ills

Pictures and Illustrations.

Negro Hunt

Story of Malem-Boo

1

Vol. 1. No. 1

The American Anti-Slavery Almanac, for 1836,Being Bissextile of Leap-Year, and the 60th of American Independence. Calculated for Boston, New York and Pittsburgh, and adapted to most parts of the United States.

2

Eclipses in the Year 1836.

1. There will be an eclipse of the Moon, on Sabbath, May 1st, in the morning, visible.

 
Bost.
N.Y.
Phil.
  H. M. H. M. H. M.
Beginning, 2 18 2 6 2 2
Ecliptical opposition 3 13 3 1 2 57
Middle, 3 22 3 10 3 6
End 4 26 4 14 4 10

Quantity, four and a half digits on the Moon's southern limb.

II. There will be an eclipse of the Sun on Sabbath, May 15th, in the morning, visible. The eclipse will be on the Sun's southern limb, as seen from North America.

 
Bost.
N.Y.
Phil.
  H. M. H. M. H. M.
Beginning, 7 24 7 8 7 2
Greatest obscuration, 8 31 8 14 8 7
End 9 59 9 28 9 32
Duration, 2 35 2 30 2 30
Digits eclipsed,
8 1/4
8
8

III. Moon eclipsed, October 24th, in the morning, invisible.

IV. Sun eclipsed, November 8th, in the evening, invisible.

Chronological Cycles.

Dominical Letters, C B Epact, 12 Roman Indiction, 9
Golden Number, 13 Solar Cycle, 25 Julian Period, G549

Explanation of the Calendar pages. — The 1st and 2nd columns show the days of the month and week. The six succeeding columns show the time of the sun's rising and setting in the places named at the top. The large figures show the hour, and the smaller ones the minutes. The next three columns show the time of the moon's rising and setting at the places mentioned. The 12th column shows the difference between mean or true time as it would be exhibited by a perfect clock, and apparent time, as it is indicated by the sun. The 13th column shows the time of high water in Boston. To find it at other places, add to the time given in the Calendar pages, or subtract from it, according to the following

TABLE.
    H. M.
Albany add 4 12
Charleston, S.C. sub. 4 10
Nantucket add 0 30
New Bedford sub. 3 53
New London sub. 2 36
New York sub. 2 21
Newburyport sub. 0 15
Philadelphia add 2 57
Portland sub. 0 45
Portsmouth, N.H. sub. 0 15
Providence sub. 3 05
Savannah sub 3 15
St. Johns, N.B. add 0 30
Vineyard Sound sub 0 30

The calculations in this Almanac are all in mean time, except the column of High Water, which is given in apparent time for the accommodation of sailors, who, when at sea, usually regulate their timepieces by the sun.

Entered according to act of Congress, in the year 1835, by Webster & Southard, in the Clerk's Office of the District Court of Massachusetts.

3

To The Public.

As a reason for issuing a new Almanac for 1836, I would merely call your attention to the fact that SLAVERY exists in the United States. While it continues, I shall deem it an imperative duty to lift up my voice in behalf of the master and the slave. My love for the master impels me to expostulate with him, and to warn him of the perils which surround the path in which he is walking. When I hear the slave groaning beneath the lash, humanity will not permit me to turn a deaf ear to his cry. But many are ready to ask. What right have we at the north to meddle with slavery? I will not stop to show that we have a right to plead the cause of those who are appointed to destruction: — I will merely allude to a few considerations which prove that we are under solemn obligations so to do.

1. Slavery is exerting a corrupting influence upon us; it is our duty to counteract this influence.

2. We have in various ways contributed to uphold and extend slavery at the south.[See Calendar page for March] It is our duty to endeavor to atone for our fault in this respect.

3. We are acting as partners to slave-holders, by restoring their fugitive slaves.

4. We have promised to assist the master in sustaining his authority, by furnishing military force, when needed, to put down insurrection.

5. We are setting the slave-holders an example of oppression, by continuing slavery in the District of Columbia, and the territories.

6. We are rewarding slave-holders for their usurpation and injustice, by allowing them to send 25 Representatives to Congress, to represent their slave property.

In preparing this work, I have acted independently of any man or body of men, and no one but myself is committed, by anything here published. It has been my chief object to condense as many valuable ideas within the prescribed limits as a proper regard to perspicuity would allow. It is rather a collection of texts than a series of essays. I am aware that some readers wish to be entirely relieved of the labor of thinking for themselves. This work is not prepared for such. It is designed to suggest matter for thought and reflection. In many cases, a thought expressed in a single sentence might furnish matter for several pages of useful comments. I ask the reader to scrutinize closely, and reflect candidly upon the various topics here presented, and if any farther information is desired, the list of books at the end will direct you where to find it.

In giving facts, anecdotes, &c., illustrative of slavery, I have carefully avoided those accounts of unusual cruelty and atrocity which have come to my knowledge; but have chosen those which show the common and ordinary operations of the system.

The extracts from the debate in the Virginia Legislature speak volumes. They are worthy of an attentive perusal by every northern opponent of abolition.

I have made free use of the many valuable works on slavery within my reach, and it has been almost impossible to give credit for every sentence and part of sentence so used. I here acknowledge my obligations to all those from whose writings I have derived assistance.

Most of the matter has been prepared, while I have been laboring under bodily indisposition and while many other objects have required my constant attention. The readers of the Almanac will receive this as an apology for its imperfections. NATH'L SOUTHARD

4

January begins on Friday.

1, 1831. First number of the Liberator published in Boston.

14, 1835. American Union for the relief and improvement of the colored race, organized in Boston.

25, 1835. William Turpin died in New York, aged 80. He was a native of Rhode Island, but removed to Charleston, S.C. He early became convinced of the sinfulness of slavery. Many slaves were emancipated by his exertions, and provided with comfortable means of support. He was instrumental in releasing from prison 29 free colored persons, who would have been sold by the laws of South Carolina, but for his exertions. He was a member of the Society of Friends, and very wealthy. At his death he made liberal bequests to those who had formerly been his slaves; and gave $20,000 to be applied to the benefit of free people of color.

30, 1832. The New England Anti-Slavery Society formed at Boston. This was the first Society of the kind which was formed in the United States. It is now called Massachusetts A.S. Society.

"I Wish You a Happy New Year."

This kind of expression will come from many a happy heart, and be accompanied by many a token of love at the beginning of 1836. Parents and children, brothers and sisters, neighbors and schoolmates, relatives and friends, will thus express their mutual regard. But who wishes a happy new year to the slave, whose years are spent in toil and hardship for which he has no reward, and who is constantly liable to injury for which he has no redress? Reader, do you wish a happy new year to him? have you prepared for him a new year's present? Can you not find some means to show your sympathy, by doing something in his behalf? Pity the slave, whose new year is a new link added to his chain of wretchedness.

"Do you wish a happy new year to the master? Can you make the year happy to him who is constantly alarmed lest, sudden destruction should overtake him? — The number of years is hidden to the oppressor. A dreadful sound, (or as in the margin, a sound of fears,) is in his ears. In prosperity the destroyer shall come upon him." Job 15:20,21. A clergyman once stated in Boston that he had correspondents in Alabama, who informed him that they were in a state of constant alarm: that they did not dare to go to bed at night, without one of their number kept awake to keep watch, lest there should be an insurrection of the slaves. Many slave-holders are in the constant habit of sleeping with pistols at their bedside; and in some cases, it is said, they take the young children of their slaves to sleep in their own rooms, that the slaves may be prevented from attacking them for fear of hurting their own children. Does not the show that they have a sound of fears in their ears? Neither the slaves nor masters, (speaking generally,) can have a happy new year while slavery continues.

[From a southern paper. A specimen of thousands.]

BY S. PHILBRICK & CO. — At private sale.

A prime likely negro wench, a good Cook, Washer and Ironer, and her son, a likely mulatto boy about 14 years of age. — June 22, 1835.

BY J.B. HERBERT & CO. — At private sale.

A Negro Man 24 years of age, a good hostler. Also a Girl 22 years old, a cook and washer. Also, a Boy 16 years old.

5

January — First Month.

THE NEGRO'S REPLY.

"Dat man is either fool or knave, And his heart is sealed to me, Who says de poor afflicted slave Is happier dan de free; But if he be not fool or knave, And if he tell de truth of me, Den let him come and be de slave, And I will be de free."

 
Boston
New York
Pittsburgh
MOON'S PHASES. D. H. M.   H. M.   H. M.  
Full Moon, 3 8 21 eve. 8 9 eve. 8 0 eve.
Third Quarter, 11 11 44 morn. 11 32 morn. 11 23 morn.
New Moon, 18 3 44 morn. 3 32 morn. 3 23 morn.
First Quarter 25 10 3 morn. 9 51 morn. 9 42 morn.


   
Boston
New York
Pittsburg
Bost.
N.Y.
Pitts
 
Bost.
DM DW Sun Rise Sun Sets Sun Rise Sun Sets Sun Rise Sun Sets Moon sets. Moon sets. Moon Sets S. slo. m s High Watr
1 Frid 7> 32 4 35 7> 27 4 41 7 25 4 42 5 31 5 26 5 19 3 35 9 56
2 Sat 32 36 27 42 25 43 6 31 6 25 5 18 4 3 10 34
3 SUN 32 37 27 43 25 44 rises rises rises 4 31 11 10
4 Mon 32 38 27 44 25 45 5 09 5 15 5 23 4 59 11 49
5 Tues 32 39 27 45 25 46 6 11 6 17 6 24 5 26 morn
6 Wed 32 40 27 46 25 47 7 17 7 21 7 24 5 53 0 18
7 Thu 32 41 27 47 25 48 8 24 8 28 8 32 6 19 1 4
8 Frid 32 42 27 48 25 49 9 32 9 34 9 37 6 45 1 41
9 Sat 32 43 27 49 24 50 10 40 10 41 10 42 7 11 2 20
10 SUN 32 44 26 5 50 24 51 11 49 11 49 11 48 7 36 3 00
11 Mon 7 31 45 7 26 5 50 7 24 4 52 morn morn morn 8 0 3 49
12 Tues 31 4 46 26 51 24 53 1 2 1 0 0 57 8 24 4 48
13 Wed 31 47 26 52 24 54 2 17 2 13 2 9 8 47 6 3
14 Thu 30 49 25 54 23 56 3 34 3 29 3 24 9 10 7 25
15 Frid 30 50 25 55 23 57 4 53 4 47 4 40 9 32 8 39
16 Sat 29 51 24 56 23 58 6 8 6 1 5 53 9 53 9 42
17 SUN 29 52 24 57 22 59 sets sets sets 10 13 10 37
18 Mon 28 53 23 58 22 5 0 5 13 5 19 5 26 10 33 11 22
19 Tues 28 55 23 59 21 1 6 30 6 35 6 40 10 53 aft 6
20 Wed 27 56 22 5 0 21 2 7 46 7 49 7 53 11 11 0 45
21 Thu 7 26 57 7 22 2 7 20 3 8 57 8 59 9 1 11 29 1 23
22 Frid 26 58 21 3 20 5 10 5 10 5 10 6 11 46 2 2
23 Sat 25 5 0 21 4 19 6 11 10 11 9 11 8 12 2 2 42
24 SUN 24 1 20 5 19 7 morn morn morn 12 17 3 27
25 Mon 23 2 19 6 18 8 0 13 0 11 0 9 12 32 4 10
26 Tues 23 3 18 8 17 9 1 16 1 13 1 9 12 45 5 7
27 Wed 22 5 18 9 16 11 2 19 2 15 2 10 12 58 6 15
28 Thu 21 6 17 10 16 12 3 22 3 10 3 10 13 10 7 27
29 Frid 20 7 16 11 15 13 4 23 4 9 4 9 13 22 8 30

6

February begins on Monday

2, 1835. Mr. Dickson made a noble and fearless speech in Congress, in favor of the abolition of slavery in the District of Columbia.

