. Illinois State Historical Library, Springfield, Illinois — Lincoln Estate Inventory; Marine Bank Ledger.

SEPTEMBER 14. Mrs. Lincoln buys new "stock" for husband at Smith's, and boys' cap and two pairs boys' socks. H. E. Pratt, 159.

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SEPTEMBER 16. Columbus, Ohio. Lincoln speaks twice, delivering his principal address at 2 P.M. on east terrace of state house, and speaking more briefly before Young Men's Republican Club that evening at City Hall. He visits Franklin County Fair. Mrs. Lincoln and one of their boys accompany him. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, III, 400-25; Ohio State Journal, Sept. 17; Daniel J. Ryan, "Lincoln and Ohio," Ohio Arch. & Hist. Quar., XXXII, No. 1.

SEPTEMBER 17. Dayton, Hamilton, Cincinnati. Between trains Lincoln speaks nearly two hours in Dayton. He stops also at Hamilton and makes short speech to crowd awaiting him. Arriving in Cincinnati, he and Mrs. Lincoln are escorted to Burnet House. At 8 P.M. he speaks in Market House Square. Ryan, 63ff; The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, HI, 436-62.

SEPTEMBER 18. Cincinnati. The Lincolns spend day with Mrs. Lincoln's cousin, Mrs. William M. Dickson, and her family, with whom Lincoln stayed during "Reaper" trial in 1855. At night they return to Burnet House. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, III, 490-91; IV, 72-3.

SEPTEMBER 19. Indianapolis. The Lincolns leave Cincinnati at 10:30 and arrive at Indianapolis in afternoon. They take rooms at American House. Lincoln addresses evening meeting at Masonic Hall. Indianapolis Journal, Sept. 20; Indianapolis Atlas, Sept. 20; The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, III, 463-70.

SEPTEMBER 20. Springfield. Lincoln and family arrive in evening. Illinois State Journal, Sept. 22.

SEPTEMBER 21. To Salmon P. Chase, whom he had not seen in Ohio, Lincoln writes: "It is useless for me to say to you (and yet I cannot refrain from saying it) that you must not let your approaching election in Ohio so result as to give encouragement to Douglasism. That ism is all which now stands in the way of an early and complete success of Republicanism; and nothing would help it or hurt us so much as for Ohio to go over or falter just now." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, III, 470-71.

SEPTEMBER 22. Lincoln. Lincoln writes instructions to jury in Fairchild v. Capps and Fairchild. Photo. [Mrs. Lincoln buys two pairs boys' boots at Smith's store. H. E. Pratt, 159.]

SEPTEMBER 24. For plaintiff in Day v. Skinner, Lincoln files bond. Record.

SEPTEMBER 26. Springfield. Lincoln deposits $50. Marine Bank Ledger. He receives, evidently by mail, $27.70 as fee from estate of Samuel G. Hunt, DeWitt County. Probate Record.

SEPTEMBER 27. Lincoln. Lincoln writes and files bond of Joshua Day and James Wiley in case of Day v. Skinner. Photo. [Mrs. Lincoln buys yard of linen at Smith's. H. E. Pratt, 159.]

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SEPTEMBER 28. Lincoln and Chicago. Lincoln starts for Milwaukee, where he is to deliver annual oration at Wisconsin State Fair. In Chicago he registers at Tremont House. Illinois State Journal, Sept. 28; Chicago Journal, Sept. 29.

SEPTEMBER 29. Chicago and Milwaukee. Lincoln is in Chicago in morning, but during day leaves for Milwaukee. Ibid., Sept. 30. [Mrs. Lincoln buys $3 parasol at Smith's. H. E. Pratt, 159.]

SEPTEMBER 30. Lincoln is introduced to his audience by president of Wisconsin Agricultural Society. He delivers address which newspapers call "dignified and impressive." Illinois State Journal, Oct. 5. In evening he speaks extemporaneously at Newhall House. Alexander M. Thompson, Political History of Wisconsin, 150; The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, III, 471-82.

OCTOBER 1. Beloit and Janesville. Lincoln arrives at Beloit at noon, and speaks at Hanchett's Hall. In evening he makes speech in Janesville. Beloit Journal, Oct. 5; Janesville Gazette, Oct. 4; The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, III, 482-86; Wisconsin Hist. Coll., XIV, 134. [Mrs. Lincoln buys 5 pounds sugar and five pounds coffee at Smith's. H. E. Pratt, 159.]

OCTOBER 2. Janesville. Lincoln remains at home of Mr. and Mrs. W. H. Tallman, where he spent night, and accompanies his host and hostess to Congregational Church. Wisconsin Magazine, Jan.-Feb., 1924.

OCTOBER 3. Chicago. Lincoln arrives in morning and registers at Tremont House. Chicago Journal, Oct. 3. [Mrs. Lincoln buys dress trimming at Smith's. H. E. Pratt, 159.]

OCTOBER 5. Clinton. "The old familiar face of A. Lincoln is again amongst us," writes Clinton reporter, "and we cannot help noticing the peculiarly friendly expression with which he greets everybody, and everybody greets him. He comes back to us after electrifying Ohio, with all his blushing honors thick upon him; yet the poorest and plainest amongst our people, fears not to approach, and never fails to receive a hearty welcome from him." Central Transcript, Oct. 6. [Mrs. Lincoln buys kid gauntlets, boys' cap, and buttons at Smith's. H. E. Pratt, 159.]

OCTOBER 6. Lincoln has assumpsit case in DeWitt Circuit Court. With Swett, he appears for defendants in Campbell v. Little and Wall; Weldon and Moore represent plaintiff. Jury is chosen and sworn. Record. [Mrs. Lincoln buys cake ingredients and tacks at Smith's. H. E. Pratt, 159.]

OCTOBER 7. In Campbell v. Little and Wall evidence is presented and arguments made, and jury retires. Record. [Mrs. Lincoln buys broom, buttons, and tape at Smith's. H. E. Pratt, 160.]

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OCTOBER 8. Jury finds for defendants in amount of $1 and costs. Record. Lincoln's account at Smith's is charged $40 for 10 cords of wood. H. E. Pratt, 160.

OCTOBER 10. Springfield and Clinton. Before his departure on circuit after spending yesterday at home, Lincoln deposits $100 in his bank account, and buys two ten-cent knives at store of his brother-in-law C. M. Smith. He also reads letter handed him by William S. Wallace inquiring about his tariff views and suggesting he write letter on subject. He writes formal letter to his friend Dubois, auditor, on behalf of Illinois Central, appealing from auditor's official $13,000,000 valuation of railroad's property for taxes. Marine Bank Ledger; C. M. Smith Account Book; The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, III, 486-87.

OCTOBER 11. Clinton. "I am here, just now, attending court," Lincoln begins his reply to letter he read in Smith's store yesterday. "If we could have a moderate, carefully adjusted, protective tariff, so far acquiesced in, as to not be a perpetual subject of political strife, squabbles, charges, and uncertainties, it would be better for us." He does not intend this as public statement. Ibid.

OCTOBER 12. Lincoln sits as judge on nine assumpsit cases in DeWitt Circuit Court. Judge's Docket; Illinois State Historical Library, Springfield, Illinois — Journal, XLVIII, 38-9.

OCTOBER 13. [Robert buys five pounds coffee and box of salt at Smith's. H. E. Pratt, 160.]

OCTOBER 14. Lincoln writes bill of exceptions in Coombs v. Blount and Stubblefield, which Judge Davis signs, again sits as judge, hearing 16 cases, and in evening Republicans meet to celebrate victory in Pennsylvania, Ohio, Indiana, and Minnesota elections. Lincoln, Swett, and Weldon make "eloquent and stirring speeches." Judge's Docket; Photo.; Illinois State Journal, Oct. 25; The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, III, 487-89.

OCTOBER 15. Clinton and Springfield. Springfield Republicans are jubilant at election returns. "Mr. Lincoln, the ‘giant killer,’ returned from DeWitt county court on the Saturday evening train, and when it became known he was in the city several hundred Republicans, headed by a band of music, formed in procession and proceeded to his residence." Lincoln goes with them to Capitol and speaks. Illinois State Journal, Oct. 17; The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, III, 489.

OCTOBER 17. Springfield. Lincoln writes Mark W. Delahay, declining to interfere on his behalf in senatorial contest in Kansas. However, he encloses letter of good wishes which he gives Delahay permission to show. He also writes William M. Dickson regarding Ohio election. "Now, let our friends bear, and forbear, and not quarrel over the spoils." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, III, 489-91. [Herndon writes $500 check on Lincoln & Herndon account in Marine & Fire Insurance Co. Marine Bank Ledger.]

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OCTOBER 18. Urbana. Lincoln has case in Champaign Circuit Court, Harvey v. Campbell. "This day comes the plaintiff," record reads, "by Lincoln & Whitney, his attorneys, and on their motion the defendant is ruled to plead to plaintiff's declaration by Monday. And this cause stands continued." Record.

OCTOBER 19. [Mrs. Lincoln buys 10 pounds sugar, five pounds coffee, and other groceries at Smith's. H. E. Pratt, 160.]

OCTOBER 20. Springfield. Lincoln returns to attend wedding of C. C. Brown, young lawyer whose examination for bar he and Herndon conducted, and Bettie Stuart, daughter of his first partner. Autobiography of C. C. Brown, Ms. owned by Stuart Brown heirs, Springfield, Ill.

OCTOBER 21. Robert buys box of cinnamon at Smith's. H. E. Pratt, 160.

OCTOBER 24. Mrs. Lincoln buys and charges pair of gloves for Robert, at Williams & Co., and clothing and goods at Smith's. H. E. Pratt, 149, 160.

OCTOBER 25. Urbana. Harvey v. Campbell is again continued in Champaign Circuit Court. Record.

OCTOBER 26. In Pepper v. Shouse et al. court gives plaintiff leave to withdraw bill of exchange and then to have case redocketed. Somers represents plaintiff; Lincoln, Coler, Sims, and Sheldon are for defendant. Ibid. Lincoln writes agreement in Correll et al. v. McDaniel et al., signing "Conkling & Lincoln & Herndon for adult defendants." Photo.

OCTOBER 27. Springfield. Palmer and McClernand, candidates for Congress, hold joint debate at courthouse. Afterward, at Republican headquarters, there are more speeches, one from Palmer. "As he sat down the crowd discovered Mr. Lincoln in the back part of the hall. . . . In answer to their call, he went forward and addressed them in his well known eloquent and impressive manner." Illinois State Journal, Oct. 28.

OCTOBER 29. Mrs. Lincoln buys and charges silk and silk thread. H. E. Pratt, 149.

NOVEMBER 1. Writing to W. E. Frazer, Lincoln declines to commit himself to Cameron of Pennsylvania for Presidency. He hints at his own candidacy: "For my single self, I have enlisted for the permanent success of the Republican cause; and, for this object, I shall labor faithfully in the ranks, unless, as I think not probable, the judgment of the party shall assign me a different position." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, III, 491.

NOVEMBER 2. Working hard for Palmer, Lincoln writes supporter in neighboring town urging him to do all he can to get Republicans out on

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election day. He also writes to William Dungy on legal matters. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, III, 493. Mrs. Lincoln buys more silk. H. E. Pratt, 149.

NOVEMBER 3. Lincoln appeals to Jesse Pickrell, asking him and his sons to get out as good vote for Palmer as possible. To P. Q. Harrison, defendant in Harrison murder case, he writes encouragement. "A young man, before the enemy has learned to watch him, can do more than any other. Pitch in and try. Palmer is good and true, and deserves the best vote we can give him." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, III, 492-93.

NOVEMBER 4. Mechanicsburg. Lincoln speaks in evening. He charges Democratic party with responsibility for agitation now disturbing country, and predicts that wrangling over slavery will continue until that party is broken. Illinois State Journal, Nov. 7; The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, III, 493.

NOVEMBER 8. Springfield. Lincoln votes in congressional election. Palmer is defeated. Election Returns. He writes Michael G. Dale, Edwardsville lawyer, about Supreme Court railroad case. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, III, 493.

NOVEMBER 10. Chicago. Chicago Tribune notices that Lincoln is on short visit to city, staying at Tremont House.

NOVEMBER 11. Norman B. Judd and wife give Lincoln quit-claim deed to property in Council Bluffs which Lincoln inspected in Aug. as security for $3,000 loan. The Abraham Lincoln Association, Springfield, Illinois. [Files and records on deposit at Illinois State Historical Library, Springfield, Illinois.] — Copy of deed.

NOVEMBER 12. [Mrs. Lincoln buys 10 pounds sugar, candles, matches, and blacking at Smith's. H. E. Pratt, 160.]

NOVEMBER 13. Danville. Lincoln writes James A. Briggs in regard to address he has promised to deliver in Brooklyn. "I will be on hand; and in due time, will notify you of the exact day. I believe, after all, I shall make a political speech of it. You have no objection? . . . I am here at court." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, III, 494.

NOVEMBER 14. [Mrs. Lincoln buys groceries and cloth at Smith's. H. E. Pratt, 160.]

NOVEMBER 16. Springfield. Lincoln signs bond for costs in Quackenbush & Co. v. Lucas in U.S. Circuit Court. Files. He deposits $75 in his bank account. Marine Bank Ledger.

NOVEMBER 17. Mrs. Lincoln buys cloth and socks at Smith's. H. E. Pratt, 160.

NOVEMBER 18. As counsel for complainant, Lincoln dismisses Rockwell et al. v. Dubois et al., chancery, at his clients' costs, in Sangamon Circuit Court. Record.

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NOVEMBER 21. From office of U.S. marshal, Lincoln writes to William Dungy: "I now find the suit is Shaw Buel & Barber against Hill & Hill. The Marshal says the execution has been levied on land, but that there has not, as yet been a sale of it. Once more I tell you, the land can be so sold, as to leave you liable on the other note & you better watch it." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, III, 494.

NOVEMBER 22. Lincoln deposits $100 in Springfield Marine & Fire Insurance Co. Marine Bank Ledger. He makes $750 loan, at 10 per cent interest, to William Cline, Sangamon County farmer, and takes mortgage as security. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, IV, 189.