13, 1833. Prince Stanislaus Poniatowski, (brother of Stanislaus Augustus, the last king of Poland,) died at Florence, aged 78. He rendered himself illustrious, by being the first to emancipate his serfs throughout his extensive estates.

Discussion at Lane Seminary.

In Feb. 1834, the subjects of slavery and colonization were discussed, (each 9 evenings,) by the students in Lane Seminary, Ohio. The question of immediate emancipation was decided in the affirmative, without a dissenting vote. The question, "Are the doctrines, tendencies and measures of the American Colonization Society and the influence of its principal supporters, such as render it worthy of the patronage of the Christian public?" was decided in the negative with only one dissenting voice. We give the following extracts from the letter of H.B. Stanton, who was then a student in the Seminary.

"We are situated within one mile of a slave-holding state; eleven of our number were born and brought up in slave states, seven of whom were sons of slave-holders, and one of them was himself a slave-holder, till recently; one of us had been a slave and had bought his freedom ‘with a great sum,’ which his own hands had earned; ten others had lived more or less in slave states, besides several who had traveled in the midst of slavery, making inquries and searching after truth."

[Is it possible to find a body of men who would be better authority?]

"From their testimony, the following facts and premises were established, to wit: That slaves long for freedom; that it is a subject of very frequent conversation among them; That they know their masters have no right to hold them in slavery; that they keenly feel the wrong, the insult and the degradation which are heaped upon them by the whites; they feel no interest comparatively in their master's affairs, because they know he is their oppressor; they are indolent, because nothing they can earn is their own; they pretend to be more ignorant and stupid than they really are, so as to avoid responsibility, and to shun the lash for any real or alleged disobedience to orders; when inspired with a promise of freedom, they will toil with incredible alacrity and faithfulness; they tell their masters and drivers they are contented with their lot, merely through fear of greater cruelty if they tell the truth; no matter how kind their master is, they are dissatisfied, and would rather be his hired servants than his slaves; the slave-drivers are generally low, brutal, debauched men, distinguished only for their cruelty and licentiousness; they generally have the despotic control of the slaves; the best side of slavery is seen by visitors; its darker features being known only to slaves, masters and drivers; [upon this point, horrid facts, in regard to the shipping and murdering of slaves, were developed.] The influence of slavery upon the physical condition, and mental and moral character of the whites, is decidedly and lamentably pernicious; the internal slave-trade is increasing, and is carried on by men distinguished, even among slave-drivers, for their cruelty and brutality! Masters are generally opposed to their negroes being educated. The blacks are abundantly able to take care of, and provide for themselves; and that they would be kind and docile if immediately emancipated."

7

February — Second Month.

James Bradley, one of the students in Lane Seminary, was formerly a slave in Arkansas. When he was about 18, his master died, and for several years he managed the plantation for his mistress. In 5 years, he obtained, by labor and trading, $855, besides supporting himself. He paid $655 for his freedom, and then went to L. Sem. He said the great desire of the slaves was "LIBERTY & EDUCATION," and shall this heaven born desire be trampled in the dust?

 
Boston
New York
Pittsburgh
MOON'S PHASES. D. H. M.   H. M.   H. M.  
Full Moon, 2 2 6 eve. 1 54 eve. 1 45 eve.
Third Quarter, 9 9 6 eve. 8 54 eve. 8 45 eve.
New Moon, 16 3 35 eve. 3 23 eve. 3 14 even.
First Quarter 24 7 2 morn. 6 50 morn. 6 41 morn.


   
Boston
New York
Pittsburg
Bost.
N.Y.
Pitts
 
Bost.
DM DW Sun Rise Sun Sets Sun Rise Sun Sets Sun Rise Sun Sets Moon sets. Moon sets. Moon sets S. slo. m s High Watr
1 Mon 7 17 5 11 7 13 5 15 7 11 5 17 6 57 6 51 6 43 13 50 10 46
2 Tues 16 13 12 16 10 18 rises rises rises 13 58 11 25
3 Wed 15 14 11 18 9 19 6 14 6 18 6 23 14 5 morn.
4 Thu 14 15 10 19 8 20 7 23 7 25 7 28 14 12 0 0
5 Frid 13 17 9 20 7 22 8 32 8 33 8 35 14 17 0 35
6 Sat 11 18 8 21 6 23 9 41 9 41 9 41 14 22 1 11
7 SUN 10 19 7 23 5 24 10 52 10 50 10 49 14 26 1 41
8 Mon 9 21 6 24 4 25 morn. morn. 11 59 14 29 2 24
9 Tues 7 8 22 5 25 3 26 0 5 0 2 morn 14 31 3 9
10 Wed 7 5 23 3 5 26 2 5 28 1 20 1 15 1 10 14 32 4 8
11 Thur 5 25 2 28 1 29 2 36 2 30 2 24 14 33 5 30
12 Frid 4 26 1 29 0 30 3 50 3 44 3 36 14 33 7 0
13 Sat 3 27 0 30 6 58 31 4 59 4 52 4 43 14 32 8 27
14 SUN 1 28 6 58 31 57 32 5 56 5 50 5 42 14 31 9 32
15 Mon 0 30 57 32 56 34 6 43 6 37 6 31 14 29 10 22
16 Tues 6 58 31 56 34 55 35 sets sets sets 14 26 11 6
17 Wed 57 32 54 35 53 36 6 34 6 37 6 40 14 22 11 43
18 Thu 56 34 53 36 52 37 7 45 7 46 7 47 14 17 aft 8
19 Frid 54 35 52 37 51 38 8 52 8 52 8 51 14 12 0 52
20 Sat 53 5 36 50 5 38 49 5 39 9 58 9 56 9 54 14 6 1 28
21 SUN 51 37 49 40 6 48 41 11 2 10 59 10 56 14 0 2 3
22 Mon 50 39 6 48 41 47 42 morn morn 11 57 13 53 2 44
23 Tues 6 48 40 46 42 45 43 0 6 0 2 morn 13 45 3 28
24 Wed 47 41 45 43 44 44 1 9 1 4 0 58 13 36 4 20
25 Thu 45 42 43 44 42 45 2 11 0 11 0 9 12 32 4 10
26 Frid 44 44 42 8 17 46 3 10 1 13 1 9 12 45 5 7
27 Sat 42 45 40 9 16 47 4 4 2 15 2 10 12 58 6 15
28 SUN 40 46 39 10 16 49 4 52 3 10 3 10 13 10 7 27
29 Mon 39 4 7 37 11 15 50 5 32 4 9 4 9 13 22 8 30

8

March begins on Tuesday.

9, 1833. Town Meeting at Canterbury, Ct., in reference to Miss Crandall's school for young ladies of color.

19, 1835 Kentucky State Anti-Slavery Society formed at Danville.

20, 1831. Insurrection of the slaves in Antiqua, which lasted 5 days.

28, 1833. John Kenrick died, aged 78.

Address to the Members of Congress.

GENTLEMEN —
An awful responsibility rests upon you, in regard to the enslavement and degradation of the colored population of these United States. Their destiny is now in your hands. Therefore as you deal with them, so will God, in his providence; deal with the nation, which you represent. Great as may be our freedom, we cannot be independent of the Almighty. Unless our rulers execute justice, ruin will befall us. The sin of oppression is peculiarly offensive to the merciful God; and whenever persisted in, has, under his moral government, brought destruction upon nations, no less than individuals. A glance at history will bring to your view illustrations of this appalling fact. And surely there have been already admonitions, which no intelligent mind can misunderstand, that his righteous displeasure is even now enkindled against this guilty nation. Why should we be stricken any more?

Gentlemen, when we say the destiny of our enslaved country men is in your hands, think not we mistake the nature and extent of your powers. We are aware, you cannot, by any act of legislation, directly liberate those who are held in bondage, under any of the State Governments. But you may hasten their deliverance by letting those go free, who are at your disposal. Slavery, with all its concomitant cruelties, is enforced upon more than 26,000 immortal beings, in the District of Columbia, the Arkansas and Floridas, which are known to be under your exclusive jurisdiction. These are suppliants at your feet. They plead for justice, for mercy, for their inalienable rights. Let them not cry in vain. Take them by the hand. Raise them from the condition of brutes. Bid them be men. And what you do will be seen by all. What you say will go out into all our borders. Should you abolish slavery in the District of Columbia alone, it would heave the foundations of the system in every State of the Union.

So long as our national government continues to uphold slavery — especially so long as our legislators refrain from considering its sinfulness and its danger, so long will those who are guilty of this flagrant violation of the rights of man, and the laws of God, be at ease. Congress is the sun — the central body, from which light radiates to every part of our political system. The eyes of the nation are upon you. Their ears are open to every report that comes from you. How great then is your responsibility! Let it be seen, we conjure you, let it be seen, that you act in the fear of God, and with a just regard for the rights of man.

N.B. At the least session of Congress, there were, in the House of Representatives, 140 members from the non-slave-holding, and 99 from the slave-holding states. Yet a motion to refer the petitions for the abolition of slavery in the Dist. Of Columbia to a special Committee, and thereby ensure the discussion of the subject in the House, was lost. All the Reps. from the slave states, (except the one from Del.) voted against the motion, and only 76 of those from the free states voted in favor of it.