NOVEMBER 24. In U.S. Circuit Court Lincoln writes and files notice of interrogatories to be asked defendant in Allen and McGrady v. Illinois River Railroad Co. Files.

NOVEMBER 25. Lincoln writes application for letters of administration for Eliza J. Jacoby in estate of Henry Jacoby and files them in Probate Court. Photo.

NOVEMBER 26. Lincoln files declaration and bond in Davis & Co. v. Strosnider in U.S. Circuit Court. Files. He writes $8.38 check to W. P. McKinnie, farmer. Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Original. Mrs. Lincoln buys cloth and thread at Smith's. H. E. Pratt, 160.

NOVEMBER 28. Lincoln writes Trumbull note on politics. "There is nothing new here. I have written merely to give my view about this Forney business." Lincoln is against Republicans appointing John W. Forney, Douglas Democrat, clerk of House as tactic to widen Democratic split. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, III, 495.

NOVEMBER 30. En route to St. Joseph. [To reach St. Joseph, Mo. on morning of Dec. I, Lincoln must have left Springfield this morning, going by rail to Quincy, crossing river and continuing to St. Joseph via another railroad.]

DECEMBER 1. St. Joseph, Mo. and Elwood, K. T. Mark W. Delahay and D. W. Wilder meet Lincoln at Hannibal Railroad station in St. Joseph, cross river to Elwood, where Lincoln speaks in Great Western Hotel dining room. He spends night in Elwood. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, III, 495-97; Kansas Hist. Coll., VII, 537n. [Mrs. Lincoln buys groceries, including 12 pounds sugar and five pounds coffee, at Smith's store. H. E. Pratt, 160.]

DECEMBER 2. Troy, Doniphan, Atchison. At Troy Lincoln addresses handful of people at courthouse. Committee takes him to Doniphan, where he speaks again. Escorted to Atchison, he registers at Massasoit House, and makes evening speech at Methodist Church. Kansas Hist.

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Coll., VII, 537-41. [At Smith's store Mrs. Lincoln buys hats, shoes, comforters, and peck of apples. H. E. Pratt, 161.]

DECEMBER 3. Leavenworth. Lincoln reaches Leavenworth in early afternoon. Procession meets him and escorts him to Mansion House. Crowd gives "three long and loud cheers" for Lincoln. In evening he speaks at Stockton's Hall. Chicago Tribune, Dec. 7, 9; The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, III, 497-502.

DECEMBER 4. "On the . . . Sabbath Mr. Lincoln confined himself to the house in company and association with a few particular friends." N.Y. Tribune, Aug. 30, 1860.

DECEMBER 5. Correspondent of New York Tribune describes Lincoln's day: "Monday morning found him on the alert. . . . He was to be found on the street, in offices or workshops, and took especial delight in familiarizing himself with our people. . . . In the afternoon he delivered another speech to an immense audience." Ibid.; The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, III, 502-04.

DECEMBER 6. Lincoln remains for territorial election. N.Y. Tribune, Aug. 30, 1860.

DECEMBER 7. Leavenworth and en route. Lincoln writes sentiment in autograph album of Mary Delahay, daughter of Mark W. Delahay, his host. He begins return trip. Ibid.; The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, III, 504.

DECEMBER 8. En route and Springfield. Lincoln reaches home in evening. "He expresses himself delighted with his visit and with the cordial reception he met with from the people of that incipient State." Illinois State Journal, Dec. 10.

DECEMBER 9. Springfield. Lincoln writes Judd, avowing his belief in Judd's loyalty in spite of constant charges to contrary. "As to the charge of your intriguing for Trumbull against me, I believe as little of that as any other charge." Lincoln says he is pledged not to contest Trumbull's seat, although he "would rather have a full term in the Senate than in the Presidency." He writes notes to two Kansas Republicans, Levant L. Jones and Daniel W. Wilder, explaining why he could not accept their invitations on his Kansas tour. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, III, 504-06. He makes $87 bank deposit. Marine Bank Ledger.

DECEMBER 11. Lincoln gives William Kellogg advice on controversy Kellogg is having with Horace Greeley, N.Y. "Tribune" editor. "I think, if I were you, I would not pursue him further than necessary to my own justification. . . . Please excuse what I have said, in the way of unsolicited a[d]vice. I believe you will not doubt the sincerity of my friendship for you." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, III, 506-07.

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DECEMBER 14. Lincoln writes Judd again, enclosing formal denial addressed to Messrs. Dole, Hubbard, and Brown, of Judd's "treachery" in 1855, his supposed half-heartedness in 1858, and his general conduct. To Judd himself Lincoln says: "I find some of our friends here, attach more consequence to getting the National convention into our State than I did, or do. Some of them made me promise to say so to you." Ibid., Ill, 507-09.

DECEMBER 15. In Joyner v. Bowen and Marvel in U.S. Circuit Court Lincoln writes agreement: "We consent that a commission in this case may issue at once, to the person named. Dec. 15, 1859. Lincoln & Herndon, for Def'ts." Files. He writes Jackson Grimshaw, Quincy lawyer, returning legal document, annotated, adding that Republican state committee will soon meet for conference. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, III, 509-10.

DECEMBER 16. Lincoln writes $25 check, "Self for Bob," evidently Christmas money for his eldest son who is attending Phillips Exeter Academy in New Hampshire. Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Original.

DECEMBER 19. In response to requests from Ohio Republicans and state officers, "with my grateful acknowledgments to both you and them, for the very flattering terms in which the request is communicated." Lincoln consents to publication of his debates with Douglas, and sends copies. "I wish the reprint to be precisely as the copies I send, without any comment whatever." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, III, 510. He also writes to his Columbus supporter, Samuel Galloway, introducing John G. Nicolay, who will bring debates copies and publication instructions. Historical and Philosophical Society of Ohio, Cincinnati. — Unpublished letter. Galloway Papers. He writes $9.30 check to "G. Loch," bootmaker. Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Original.

DECEMBER 20. Lincoln sends autobiographical sketch to Jesse W. Fell of Bloomington. "Herewith is a little sketch, as you requested. There is not much of it, for the reason, I suppose, that there is not much of me. If any thing be made out of it, I wish it to be modest, and not to go beyond the material." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, III, 511-12.

DECEMBER 21. In U.S. Circuit Court Lincoln files declaration and bond in Green et al. v. Smith et al., suit to enforce payment of promissory notes totalling $600. Files.

DECEMBER 23. Lincoln buys 5˘ worth of borax, at his drug store. Mrs. Lincoln buys cloth and silk thread at Smith's. H. E. Pratt, 152, 161.

DECEMBER 24. Lincoln pays evening visit to Post Office and discusses with postmaster best way of distributing documents sent by Trumbull. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, III, 512-13.

DECEMBER 25. Lincoln writes Trumbull, suggesting he send government

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documents to postmaster for distribution, rather than directly to recipients. He compliments him on recent speech in Senate. Ibid.

DECEMBER 26. In U.S. Circuit Court Lincoln files declaration and bond in Green et al. v. Berry and Berry. Files. He writes $5 check to Martin Walters, printer. Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Original.

DECEMBER 27. Lincoln locates Land Warrant No. 68,465 for 120 acres, issued to him in 1856 for services in Black Hawk War. Land he selects is about 60 miles north and east of Council Bluffs, Iowa. Herndon & Weik, 83.

DECEMBER 29. Lincoln has clerk write to Zophar Case, U.S. Court clerk at Carlyle, Ill., about declaration in law case involving lands in Hamilton County, then addresses and signs letter. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, III, 513. He writes $1.25 check to J. B. Fosselman, grocer. Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Original.

DECEMBER 31. Lincoln buys nine pounds of crushed sugar at Smith's store. H. E. Pratt, 161.

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JANUARY 2. Springfield. Lincoln signs firm name to receipt: "Received of M. G. Dale by the hand of J & D Gillespie the sum of Fifty Dollars on ape of services in the District Court in the cases connected with the Mississippi & Atlantic Rail Road Company." Brown University Library, Providence, Rhode Island. — Original.

JANUARY 3. Lincoln's work in U.S. Court begins when Rice v. Wing, in which he argued demurrer June 21, 1859, is called. With Logan and Gillespie, Lincoln appears for defendant, and obtains leave to plead by Jan. 5. Record.

JANUARY 5. Lincoln has cases in both U.S. and Supreme Courts. In former, four suits in which he and Gillespie represent defendant are continued, their clients being ruled to plead by Jan. 11; fifth case, in which he also represents defendant, is continued at defendant's costs. In Supreme Court Lincoln moves that appeal in Harris, Headon et al. v. True be dismissed. Ibid.

JANUARY 6. Supreme Court overrules Lincoln's motion of yesterday. Moulton, representing appellant, is allowed ten days to perfect his appeal bond. Ibid.

JANUARY 7. In three cases he filed in U.S. Circuit Court during Nov. and Dec., Lincoln has defendants ruled to plead by Jan. 9: Davis & Co. v.

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Strosnider; Green et al. v. Smith et al.; and Green et al. v. Berry and Berry. Ibid.

JANUARY 9. Defendants default in three cases continued Jan. 7th, and Lincoln obtains judgments for $3,669.59, $856.78, and $808.34 respectively. Record. He writes for William Yates letter of introduction to his friend Leonard Swett. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, III, 513.

JANUARY 11. Lincoln files pleas in five cases in U.S. Circuit Court: Rice v. Wing; Fox v. Johnson; Fox v. Dale; Whiting v. Dale; Rice v. Blakeman. These suits were called Jan. 5, and defendants ruled to plead by Jan. 11. Files.

JANUARY 12. In Supreme Court, People v. Illinois Central, filed Feb. I, 1859, comes to trial. Logan argues case for plaintiff, Lincoln and J. M. Douglas for defendant. Court takes it under advisement, and later finds for defendant. 27 Ill.64-70. Lincoln deposits $75 in his bank account. Marine Bank Ledger. He trades in his old buggy to his carriage maker, for $9.25 credit on his account, and pays $18.25 cash. Obed Lewis Account Books. He writes $5.90 check to "Canedy & Johnson," druggists. Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Original.

JANUARY 13. Two of Lincoln's cases are called in U.S. Circuit Court. Allen and McGrady v. Illinois River Railroad Co., which Lincoln filed July I, 1859, is continued on his motion. In Whiting v. Dale, defendant's attorneys enter motion for continuance and files affidavit. Court withholds decision. Files; Record.

JANUARY 14. Court orders Whiting v. Dale continued at defendant's costs. In Supreme Court six suits, in all of which Illinois Central is one of defendants, come to trial, continued from Jan. 19, 1859. Cases are argued and submitted by Hay for plaintiffs and Lincoln for railroad. Court takes them under advisement, and later remands them. Ibid.; 23 Ill., 473.

JANUARY 15. Lincoln writes Femando Jones of Chicago: "Our republican friend, J. W. Fell, of Bloomington, Illinois, can furnish you the materials for a brief sketch of my history, if it be desired." He writes to another Republican, Alonzo J. Grover of Earlville, Ill. his views on fugitive slave law. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, III, 514.

JANUARY 17. Gill v. Hoblitt, involving technical defect in summons, comes up in Supreme Court. Lincoln argues and submits case for defendant, and court later orders remand. Record; 23 Ill. 473-75.

JANUARY 19. Lincoln files declaration in Piatt v. Wilson in U.S. Circuit Court. Defendant is charged with unlawful possession of land in Hamilton County. Hay and Cullom enter defendant's appearance, waive service of

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declaration and notice, and file plea of general issue, which Lincoln wrote. Files; Record.

JANUARY 20. Lincoln writes Gustave Koerner: "Yesterday the Judge decided the demurrer against us on all the points. On looking over your memorandum left with me, I find you desire me to ‘have the case set for trial as late as I can’ — but really I find I have no power [to] set a time for the trial. The opposite party is not here, in person, or by counsel; and the Judge, properly enough, refuses to make a stipulation for the absent party." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, III, 514-15.

JANUARY 21. Lincoln makes two deposits at Springfield Marine & Fire Insurance Co., $27 and $118.25. Marine Bank Ledger.

JANUARY 24. Lincoln writes J. W. Sheahan, editor of Chicago "Times" and strong Douglas supporter, denying that he had revised "in any just sense of the word," his debates prior to publication. "I only made some small verbal corrections, . . . not feeling justified to do more, when republishing the speeches along with those of Senator Douglas — his and mine being mutually answers and replies to one another." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, III, 515.

JANUARY 25. Lincoln is busy in U.S. Circuit Court with Beaver v. Taylor and Gilbert, Cairo land case tried June 20, 1859 and won by defendants. Now defendants' attorneys, Lincoln, Logan, Stuart, and Edwards, contest plaintiff's motion for new trial. Illinois State Journal, Jan. 26. [Court later denies motion.]

JANUARY 26. Lincoln acknowledges service of notice in chancery case involving Columbia Machine Manufacturing Co. Photo.

JANUARY 27. In U.S. Circuit Court four of Lincoln's current cases come to trial. Rice v. Wing is dismissed at plaintiff's costs. In Fox v. Johnson, and Fox v. Dale, jury is sworn, but after plaintiff's evidence is shown, defendants default. Rice v. Blakeman is continued by consent. Record.

JANUARY 28. Lincoln, L. W. Ross, and O. H. Browning certify that they have examined Henry S. Greene and found him qualified to practise law. They recommend he be granted license. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, III, 515.

JANUARY 30. Lincoln files declaration in ejectment suit, Piatt v. Parker, in U.S. Circuit Court. Parrish for defendant waives service of declaration and notice and files plea. Files; Record.

FEBRUARY 1. Ambos v. Barrett, Lincoln for plaintiff, is continued in U.S. Circuit Court. In Supreme Court he submits Leonard v. Villars, acting for defendant. He deposits $539.95, and writes $100 check to "Woods and Henckle," tailors, evidently for new suit for his New York trip. Browning

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calls after tea and spends hour or two, and in evening Lincoln and Grimshaw address "large and enthusiastic meeting" at Republican Headquarters. Ibid; Marine Bank Ledger; Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Original. Browning, Diary; Illinois State Journal, Feb. 2.

FEBRUARY 2. Lincoln loses his effort to set aside verdict in Clark v. Jones, decided against him in U.S. Circuit Court in June 1859. Court orders execution on previous judgment. Record. He writes $15.25 check to "Self for Officer & Pusey," Thomas Officer and William Pusey, Council Bluffs real estate dealers who were Lincoln's agents in locating 120 acres of bounty land. Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Original.

FEBRUARY 4. Lincoln replies to request of Abraham Jonas, Quincy Republican, for copy of Lincoln-Douglas Debates. "As you are one of my most valued friends, and have complimented me by the expression of a wish for the book, I propose doing myself the honor of presenting you with one, as soon as I can." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, III, 516.

FEBRUARY 5. Lincoln is having difficulty averting trouble between different Republican factions in Illinois. There is still talk of Judd's "treachery." Herndon has been reviving old stories of 1855, and Judd has complained. "I did not press him about the past; but got his solemn pledge to say nothing of the sort in the future." Ibid.

FEBRUARY 6. In U.S. Circuit Court, Lincoln's case Dawson v. Ennis and Ennis is continued by consent of attorneys. He deposits $265 at bank. Record; Marine Bank Ledger.

FEBRUARY 8. Lincoln and Browning have "free talk about the Presidency." Browning favors Bates of Missouri. Lincoln admits that Bates may be strongest candidate in Illinois, that Bates can get votes "even in this County that he cannot get." Perhaps when convention meets he may think Bates's nomination "the very best thing that can be done." Browning, Diary. Lincoln writes to Henry E. Dummer of Beardstown on law case. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, III, 517.

FEBRUARY 9. Lincoln appeals to Judd. He says that while it would not hurt him to miss nomination, it would be harmful if he should not get Illinois delegation. Judd's enemies are bitter against him, and for revenge will "lay to the Bates egg in the South, and to the Seward egg in the North, and go far toward squeezing me out in the middle with nothing. Can you not help me a little in this matter?" Lincoln also writes to his old friend, Josiah M. Lucas, explaining that he did not support Lucas for House postmaster because there was no time for action. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, III, 517-18.

FEBRUARY 10. In U.S. Circuit Court one case of Lincoln's, Joyner v. Bowen and Marvel, is continued. Record. Lincoln writes to Major W.

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Packard, McLean County treasurer, about taxes on William Florville's land. Lincoln forgot to pay them. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, III, 518.

FEBRUARY 13. Lincoln makes affidavit of nonresidence in Supreme Court cases of Columbia Machine Manufacturing Co. v. Ulrich et al., and Columbia Machine Manufacturing Co. v. Dorwin et al. Photo. He writes to Horace White explaining that he is unable to speak in Wisconsin on 28th because he has already agreed to speak in Brooklyn on 27th. He writes "thank you" note to John C. Henshaw of New York, who has sent book (not received) on labor and capital. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, III, 518-19.

FEBRUARY 14. In U.S. Circuit Court Lincoln makes his last appearance for term. Two of his cases are continued, and in third he files bill of revivor. He answers letter from Messrs. Hall, Fullinwider, and Correll of Sangamon County asking meaning of statement "a house divided against itself cannot stand." After quoting paragraph Lincoln writes: "It puzzles me to make my meaning plainer." Record; Files; The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, III, 519-20.

FEBRUARY 16. Lincoln corrects complainant's bill in Fanners Loan & Trust Co. v. Great Western Railroad, signing "J. C. Conkling for complainant." Photo.

FEBRUARY 17. Lincoln writes two letters. To D. L. Phillips he apologizes for not answering his letter of 13th sooner; he has been so busy he could not attend to it. He lists four judgments won Jan. 20, 1858. He tells Eunice E. Howell of New York that he cannot "lecture for you this winter." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, III, 520-21.

FEBRUARY 21. To John Olney of Shawneetown Lincoln writes: "Your excellent letter of the 14th. is just received. It puts some propositions so admirably that I am tempted to publish them — without names, of course." Ibid.

FEBRUARY 23. Springfield and en route. Lincoln leaves for New York to speak at Cooper Union. Illinois State Register comments: "Subject, not known. Consideration, $200 and expenses. Object, presidential capital. Effect, disappointment."

FEBRUARY 25. Philadelphia and New York. Changing trains in Philadelphia, Lincoln receives note from Simon Cameron and David Wilmot inviting him to visit them at Girard House. He calls there and finds both out. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, III, 521. On arriving at New York he takes rooms at Astor House. He visits office of New York "Independent" and talks with Henry C. Bowen, editor. He also spends some time revising his address. Henry B. Rankin, Intimate Character Sketches of Abraham Lincoln, 178-81; Newton, 266-67.

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FEBRUARY 26. New York. Lincoln attends church with Henry C. Bowen and writes to Simon Cameron regretting that he did not meet Cameron and Wilmot in Philadelphia Saturday. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, III, 521.

FEBRUARY 27. Visitors call at Astor House to see Lincoln, and he refuses invitations to speak at Patterson and Orange. Illinois State Journal, Mar. 3. In evening he speaks at Cooper Union. "Prolonged applause" greets him when he enters, escorted by David Dudley Field and William Cullen Bryant. Frequent clapping interrupts speech. At conclusion of meeting many stop to congratulate him. N.Y. Tribune, Feb. 28; The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, III, 522-50. 522-50.

FEBRUARY 28. Providence. Lincoln speaks in evening. Gov. Hoppin calls meeting to order, and Thomas A. Jenckes introduces Lincoln. "Railroad Hall was filled to overflowing . . . by an audience to welcome and to hear the great champion of Republicanism in Illinois." Illinois State Journal, Mar. 7; The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, III, 550-51.

FEBRUARY 29. Providence and Exeter. Lincoln travels from Providence to Exeter, where his son Robert is in school. (He probably leaves Providence at 10:40 A.M., changes trains at Boston, and arrives at 4:27.) At Exeter committee meets him and secures promise to speak at Dover Friday. Elwin L. Page, Abraham Lincoln in New Hampshire, 25-7.

MARCH 1. Exeter, Concord, and Manchester. Robert Lincoln and George Latham of Springfield accompany Lincoln from Exeter to Concord, where he speaks at I:45 P.M. in Phoenix Hall. He goes to Manchester and addresses "immense gathering" at Smyth Hall. He stays night at City Hotel. Page, 60; Chicago Tribune, Mar. 9; The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, III, 551-52.

MARCH 2. Manchester and Dover. Lincoln returns to Exeter and goes on to Dover, where he is escorted to home of George Mathewson. After evening speech he visits New Hampshire House, where he stays until after midnight, and returns to Mathewson's. Page, 68-9, 75-7, 90; The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, III, 552-54.

MARCH 3. Exeter. Lincoln spends part of day with Robert. In evening he makes speech. He writes to Isaac Pomeroy of Newark, N. J., who invited him to address Young Men's Working Club. "I have already spoken five times, and am engaged to speak five more. By the time these engagements shall be fulfilled, I shall be so far worn down, and also will be carried so far beyond my allotted time, that an immediate return home will be a necessity with me." At this sitting he is declining invitations to Philadelphia, Reading, and Pittsburgh. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, III, 554; Percy G. Eggleston, Lincoln in New England, 8; Bulletin of Phillips Exeter Academy, XII, No. 3, 9.

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MARCH 4. Lincoln spends day with Robert and his classmates. He attends Phillips church. Ibid. He writes Mrs. Lincoln: "I have been unable to escape this toil. If I had foreseen it, I think I would not have come east at all. The speech at New York, being within my calculation before I started, went off passably well and gave me no trouble whatever." He acknowledges $200 check from James A. Briggs of New York, and outlines his tour, past and future, since leaving New York. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, III, 554-55.

MARCH 5. Hartford. Lincoln, introduced by Gov. Buckingham, speaks in evening at City Hall. He closes with strong appeal: "Let us not be slandered from our duties, or intimidated from preserving our dignity and our rights by any menace; but let us have faith that Right, Eternal Right makes might, and as we understand our duty, so do it!" He is escorted to his hotel by original "Wide Awake" Club. Eggleston, 13-5; The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, IV, 2-13.

MARCH 6. New Haven. Lincoln speaks in Union Hall. Procession led by New Haven band escorts him to home of J. F. Babcock, his host. Eggleston, 15; Chicago Tribune, Mar. 14; The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, IV, 13-30.

MARCH 7. New Haven and Merlden. Evening special train takes Lincoln and 300 supporters to Meriden. Torchlight procession escorts him to hall, where he speaks for more than two hours. He returns on special train to New Haven, where another procession, headed by Wallingford brass band, escorts him to Babcock's residence. Chicago Tribune, Mar. 14.

MARCH 8. New Haven, New London, Woonsocket. On way from New Haven to Woonsocket, Lincoln stops in New London for three hours. He takes afternoon train to Providence, where several hundred admirers and band meet him and escort him to Woonsocket. At Harris Hall he delivers "one of his most powerful addresses." Eggleston, 18, 21-2; Chicago Tribune, Mar. 14.

MARCH 9. Norwich. Town hall is crowded to hear Lincoln give "manly vindication of the principles of the Republican party, urging the necessity of the union of all elements to free our country from its present rule, and closed with an eloquent exhortation for each and every one to do his duty without regard to the sneers and slanders of our political opponents." Eggleston, 23.

MARCH 10. Bridgeport. Lincoln makes his last speech in New England in town's largest hall, filled to capacity. Ibid., 30. He takes night express for New York. N.Y. Tribune, Mar. 12.

MARCH 11. New York and Brooklyn. Lincoln and James A. Briggs hear Beecher preach at Plymouth Church in Brooklyn, and visit Universalist Church of Edwin H. Chapin in New York. Hiram Barney takes Lincoln to House of Industry at Five Points, and home to tea. Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Salmon P. Chase Papers, Library of Congress, Washington, D. C., James A.

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Briggs to S. P. Chase, Mar. 17; N.Y. Tribune, Mar. 13; N.Y. Evening Post, Aug. 16, 1867.

MARCH 12. New York and era route. In morning Lincoln leaves for home on Erie Railroad. New York Tribune speeds parting guest: "Mr. Lincoln has done a good work and made many warm friends."

MARCH 14. Springfield. Early in morning Lincoln arrives on Great Western, "in excellent health and in his usual spirits." He turns to his correspondence, apologizing to A. W. Harvey for his inability to speak in Buffalo, and to Messrs. Beers and Mansfield, photographers, for not finding time to sit for portrait. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, IV, 30-1.

MARCH 15. Lincoln deposits $604 in his bank account. Marine Bank Ledger. He writes note to Rufus W. Miles, Knox County Republican, thanking him for his approval of New York speech. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, IV, 31.

MARCH 16. To Mark Delahay of Kansas Lincoln writes: "I can not enter the ring on the money basis — first, because, in the main, it is wrong; and secondly, I have not, and can not get, the money." If, however, Delahay is appointed delegate to convention, Lincoln will supply $100 for expenses. He writes to Trumbull about Delahay's senatorial ambitions. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, IV, 31-2.

MARCH 17. Lincoln, Hatch, Dubois, and Herndon have farewell interview with Gov. Bissell, mortally ill and sinking rapidly. Chicago Tribune, Mar. 23. Lincoln writes E. Stafford that financial part of arrangement Stafford proposes is impossible. He cannot raise $10,000; "nor have my friends, so far as I know, yet reached the point of staking any money on my chances of success." He also writes to James W. Somers, Urbana attorney, advice about Somers' thought of moving to Chicago, Missouri, or Kansas. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, IV, 33.

MARCH 19. Lincoln. Acting for defendant, Lincoln writes, signs, and files demurrer in Hinrichsen v. Laughery in Logan Circuit Court. He writes agreement as to issue in Musick v. Baughn and Jackson, which Young for defendant and Parks for plaintiff sign. Photo.

MARCH 20. Lincoln writes indictment in People v. Musick et al. Files.

MARCH 21. Springfield. Gov. Bissell is buried. "In the [funeral] procession were several of the most prominent men of the State; men renowned in politics, education, military history and the law. Among them were Hon. Abraham Lincoln; his law partner, Wm. H. Herndon," and many others. Chicago Journal, Mar. 22.

MARCH 23. Chicago. One of Lincoln's famous cases — Johnston v. Jones and Marsh — comes to trial in U.S. Court. Title to important accretions

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of land north of Chicago River is involved. This is third trial of case, and first time Lincoln has appeared as counsel. With him, for defense, are Fuller, Higgins, and Van Arman; Morris, Arnold, and Wills represent plaintiff. Ibid., Mar. 26; The Abraham Lincoln Association, Springfield, Illinois. [Files and records on deposit at Illinois State Historical Library, Springfield, Illinois.] — Papers, 1932, 41N.

MARCH 24. Busy in court, Lincoln writes to Samuel Galloway of Columbus about Presidency. "My name is new in the field; and I suppose I am not the first choice of a very great many. Our policy, then, is to give no offence to others — leave them in a mood to come to us, if they shall be compelled to give up their first love." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, IV, 33-4.

MARCH 26. In court all day, Lincoln also writes to Trumbull about political situation in Connecticut. "It would both please, and help our friends there, if you could be with them in the last days of the fight. Having been there, I know they are proud of you as a son of their own soil, and would be moved to greater exertions by your presence among them. Can you not go? Telegraph them, and go right along." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, IV, 34.

MARCH 27. Lincoln is busy with Johnston v. Jones and Marsh. Record.

MARCH 28. Lincoln writes Ward Hill Lamon about indictment which he (Lincoln) had drawn. "I think I had no authority but the Statute when I wrote the Indictment. In fact, I remember but little about it. . . . I am so busy with our case on trial here, that I can not examine authorities near as fully as you can there. If, after all, the indictment shall be quashed, it will prove that my forte is as a Statesman, rather than as a Prossecutor." He also writes note of recommendation for James W. Somers of Urbana. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, IV, 34-5.

MARCH 29. In his free time Lincoln is giving sittings to Leonard W. Volk, sculptor related to Douglas by marriage who recently finished bust of Douglas. Chicago Tribune.

MARCH 30. Lincoln is busy in court and studio. Record.

MARCH 31. Johnston v. Jones and Marsh runs on. Ibid.