9

March — Third Month.

 
Boston.
New York.
Pittsburgh.
MOON'S PHASES. D. H. M.   H. M.   H. M.  
Full Moon, 3 5 8 morn. 4 56 morn. 4 47 morn.
Third Quarter, 10 4 40 morn. 4 28 morn. 4 19 morn.
New Moon, 17 4 20 morn. 4 8 morn. 3 59 morn.
First Quarter 25 3 40 morn. 3 28 morn. 3 19 morn.


   
Boston.
New York
Pittsburg.
Bost.
N.Y.
Pitts.
 
Bost.
DM DW Sun Rise Sun Sets Sun Rise Sun Sets Sun Rise Sun Sets Moon sets. Moon sets. Moon Sets S. slo. m s High Watr
1 Tues 6 37 5 49 6 36 5 50 6 35 5 51 6 6 6 2 5 56 13 33 10 28
2 Wed 35 50 34 51 33 52 rises rises rises 12 21 11 1
3 Thu 34 51 32 52 32 53 6 18 6 20 6 22 12 8 11 38
4 Frid 32 52 31 54 30 54 7 29 7 29 7 30 11 54 morn
5 Sat 31 53 29 55 29 55 8 41 8 40 8 39 11 40 0 7
6 SUN 29 55 28 56 27 56 9 55 9 52 9 49 11 26 0 46
7 Mon 27 56 26 57 26 57 11 10 11 6 11 1 11 12 1 22
8 Tues 26 57 25 58 24 58 morn morn morn 10 57 2 4
9 Wed 24 58 23 59 23 59 0 27 0 21 0 15 10 41 2 54
10 Thu 22 59 21 6 0 21 6 0 1 41 1 35 1 28 10 25 4 0
11 Frid 20 6 1 20 1 19 2 2 51 2 44 2 35 10 9 5 27
12 Sat 6 19 2 6 18 2 6 18 3 3 50 3 43 3 35 9 53 7 2
13 SUN 17 3 16 3 16 4 4 39 4 33 4 26 9 36 8 26
14 Mon 15 4 15 4 15 5 5 18 5 13 5 7 9 20 9 24
15 Tues 13 5 13 6 13 6 5 50 5 46 5 42 9 2 10 10
16 Wed 12 6 11 7 11 7 sets sets sets 8 45 10 45
17 Thu 10 8 10 8 10 8 6 34 6 35 6 35 8 28 11 21
18 Frid 8 9 8 9 8 9 7 41 7 40 7 38 8 10 11 54
19 Sat 7 10 7 10 7 10 8 46 8 41 8 41 7 52 aft 28
20 SUN 5 11 5 11 5 11 9 51 9 48 9 43 7 34 1 0
21 Mon 3 6 12 3 6 12 3 6 12 10 55 10 50 10 45 7 16 1 35
22 Tues 1 13 2 13 2 13 11 58 11 53 11 46 6 58 2 26
23 Wed 0 14 0 14 0 14 morn morn morn 12 2 3 1
24 Thu 5 58 16 5 58 15 5 58 15 0 59 0 52 0 45 6 21 3 55
25 Frid 56 17 57 16 57 16 1 55 1 48 1 40 6 2 4 57
26 Sat 54 18 55 17 55 17 2 45 2 30 1 9 5 44 6 14
27 SUN 53 19 53 18 54 18 3 28 3 22 2 10 5 25 7 32
28 Mon 51 20 52 19 52 19 4 4 3 59 3 52 5 6 8 36
29 Tues 49 21 50 20 50 20 4 35 4 31 4 26 4 48 9 26
30 Wed 47 22 48 21 49 21 5 2 4 59 4 56 4 29 10 8
31 Thu 46 23 47 22 48 22 5 26 5 25 5 57 4 11 10 37

10

April, begins on Friday,

FAST-DAY.

During this month, a day is usually set apart for fasting and prayer, in many parts of the United States. There cannot be a more appropriate time to consider our national sin, than on this day of humiliation. It is hoped that every clergyman will be ready on this day, to "cry aloud, and show the people their transgressions," in reference to slavery, as well as other great national sins. When we think of God's severe threatenings against those who "have dealt by oppression with the stranger," we have reason to humble ourselves, and cry mightily to God. Let us follow the example of the Ninevites, and "turn every man from his evil way, and from the violence that is in our hands. Who can tell if God will turn away from his fierce anger, that we perish not?" Let us observe the fast that God has chosen, (Is. 58: 6.) and put away from the midst of us the yoke, the putting forth of the finger, and speaking vanity; and we may expect the fulfillment of the promise; "Then shall thy light rise in obscurity, and thy darkness be as the noon-day. And the Lord shall guide thee continually, and satisfy thy soul in drought, and make fat thy bones."

Effects of Slavery Upon the Church.

What are the benefits that slavery has conferred upon the church, in return for its Christian baptism, and its hearty welcome to the communion of the saints? It builds anew and sanctifies the heathen barrier of caste, and while her prayers and her aims traverse oceans to find heathen in the ends of the earth, it shuts up her bowels against the heathen at her own door, and of her own creation; and, as if to make the church the derision of scoffers, it grants her special indulgence to make heathen at home for her own benefit, provided, by way of penance, she contributes a tithe of the profit for the conversion of heathen abroad. — Ohio Declaration.

Persecution.

There are many who wonder that a cause, which is so evidently the cause of God, should meet with such fierce and bitter opposition; and there is danger that abolitionists may become disheartened, in view of it. To such I would say, "Count it not strange concerning the fiery trial which is to try you, as though some strange thing happened unto you," — 1 Pet. 4:12. I believe we shall search in vain for the history of any important reformation, which was ever accomplished without encountering difficulties and obstacles; and we have no reason to believe that we shall be able to strangle the giant, slavery, without a long and severe struggle. It is important, therefore, that we should be early inured to hardship and reproach, that our steadfastness may be tried, and that we may become hardened against every attack, or in other words, fire-proof. The reproach we endure prevents half-hearted time-servers from coming into our ranks.

The farmer does not mourn when he sees the April storm beating upon the tender blade which is just springing up. He knows that it will cause it to strike its root deeper, and to cling more closely to the soil which sustains it. So it should be with us. When the storms of persecution beat upon us, it should cause us to plant ourselves more firmly upon the truths of God's word, and to cling more closely to our Master and Leader.

11

April. — Fourth Month.

It is supposed that not less than 50,000 visitors from the slave-holding states visit the north every year. Let them come in contact with a people zealously and understandingly opposed to slavery; let them hear the united voice of a whole community, proclaiming to them the guilt and danger of oppression, and many of them will go home and ‘loose the bands of wickedness,’ and persuade others to do likewise.

 
Boston.
New York.
Pittsburgh.
MOON'S PHASES. D. H. M.   H. M.   H. M.  
Full Moon, 1 5 22 eve. 5 10 eve. 5 1 eve.
Third Quarter, 8 11 17 morn. 11 5 morn. 10 56 morn.
New Moon, 15 6 18 eve. 6 6 eve. 5 57 eve.
First Quarter, 23 10 2 eve. 9 50 eve. 9 41 eve.


   
Boston.
New York.
Pittsburg.
Bost.
N.Y.
Pitts.
 
Bost.
DM DW Sun Rise Sun Sets Sun Rise Sun Sets Sun Rise Sun Sets Moon rises Moon rises Moon rises S. slo. m s High Watr
1 Frid 5> 44 6 24 5> 45 6 23 5 45 6 23 6 25 6 23 6 24 3 53 11 19
2 Sat 42 26 43 24 44 24 7 37 7 35 7 32 3 34 11 53
3 SUN 40 27 42 25 42 25 8 54 8 50 8 46 3 16 morn
4 Mon 39 28 40 26 41 26 10 13 10 8 10 2 2 58 0 33
5 Tues 37 29 38 28 39 27 11 31 11 24 11 17 2 40 1 12
6 Wed 35 30 37 29 37 28 morn morn morn 2 23 2 0
7 Thu 34 31 35 30 36 29 0 43 0 36 0 28 2 6 2 55
8 Frid 32 32 34 31 34 30 1 47 1 40 1 31 1 48 4 8
9 Sat 30 33 32 32 33 31 2 39 2 32 2 25 1 32 5 33
10 SUN 29 35 30 33 31 32 3 20 11 49 3 8 1 15 7 6
11 Mon 5 27 6 36 5 29 6 34 5 30 6 33 3 53 3 49 3 44 0 59 8 18
12 Tues 25 37 27 35 28 34 4 20 4 17 4 14 0 43 9 10
13 Wed 24 38 26 36 27 35 4 43 2 13 2 9 0 27 9 54
14 Thu 22 39 24 37 25 36 5 4 3 29 3 24 0 12 10 27
15 Fri 20 40 23 38 24 37 sets sets sets fast 3 11 0
16 Sat 19 41 21 39 22 38 7 37 7 34 7 31 0 18 11 32
17 SUN 17 42 20 40 21 39 8 42 8 38 8 33 0 32 aft 5
18 Mon 16 43 18 41 19 40 9 46 9 41 9 34 0 46 0 40
19 Tues 28 55 23 59 21 1 6 30 10 42 10 34 1 0 1 14
20 Wed 27 56 22 5 0 21 2 7 46 11 39 11 30 1 12 1 56
21 Thu 5 11 647 5 14 6 44 5 15 6 43 morn morn morn 1 25 2 42
22 Frid 10 48 12 45 14 44 0 38 0 32 0 24 1 37 3 32
23 Sat 8 49 11 46 12 45 1 24 1 17 1 10 1 49 4 34
24 SUN 7 50 9 47 11 46 2 2 1 56 1 50 2 0 5 39
25 Mon 5 51 8 48 9 47 2 34 2 30 2 24 2 11 6 55
26 Tues 4 52 7 49 8 48 3 2 2 59 2 54 2 22 8 4
27 Wed 2 53 5 50 7 49 3 37 3 24 3 22 2 32 8 56
28 Thu 1 55 4 51 5 50 3 50 3 49 3 48 2 41 9 40
29 Frid 4 59 56 2 52 4 51 4 13 4 13 5 14 2 50 10 21
30 Sat 58 57 1 53 3 52 4 37 4 39 5 42 2 58 10 57

12

May begins on Sunday.

1, 1833. Garrison started for England.

7, 1808. Bible Society formed.