APRIL 1. Lincoln receives $15 by express from Homer, Ill. He does not know who sent it, but suspects "Mr. Patterson to whom I loaned that amount a few weeks ago." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, IV, 35.

APRIL 2. Chicago and Waukegan. Lincoln is in court, but afterwards delivers speech at Waukegan "at the earnest solicitation of citizens of Lake County." Chicago Tribune.

APRIL 3. Chicago and Evanston. After court Lincoln visits Evanston as guest of his old friend Julius White, harbormaster and member of Chicago

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Board of Trade, informally receives at White's home, and is serenaded. The Abraham Lincoln Association, Springfield, Illinois. [Files and records on deposit at Illinois State Historical Library, Springfield, Illinois.] — Files; Joseph S. Currey, Lincoln's Visit to Evanston, 5.

APRIL 4. Chicago. Johnston v. Jones and Marsh ends. Jury retires at 1 P.M. and five hours later brings in verdict for defendants, Lincoln's clients. Chicago Tribune, Apr. 5. He collects $350 "fee in case of Johnston v. Jones," and signs receipt. Photo.

APRIL 5. Springfield. Lincoln returns to Springfield, and deposits $325 in his bank account. Marine Bank Ledger.

APRIL 6. Lincoln attacks his accumulated correspondence, writing six letters. He tells R. M. Corwine, Ohio delegate to Chicago convention, his opinion of presidential politics in Illinois. Seward would be best for northern part, worst for southern half. Chase is in same situation. Reverse applies to Bates. About his own chances Lincoln feels disqualified to speak. He thanks William Gooding of Lockport, Ill. for his letter, and tells William Hobbs and William Hanna of Bloomington that he prefers a vacation from speech-making. If they insist, he will speak April 10. He writes family history to Richard V. B. Lincoln of Pennsylvania. He relates circumstances of $200 fee for New York speech to Cornelius McNeill of Middleport [Watscka], Ill., Republican editor who is worried about press gossip that Lincoln "charged" for making speech. He tells John Pickering, Edwards County Republican, where copies of his New York speech can be obtained. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, IV, 36-9.

APRIL 7. Elated by Republican victory in recent city election, Lincoln writes Trumbull optimistic letter. He declines invitation of John M. Carson to lecture before Harrison Literary Institute of Chicago. "What time I can spare from my own business this season I shall be compelled to give to politics." He tells F. G. Herbruger that he cannot lecture at Harrison Literary Institute of Philadelphia. "I am not a professional lecturer." He writes Harvey G. Eastman of Poughkeepsie, N.Y. that he is unable to send photograph, but Eastman can "easily get one at New York. While I was there I was taken to one of the places where they get up such things." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, IV, 39-41.

APRIL 9. [McLean Circuit Court commences second week of spring session.]

APRIL 10. Bloomington. Lincoln speaks in Phoenix Hall. "Mr. Lincoln is probably the fairest and most honest political speaker in the country," Pantograph comments (Apr. 11). "While he convinces the understanding by arriving at legitimate and unavoidable sequences, he wins the hearts of his hearers by the utmost fairness and good humor." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, IV, 41-3; Wake field, 108-09.

APRIL 13. Springfield. Lincoln reaches home at night. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, IV, 43-4.

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APRIL 14. Lincoln writes to Delahay again. "I see by the despaches that . . . Kansas has appointed Delegates and instructed them for Seward. Dont stir them up to anger, but come along to the convention, & I will do as I said about expenses." Pie writes Solomon Sturges, Chicago banker, that he has not yet determined whether to attend convention, and cannot say whether he can accept his hospitality. Lincoln discusses his presidential chances in letter to James F. Babcock of New Haven, Conn., and lists 11 "confidential friends" working to nominate him. He writes letter of introduction for Dr. Theodore Canisius. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, IV, 43-5.

APRIL 16. Lincoln deposits $100 in Marine & Fire Insurance Co. Marine Bank Ledger.

APRIL 21. To Hawkins Taylor, supporter who expects to attend Chicago convention, Lincoln writes: "I am glad there is a prospect of your party passing this way to Chicago. Wishing to make your visit here as pleasant as we can, we wish you to notify us as soon as possible, whether you come this way, how many, and when you will arrive." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, IV, 45.

APRIL 22. Lincoln makes $150 loan, at 10 per cent interest, to J. K. and Thomas Lewis of Springfield. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, IV, 188.

APRIL 26. To "large and intelligent audience" at Cook's Hall, Lincoln repeats his lecture on "Discoveries and Inventions." Illinois State Journal, Apr. 28.

APRIL 27. Lincoln annotates defendants' answer in Roberts v. Stuart & Edwards, Sangamon Circuit Court case. Record.

APRIL 29. Lincoln writes Trumbull about presidential possibilities. "The taste is in my mouth a little; and this, no doubt, disqualifies me, to some extent, to form correct opinions." Nevertheless, neither Seward nor Bates can carry Illinois if Douglas is Democratic candidate. McLean would be stronger than either if it were not for his age. But in Illinois the problem will be to win legislature. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, IV, 45-6.

APRIL 30. Lincoln receives letter from C. M. Allen of Indiana delegation to Chicago convention. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, IV, 46. He writes $10 check to "Isaac Sisson." Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Original.

MAY 1. Lincoln writes Trumbull that all expect Douglas to be nominated by Charleston Democratic convention. To G. M. Allen of Indiana he confesses that nomination of Douglas will put case "in the hardest shape for us." Dubois and David Davis will meet Allen in Chicago. "If you let Usher & Griswold of Terre-Haute know, I think they will co-operate with you." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, IV, 46-7.

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MAY 2. To R. M. Corwine of Ohio Lincoln outlines his prospects. "I think the Illinois delegation will be unanamous for me at the start; and no other delegation will. . . . You know how it is in Ohio. I am certainly not the first choice there; and yet I have not heard that any one makes any positive objection to me. It is just so everywhere so far as I can perceive." Dubois and Davis will be in Chicago to confer with "friends from other States." Lincoln thanks James G. Wilson of Chicago for sending book of Fitz-Greene Halleck's poems, praising several. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, IV, 47-8.

MAY 8. Decatur. Lincoln attends state Republican convention. Joseph G. Cannon meets him for first time. Address of J. G. Cannon, Danville, Oct. 20, 1922 (pamphlet).

MAY 9. State Republican convention meets. When Lincoln appears in audience John Hanks carries in two old fence rails, placarded for Lincoln. Audience bursts into cheers, and Lincoln makes brief talk, admitting to splitting rails in Macon County. N.Y. Tribune, May 22; The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, IV, 48-9.

MAY 10. Convention instructs Illinois delegation for Lincoln for President. Chicago Tribune, May 11.

MAY 12. Springfield. To Dr. Edward Wallace of Pennsylvania, who is attending Chicago convention, to whom he sent statement of his tariff views Oct. 11, 1859, Lincoln confesses that he has forgotten exact content of earlier letter. He writes short restatement of his position, and adds: "I really have no objection to these views being publicly known; but I do wish to thrust no letter before the public now, upon any subject." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, IV, 49.

MAY 14. Lincoln writes his friend Carl Schurz, chairman of Wisconsin delegation at Chicago, note of introduction to Jesse K. Dubois. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, IV, 50.

MAY 17. Lincoln gives E. L. Baker, editor of "Illinois State Journal," copy of "Missouri Democrat" in which he had marked passages referring to Seward's position on slavery issue, and on margin of which he writes in pencil: "I agree with Seward in his ‘Irrepressible Conflict,’ but I do not endorse his ‘Higher Law’ doctrine. Make no contracts that will bind me." Baker takes this to Chicago. Herndon & Weik, 373-74; The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, IV, 50.

MAY 18. Chicago convention nominates Lincoln on third ballot. News reaches Springfield by noon, and at once firing of 100 guns commences. In afternoon friends call on Lincoln at home to congratulate him. In evening mass meeting assembles at state house. Crowd moves to Lincoln's residence. He appears, speaks briefly, and invites in as many as can get inside, Illinois State Journal, May 19; The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, IV, 50-1.

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MAY 19. Lincoln receives formal notice of his nomination. Notification committee arrives in Springfield late in afternoon, and calls on Lincoln at 8 P.M. He receives them in north parlor, and responds briefly to address of chairman, Ashmun of Massachusetts. Committee then moves to south parlor, where members are presented to Mrs. Lincoln. N.Y. Tribune, May 25; The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, IV, 51.

MAY 20. Lincoln sits for two photographs. Meserve, 53.

MAY 21. Lincoln acknowledges congratulations of Joshua R. Giddlngs, Ohio abolitionist: "It is indeed, most grateful to my feelings, that the responsible position assigned me, comes without conditions, save only such honorable ones as are fairly implied. I am not wanting in the purpose, though I may fail in the strength, to maintain my freedom from bad influences. Your letter comes to my aid in this point, most opportunely." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, IV, 51-2.

MAY 23. Lincoln formally accepts nomination in letter to George Ashmun, convention president. "Imploring the assistance of Divine Providence, and with due regard to the views and feelings of all who were represented in the convention . . . I am most happy to co-operate for the practical success of the principles declared by the convention." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, IV, 52-3.

MAY 24. Thurlow Weed, political boss of New York and William H. Seward's "manager," visits Lincoln. Register, May 25.

MAY 25. Lincoln deposits $500 in his bank account. Marine Bank Ledger.

MAY 26. Lincoln writes letters in reply to congratulations. He is optimistic: "So far as I can learn, the nominations start well everywhere; and, if they get no back-set, it would seem as if they are going through." He writes briefly to Salmon P. Chase, Cassius M. Clay, Schuyler Colfax, Caleb B. Smith, Trumbull, and Washburne. He tells S. Wells Cone of Kansas that he expects "to be at home constantly for some weeks." More to the point, he writes Leonard Swett approving his activities in smoothing factional differences. He tells David Davis about Weed's visit, and drafts letter for Davis to write, sign, and send to Pennsylvania Republicans Davis dealt with at Chicago, as Lincoln's platform for campaign. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, IV, 53-6; Photo.

MAY 28. In response to inquiry from Samuel Haycraft of Elizabethtown, Ky. Lincoln writes autobiographical letter on family history. "I am really very glad of your letter, and shall be pleased to receive another at any time." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, IV, 56-7.

MAY 30. Problems of patronage are already before Lincoln. He writes Leonard Swett of Bloomington his intentions toward New York Republican

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factions headed by Weed and James Putnam. "It can not have failed to strike you that these men ask for just, the same thing — fairness, and fairness only. This, so far as in my power, they, and all others, shall have." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, IV, 57. Lincoln buys Tonic and "Hair Balsam" at his drug store. H. E. Pratt, 153.

MAY 31. Lincoln writes to Charles G. Nott of New York, who is editing Cooper Union speech for publication as campaign document: "So far as it is intended merely to improve in grammar and elegance of composition, I am quite agreed; but I do not wish the sense changed, or modified, to a hair's breadth." He writes again to Schuyler Colfax, and to Trumbull, who is arranging with Hannibal Hamlin, nominee for Vice President, letters of formal acceptance. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, IV, 57-9.

JUNE 1. To F. A. Wood Lincoln writes: "Yours of May 24th. is received. You say you are not a Lincoln man; ‘but still would like to have Mr. L's autograph.’ Well, here it is." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, IV, 68.

JUNE 2. Lincoln composes form letter for autograph collectors, and uses it twice. [At some time this month he also drafts forms for those who ask for biographical sketch and his political views. For campaign biographers, he writes extensive autobiography. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, IV, 60-8.]

JUNE 4. Lincoln begins second letter to Samuel Haycraft with sentences that are to give him considerable embarrassment. "You suggest that a visit to the place of my nativity might be pleasant to me. Indeed it would. But would it be safe? Would not the people Lynch me?" He informs George Ashmun that his name is Abraham, not Abram, and writes five routine acknowledgment letters. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, IV, 68-70.

JUNE 5. Lincoln summarizes political developments for Trumbull. "Gov. Reeder was here last evening direct from Pennsylvania. He is entirely confident of that state, and of the general result. . . . Weed was here, and saw me; but he showed no signs whatever of the intriguer. He asked for nothing; and said N.Y. is safe, without condition." Lincoln thanks Digby V. Bell of Chicago for sending chair made from wood of all 34 states, which sat on platform at Chicago convention. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, IV, 71.

JUNE 6. Lincoln resumes his law practice. In U.S. Circuit Court case of Joyner v. Bowen and Marvel, continued from Feb. 10, he draws and files affidavit and agreement; in Conner v. Berry he files plea and notice. Files.

JUNE 7. Springfield Republicans hold rally to celebrate Lincoln's nomination, with procession in morning, speeches afternoon and evening, and closing torchlight procession. Illinois State Journal, June 8. Lincoln writes W. M. Dickson of Cincinnati regarding bill from Burnet House for his stay in Sept. 1859. CIV. IV, 72-3.

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JUNE 8. Lincoln has two cases In U.S. Circuit Court. In Davis et al. v. Malhoitt et al., gamishee proceeding, Malhoitt is ordered to plead tomorrow. In Williams v. Sawyer et al. leave to amend bill of complaint is given complainant's solicitors. Lincoln & Herndon represent plaintiffs in both cases. Record. Lincoln endorses pardon petition to Gov. Wood on behalf of Emanuel Fowler, convicted of assault in Shelby County June 6. He thanks his Tremont colleague, John A. Jones, for his felicitations. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, IV, 73.

JUNE 9. Davis et al. v. Malhoitt is called, and plaintiffs appear "by Messrs. Lincoln and Herndon their Attorneys." Defendant defaults, and court orders judgment entered against him for $500 garnishee. Lincoln releases mortgage he took from Ritta Angelica da Silva Feb. 20, 1855. Record. He writes two acknowledgment notes, and letter which reveals another penalty of fame. Mrs. Deziah Vance, widow of John Vance of Danville, for whom Lincoln handled case in 1844, has asked if he has any money collected for Mr. Vance. Lincoln replies that he has not, and doubts that 16-year-old claim can be collected. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, IV, 73-4.