13, 1607. Virginia settled

17, 1829 John Jay died at Bedford, N.Y. He was one of the Presidents of the old Continental Congress, Minister to Spain and Great Britain, Governor of New York, and Chief Justice of the U. States.

24, 1833. Act passed by the Legislature of Ct. prohibiting schools for colored persons from other states. In 1835, a petition to the Legislature for the repeal of this Act was rejected.

25, 1835. The New England A.S. Convention assembled at Boston.

27, 1835. The Mayor and Aldermen of Boston, rejected an spplication of 125 citizens for the use of Faneuil Hall, for the purpose of holding a meeting in which to plead the cause of the slaves.

American Anti-slavery Society.

At its annual meeting, May 12, 1835, the following officers were chosen.

President, Arthur Tappan; Treasurer, John Rankin; Sec'y for Foreign Correspondence, Hon. William Hay; Sec'y for Dom. Cor. Elizur Wright, Jr.; Recording Secretary, Abraham L. Cox, M.D.

Executive Committee. Arthur Tappan, John Rankin, Lewis Tappan, Joshua Leavitt, Samuel E. Cornish, William Goodell, Abraham L. Cox, Theodore S. Wright, Simeon S. Jocelyn, Elizur Wright, Jr.

This committee is distinguished for faithfulness and efficiency. All friends of the cause should give liberally to sustain its operations.

The following were among the Resolutions passed at the meeting.

Resolved, That this Society recommend that all its auxiliaries, so far as convenient, hold public meetings on the 4th of July throughout the country, and take collections in aid of its funds.

Resolved, That this Society earnestly request that ladies, in every section of the land, organize themselves into Anti-slavery societies, and sewing or other associations for the purpose of co-operating with it in the great work of emancipation and that those ladies who have already done this, have the warmest thanks of the members of the parent institution, for the prompt and efficient co-operation they have rendered.

Resolved, That this Society rejoices in the formation and co-operation of juvenile anti-slavery societies and associations, and does earnestly desire that children in all parts of the country may be encouraged to for themselves into similar societies that children who are free may thus aid in emancipating the children of this land who are now slaves.

Resolved, That this Society regards with approbation and gratitude the formation of young men's anti-slavery societies, and earnestly hopes that young men throughout the country will embody themselves in similar associations, and give to the cause of emancipation the influence and vigor of their youthful energies.

Resolved, That the laws and practices of the slave-holding States which forbid our free colored citizens traveling through their borders or settling on their soil, under the pains and penalties of fine or imprisonment, are anti-republican, cruel and unconstitutional, and a bold infringement upon state rights, demanding strong expostulation and indignant remonstrance on the part of the people of the free states.

For an account of the publications of the Society, see page 47.

13

May — Fifth Month.

During this month, the National A.S. Society will hold its anniversary in New York, and a Convention for New England will be held at Boston. Let the friends of the cause come together, and cheer each other's hearts in the prosecution of their great work.

 
Boston.
New York.
Pittsburgh.
MOON'S PHASES. D. H. M.   H. M.   H. M.  
Full Moon, 1 3 13 morn. 3 1 morn. 2 51 morn.
Third Quarter, 7 6 5 eve. 5 53 eve. 5 44 eve.
New Moon, 15 9 22 morn. 9 10 morn. 9 0 morn.
First Quarter 23 1 13 eve. 1 1 eve. 0 51 eve.
Full Moon, 30 11 15 morn. 11 3 morn. 10 54 morn.


   
Boston.
New York.
Pittsburg.
Bost.
N.Y.
Pitts.
 
Bost.
DM DW Sun Rise Sun Sets Sun Rise Sun Sets Sun Rise Sun Sets Moon rises. Moon rises. Moon rises S. slo. m s High Watr
1 SUN 4 57 6 58 5 0 6 54 5 1 6 53 7 43 7 37 7 30 3 6 11 40
2 Mon 55 59 4 59 55 0 54 9 11 9 5 8 58 3 13 Morn
3 Tues 54 7 0 58 52 32 53 6 18 6 20 6 22 12 8 11 38
4 Wed 53 1 56 57 58 56 11 39 11 32 11 22 3 26 1 9
5 Thu 51 2 55 58 57 57 morn morn morn 3 32 1 58
6 Frid 50 3 54 59 56 58 0 36 0 22 0 22 3 37 2 57
7 Sat 49 4 53 7 0 55 59 1 21 1 16 1 8 3 42 3 57
8 SUN 48 5 52 1 53 7 0 1 57 1 52 1 47 3 45 5 29
9 Mon 47 6 51 2 52 1 2 25 2 22 2 18 3 49 6 44
10 Tues 45 7 50 3 51 2 2 49 2 47 2 44 3 51 7 50
11 Wed 4 44 7 8 4 49 4 4 50 2 3 10 3 9 3 8 3 54 8 42
12 Thurs 43 10 48 5 49 3 3 30 3 31 3 32 3 55 9 28
13 Frid 42 11 47 6 48 4 3 51 3 53 3 55 3 56 10 2
14 Sat 41 12 46 7 47 5 4 13 4 16 4 20 3 56 10 34
15 SUN 40 13 45 6 46 6 sets sets sets 3 56 11 7
16 Mon 39 14 44 7 46 7 8 32 8 33 8 25 3 55 11 43
17 Tues 38 15 43 10 45 8 9 38 9 32 9 24 3 54 aft 19
18 Wed 37 16 42 11 44 9 10 33 10 26 10 18 3 52 0 57
19 Thu 36 17 41 12 7 10 11 20 11 14 11 6 3 59 1 39
20 Frid 35 18 40 13 42 11 morn 11 55 3 46 3 46 2 33
21 Sat 3 6 12 3 6 12 3 6 12 10 55 10 50 10 45 7 16 1 35
22 SUN 34 19 39 15 41 12 0 35 0 30 0 23 3 39 3 57
23 Mon 33 20 38 15 40 13 1 3 0 59 0 55 3 34 4 55
24 Tues 32 21 37 7 16 39 14 1 28 1 25 0 22 3 29 6 3
25 Wed 32 22 37 17 39 16 1 55 1 48 1 40 6 2 4 57
26 Thu 31 23 36 18 38 16 2 13 2 13 2 13 3 18 8 15
27 Frid 30 24 35 19 38 17 2 36 2 37 2 39 3 11 9 7
28 Sat 30 25 35 20 37 17 3 1 3 4 3 7 3 4 9 57
29 SUN 29 26 34 20 36 18 3 31 3 35 3 40 2 57 10 41
30 Mon 29 26 34 21 36 19 rises rises rises 2 49 11 28
31 Tues 28 27 33 22 36 20 9 13 9 13 9 4 2 41 morn

14

June begins on Wednsday.

4, 1829. Resolutions introduced into the British House of Commons declaring slavery in the British colonies unlawful. Not carried.

10, 1806. Act to abolish the slave-trade passed the British Parliament. In the House of Commons, the vote stood 114 to 15; in the House of Lords, 100 to 36. The measure was first introduced in the Parliament, May 9, 1788.

27, 1833. Miss Crandall imprisoned in Brooklyn Ct. on the charge of having taught persons of color from out of the state.

To the Free People of Color.

We are engaged in a work of great difficulty, toil and sacrifice, and we ask you to assist us. It is this: — to remove every external obstacle in the way of the upward and onward progress, in virtue, respectability and happiness, of every colored inhabitant of the United States. We wish to have every avenue leading to true happiness, opened as widely to you as to persons of a different complexion. It is in your power, by your good conduct, to put your shoulders to the wheel, and roll forward the car of abolition; or you may, by your vices, place obstructions in the way, and hold it back in its progress. Which do you choose to do? There is not one of you who can say, ‘I have nothing to do in this matter.’ You are, each one of you, doing much either to help forward or to hinder the work in which we are engaged. We have not room to enlarge. We offer the following brief suggestions, and entreat of you to ‘think of these things.’ Let every colored boy and girl who can, get them by heart.

I must be industrious. I have much to do, and have need to be always employed.

I must be economical. There are so many good uses to which money can be applied, that not a cent should be wasted.

I must improve my time. ‘Part with no moment but in purchase of its worth.’ Time is too precious to be thrown away.

I must be temperate in all things. I will give it no quarter.

I must improve my mind. If I am ignorant, I shall be constantly liable to be imposed upon. God has given me a mind, and the means of improvement, and it is my duty to use them.

I must ‘Search the Scriptures.’ They are the fountain of wisdom.

I must ‘live peaceably with all’ around me. We can never be prosperous or happy, if we quarrel with one another.

I must use no profane language. It is very wicked, & does no good. Parents must be very careful to teach their children good morals and useful knowledge. {The Sabbath School will afford you much aid.}

Children must obey their parents, — Promptly and cheerfully. ‘God helps them that help themselves.’ If you wish for assistance from others, make a GOOD USE of the privileges you now enjoy. By observing the foregoing suggestions, you will make yourself a blessing to society, you will strengthen the hands and encourage the hearts of your friends, and fill their mouths with arguments; you will leave no invaluable legacy to your children, and put to shame the malice of your enemies. By pursuing a contrary course, you will prove a curse to yourself and your race, you will pierce with anguish the hearts of your friends, give your enemies course of triumph, spread gloom and darkness over the prospects of the slave, and leave an inheritance of shame to your children, who will visit your grave to curse your memory.

15

June — Sixth Month.

The convention of free people of color will assemble on the sixth of this month in the city of Philadelphia. May they forget all local prejudice and personal animosity, and join hand in hand in the great work of self-improvement. The signs of the times clearly show that they who have been so long "meted out and trodden down," are soon to rise "from the dust." They may do much to hasten the event.

 
Boston.
New York.
Pittsburgh.
MOON'S PHASES. D. H. M.   H. M.   H. M.  
Third Quarter, 6 2 16 morn. 2 4 morn. 1 55 morn.
New Moon, 14 0 53 morn. 0 41 morn. 0 32 morn.
First Quarter, 22 1 8 morn. 0 56 morn. 0 47 morn.
Full Moon, 28 6 13 morn. 6 1 eve. 5 52 morn.


   
Boston.
New York.
Pittsburg.
Bost.
N.Y.
Pitts.
 
Bost.
DM DW Sun Rise Sun Sets Sun Rise Sun Sets Sun Rise Sun Sets Moon rises Moon rises Moon Rises S. fast m s High Watr
1 Wed 4> 27 7 28 4> 33 7 23 4 35 7 21 10 25 10 18 10 10 2 32 0 11
2 Thu 27 29 32 23 34 22 11 17 11 11 11 4 2 23 1 4
3 Frid 27 29 32 24 34 22 11 57 11 52 11 46 2 13 1 51
4 Sat 26 30 32 25 34 23 morn morn morn 2 3 2 44
5 SUN 26 31 31 25 33 23 0 28 0 25 0 19 2 40 3 43
6 Mon 26 31 31 26 33 24 0 54 0 51 0 48 2 23 4 45
7 Tues 25 32 31 26 33 25 1 16 1 15 1 13 1 32 5 55
8 Wed 25 33 31 27 33 25 1 36 1 36 1 37 1 20 6 52
9 Thu 25 33 30 28 33 26 1 56 1 58 2 0 1 9 7 56
10 Frid 25 34 30 28 33 27 2 18 2 21 2 24 0 57 7 56
11 Sat 4 25 7 34 4 30 7 29 4 32 7 27 2 41 2 46 2 50 0 45 9 32
12 SUN 24 35 30 29 32 28 3 9 3 14 3 20 0 33 10 9
13 Mon 24 35 30 30 31 28 3 42 3 48 3 55 0 20 10 43
14 Tues 24 36 30 30 31 28 sets sets sets 0 8 11 19
15 Wed 24 36 30 38 24 29 9 19 9 12 9 5 slow 11 58
16 Thu 24 36 30 31 32 29 10 1 9 48 0 19 0 19 aft 36
17 Frid 24 37 30 31 32 29 10 37 10 31 10 25 0 31 1 15
18 Sat 16 43 18 41 19 9 46 9 41 9 34 0 46 0 40
19 SUN 28 55 23 59 21 1 6 30 10 42 10 34 1 0 1 14
20 Mon 27 56 22 5 0 21 2 7 46 11 39 11 30 1 12 1 56
21 Tues 5 11 647 5 14 6 44 5 15 6 43 morn morn morn 1 37 2 42
22 Wed 10 48 12 45 14 44 0 38 10 5 10 6 11 46 2 2
23 Thu 8 49 11 46 12 45 1 24 11 9 11 8 12 2 2 42
24 Frid 7 50 9 47 11 46 2 2 1 56 1 50 2 0 5 59
25 Sat 5 51 8 48 9 47 2 34 2 30 2 24 2 11 6 55
26 SUN 4 52 7 49 8 48 3 2 2 59 2 54 2 22 8 4
27 Mon 2 53 5 50 7 49 3 37 3 24 3 22 2 32 8 56
28 Tues 1 55 4 52 5 50 3 50 3 49 3 48 2 41 9 40
29 Wed 4 59 56 2 52 4 51 4 13 4 13 5 14 2 50 10 21
30 Thu 19 9 1 53 3 52 4 37 4 39 5 42 2 58 10 57

16

July begins on Friday.

4. 1776. Declaration of American Independence.

7, 1809. St. Domingo surrendered to the British.

13, 1833. Great Anti-Colonization meeting at Exeter Hall, London.

15, 1834. Date of James G. Birney's Letter to Thornton J. Mills, giving his reasons for withdrawing from the Colonization Society.

28, 1833. Wilberforce died, aged 74.

The corner-stone upon which our fathers founded the TEMPLE of FREEDOM was broadly this — ‘that all men are created equal; that they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable rights; That among these are life, LIBERTY, and pursuit of happiness.’ At the sound of their trumpet call, three millions of people rose up as from the sleep of death, and rushed to the strife of blood; deeming it more glorious to die instantly as freemen, than desirable to live one hour as slaves. — They were few in number — poor in resources; but the honest conviction that TRUTH, JUSTICE and RIGHT were on their side, made them invincible.

While one sixth part of the inhabitants of the land are held as articles of merchandise, can we call the work of our fathers complete?

"The Masters treat their slaves as kindly as they treat their children!"

A sea captain relates, that while stopping at a southern port, he boarded at a house where there were several daughters; one of whom, while he was there, met with an accident, by which she lost two of her front teeth. A mulatto female slave was immediately called in, and two of her teeth were drawn out, and inserted in their stead.

How Parents Do Treat Their Children.

The following was related by an apologist for slavery.

While stopping in a town of considerable note, in the interior of Virginia, he was awakened, one Sabbath morning, by loud screaming in the street. He ran out, as soon as possible, to ascertain the cause. He found that the screaming came from a cart in which were confined a mulatto woman, and four children, nearly white. A slave-dealer was taking them through the village, in this manner, on his way to the south. The gentleman inquired into their history, and learned that the woman had lived for several years, in the family of a gentleman in that neighborhood, as his house-keeper. She was the mother of the children, and it was generally supposed, by all who resided in the vicinity, that the gentleman with whom she lived, was their father. He was then in Washington, and had written to his overseer, a few days before, directing him to sell the woman and her children to some slave-dealer, who would carry them where he should never hear from them again; — assigning it as his reason that he had made arrangements to bring a wife home with him, and he feared that, if the woman and her children were allowed to remain, it would occasion trouble.

‘The despotism which our fathers could not bear in their native country is expiring, and the sword of justice in her reformed hands has applied its exterminating edge to slavery. Shall the United States — the free United States, which could not bear the bonds of a king, cradle the bondage which a king is abolishing? Shall a Republic be less free than a Monarchy? Shall we, in the vigor and buoyancy of our manhood, be less energetic in righteousness, than a kingdom in its age?’ — Dr. Follen's Address.

17

July — Seventh Month.

The people of the land have used oppression, and exercised robbery, and have vexed the poor and needy; yea, they have oppressed the stranger wrongfully. — Ezek. 22:29. Ye have not hearkened unto me, in proclaiming liberty: — behold I proclaim a liberty for you, saith the Lord, to the sword, to the pestilence, & to the famine. — Jer. 34: 17.

 
Boston.
New York.
Pittsburgh.
MOON'S PHASES. D. H. M.   H. M.   H. M.  
Third Quarter, 5 0 51 eve. 0 39 eve. 0 29 eve.
New Moon, 13 4 5 eve. 3 53 eve. 3 44 eve.
First Quarter, 24 10 21 morn. 10 9 morn. 10 0 morn.
Full Moon, 28 1 3 morn. 0 51 morn. 0 42 morn.


   
Boston.
New York.
Pittsburg.
Bost.
N.Y.
Pitts.
 
Bost.
DM DW Sun Rise Sun Sets Sun Rise Sun Sets Sun Rise Sun Sets Moon rises. Moon rises Moon rises S. slo. m s High Watr
1 Frid 4 29 7 38 4 34 7 33 4 36 7 31 10 28 10 2 10 20 3 26 0 48
2 Sat 29 38 35 32 37 31 10 56 10 5 10 51 3 38 1 32
3 SUN 30 38 35 32 37 30 11 20 11 18 11 19 3 49 2 18
4 Mon 30 38 36 32 38 30 11 41 11 41 11 41 4 0 morn
5 Tues 31 37 36 32 38 30 morn morn morn 4 11 3 56
6 Wed 32 37 37 32 39 29 0 2 0 3 0 4 4 21 4 49
7 Thu 32 37 26 57 26 29 0 23 0 2 0 27 4 31 5 52
8 Fri 33 36 25 58 24 29 0 45 0 49 0 54 4 40 6 58
9 Sat 34 36 23 59 23 28 1 12 1 17 1 22 4 49 8 0
10 SUN 34 35 40 30 21 28 1 43 1 49 1 55 4 58 8 56
11 Mon 4 35 7 35 4 40 7 30 4 42 7 28 2 20 2 27 2 35 5 6 9 44
12 Tues 36 34 41 29 43 27 3 5 3 12 3 20 5 14 10 25
13 Wed 37 34 42 29 43 27 sets sets sets 5 22 11 0
14 Thu 37 33 42 28 44 26 8 39 8 33 8 27 5 29 11 39
15 Frid 38 33 43 28 45 26 9 10 9 6 9 4 5 35 aft 13
16 Sat 39 32 44 27 45 25 9 37 9 33 9 29 5 41 0 48
17 SUN 40 31 45 26 46 25 10 0 9 58 9 55 5 46 1 24
18 Mon 41 31 46 26 47 24 10 21 10 20 10 19 5 51 1 58
19 Tues 42 30 46 25 48 24 10 42 10 42 10 43 5 56 2 38
20 Wed 42 29 47 24 49 23 11 3 11 5 11 7 6 0 3 17
21 Thu 4 43 7 28 4 48 7 23 4 49 7 22 11 27 11 30 11 34 6 3 4 8
22 Frid 44 27 49 23 50 22 11 55 morn morn 6 5 5 17
23 Sat 45 27 50 22 51 21 morn 0 0 0 5 6 7 6 48
24 SUN 46 26 51 21 52 20 0 31 0 37 0 43 6 21 3 55
25 Mon 47 25 52 20 53 19 1 17 1 24 1 32 6 10 9 16
26 Tues 48 24 53 19 54 18 2 16 2 23 2 31 6 10 10 13
27 Wed 49 23 53 18 54 17 rises rises rises 6 9 11 6
28 Thurs 50 22 54 17 55 16 8 22 8 17 8 11 6 9 11 51
29 Frid 51 21 55 16 56 15 8 54 8 51 8 47 6 7 morn
30 Sat 52 20 56 15 57 14 9 21 9 19 9 17 6 5 0 31
31 SUN 53 18 57 14 58 13 9 44 9 43 9 42 6 2 1 10

18

August begins on Monday.

1, 1834. Emancipation of all the slaves in the British Colonies.

3, 1492, Columbus first sailed for America.

5, 1826. A decree issued by the Austrian Gov't, That every slave who should set foot on Austrian soil, or even on the deck of an Austrian vessel, should become free.

24, 1759. Wilberforce born.

26, 1832. Adam Clarke died, aged 72.

The First of August.

This is a day on which the friends of universal liberty should rejoice; and to which they may refer, as a day when the seal of falsehood was set upon the absurd predictions of slave-holders and their apologists, that rebellion, conflagration and murder would attend the liberation of the negro. In most of the islands, emancipation was rather nominal than real; — the whip was taken out of the master's hand, and lodged in the hands of a magistrate, while no motive to labor was offered to the slave, whom they then registered as an apprentice. Under these circumstances, "they exhibited a meekness, patience, and forbearance; utterly without a parallel. Not one life has yet been taken, not one dwelling fired, throughout the British West Indies, by the emancipated slaves." In Jamaica, there were 331,000 slaves, and only 37,000 whites. If there should be no evils resulting from the apprenticeship system, we shall be compelled to believe that the blacks are prodigies of mildness and forbearance.