JUNE 11. Lincoln writes to J. Mason Haight, who commented on Lincoln serving water to notification committee: "Having kept house sixteen years, and having never held the ‘cup’ to the lips of my friends then, my judgment was that I should not, in my new position, change my habit in this respect." He thanks J. E. Tilton, Boston publisher, for book. [John G. Nicolay is now working as Lincoln's secretary.] The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, IV, 75; Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Lyman Trumbull Papers, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. Nicolay to Trumbull. __

JUNE 12. Browning makes morning call on Lincoln in his new borrowed state house office, and remains while Thomas Hicks works on Lincoln's portrait, returning in afternoon. "Lincoln bears his honors meekly," writes Browning. "As soon as other company had retired after I went in he fell into his old habit of telling amusing stories, and we had a free and easy talk of an hour or two." Browning, Diary.

JUNE 13. Browning returns. "Spent a portion of the day with Lincoln talking to him whilst Mr. Hicks worked upon his portrait," he writes. "He completed it this P.M. In my judgment it is an exact, life like likeness, and a beautiful work of art. It is deeply imbued with the intellectual and spiritual, and I doubt whether anyone ever succeeds in getting a better picture of the man." Ibid.

JUNE 14. Lincoln writes in Hicks' notebook memorandum on location of his Kentucky birthplace. He thanks Charles Sumner for sending speech, which he has not had time to read. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, IV, 75-6. Browning spends evening at Lincoln home. Browning, Diary.

JUNE 15. Lincoln and Browning take tea with Jesse K. Dubois. Ibid. Lincoln acknowledges letter from J. E. Brady of Pittsburgh. "Your kind

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remembrance of me gratifies me, as well as the flattering prospect which you give of the old ‘Stone.’" He thanks W. M. Dickson for dealing with Burnet House bill. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, IV, 76-7.

JUNE 16. Correspondent of Trenton (N.J.) Democrat describes Lincoln: "Mr. Lincoln is remaining quietly at home. . . . He occupies, during the large share of his time, the Executive apartments at the State-house, on the second floor, and some days receives hundreds of visitors, while the mails and telegraph put him in communication with a vastly larger number throughout all sections of the country." N.Y. Tribune, June 23.

JUNE 17. Lincoln writes Washburne that he will be home all summer, and hopes to see him. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, IV, 77.

JUNE 18. Lincoln writes to Carl Schurz: "I beg you to be assured that your having supported Gov. Seward, in preference to myself in the convention, is not even remembered by me for any practical purpose, or the slightest u[n]pleasant feeling. I go not back of the convention, to make distinctions among its' members; and, to the extent of our limited acquaintance, no man stands nearer my heart than yourself." Lincoln thanks Oran Follett of Sandusky for his interest "in the cause," and is aware of the matter on which he wrote, Seward "corruption." He writes Richard W. Thompson of Indiana that Thompson should talk to Henry Winter Davis of Maryland. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, IV, 78-9.

JUNE 19. "Lincoln is well and doing well," writes Herndon to Trumbull. "Has thousands of letters daily, many visitors every hour from all sections. He is bored, bored badly." Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Lyman Trumbull Papers, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. Lincoln, indignant, writes Galloway of Ohio: "Messrs. Follett, Foster & Co's Life of me is not by my authority; and I have scarcely been so much astounded by anything, as by their public announcement that it is authorized by me." He asks Galloway to "look it over, & exclude what you may think would embarrass the party — bearing in mind, at all times, that I authorize nothing — will be responsible for nothing." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, IV, 79-80.

JUNE 20. Lincoln makes his last appearance in U.S. Circuit Court. Case is Dawson v. Ennis and Ennis, for infringement of patent right in double plow. Lincoln and Ketchum argue case for plaintiff. Palmer for defendant. Court takes case under advisement (reaching decision Mar. 9, 1861). Illinois State Journal, June 21.

JUNE 21. Lincoln buys pair of boots for Tad. H. E. Pratt, 150.

JUNE 22. At request of O. M. Hatch, secretary of state, Lincoln sends autograph to Charles F. Ulrich, whose son is making collection. Photo.

JUNE 26. Lincoln writes Joshua R. Giddings that he has received his last letter and would have answered sooner except for illness in family. "The

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suggestions you make are very important, and are duly appreciated by me. If I fail, it will be for lack of ability, and not of purpose." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, IV, 80-1.

JUNE 28. Lincoln thanks William Cullen Bryant, editor of New York "Evening Post," for recent letter. "I appreciate the danger against which you would guard me; nor am I wanting in the purpose to avoid it. I thank you for the additional strength your words give me to maintain that purpose." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, IV, 81. Lincoln is elected to board of trustees of Illinois State University, Springfield's projected college. Minutes, Carthage College, Carthage, Ill.

JUNE 30. C. A. Barry, Massachusetts artist, arrives in Springfield to do crayon portrait of Lincoln. He presents letter of introduction from Gov. Banks of Massachusetts, and Lincoln agrees to give him sitting morning of July 2. Granite Monthly, Oct.-Dec., 1904, 102-04.

JULY 2. Lincoln poses for Barry. Ibid. He writes letter of introduction for D. L. Phillips of Anna, calling him one of the "most active and efficient republicans in Illinois. He is doing good service in our cause; and will ask nothing not needed, and misapply nothing received by him." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, IV, 81. Chicago Tribune notes that Willie Lincoln is dangerously ill with scarlet fever.

JULY 3. Barry continues work on his sketch of Lincoln. Granite Monthly, Oct.-Dec., 1904, 102-04.

JULY 4. Lincoln writes to his old friend A. G. Henry, now residing in Oregon. "Long before this you have learned who was nominated at Chicago. We know not what a day may bring forth; but, to-day, it looks as if the Chicago ticket will be elected." Mentioning Willie's scarlet fever, Lincoln adds: "I have a head-ache, and a sore throat upon me now, inducing me to suspect that I have an inferior type of the same thing." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, IV, 81-2.

JULY 10. Lincoln writes R. W. Thompson of Terre Haute, who apparently has asked for permission to make use of Lincoln's record: "If my record would hurt any, there is no hope that it will be over-looked; so that if friends can help any with it, they may as well do so. Of course, due caution and circumspection, will be used." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, IV, 82-3.

JULY 16. Lincoln writes Leonard Swett that he wants to see him and Judge Davis about their going to Pennsylvania. He gives Nicolay note of introduction to R. W. Thompson, with whom Nicolay is to confer. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, IV, 83-4. Lincoln writes $5 check to Second Portugese Church, Springfield. Photo. In evening he receives "elegant serenade by Sanford's opera troupe." Illinois State Journal, July 18.

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JULY 18. Lincoln writes to Hannibal Hamlin, his running mate. "It appears to me that you and I ought to be acquainted, and accordingly I write this as a sort of introduction of myself to you. You first entered the Senate during the single term I was a member of the House of Representatives, but I have no recollection that we were introduced." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, IV, 84-5.

JULY 19. Thomas M. Johnston, artist, calls on Lincoln, who promises to give him sitting next morning. Boston Globe, Feb. 15, 1932.

JULY 20. Lincoln writes Cassius M. Clay of Kentucky, thanking him for taking stump in Indiana, and asking Clay's permission to make appointments for him in southern Illinois. "In passing, let me say, that at Rockport you will be in the county within which I was brought up from my eigth year — having left Kentucky at that point of my life." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, IV, 85.

JULY 21. In western Illinois rumor persists that Lincoln years ago attended Know-Nothing lodge in Quincy. Lincoln writes to Abraham Jonas, reciting in detail his movements on two pertinent occasions when he visited Quincy, and asks that affidavits be procured from respectable men to settle the question. "It must not publicly appear that I am paying any attention to the charge." Lincoln endorses Gov. John Wood's invitation to Seward to speak in Springfield. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, IV, 85-6.

JULY 22. Lincoln consoles young friend who failed to pass Harvard entrance examinations. "Allow no feeling of discouragement to seize, and prey upon you. It is a certain truth, that you can enter, and graduate in, Harvard University; and having made the attempt, you must succeed in it. ‘Must’ is the word." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, IV, 87.

JULY 23. Lincoln writes to Caleb Smith of Indiana: "From present appearances we might succeed . . . without Indiana; but with it, failure is scarcely possible. Therefore put in your best efforts." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, IV, 87-8.

JULY 24. Springfield Republicans hold rally. Carl Schurz, speaker of day, arrives in morning and stays at Lincoln's home as guest. In evening American and German Wide-Awake clubs parade to Lincoln's residence and escort him and Schurz to state house. Illinois State Journal, July 25. Lincoln autographs for Schurz copy of Debates. Original owned by Paul Steinbrecher, Chicago, Ill.

JULY 25. Springfield Democrats demonstrate with procession. Democrats claim Lincoln watched parade from state house dome. Republicans deny it, and for weeks controversy, reminiscent of Lincoln's Mexican War resolutions, goes on as to ‘spot’ from which he viewed parade. Register, Illinois State Journal, July 26 ff.

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JULY 26. Thomas M. Johnston, Boston artist, completes portrait of Lincoln. R. R. Wilson, Lincoln in Portraiture, 104.

JULY 27. Lincoln writes Francis E. Spinner, New York congressman: "You will perhaps be pleased, as I have been, to know that many good men have tendered me substantially the same advice that you do (excepting as to re-election) and that no single man of any mark has, so far, tempted me to a contrary course." Spinner had warned Lincoln that Buchanan men were making patronage deals with Republicans. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, IV, 88.

JULY 28. Lincoln sends Nicolay, his secretary, to Carl Schurz with scrapbook which Schurz wants, and writes covering note. Ibid.

JULY 29. Lincoln acknowledges speech which James O. Putnam of New York sent him, and compliments him. "And now allow me to name one error. John Adams was not elected over Jefferson by the H. R. but Jefferson was over Burr. Such is my recollection." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, IV, 89.

JULY 30. To Thomas Doney, Lincoln writes: "The picture (I know not the artistic designation) was duly and thankfully received. I consider it a very excellent one; though, truth to say, I am a very indifferent judge." Ibid.

AUGUST 2. Lincoln writes letters of introduction of Judge David Davis, for Davis to use while touring east, especially Pennsylvania, on campaign business. Photo.

AUGUST 4. Lincoln writes to his old friend Simeon Francis, now living in Oregon. He has received three letters from Francis, unanswered earlier because he had not time "to write at length." Lincoln gives personal and political news. "We had a storm here last night which did considerable damage. . . . I hesitate to say it, but it really appears now, as if the success of the Republican ticket is inevitable." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, IV, 89-90.

AUGUST 6. Lincoln writes Simon Gameron that Lincoln's tariff notes David Davis has shown in Pennsylvania must not "get into the news-papers." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, IV, 90-1. He writes $5 check to "Wife." Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Original.

AUGUST 7. Correspondent of New York "Herald" calls on Lincoln at his home and finds Lincoln, Mrs. Lincoln, Willie, Tad, Mrs. Judd, and E. B. Washburne. "The ladies were especially entertaining, while ‘Old Abe’ and your correspondent took a chair together and talked upon almost every topic now attracting the attention of the public." Lincoln indiscreetly mentions his reply to Haycraft's letter: "Would not the people lynch me?" N.Y. Herald, Aug. 13.

AUGUST 8. Illinois Republicans hold immense rally to celebrate Lincoln's nomination. Thousands attend. Giant morning procession passes Lincoln

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residence; he reviews it from his doorway. In afternoon there is speaking from five stands at fair grounds. Lincoln appears, declines to make speech, and escapes on horseback. More speeches are made in evening at Wigwam and state house. Lincoln endorses pardon petition of Buckner S. Morris to Gov. Wood. Illinois State Journal, Aug. 9; The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, IV, 91-2.

AUGUST 9. O. H. Browning records in his diary: "In forenoon called at Lincolns and spent an hour, with him, Mrs. Lincoln & Mrs. Judd — A great many people still in town." Browning, Diary.

AUGUST 10. Lincoln writes to Cassius M. Clay proposing change in his Illinois speaking engagements. "As to the inaugural, I have not yet commenced getting it up; while it affords me great pleasure to be able to say the cliques have not yet commenced upon me." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, IV, 92-3.

AUGUST 11. Lincoln acknowledges letter and newspaper clipping from M. B. Miner. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, IV, 93.

AUGUST 13. J. Henry Brown, Pennsylvania artist, arrives with letter of introduction from John M. Read, Pennsylvania Republican. Lincoln consents to sit for miniature painted on ivory. "We walked together. . .," wrote Brown, "to a daguerrean establishment. I had a half dozen of ambrotypes taken of him before I could get one to suit me." Lincoln National Life Foundation, Fort Wayne, Indiana. — Brown Journal, Ms., photo. Lincoln credits promissory notes of A. and J. Haines of Pekin with $50 payment, and deposits money in his bank account. Illinois State Historical Library, Springfield, Illinois — Lincoln Estate Inventory; Marine Bank Ledger. He writes to "Mrs. Snedeker" acknowledging letter and box of peaches from "Daughters of Abraham." Original owned by Mrs. Eugene McCoil, Mt. Pleasant, Iowa.

AUGUST 14. To T. A. Cheney, Lincoln writes: "I would cheerfully answer your questions in regard to the Fugitive Slave law, were it not that I consider it would be both imprudent, and contrary to the reasonable expectation of friends for me to write, or speak anything upon doctrinal points now. Besides this, my published speeches contain nearly all I could willingly say. Justice and fairness to all, is the utmost I have said, or will say." He writes three other political letters. He asks George G. Fogg, secretary of Republican National Committee, how things look, and if he should accept invitation to Springfield, Mass. horse show. Samuel Galloway of Ohio he invites to visit him, unless time so spent would injure Galloway's congressional campaign. He writes to James E. Harvey of New York briefly on Republican jealousies there: "Justice and fairness to all." He endorses pardon petition of Thomas Patterson, recently convicted of manslaughter in Vermilion County. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, IV, 93-5.

AUGUST 15. Lincoln writes to John B. Fry that he receives many assurances from South "that in no probable event will there be any very formidable effort to break up the Union." To William Fithian of Danville he appeals

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for help in Vermilion legislative district. "To lose Trumbull's re-election next winter would be a great disaster." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, IV, 95.