In the islands of Bermuda and Antigua which adopted the plan of immediate and unconditional emancipation, (for advocating which we are called fanatics and madmen,) the highest hopes of the negroes' friends were fulfilled. Bermuda contained 5,500 whites, and 4,650 slaves: — Antigua, 2,000 whites, and 30,000 slaves.

The Bermuda Gazette of Aug. 4, says, "Four days of universal freedom have now passed, and four days of more perfect regularity and quiet have these famed peaceful islands never witnessed."

The Hon. Mr. Butterfield, Chief Justice of Bermuda, in his charge to the grand jury on the 6th of November, observed; "It is a subject of congratulation, and certainly of commendation to the emancipated, that in three months the general character and comfort of society has improved, and that the evils which some of its best friends apprehended, were in all cases overrated, and in some have had no existence."

But there the whites were equal in number to the blacks; — let us see what were the "consequences" of emancipation, where there were 15 blacks to one white.

An Antigua paper of Aug. 7, says, "A whole people, comprising 30,000 souls, have passed from slavery into freedom, not only without the slightest irregularity, but with the solemn and decorous tranquillity of the Christian Sabbath." The same paper of Aug. 21, says, "Not the least symptom of insubordination has manifested itself anywhere; and the daily accounts from all quarters testify to the excellent disposition and conduct of the new freemen."

"It had been customary in this island, as an additional security against insurrection, to proclaim martial law at the Christmas holy-days, during which time the slaves had peculiar opportunities for forming conspiracies. The great act of justice accomplished on the first of August, relieved the planters of all apprehension of insurrection; and not only was the usual proclamation withheld at the last Christmas, but the militia was exempted from duty." — Jay's Inquiry.

19

August — Eighth Month.

Let the oppressed go free, break every yoke. — Then shall thy light break forth as the morning, and thy HEALTH shall spring forth speedily. And thou shalt be like a watered garden, and like a spring of water, whose waters fail not. And they that shall be of thee shall build the old waste places; and thou shalt be called the Repairer of the breach. Is. 58.

 
Boston.
New York.
Pittsburgh.
MOON'S PHASES. D. H. M.   H. M.   H. M.  
Third Quarter, 4 2 29 morn 2 17 morn. 2 8 morn.
New Moon, 12 6 28 morn 6 16 morn. 6 7 morn.
First Quarter, 19 5 32 eve. 5 20 eve. 5 11 eve.
Full Moon, 26 8 56 morn. 8 44 morn. 8 35 morn.


   
Boston.
New York.
Pittsburg.
Bost.
N.Y.
Pitts.
 
Bost.
DM DW Sun Rise Sun Sets Sun Rise Sun Sets Sun Rise Sun Sets Moon rises. Moon rises Moon rises S. slo. m s High Watr
1 Mon 4 54 7 17 4 58 7 13 5 0 7 11 10 5 10 6 10 7 5 59 1 47
2 Tues 55 16 59 12 1 10 10 26 10 28 10 31 5 55 2 27
3 Wed 56 15 5 0 11 2 9 10 49 10 52 10 56 5 50 3 8
4 Thu 57 14 1 10 3 8 11 14 11 18 11 23 5 45 3 59
5 Frid 58 13 2 9 4 7 11 43 11 49 11 55 5 39 4 52
6 Sat 59 11 3 8 5 6 morn morn morn 5 33 6 5
7 SUN 5 0 7 10 4 57 26 29 0 23 0 2 0 27 4 31 5 52
8 Mon 1 9 5 58 24 29 0 45 0 49 0 54 4 40 6 58
9 Tues 2 7 6 59 23 28 1 12 1 17 1 22 4 49 8 0
10 Wed 3 6 7 3 8 1 2 48 2 54 3 3 5 2 10 5
11 Thu 4 5 8 1 9 0 2 20 2 27 4 2 4 53 10 42
12 Frid 5 5 3 5 9 0 10 6 59 sets sets sets 4 43 11 18
13 Sat 6 2 10 6 59 5 11 57 8 6 8 3 8 0 4 33 11 53
14 SUN 7 1 11 57 12 56 8 27 8 26 8 24 4 23 aft 24
15 Mon 8 6 59 12 56 13 55 8 48 8 48 8 48 4 11 0 58
16 Tues 10 58 13 55 14 53 9 9 9 10 9 12 4 0 1 30
17 Wed 11 56 14 53 15 52 9 31 9 34 9 37 3 47 2 6
18 Thu 12 55 15 52 16 50 9 58 10 2 10 6 3 34 2 48
19 Frid 13 53 16 50 17 49 10 29 10 35 10 41 3 21 3 44
20 Sat 14 52 17 49 18 48 11 10 11 16 11 24 3 7 4 59
21 SUN 15 50 18 47 19 46 morn morn morn 2 52 6 34
22 Mon 5 16 6 49 5 19 6 46 5 20 6 45 0 1 0 9 0 17 2 37 8 4
23 Tues 17 47 19 41 21 43 1 6 0 0 1 21 2 22 9 14
24 Wed 18 45 20 43 22 42 2 20 0 37 2 35 2 6 10 10
25 Thu 19 44 21 41 23 40 3 40 3 45 3 51 1 50 10 55
26 Frid 20 42 22 40 23 39 rises rises rises 1 33 11 34
27 Sat 21 41 23 38 24 37 7 44 7 43 7 41 1 16 morn
28 SUN 22 39 24 37 25 36 8 6 8 6 8 6 0 59 0 11
29 Mon 23 37 25 35 26 34 8 28 8 29 8 31 0 41 morn
30 Tues 24 35 26 34 27 33 8 50 8 52 8 56 0 23 0 31
31 Wed 25 34 27 32 28 31 9 15 9 19 9 24 0 5 1 10

20

September begins on Thursday.

2. 1834. Date of Mr. Birney's Letter to the churches, in favor of immediate abolition

5, 1774. First Congress met at Philadelphia. Fifty-two members.

7, 1831. A city meeting, called by Dennis Kimberly, Mayor of New Haven, Ct was held, to consider a plan for the establishment in that city, of a College for the education of colored youth, at which meeting it was "Resolved, — by the Mayor, Aldermen, Common Council and Freemen of the City of New Haven, in City Meeting assembled, That we will resist the establishment of the proposed College in this place, by every lawful means."

15, 1791. Rev. Jonathan Edwards preached in New Haven his excellent sermon on the "Injustice and impolicy of the slave-trade, and of the slavery of the Africans."

15, 1829. Slavery abolished in Mexico, by a proclamation of the President.

16 1831. Three missionaries, Butler, Trott & Worcester, sentenced to four years' imprisonment, at hard labor, in the penitentiary in Geo.

20, 1833. An assault was made on Miss Crandall's house, while Rev. Ray Potter was holding a religious meeting there. Rotten eggs and other missiles were thrown at the windows.

Prejudice Against Color.

Mark how a plain tale shall put you down. Shakspeare

It is a singular fact that those who profess belief in a strong, instinctive, insurmountable prejudice against color, are the very ones who are most alarmed about amalgamation by intermarriage. As if the two propositions did not obviously destroy each other!

At a town meeting in New Hampshire the question was discussed whether colored people ought to be admitted into schools upon equal terms with white scholars. One individual arose and treated the subject after the usual manner of those who have thought little about it. "If we cultivate these people," said he, "the first thing we shall know they will be marrying our daughters. Such a thing as a kind social relation between the two races was never intended by Providence. The colored people are naturally inferior and cannot be elevated. It is impossible for us to exist together in the same community with them, on equal terms; you might as well try to mix oil and water."

Upon this, a plain farmer remarked, "Why I thought you said just now that the first thing we should know they would be marring our darters. If they wont mix any better than ile and water, what are you afraid on?"

At the same meeting, in the same place, a person observed that he had no objection to colored people's being educated; but they might get up schools for themselves; it was his opinion that white folks had better let the niggers alone. An elderly man arose, and asked the following pithy question: "When the angel of the Lord commanded Philip to enter the chariot of the Ethiopian and explain to him the Scriptures, what if Phillip had answered, ‘I think, Lord, it is best for white people to let these niggers alone?’"

Let the long evenings be well improved. Hold public meetings and discussions often. In cities, let there be a course of familiar lectures on useful topics for people of color.

21

September — Ninth Month.

Have we not all one Father? Hath not one God created us? Mal. 2:10. If ye have respect to persons, ye commit sin. James 2:9 God is no respecter of persons. Acts 10: 34. And hath made of one blood all nations of men for to dwell on all the face of the earth. Acts 17: 26. One is your master, even Christ, and all ye are brethren Matt. 23: 8. Ye are brethren; why do ye wrong one to another?

 
Boston.
New York.
Pittsburgh.
MOON'S PHASES. D. H. M.   H. M.   H. M.  
Third Quarter, 2 7 5 eve. 6 53 eve. 6 44 eve.
New Moon, 10 7 59 eve. 7 47 eve. 7 38 eve.
First Quarter 17 11 35 eve. 11 23 eve. 11 14 eve.
Full Moon, 24 7 5 eve. 6 53 eve. 6 44 eve.


   
Boston.
New York.
Pittsburg.
Bost.
N.Y.
Pitts.
 