AUGUST 16. New York "Herald" has written up Lincoln's remark about lynching in Kentucky if he should visit there. He writes George G. Fogg to have inserted in paper anonymous correction he has drafted, and he writes Haycraft to forestall in Kentucky undesired repercussions from "Herald" article. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, IV, 96-7. Lincoln sits for J. Henry Brown, artist, in Capitol library. Lincoln National Life Foundation, Fort Wayne, Indiana. — Brown Journal, photo.

AUGUST 17. Somewhat uneasy about New York, Lincoln writes to Thurlow Weed. "There will be the most extraordinary effort ever made, to carry New-York for Douglas. You, and all others who write me from your state, think the effort can not succeed; and I hope you are right;

still it will require close watching, and great effort on the other side." He asks Senator James F. Simmons if Rhode Island is safe, having received letter about money pouring in for Douglas. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, IV, 97-8.

AUGUST 18. Lincoln acknowledges book from C. H. Fisher. "While I have not yet found time to examine it, I doubt not I shall find much pleasure in its perusal." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, IV, 98.

AUGUST 20. Lincoln again sits, in Representatives Hall, for J. Henry Brown. Wilson, 109-10; Lincoln National Life Foundation, Fort Wayne, Indiana. — Brown Journal, photo.

AUGUST 22. Lincoln declines invitation to horse show at Springfield, Mass. "For reasons not necessary to be mentioned, I am constrained to decline the honor which you so kindly tender me." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, IV, 99. He sits for J. Henry Brown. Lincoln National Life Foundation, Fort Wayne, Indiana, Brown Journal, photo.

AUGUST 23. Still uneasy about New York "Herald" article, Lincoln writes Haycraft: "My only object was to assure you that I had not, as represented by the Herald correspondent, charged you with an attempt to inveigle me into Kentucky to do me violence. I believe no such thing of you, or of Kentuckians generally; and I dislike to be represented to them as slandering them in that way." He invites Robert C. Schenck of Ohio to campaign in Illinois. "We really want you." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, IV, 99-100.

AUGUST 24. Lincoln writes long autobiographical letter to his relative John Hanks of Macon County, who started "Rail Splitter" movement at Decatur convention. John's brother Charles has claimed Decatur rails were fakes. "Don't let this letter be made public." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, IV, 100-01. He gives fourth sitting to J. Henry Brown. Lincoln National Life Foundation, Fort Wayne, Indiana. — Brown Journal, photo.

AUGUST 25. Lincoln deposits $300. Marine Bank Ledger. "Mr. Lincoln's fifth and last sitting" for J. Henry Brown. "The picture gives great

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satisfaction; Mrs. Lincoln speaks of it in the most extravagant terms of approbation." Lincoln National Life Foundation, Fort Wayne, Indiana. — Brown Journal, photo.

AUGUST 26. Lincoln attends church, where J. Henry Brown sees him. "I hardly know how to express the strength of my personal regard for Mr. Lincoln," writes Brown. "I never saw a man for whom I so soon formed an attachment. I like him much, and agree with him in all things but his politics. He is kind and very sociable; immensely popular among the people of Springfield. . . . There are so many hard lines in his face that it becomes a mask of the inner man. His true character only shines out when in an animated conversation, or when telling an amusing tale, of which he is very fond. He is said to be a homely man; I do not think so." Ibid.

AUGUST 27. Lincoln gives his opinion of "supposed speech of Mr. Dallas to Lord Brougham" which correspondent sent. He cannot agree that slavery is a necessity imposed by Negro race. "That the going many thousand miles, seizing a set of savages, bringing them here, and making slaves of them, is a necessity imposed on us by them, involves a species of logic to which my mind will scarcely assent." He thanks Amory Holbrook of Oregon for his political news, and tells Judge John M. Read of Pennsylvania that J. Henry Brown's miniature is excellent. "To my unpracticed eye, it is without fault." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, IV, 101-02.

AUGUST 29. Still concerned about New York "Herald" story, Lincoln writes to Fogg: "You have done precisely right in that matter with the Herald. Do nothing further about it. Although it wrongs me, and annoys me some, I prefer letting it run its course, to getting into the papers over my own name." As to Republican prospects, "the whole field appears reasonably well." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, IV, 102.

AUGUST 30. Lincoln sends his autograph to C. H. Brown. Photo.

AUGUST 31. Lincoln tries to smooth factional differences among Pennsylvania Republicans. To John M. Pomeroy, who wrote of local troubles, he replies: "I am slow to listen to criminations among friends. . . . My sincere wish is that both sides will allow by-gones to be by-gones, and look to the present & future only." He also writes friendly notes to Zachariah Chandler of Michigan and Benjamin F. James of Chicago. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, IV, 102-04.

SEPTEMBER 1. Lincoln writes to Henry Wilson of Massachusetts on value of political organization. In late Aug. or early Sept. Lincoln begins long reply to pamphlet by John Hill, Petersburg Democrat, entitled "Opposing principles of Henry Clay and Abraham Lincoln." Having got his own pamphlet well started as reply, he gives it up, evidently deciding that Hill's attack is not worth more of his time. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, IV, 104-09.

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SEPTEMBER 4. Lincoln has heard rumor, as emanating from Hamlin, that Maine Republicans would lose two congressional districts. He writes Hamlin: "Such a result . . . would, I fear, put us on the down-hill track, lose us the State elections in Pennsylvania and Indiana, and probably ruin us on the main turn in November. You must not allow it." He relates his career as candidate to John Coulter of Niles, Mich., and writes Joseph Medill of Chicago reporting recent good news from key states. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, IV, 109-11.

SEPTEMBER 5. Opposition newspapers are circulating denunciation of Jefferson which they claim Lincoln made in 1844 speech. Lincoln denies it. "So far as its authorship is imputed to me," he writes A. G. Chester, Buffalo editor, "it is a base forgery." He "never said anything like it. . . . My friends will be entirely safe in denouncing the thing as a forgery." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, IV, 111-12.

SEPTEMBER 6. Lincoln reads proof sheets of his Cooper Union address, makes changes, and returns them to Charles C. Nott. "And now please accept for yourself, and present to the ‘Young men's Republican Union’ my grateful acknowledgments, for your and their exceeding kindness towards me in this matter." He writes to A. K. McClure of Pennsylvania regarding danger in that state. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, IV, 112-13.

SEPTEMBER 9. Lincoln acknowledges letter from E. B. Washburne, whose brother is running for governor of Maine. "Yours of the 5th. was received last evening. I was right glad to see it. It contains the freshest ‘posting’ which I now have. It relieved me some from a little anxiety I had about Maine." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, IV, 113-14.

SEPTEMBER 10. "I have pleasure in assuring you," Lincoln writes to Charles G. Wilson, "that there is no great pressure upon me for the offices in prospect." Lincoln, Browning, Hatch, and Dubois have conference for "arranging some political appointments." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, IV, 114; Browning, Diary. Lincoln is awarded land grant (120 acres) by federal government for Black Hawk War service. Hertz, Lincoln, 785.

SEPTEMBER 13. "You must not lay much stress on the blunder about Mr. Adams," Lincoln writes James O. Putnam, "for I made a more mischievous one, in the first printed speech of mine, on the Slavery question — Oct. 1854 — I stated that the prohibition of slavery in the North West Territory was made a condition in the Virginia deed of cession — while, in fact, it was not." He also writes James F. Babcock of New York about pictures and Volk's bust. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, IV, 114-15.

SEPTEMBER 14. Lincoln writes Judge John Pettit of Kansas about prospects in New York. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, IV, 115.

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SEPTEMBER 20. Lincoln writes Nathaniel Grigsby, whose brother Aaron had married Lincoln's sister in Indiana. "There is now a Republican electoral ticket in Missouri, so that you can vote for me if your neighbors will let you. I would advise you not to get into any trouble about it." He tells Gov. Morgan of New York, Republican national chairman, that Illinois is indeed in danger of losing legislature. Judd can tell him what national committee can do to help. Currently, however, Indiana is biggest problem because of their Oct. election. "Bend all your energies upon Indiana now." He acknowledges letter from his old friend Nathan Sargent. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, IV, 116-17.

SEPTEMBER 21. Correspondent of "Missouri Democrat" calls on Lincoln. "During that hour, visitors, ladies and gentlemen, called upon him from almost every State in the Union; and we were all greeted with a most cordial welcome by this man of the people." He "can not only discuss ably the great democratic principle of our Government, but at the same time tell how to navigate a vessel, maul a rail, or even dress a deer-skin." N.Y. Tribune, Sept. 29. Lincoln writes family history to John Chrisman, descendant of Virginia Lincolns. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, IV, 117.

SEPTEMBER 22. Lincoln writes five brief letters on politics. "It all looks very favorable to our success," he tells A. G. Henry of Oregon. "No one, this side of the mountains, pretends that any ticket can be elected by the People, unless it be ours." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, IV, 118-19.

SEPTEMBER 24. Lincoln writes young relative: "This side of the Rocky Mountains things appear reasonably well for the general result. In opposing David Logan, at the late Congressional election in Oregon, I suppose you did what you thought was right. . . . Still, I am sorry you did not think differently, as I knew David from his childhood, and he studied law in our office when his father and I were partners." He thanks F. E. Spinner of New York for "Bag of books." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, IV, 120-21.

SEPTEMBER 25. Lincoln advises prospective lawyer on how to study law. "Get the books, and read, and study them carefully. Begin with Blackstone's Commentaries, and after reading it carefully through, say twice, take up Ghitty's Pleading, Greenleaf's Evidence, & Story's Equity &c., in succession. Work, work, work, is the main thing." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, IV, 121.

SEPTEMBER 26. Prince of Wales passes through Springfield. Lincoln tells reporter that he wanted to see royal visitor, but that action on his part would have been inconsistent with dignity. So he remains at state house, where he met "so many sovereigns during the day that really the Prince had come and gone" before he knew it. N.Y. Herald, Oct. 20. Lincoln writes two brief political letters. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, IV, 121-22.

SEPTEMBER 27. Lincoln writes J. E. Harvey: "There is no reality in that

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suspicion about Judge Kelley. Neither he nor any other man has obtained or sought such a relation with me." He thanks George B. Lincoln of New York for sending campaign medals "for the Boys." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, IV, 122.

SEPTEMBER 28. O. M. Hatch introduces another New York "Herald" correspondent to Lincoln. Reporter finds him in governor's office, "seated, engaged in conversation with strangers from different parts of the country. . . . He entered at once into conversation upon the general topics of the day." N.Y. Herald, Oct. 20. Lincoln thanks "Prof. " Daniel P. Gardner for gift of soap. "Mrs. L. declares it is a superb article. She at the same time, protests that I have never given sufficient attention to the ‘soap question’ to be a competent judge." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, IV, 122-23.

SEPTEMBER 29. Lincoln enjoys himself by composing, in pencil, imaginary dialogue between Douglas and Breckinridge. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, IV, 123-24.

OCTOBER 1. Seward, on tour of west, passes through Springfield. Lincoln is one of crowd at station to meet him, and they chat briefly. Crowd cheers both. Illinois State Journal, Oct. 2. Charge that Lincoln had slandered Jefferson is still circulating. To J. H. Reed, Aledo, Ill. editor, Lincoln sends emphatic denial. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, IV, 124-25.

OCTOBER 2. Questions about Lincoln's tariff views are being asked of Republican speakers. One, J. E. Harvey, writes Lincoln for speech quotations on subject. Lincoln answers that none was reported, and refers Harvey to Republican tariff plank. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, IV, 125.

OCTOBER 5. Lincoln writes to Jesse Fell on importance of carrying three Illinois districts. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, IV, 126.

OCTOBER 6. Lincoln gives S. T. Logan receipt for balance of his share of fee in Cairo land case, Beaver v. Taylor and Gilbert. Total fee was $3,000. Logan gives Lincoln $239 cash and his note for $400. Paul M. Angle, New Letters and Papers of Lincoln, 256. Lincoln deposits cash in his bank account. Marine Bank Ledger.

OCTOBER 10. To Herndon, campaigning in Petersburg, Lincoln dashes off note: "I cannot give you details, but it is entirely certain that Pennsylvania and Indiana have gone Republican very largely, Penn. 25,000 & Indiana 5 to 10. Ohio of course is safe." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, IV, 126.

OCTOBER 11. Republicans celebrate victory in Ohio, Indiana, and Pennsylvania elections. Wide Awakes parade to Lincoln's home. "Mr. Lincoln, surrounded by a large number of personal friends, stood upon the doorsteps and bowed in silent acknowledgment of their cheers." Crowd moves to Wigwam for speeches. Illinois State Journal, Oct. 12.

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OCTOBER 12. Lincoln writes to William H. Seward about Seward's recent Speeches. "It now really looks as if the Government is about to fall into our hands. Pennsylvania, Ohio, and Indiana have surpassed all expectation." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, IV, 126-27. He buys tonic, cocaine, and powder at his drug store. H. E. Pratt, 153.

OCTOBER 13. Lincoln writes to Judge William D. Kelley gratefully accepting inscription to Lincoln in Kelley's new legal work. He thanks John M. Read of Pennsylvania for two framed engravings, and says he is rejoicing over Oct. election results. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, IV, 127.

OCTOBER 15. To L. Montgomery Bond of Philadelphia Lincoln explains his attitude toward South: "I certainly am in no temper, and have no purpose, to embitter the feelings of the South; but whether I am inclined to such a course as would, in fact, embitter their feelings, you can better judge by my published speeches, than by anything I would say in a short letter." In evening Lincoln visits Wigwam, where Thomas Corwin of Ohio speaks. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, IV, 128; Illinois State Journal, Oct. 16.

OCTOBER 16. John G. Nicolay records incident: "Mr. Lincoln, coming to his room this morning, was accosted by a stranger who inquired the way to the same place. Mr. Lincoln offered to show him the way, and arriving, very much electrified the man by turning round and saying to him, ‘I am Lincoln.’ He had no idea he was being ciceroned by the famous Rail Splitter." The Abraham Lincoln Association, Springfield, Illinois. [Files and records on deposit at Illinois State Historical Library, Springfield, Illinois.] — Memo. Ms.