Bost.
DM DW Sun Rise Sun Sets Sun Rise Sun Sets Sun Rise Sun Sets Moon rises Moon rises Moon rises S. fast m s High Watr
1 Thu 5> 26 6 32 5> 28 6 30 5 29 6 30 9 43 9 48 9 54 0 14 2 40
2 Frid 28 30 29 29 30 28 10 16 10 22 10 29 0 33 3 27
3 Sat 29 29 30 27 31 26 10 56 11 3 11 11 0 52 4 22
4 SUN 30 27 31 26 32 25 11 43 11 50 11 58 1 10 5 31
5 Mon 31 25 32 24 33 23 morn morn morn 1 30 6 50
6 Tues 32 24 33 22 34 22 0 37 0 44 0 52 1 50 8 6
7 Wed 33 22 34 21 35 20 1 38 1 44 1 52 2 10 9 1
8 Thu 34 20 35 19 36 18 2 42 2 47 2 54 2 30 4 8
9 Frid 35 19 36 17 37 17 3 49 3 52 3 56 1 32 5 33
10 Sat 36 17 37 16 38 15 sets sets sets 3 12 11 0
11 SUN 37 15 38 14 38 14 6 53 6 52 6 51 3 33 11 33
12 Mon 5 38 6 13 5 39 6 12 5 39 6 12 7 14 7 15 7 16 3 54 aft 5
13 Tues 39 12 40 11 40 10 7 36 7 38 7 41 4 14 0 44
14 Wed 40 10 41 9 41 9 8 1 8 5 8 9 4 35 1 14
15 Thu 41 8 42 7 42 7 8 31 8 36 8 42 4 56 1 54
16 Frid 42 6 43 6 43 5 9 9 9 15 9 22 5 18 2 40
17 Sat 43 5 44 4 44 4 9 56 10 3 10 11 5 39 3 43
18 SUN 44 3 45 2 45 2 10 54 11 2 11 10 6 0 5 4
19 Mon 45 1 46 1 46 0 morn morn morn 6 22 6 42
20 Tues 47 5 59 47 5 59 5 47 5 59 0 4 0 11 0 19 6 42 8 8
21 Wed 48 57 48 57 48 57 1 20 1 26 1 32 7 3 9 12
22 Thu 5 49 56 549 56 49 55 2 38 2 42 2 47 7 24 10 0
23 Frid 50 54 50 54 50 54 3 54 3 57 4 0 7 45 10 43
24 Sat 51 52 51 52 51 52 rises rises rises 8 5 11 16
25 SUN 52 50 52 50 52 50 6 29 6 30 6 31 8 26 11 49
26 Mon 53 48 53 48 53 49 6 51 6 53 6 56 8 46 morn
27 Tues 54 47 54 47 54 47 7 15 7 18 7 22 9 7 0 23
28 Wed 55 45 55 45 55 46 7 41 7 46 7 51 9 26 0 58
29 Thu 56 43 56 44 56 44 8 13 8 19 8 25 9 46 1 35
30 Frid 58 41 57 42 57 52 8 50 8 57 9 5 10 5 2 18

22

October begins on Saturday.

1, 1807. First steamboat passed from New York to Albany.

3, 1833. Riots at New York. Garrison returned from England.

11, 1492 Columbus discovered Bahama.

18, 1831. The bill abolishing the hereditary rights of the French peerage passed in the Chamber of Deputies.

25, 1682. Philadelphia settled.

30, 1831. Nat Turner, the ringleader of the slave insurrection in Southampton Co. Va. Taken. Executed Nov. 11th, 1834.

Free Labor and Slave Labor

While the farmers of the north are gathering in their golden harvests, the laborer who has borne the heat of summer in cultivating the soil, rejoices in the expectation of being rewarded for his labor. He and his employer have mutual interests, and they will strive to promote each other's welfare. Where slavery prevails, it is not so. The system is as much at war with economy as it is with justice.

"The slave is bought, sometimes at a very high price; in free labor there is no such investment of capital. The slave does not care how slowly or carelessly he works; it is the free man's interest to do his business well and quickly. The slave is indifferent how many tools he spoils; the free man has a motive to be careful. The slave's clothing is indeed very cheap, but it is of no consequence to him how fast it is destroyed — his master must keep him covered, and that is all he is likely to do; the hired laborer pays more for his garments, but makes them last three times as long. The free man will be honest for reputation's sake; but reputation will make the slave none the richer, nor invest him with any of the privileges of a human being — while his poverty and sense of wrong both urge him to steal from his master. A salary must be paid to an overseer to compel the slave to work; the free man is impelled by the desire of increasing the comforts of himself and family." — Mrs. Child.

"Wherever the option exists to employ, at an equal hire, free or slave labor, the former will be decidedly preferred. It is more capable, more diligent, more faithful, and in every respect more worthy of confidence.

It is believed that nowhere in the farming portion of the United States would slave labor be generally employed, if the proprietor were not tempted to raise slaves by the high price of the Southern market, which keeps it up in his own." — Henry Clay.

"The labor of a West India slave costs about thrice as much as it would cost if executed by a free man." — Dr. James Anderson.

A West India planter found by experiment that 6 slaves stimulated by the offer of a premium did more work in the same time than 18 who were driven by the lash. — Adam Hodgson's Letter to J.B. Say.

"In passing from a free into a slave-state, the change is instantly visible, even to the most careless eye, and nature herself seems to droop and sicken under the withering influence of slavery."

The mind of a slave, while a slave, is like a watch without its mainspring. You may take hold of its hands by direct physical force and move them around, but you cannot make them go alone. The self-moving power in gone. But make that slave a freeman, restore his long-lost but inalienable rights, and by that single act, you have put the main-spring back again. — Phelps.

23

October — Tenth Month.

Go to now, ye rich men, weep and howl for your miseries that shall come upon you. Behold, the hire of the laborers who have reaped down your fields, which is of you kept back by fraud, crieth; and the cries of them which have reaped are entered into the ears of the Lord of Sabbath. — James 5: 1, 4.

 
Boston.
New York.
Pittsburgh.
MOON'S PHASES. D. H. M.   H. M.   H. M.  
Third Quarter, 2 1 57 eve. 1 45 eve. 1 36 eve.
New Moon, 10 8 45 morn. 8 33 morn. 8 24 morn.
First Quarter, 17 5 40 morn. 5 28 morn. 5 19 morn.
Full Moon, 24 8 21 morn. 8 9 morn. 8 0 morn.


   
Boston.
New York.
Pittsburg.
Bost.
N.Y.
Pitts.
 
Bost.
DM DW Sun Rise Sun Sets Sun Rise Sun Sets Sun Rise Sun Sets Moon rises Moon rises Moon rises S. fast m s High Watr
1 Sat 5 59 5 40 5 58 5 40 5 58 5 41 9 35 9 42 9 50 10 25 3 7
2 SUN 6 0 38 59 39 59 39 10 26 10 33 10 41 10 43 4 4
3 Mon 1 36 6 0 37 6 0 37 11 25 11 31 11 39 11 2 5 7
4 Tues 2 34 1 35 1 36 morn morn morn 11 20 6 24
5 Wed 3 33 2 34 2 34 0 27 0 33 0 40 11 38 7 38
6 Thu 4 31 3 32 3 33 1 33 1 37 1 42 11 55 8 38
7 Frid 5 29 4 31 4 31 2 39 2 42 2 46 12 12 9 26
8 Sat 7 28 5 29 5 29 3 46 3 48 3 50 12 29 10 3
9 SUN 8 26 6 27 6 28 4 54 4 55 4 56 12 45 10 37
10 Mon 9 24 7 26 7 26 sets sets sets 13 0 11 13
11 Tues 10 23 9 24 8 25 6 3 6 6 6 10 13 16 11 45
12 Wed 6 11 5 21 6 10 5 23 6 9 5 23 6 32 6 36 6 41 13 31 aft 23
13 Thu 12 19 11 21 10 22 7 7 7 13 7 19 13 45 1 4
14 Frid 14 18 12 20 11 20 7 52 7 59 8 7 13 58 1 48
15 Sat 15 16 13 18 12 19 8 48 8 55 9 3 14 11 2 43
16 SUN 16 15 14 16 13 17 9 54 10 1 10 10 14 24 3 54
17 Mon 17 13 15 15 14 16 11 8 11 14 11 21 14 36 5 16
18 Tues 18 11 16 13 15 14 morn morn morn 14 47 6 50
19 Wed 19 10 17 12 16 13 0 24 0 29 0 35 14 58 8 5
20 Thu 21 8 18 11 18 12 1 40 1 43 1 47 15 8 8 59
21 Frid 22 7 20 9 19 10 2 53 2 55 2 57 15 18 9 44
22 Sat 6 23 5 6 21 5 8 6 20 5 9 4 3 4 4 4 5 15 27 10 21
23 SUN 24 4 22 6 21 7 5 13 5 12 5 10 15 27 10 55
24 Mon 26 2 23 5 22 6 rises rises rises 15 43 11 33
25 Tues 27 1 24 3 23 5 5 41 5 45 5 50 15 50 Morn
26 Wed 28 4 59 25 2 24 3 6 10 6 15 6 22 15 56 0 3
27 Thu 29 58 27 1 25 2 6 45 6 51 6 59 16 1 0 38
28 Frid 31 57 28 0 26 1 7 27 7 34 7 42 16 6 1 16
29 Sat 32 55 29 4 58 28 0 8 16 8 23 8 31 16 10 1 16
30 SUN 33 54 30 57 29 4 58 9 12 9 19 9 27 16 13 2 0
31 Mon 34 53 31 31 56 20 10 13 10 19 10 26 16 15 3 38

24

November begins on Tuesday.

22, 1791. Massacre in St. Domingo.

26, 1829. Bushrod Washington died at Philadelphia, aged 71.

30, 1831, A convention between the kings of England and France for the ore effectual suppression of the slave trade, signed at Paris.

Negro Hunt

25

November — Eleventh Month.

Self-defence. — Multitudes of northern men are every year going to the south, and becoming slave-holders, by marriage or purchase. The story is circulated here, and they are said to have "done very well." We wish to prevent this, in future, and to preserve our neighbors, brothers and children, from participation in this sin. If we had no other reason, this would be sufficient for much more than we have done.

 
Boston.
New York.
Pittsburgh.
MOON'S PHASES. D. H. M.   H. M.   H. M.  
Third Quarter, 1 9 54 morn. 9 42 morn. 9 34 morn.
New Moon, 3 8 51 eve. 8 30 eve. 8 30 eve.
First Quarter, 15 1 7 eve. 0 55 eve. 0 47 eve.
Full Moon. 23 0 48 morn. 0 36 morn. 0 28 morn.


   
Boston.
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Pittsburg.
Bost.
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Pitts.
 