OCTOBER 19. "I regret the necessity of saying I have no daughters," Lincoln writes to Miss Grace Bedell of Westfield, N.Y. "I have three sons — one seventeen, one nine, and one seven, years of age. They, with their mother, constitute my whole family. As to the whiskers, having never worn any, do you not think people would call it a piece of silly affection if I were to begin it now?" The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, IV, 129-30. Mrs. Lincoln buys and charges $5.50 worth of linen. H. E. Pratt, 150.

OCTOBER 23. Lincoln writes to David Turnham, friend of Indiana days: "I well remember when you and I last met, after a separation of fourteen years, at the cross-road voting place, in the fall of 1844. It is now sixteen years more and we are both no longer young men. I suppose you are a grandfather; and I, though married much later in life, have a son nearly grown." He tells William S. Speer of Tennessee that anything he might write disclaiming intention of interfering with slaves in slave states "would do no good." He has already many times said that in print. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, IV, 130-31. Mrs. Lincoln buys cloth and buttons which come to $16.35. H. E. Pratt, 150.

OCTOBER 24. Lincoln denies he ever gave money to Kansas Emigrant Aid societies. "I once subscribed twentyfive dollars, to be paid whenever Judge

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Logan would decide it was necessary to enable the people of Kansas to defend themselves against any force coming against them from without the Territory, and not by authority of the United States. Logan never made the decision, and I never paid." He writes note for "lady-bearer," instructing freight agent to "let her have the freight, and I will pay you any amount not exceeding four dollars on presentation of this note." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, IV, 131-32.

OCTOBER 25. To caller, Gen. Welsh of New York, Lincoln remarks: "I declare to you this morning. General, that for personal considerations I would rather have a full term in the Senate — a place in which I would feel more consciously able to discharge the duties required, and where there is more chance to make reputation, and less danger of losing it — than four years of the presidency." The Abraham Lincoln Association, Springfield, Illinois. [Files and records on deposit at Illinois State Historical Library, Springfield, Illinois.] — Nicolay Memo., Ms.

OCTOBER 26. Reports have reached Lincoln that on his election army officers at Fort Kearney intend to go south with their arms and resist. Though not greatly alarmed, he writes Maj. David Hunter to find out whether there is any foundation for rumor. He thanks H. E. Hoeike, St. Louis photographer, for photographs sent. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, IV, 132. Lincoln is visited by famous boxer, John C. Heenan, "the Benicia Boy." Illinois State Journal, Oct. 27.

OCTOBER 27. To G. T. M. Davis of Alton Lincoln refuses to make public statement of his views. He would repeat his intent of noninterference with slavery in slave states "a thousand times, if there were no danger of encouraging bold bad men to believe they are dealing with one who can be scared into anything." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, IV, 132-33.

OCTOBER 28. "Your suggestions are all worthy of consideration, and shall receive it," Lincoln writes R. W. Thompson. "The eyes of some of our best sentinels are already upon that matter of forged naturalization papers to be issued as from your court; and, if possible, the use of such papers will be prevented. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, IV. 133.

OCTOBER 29. To editor of Louisville "Journal," George D. Prentice, Lincoln explains his reluctance to restate his position in order to calm southern apprehensions. He is already on record. Opponents are eager for anything on which to base "new misrepresentations," and he does not care to put weapons in their hands. Lincoln writes polite notes to Mrs. Eliza A. Hamilton of Keene, N. H., and Mrs. Stephen A. Hurlbut of Belvidere, Ill. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, IV, 134-35.

OCTOBER 30. Jesse Atwood, Philadelphia portrait painter, is working on Lincoln's portrait. Illinois State Journal, Oct. 26, Nov. 1.

OCTOBER 31. Lincoln is convinced that his attitude of silence is proper. "Allow me to beg that you will not live in much apprehension of my

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precipitating a letter upon the public," he assures George G. Fogg. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, IV, 135.

NOVEMBER 3. Lincoln instructs his secretary: "I wish Mr. Nicolay would invite the following gentlemen to tea at my house, at 5 P.M. tomorrow. Mr. Schenck Mr. Piatt Mr. Cartter Mr. Ogden Mr. Philips Mr. Hatch Mr. Dubois Mr. Nicolay — himself. Saturday, Nov. 3. Lincoln." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, IV, 136.

NOVEMBER 4. Lincoln and guests have tea at Lincoln home. Ibid.

NOVEMBER 5. When Lincoln visits Post Office bystander asks how he is going to vote. "For Yates for Governor," he replies. But for President? "How vote?" Lincoln repeats — "By ballot!" He tells a funny story and walks off, arms full of mail. N.Y. Tribune, Nov. 10.

NOVEMBER 6. Election day. Lincoln spends most of it at his state house office. About 3 P.M. he walks quietly to polling place in courthouse. Crowd gives him ovation. After cutting his own name from ballot, he votes straight ticket. Evening he spends in telegraph office, getting returns. Shortly after midnight he and Mrs. Lincoln attend supper, and soon go home. Ibid., Nov. 7, 8.

NOVEMBER 7. Reporter writes: "Mr. Lincoln is this morning receiving the heartiest congratulations of his friends, or, in other words, of the entire community. His room at the State House is constantly thronged." In evening Republicans gather at state house, where, at 7:30, Lincoln, Hatch, and others appear. Lincoln listens to speeches, but declines to give one. Ibid., Nov. 8.

NOVEMBER 8. Lincoln is still receiving felicitations. Local Republicans however, are somewhat concerned over legislature, returns being so incomplete as to leave Trumbull's re-election in doubt. Ibid., Nov. 9. Lincoln writes Hamlin that he is anxious for personal interview, and asks him to meet him in Chicago. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, IV, 136.

NOVEMBER 9. Late returns forecast Trumbull's re-election. But trouble is brewing south. Lincoln reads dispatch that he has been hanged in effigy at Pensacola, Florida. Correspondent reports: "I am told that Mr. Lincoln considers the feeling at the South to be limited to a very small number, though very intense." N.Y. Tribune, Nov. 10. Lincoln thanks John Comstock of Peoria for barrel of flour manufactured during Republican procession at Peoria Aug. 31. He asks Nathan Sargent whom "Judge Campbell" favors for secretary of state, and thanks Gen. Winfield Scott for sending copy of his views on crisis. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, IV, 137.

NOVEMBER 10. To Truman Smith Lincoln reiterates his determination to make no public declaration. "I could say nothing which I have not

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already said, and which is in print, and open for the inspection of all." If commerce has slumped, let the "respectable scoundrels" who caused it "go to work and repair the mischief of their own making." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, IV, 138-39. He buys tonic and "Hair Balsam" at his drug store. H. E. Pratt, 153.

NOVEMBER 12. Reporter writes: "The news from the South produces no perceptible effect here, and fails to induce the least change in Mr. Lincoln's determination to withhold all intimations as to his policy. . . . The hunters for office have not yet assembled here in great force, but a brisk business is done with letters." N.Y. Tribune, Nov. 13.

NOVEMBER 13. Another reporter finds Lincoln studying nullification and Jackson's 1832 proclamation. He "is not a bit alarmed by the aspect of affairs." Illinois State Journal, Nov. 24. "Rest fully assured," Lincoln writes Haycraft, "that the good people of the South who will put themselves in the same temper and mood towards me which you do, will find no cause to complain of me." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, IV, 139.

NOVEMBER 14. Politicians begin their assault on Lincoln in person. Their activities give rise to newspaper speculation on cabinet selections. Lincoln remarks that "if the responsibility rested with them, as it does with him, they would be much less speedy with their selections and announcements." N.Y. Tribune, Nov. 15.

NOVEMBER 15. In conversation Lincoln expresses himself on disunion: "My own impression is at present (leaving myself room to modify the opinion if upon a further investigation I should see fit to do so) that this government possesses both the authority and the power to maintain its own integrity. . . . The ugly point is the necessity of keeping the government together by force, as ours ought to be a government of fraternity." The Abraham Lincoln Association, Springfield, Illinois. [Files and records on deposit at Illinois State Historical Library, Springfield, Illinois.] — Nicolay Memo.

NOVEMBER 16. Kentucky visitor urges Lincoln to make up his cabinet of "conservative" men, including one or more from South. Lincoln tells his visitor "that the substance of his plan was that the Republicans should now again surrender the Government into the hands of the men they had just conquered, and that the cause should take to its bosom the enemy who had always fought it." Ibid. He writes to Nathanial P. Paschall, editor of "Missouri Republican," explaining his reasons for silence. "I am not at liberty to shift my ground. . . . If I thought a repetition would do any good I would make it. But my Judgment is it would do positive harm. The secessionists, per se believing they had alarmed me, would clamor all the louder." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, IV, 139-40.

NOVEMBER 17. Gustave Koerner has interview with Lincoln, who says he "has no idea of taking a position towards the South which might be considered a sort of apology for his election." Koerner, II, 105. On Ruckel

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mortgage, made Sept. 28, 1857, Lincoln credits $50 payment, third year's interest. Photo.

NOVEMBER 18. "The exciting news from the South does not appear to disturb Mr. Lincoln's equanimity. Without underrating its bearing, he still adheres to the opinion that actual secession will not be attempted. He avoids discussing this delicate question in the presence of visitors, but when referring to it his words are said to indicate a firm and settled opinion against the right to secede." N.Y. Herald, Nov. 22.

NOVEMBER 19. Lincoln writes three acknowledgments of congratulations, including one to his old friend Speed: "I shall be at Chicago Thursday the 22nd. Inst. and one or two succeeding days. Could you not meet me there? Mary thinks of going with me; and therefore I suggest that Mrs. S. accompany you." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, IV, 140-41. Donn Piatt and R. G. Schenck of Ohio arrive in Springfield, take tea with Lincoln at home, and sit far into night discussing situation. Illinois State Journal, Nov. 20, Donn Piatt, Memories of the Men who Saved the Union, 29-34.

NOVEMBER 20. Republicans hold "ratification" meeting at which Trumbull delivers principal address. Lincoln writes part of his speech. Keynote of his contribution is that "each and all of the States will be left in as complete control of their own affairs . . . as they have ever been under any administration." Wide-Awake parade stops at Lincoln's house en route to Wigwam for Trumbull's speech, calls for Lincoln, who addresses them briefly in similar vein. Illinois State Journal, Nov. 21; The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, IV, 141-43.

NOVEMBER 21. Springfield and Chicago. Crowd gathers at station to see Lincoln off. Train stops at Lincoln, Bloomington, and Lexington, and Lincoln makes brief talks. In Chicago his party goes to Tremont House, where Hamlin awaits them. Meeting of future President and Vice-President is "cordial in the highest degree." N.Y. Herald, Nov. 22; Chicago Journal, Nov. 22; The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, IV, 143-44.

NOVEMBER 22. Chicago. Lincoln, Hamlin, Mrs. Lincoln, Mrs. Piatt, and others visit Wigwam, Post Office, Custom House, U.S. Court, and return to Tremont House. N.Y. Herald, Nov. 23.

NOVEMBER 23. Public reception takes up morning. "Until noon, a steady stream of visitors poured in at the Lake street entrance of the Tremont House." Lincoln, Mrs. Lincoln, and Hamlin shake hands with all who pass. After reception Lincoln declines to receive visitors. At 5 he dines with Trumbull and Hamlin. Chicago Tribune, Nov. 24; N.Y. Herald, Nov. 24.

NOVEMBER 24. Lincoln gives his autograph to George D. Rumsey, son of Mayor Julian S. Rumsey of Chicago. Photo. Lincoln and Hamlin seclude themselves at Lake View, home of Ebenezer Peck, and discuss cabinet business. William E. Baringer, A House Dividing, 84.

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NOVEMBER 25. "Mr. Lincoln attended St. James Church . . . with Hon. Isaac N. Arnold, and in the afternoon, by invitation, was present at the Mission Sabbath School and made a short address to the children." Chicago Journal, Nov. 26. Lincoln sits for Samuel Alschuler, formerly of Urbana, who photographed Lincoln in 1858. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, IV, 145.

NOVEMBER 26. Chicago and Springfield. Before leaving Tremont House, Lincoln pens note to his old friend Henry Whitney, formerly of Urbana, replying to Whitney's note on behalf of Alschuler, photographer. Ibid. Mr. and Mrs. Lincoln leave Chicago at 9 A.M. and reach Springfield at 6:30. Lincoln's return "is the delight of the reporters and a number of office-seekers, who have been lying in wait for him since [Nov. 24]. The President and party traveled in separate cars. No ovations were received on the way on account of the rainy weather." Chicago Journal, Nov. 26; N.Y. Tribune, Nov. 27.

NOVEMBER 27. Springfield. Lincoln spends most of day reading several hundred accumulated letters. Ibid., Nov. 28. To Hamlin he writes: "I deem it proper to advise you that I also find letters here from very strong and unexpected quarters in Pennsylvania, urging the appointment of General Cameron to a place in the cabinet." He writes autograph for Fred R. Jackson of Stillwater, N.Y. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, IV, 145.

NOVEMBER 28. Lincoln answers demand of H. J. Raymond of N.Y. "Times" for policy statement: "On the 20th. Inst. Senator Trumbull made a short speech which I suppose you have both seen and approved. Has a single newspaper, heretofore against us, urged that speech [upon its readers] with a purpose to quiet public anxiety? Not one, so far as I know." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, IV, 145-46.

NOVEMBER 29. "Quite a number of country people were in town, and paid their respects to the President-elect. Mr. Lincoln, like the rest of Anglo-American mankind, feasted on a roast turkey, and having special cause to thank his Maker, attended Divine service." He has long interview with George Fogg of Republican National Committee. N.Y. Tribune, Dec. 1.

NOVEMBER 30. Lincoln has many visitors, among them Hugh White of New York, with whom he served in Congress, and "several Kentuckians of standing," who are favorably impressed with his "conversational powers." Ibid.; N.Y. Herald, Dec.6. Lincoln writes Alexander H. Stephens requesting copy of speech Stephens has made in Georgia legislature. For John H. Littlefield, law student at his office, Lincoln writes: "I will pay five dollars to whomever will loan that sum to the bearer, Mr. Littlefield." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, IV, 146.

DECEMBER 1. Hawkins Taylor of Iowa tells Lincoln that he and party are in debt to Cameron for success in Pennsylvania. Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. — Simon Cameron Papers, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C., Taylor to Cameron, Jan. 12, 1861.

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DECEMBER 3. Joshua R. Giddings, Ohio abolitionist, has long interview with Lincoln. "Mr. Lincoln keeps himself fully posted as to the conditions of the money market. Mr. Dubois, the State Auditor . . . furnishes him constantly such information as enables him to understand the strange capers of your bulls and bears." N.Y. Herald, Dec. 9.

DECEMBER 4. "Mr. Lincoln's room was crowded all day during reception hours," reporter writes, "and there was no end of introductions, salutations, congratulations, compliments, etc. etc. The attention of the President-elect is now fixed on Congress. He awaits the appearance of his predecessor's Message with the greatest anxiety." George Fogg is again in town, spending much time with Lincoln. Ibid.

DECEMBER 5. Illinois electoral college meets and casts its vote for Lincoln and Hamlin. Lincoln and electors dine at home of James C. Conkling. N.Y. Tribune, Dec. 6. He reads synopsis of Buchanan's message, and is irritated at what he considers President's desire to place responsibility for secession crisis on free states. N.Y. Herald, Dec. 10. Mrs. Lincoln buys and charges "3 yds. Cashmere @ 1.40." H. E. Pratt, 150.

DECEMBER 6. After reading text of Buchanan's message, Lincoln is considerably mollified. N.Y. Herald, Dec. 11. Lincoln turns back "Illinois Staats-Anzeiger" to Theodore Canisius. Across back of May 30, 1859 contract he certifies that Canisius has fulfilled obligations, and therefore, for consideration, he conveys to him type, paper, and good will. Barton, I, 423.

DECEMBER 7. Lincoln writes passage from "House Divided" speech for E. B. Pease of Springfield, and adds certificate of genuineness. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, IV, 147.

DECEMBER 8. Lincoln writes William H. Seward: "With your permission, I shall, at the proper time, nominate you to the Senate, for confirmation, as Secretary of State, for the United States." He encloses this note in letter to Hamlin, asking him to consult with Trumbull, "and if you and he see no reason to the contrary, deliver the letter to Governor Seward at once. If you see reason to the contrary, write me at once." He writes explanatory letter to Seward, and letter to Trumbull asking him to confer with Hamlin about Seward, sending copies of both letters to Seward. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, IV, 147-49.

DECEMBER 10. Lincoln writes Trumbull again: "Let there be no compromise on the question of extending slavery. If there be, all our labor is lost, and, ere long, must be done again. The dangerous ground — that into which some of our friends have a hankering to run — is Pop. Sov. Have none of it. Stand firm. The tug has to come, & better now, than any time hereafter." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, IV, 149-50.

DECEMBER 11. Lincoln writes William Kellogg, congressman from Illinois, letter similar to one just sent Trumbull. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, IV, 150. In Springfield

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secession is now considered certain. "The President elect is prepared for the inevitable calamity, and his plans of action, it is said, are being adapted to it." N.Y. Herald, Dec. 15. Francis P. Blair Jr. of St. Louis confers with Lincoln. Ibid., Dec. 17.

DECEMBER 12. Blair spends most of day with Lincoln. He denounces compromise and concession. Ibid. Lincoln replies to demands that he place in his cabinet two or three Southerners from opposition parties by publishing short editorial in "Illinois State Journal." Who knows whether they would accept? If so, who surrenders, they or Lincoln? Or do they commence "in open opposition?" The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, IV, 150. Mrs. Lincoln buys and charges $8 shawl and 14 yards of "Moreno" ($15.40). H. E. Pratt, 150.

DECEMBER 13. Lincoln stiffens another Illinois congressman, Washburne. "Prevent, as far as possible, any of our friends from demoralizing themselves, and our cause, by entertaining propositions for compromise of any sort, on ‘slavery extension.’" The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, IV, 151. Lincoln buys yard goods and 75˘ pocket handkerchief at John Williams' store. H. E. Pratt, 150. At night Lincoln attends wedding "of his friend . . . Hon. O. M. Hatch, the Secretary of State, to Miss Enos, of this city." N.Y. Herald, Dec. 20.

DECEMBER 14. "The appearance of Mr. Lincoln has somewhat changed for the worse within the last week," "Herald" reporter writes. "He . . . looks more pale and careworn. . . . But . . . the vigor of his mind and steadiness of his humorous disposition are obviously unimpaired." Ibid.

DECEMBER 15. On invitation of Lincoln, Bates of Missouri is in Springfield. He spends most of day with Lincoln, and it is rumored he has been offered cabinet post. N.Y. Tribune, Dec. 17. Lincoln writes confidential letter to John A. Gilmer, North Carolina congressman. Declining to write for publication, Lincoln emphasizes conservative nature of his views. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, IV, 151-53.

DECEMBER 17. Lincoln writes Trumbull and Weed: let there be no compromise on slavery extension. To Weed he defines his position on secession: "My opinion is that no state can, in any way lawfully, get out of the Union, without the consent of the others; and that it is the duty of the President, and other government functionaries to run the machine as it is." The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, IV, 153-54. Mrs. Lincoln buys and charges yard goods and edging. H. E. Pratt, 150.

DECEMBER 18. Lincoln writes announcement of appointment of Edward Bates to cabinet for insertion in "Missouri Democrat." To John D. Defrees he comments: "I am sorry any republican inclines to dally with Pop. Sov. of any sort. It acknowledges that slavery has equal rights with liberty, and surrenders all we have contended for." He writes Montgomery Blair of Maryland that he is corresponding with Gilmer. Trumbull can show Blair

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copy of Lincoln's letter. He complains to Henry J. Raymond of New York "Times" about misrepresentations of Mississippian, William Smedes, whose writing "Times" has published. "A very mad-man," says Lincoln. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, IV, 154-56.

DECEMBER 19. Mississippian, "a live disunionist, wearing the emblem of secession," calls on Lincoln. When conversation turns to secession, Southerner makes sullen remarks. Lincoln defines stand of his party and presents copy of Lincoln-Douglas debates, autographed. Visitor is visibly chastened. N.Y. Herald, Dec. 24.

DECEMBER 20. Thurlow Weed arrives and calls on Lincoln at home, where they confer until mid-afternoon. It is rumored that Weed has received little encouragement for his proposed compromise. Lincoln draws up three short resolutions for presentation to Republicans of Senate Committee of Thirteen. News of secession of South Carolina reaches Springfield and produces sensation. Lincoln, however, receives it calmly. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, IV, 156-57; N.Y. Tribune, Dec. 21; N.Y. Herald, Dec. 25. Mrs. Lincoln buys more yard goods and edging. H. E. Pratt, 150.

DECEMBER 21. Lincoln informs Trumbull of Weed's visit, and says he gave him three resolutions which might do much good "if introduced, and unanamously supported by our friends." He advises Gov. Curtin on Curtin's inaugural remarks: "I think you would do well to express, without passion, threat, or appearance of boasting, but nevertheless, with firmness, the purpose of yourself, and your state to maintain the Union at all hazzards." He thanks Francis P. Blair Sr. of Washington for his account of Blair's interview with Gen. Scott. "If the forts shall be given up before the inaugeration, the General must retake them afterwards." Washburne has also talked to Scott, and reported. Lincoln writes Washburne to tell commanding general forts must be held or retaken. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, IV, 157-59.

DECEMBER 22. Informed of rumor that Buchanan has instructed Major Anderson to surrender Fort Sumter if attacked, Lincoln exclaims, "If that is true they ought to hang him!" He adds that he has just written to Washburne "to tell General Scott confidentially that I wished him to be prepared, immediately after my inauguration, to make arrangements at once to hold the forts, or, if they had been taken, to take them back again." The Abraham Lincoln Association, Springfield, Illinois. [Files and records on deposit at Illinois State Historical Library, Springfield, Illinois.] — Nicolay Memo., Ms. Lincoln writes Major David Hunter that he thinks forts must be retaken, if they fall. Lincoln acknowledges letter from Peter H. Silvester of Coxsackie, N.Y., former colleague in Congress, but has time to write no more than that, and: "If Mr. B. surrenders the forts, I think they must be retaken." He replies to letter from Alexander H. Stephens of Georgia, another former congressional colleague, assuring him that South will not be harmed by Republican rule. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, IV, 159-61.

DECEMBER 24. Two notables arrive in Springfield, Lincoln's old friend

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E. D. Baker and David Wilmot of Pennsylvania. Lincoln calls on Wilmot at his hotel and spends most of day. N.Y. Tribune, Dec. 25. Lincoln writes to Trumbull. Lincoln has heard that South Carolina forts are to be surrendered. If true, he intends to announce publicly that they are to be retaken, to give Union men "a rallying cry." He thanks Isaac N. Morris, Quincy, for introducing Union resolution in Congress, and asks Hamlin to find New Englander of Democratic antecedents for cabinet. "Or shall I decide for myself?" The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, IV, 161-62. Lincoln buys yard goods for his wife, and 11 handkerchiefs for Christmas presents. H. E. Pratt, 150.

DECEMBER 26. Lincoln deposits $400 in his bank account. Marine Bank Ledger.

DECEMBER 27. "That popular mania — the collection of autographs of distinguished men," "Herald" correspondent writes, "— has proved of late a source of considerable annoyance to Mr. Lincoln also, and hardly a mail reaches here without bringing him numerous requests." N.Y. Herald, Jan. 5, 1861. Lincoln begins daily morning sittings for Thomas D. Jones, Cincinnati sculptor, at improvised studio at St. Nicholas Hotel. This hour enables Lincoln to escape visitors, relax, and think. Among the matters on his mind is struggle for and against Cameron. Lincoln writes memorandum of charges that Cameron bought his election to Senate in 1857, listing witnesses for and against him. He concludes that weight of evidence is for Gameron. Thomas D. Jones, Memories of Lincoln, 5-8; The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, IV, 165-67.

DECEMBER 28. Lincoln writes Trumbull: "Gen. Duff Green is out here endeavoring to draw a letter out of me. I have written one, which herewith I inclose to you, and which I believe could not be used to our disadvantage. Still, if, on consultation with our discreet friends, you conclude that it may do us harm, do not deliver it." [Enclosure, which states that Lincoln would not oppose constitutional amendment, and that he would uphold right of each state to control its domestic institutions, is not delivered.] The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, IV, 162-63.

DECEMBER 29. Lincoln is convinced that Gulf states will secede, and is watching border states "with daily increasing interest." N.Y. Herald, Jan. 3, 1861. Lincoln and Nicolay move out of governor's office at state house. Lincoln plans to spend most of his time at home, and Nicolay takes room in Johnson's Building, across from Chenery House. Lincoln expects to come in occasionally. The Abraham Lincoln Association, Springfield, Illinois. [Files and records on deposit at Illinois State Historical Library, Springfield, Illinois.] — Nicolay Memo. Lincoln replies to William Cullen Bryant, who warned him about compromises of "well-known politician." Lincoln says he did not press any compromise. "As to the matter of the cabinet, . . . I shall have a great deal of trouble, do the best I can." He writes Seward his reaction to four names Seward proposed for cabinet. Lincoln also answers letter from James Watson Webb, New York editor. Forts must be held or retaken. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, IV, 163-65.

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DECEMBER 30. Simon Camelon, cabinet candidate from Pennsylvania, arrives in Springfield. He proceeds to Lincoln's residence, where he is received with Lincoln's "customary artless Western heartiness." N.Y. Herald, Jan. 7. Later they talk at Cameron's hotel, and are accidentally joined by Edward Bates. Edward Bates, Diary.

DECEMBER 31. Cameron's visit brings results, for Lincoln writes: "I think fit to notify you now, that by your permission, I shall, at the proper time, nominate you to the U.S. Senate, for confirmation as Secretary of the Treasury, or as Secretary of War — which of the two, I have not yet definitely decided." Lincoln also writes note to Chase of Ohio, asking him to come to Springfield at once. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, Roy P. Basler, Editor, Rutgers; 1953, IV, 168.

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Glossary of Legal Terms.

ad litem — for a limited period

ad quod damnum — fine and imprisonment

appellant — supreme court plaintiff

appellee — supreme court defendant

assumpsit — action for breach of contract

capias — writ ordering that person be taken in custody

declaration — formal statement of plaintiff

dedimus — writ commissioning citizen to take evidence for court

demurrer — plea challenging allegations of opposite party

et al. — and others

ex parte — in the matter of

ex rel. — in relation to

et ux. — and wife

interlocutory decree — preliminary legal ruling

mandamus — command writ of superior court

nolle prosequi — no further prosecution

non detinet — writ ordering release of property

p. d. — for defendant

p. q. — for plaintiff

parol — by deposition

praecipe — write commanding person to come before court.

procedendo — writ of remand

pro confesso — confessed

replevin — action to recover goods or chattels

replication — defendant's reply to plaintiff

scire facias — writ requiring person named to show cause why court record

should not be enforced supersedeas — stay writ

trover — action to recover personal property

vi et armis — by force of arms

writ of certiorari — legal writ summoning lower court record

nts

Notes.

1. Lincoln never introduced bill, possibly because his incoming mail about jobs under Taylor, and his colleagues, reminded him that such a move would hurt his patronage chances. Nor was there possibility of passage. Hence, serving notice of intent was no less effective, as antislavery move, than introducing bill.

2. Basic cause of Lincoln's defeat was disenchantment of Illinois Whigs with his Mexican War position, plus support for Butterfield by Whig party's national leaders Henry Clay and Daniel Webster. Beveridge, I, 49n; Herndon & Weik, 224n.

3. Before his death in July, 1849, Robert S. Todd had begun suit for recovery of estate of his cousin, Mary Todd Russell, who conveyed her property to Robert Wickliffe, her husband. On this date bill of revivor is filed in Fayette County Court, Kentucky, on behalf of Mr. and Mrs Abraham Lincoln and other heirs of . Todd, "who charge as in the original & cross bills of their ancestor." Townsend, Lincoln and His Wife's Home Town, 206-07.

4. SW 1/4 of the NE 1/4 of Sec. 29 T 17 R4.

5. Time en route is based on experience of O. H. Browning, who traveled from Quincy to Easton, Mo. by the same . route in 1860. Browning, Diary.