Bost.
DM DW Sun Rise Sun Sets Sun Rise Sun Sets Sun Rise Sun Sets Moon rises Moon rises Moon rises S. slo. m s> High Watr
1 Tues 6> 36 4 51 6> 32 4 54 6 31 4 56 11 17 11 22 11 27 16 16 4 36
2 Wed 37 50 34 53 32 55 morn morn morn 16 17 5 39
3 Thu 38 49 35 52 33 54 0 22 0 25 0 29 16 17 6 52
4 Frid 39 48 36 51 35 52 1 28 1 30 1 32 4 59 7 57
5 Sat 41 46 37 50 36 51 2 34 2 36 2 37 5 26 8 47
6 SUN 42 45 38 49 37 50 3 43 3 43 3 42 5 53 9 44
7 Mon 43 44 40 48 38 49 4 54 4 52 4 50 6 19 10 10
8 Tues 45 43 41 47 39 48 6 9 6 6 6 1 6 45 10 48
9 Wed 46 42 42 46 40 47 sets sets sets 15 58 11 29
10 Thu 47 41 43 45 42 46 5 45 5 51 5 58 15 52 aft 11
11 Frid 6 48 4 40 44 4 44 6 43 45 6 38 6 45 7 54 15 45 0 55
12 Sat 50 39 6 46 43 44 4 44 7 43 7 51 8 2 15 37 1 44
13 SUN 51 38 47 42 45 43 8 57 9 4 9 11 15 29 2 40
14 Mon 52 37 48 41 46 43 10 14 10 19 10 27 15 19 3 45
15 Tues 53 36 49 40 47 42 11 31 11 34 11 39 15 9 5 0
16 Wed 55 35 50 39 49 41 morn morn morn 14 58 6 17
17 Thu 56 34 52 38 50 40 0 43 0 46 0 49 14 46 7 27
18 Frid 57 33 53 58 51 40 1 54 1 54 1 55 14 33 8 27
19 Sat 58 33 54 37 52 39 3 2 3 1 3 0 14 20 9 12
20 SUN 7 0 32 55 36 53 39 4 9 4 7 4 5 14 6 9 54
21 Mon 1 4 31 56 4 36 6 54 4 38 5 16 5 13 5 10 13 50 10 28
22 Tues 2 30 57 35 55 37 6 23 6 19 6 13 13 35 11 0
23 Wed 3 30 59 35 57 37 rises rises rises 13 18 11 37
24 Thu 4 29 7 0 34 58 36 5 21 5 28 5 35 13 0 morn
25 Frid 6 29 1 34 59 36 6 8 6 15 6 24 12 42 0 15
26 Sat 7 28 2 33 0 35 7 2 7 9 7 17 12 23 0 54
27 SUN 8 28 3 33 1 35 8 1 8 15 8 18 12 3 6 15
28 Mon 9 27 4 32 2 34 9 4 9 10 9 16 11 10 7 27
29 Tues 10 27 5 32 3 34 10 7 10 12 10 18 11 22 3 11
30 Wed 11 27 6 32 4 34 11 12 11 15 11 21 11 32 3 51

26

December begins on Thursday.

4, 1833. A Convention met at the Adelphi Hall, Philadelphia, to form the American Anti-Slavery Society. Ten states were represented.

6, 1833 Declaration of principles signed by the A.S. Convention.

14, 1799 Washington died, aged 68. — 17, 1830. Bolivar died.

22, 1620. Pilgrims landed at Plymouth, seeking a land of liberty.

28, 1831. Insurrection of slaves in Jamaica. Martial law was proclaimed, and continued in force more than a month. 30,000 blacks were under arms, 4000 of whom were killed. Property destroyed estimated at $15,000,000. Emancipation will prevent insurrection.

Slavery in the District of Columbia.

[Extract from a Traveler's Journal.]

February, 1835. Visited the Slave-Trader's Prison at Alexandria, where a brisk business is carried on by Franklin & Armfield, in purchasing men, women and children, and shipping them to the far South. They are bought without regard to parental ties, and children are often torn from their parents by unprincipled agents, employed for the purpose, who collect them as our country drovers collect horses, cattle, sheep, or swine, and often march them through the enclosure of the capitol, in droves, chained together. This was done during the last session of Congress. Many are committed to jail, and sold into slavery for life, to pay their jail fees. I found in the prison, under the dwelling of F. & A., about seventy men and boys, some of whom had heavy chains upon them, — and I was informed, that in another apartment were an equal number of women and girls, none of whom had any bed, or even straw to sleep on. Something called a blanket was allowed each one, and this comprehended bed and bedding, with a brick pavement for a floor. Among the females were two young women, about twenty years of age, sold to pay their jail expenses, being free but having the misfortune to be arrested on suspicion, and not being able to bring the proof required, and having no friend to pay a few dollars, they must be sold into perpetual slavery. Many free persons, I was informed, were often kidnapped, and carried on board of slave vessels, to be sold at New Orleans.

A friend of mine had a boy whom he had bought for $150, — to be free when 27 years old. A few days after the above-named visit, this boy was detected in stealing some articles from several boarders in the house. He plead guilty to the charge, and produced the most valuable of the stolen articles. He was ordered to be stripped, and flogged as long as any life was left in him, and then have his back washed with salt and water, and was then sent to jail, having, however, been previously put on oath to testify against a free colored man, who was committed to jail on his testimony, as being necessary. After being committed, the city constable returned and informed the holder, that he knew a slave-buyer who would give $350 for the boy, and take the risk of any complaint in regard to his being free at the age of 27, and strongly recommended that he should be sold!!

When your informant left, they were both [the slave and the FREE colored man convicted on his testimony] in the government prison, with about 50 other colored persons placed there for different offences, but most of them for inability to prove their freedom by white witnesses.

27

December — Twelfth Month.

Congress meet on the 5th of this month. Can you say that you are opposed to slavery, if you have not signed a petition for its abolition at the seat of government? ‘Wo unto them that decree unrighteous decrees’ Are you not doing this by your representatives?

 
Boston.
New York.
Pittsburgh.
MOON'S PHASES. D. H. M.   H. M.   H. M.  
Third Quarter, 1 5 27 morn. 5 15 morn. 5 7 morn.
New Moon, 8 8 16 morn. 8 4 morn. 7 55 morn.
First Quarter, 14 11 10 eve. 10 58 eve. 10 49 eve.
Full Moon, 22 7 32 eve. 7 20 eve. 7 7 eve.
Third Quarter, 30 11 7 eve. 10 55 eve. 10 47 eve.


   
Boston.
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Pittsburg.
Bost.
N.Y.
Pitts.
 
Bost.
DM DW Sun Rise Sun Sets Sun Rise Sun Sets Sun Rise Sun Sets Moon rises Moon rises Moon rises S. fast m s High Watr
1 Thu 7 12 4 26 7 7 4 31 7 5 4 34 morn morn morn 10 37 4 41
2 Frid 14 26 8 31 6 33 0 17 0 18 0 20 10 14 5 39
3 Sat 15 26 9 31 7 33 1 23 1 23 1 28 9 50 6 44
4 SUN 16 26 10 31 8 33 2 31 2 30 2 25 9 26 7 51
5 Mon 17 25 11 31 9 33 3 42 3 40 3 34 9 1 8 44
6 Tues 18 25 12 31 10 33 4 59 4 55 4 50 8 35 9 36
7 Wed 19 25 13 30 11 32 6 18 6 13 6 5 8 9 10 23
8 Thu 19 25 14 30 12 32 sets sets sets 7 43 11 8
9 Frid 20 25 15 31 13 33 5 24 5 31 5 39 12 45 11 57
10 Sat 21 25 16 31 14 33 6 37 6 44 6 52 6 48 aft 44
11 SUN 7 22 4 25 7 17 4 31 715 4 33 7 57 8 2 8 10 6 20 1 30
12 Mon 23 25 18 31 15 33 9 16 9 20 9 27 13 31 3 21
13 Tues 24 26 18 31 16 33 10 32 10 35 10 39 5 52 3 16
14 Wed 14 26 19 31 17 34 11 45 11 46 11 48 5 23 4 12
15 Thu 25 26 20 31 18 34 morn morn morn 4 25 5 16
16 Frid 26 26 20 32 18 34 0 54 0 54 0 54 3 56 6 20
17 Sat 27 27 21 32 19 34 2 1 2 0 1 58 3 27 7 26
18 SUN 27 27 22 32 19 35 3 8 3 5 3 1 2 57 8 29
19 Mon 28 27 22 33 20 35 4 14 4 10 4 5 2 57 9 14
20 Tues 28 28 23 33 20 35 5 20 5 15 5 7 1 57 9 57
21 Wed 7 29 4 28 7 23 4 34 7 21 4 36 6 25 6 18 6 9 1 27 10 32
22 Thu 29 5 24 34 21 36 rises rises rises 0 58 11 12
23 Frid 30 29 24 35 22 37 4 54 5 1 5 10 0 28 11 48
24 Sat 30 30 25 36 22 37 5 52 5 58 6 7 slow morn
25 SUN 31 31 25 36 23 38 6 54 6 59 7 7 0 32 0 25
26 Mon 31 31 26 37 23 39 7 57 8 2 8 8 1 2 1 5
27 Tues 31 32 26 38 23 40 9 1 9 4 9 9 1 32 1 34
28 Wed 32 33 26 38 24 41 10 5 10 7 10 11 2 1 2 16
29 Thu 32 34 26 39 24 41 11 9 11 9 11 13 2 30 2 55
30 Frid 32 34 27 40 24 42 morn morn morn 2 59 3 38
31 Sat 32 35 27 41 25 42 0 14 0 13 0 11 3 28 4 38

28

Principles of Anti-Slavery Societies.

"Can any good thing come out of Nazareth? Come and see."

Then societies are composed of men of all denominations, all political creeds, every variety of natural disposition; — they are scattered over a wide territory from Maine to Kentucky, in crowded cities and secluded hamlets; — they embrace the learned and unlearned, the rich and the poor: — and yet their principles, like the testimony of faithful eye-witnesses, appear to have emanated from one source; and so indeed they did. They are the offspring of ONE Eternal Mind.

In looking over the many declarations of Anti-Slavery Societies, in order to give our readers a brief exposition of principles, we have found so much that was pure, elevated, and thrilling, that we have been at a loss what position to choose. We give selections from the Declaration of the Ohio A.S. Convention, dated April 22, 1835, — the prospectus of the Liberator, Dec. 1832, and the Declaration of the National A.S. Convention, Dec. 6, 1833. They are the principles contained in the Bible, and set forth in the Declaration of Independence.

Slavery a Sin.

We believe slavery to be a sin — sin, in itself, apart from its occasional rigors incidental to its administration, — sin, because it converts persons into things, makes men property, God's image merchandize.

What is that but a sin, which sinks to the level of brutes, beings ranked and registered by God a little lower than the angels — wrests from their rightful owners the legacies which their Maker has bequeath them — inalienable birthright endowments exchanged for no equivalent, unsurrendered by volition and unforfeited by crime — breaks open the sanctuary of human rights, and makes its sacred things common plunder — driving to the shambles Jehovah's image, herded with four-footed beasts and creeping things, and bartering for vile dust the purchase of a Redeemer's blood, and the living members of his body? What is that but a sin, which derides the sanctity with which God has invested domestic relations — annihilates marriage — makes void parental authority, nullifies filial obligation — invites the violation of chastity by denying it legal protection, thus bidding God speed to lust as it riots at noon-day, glorying in the immunities of law?

Effects of Slavery

The influences of slavery upon slave-holders and the slave states, are an abiding sense of insecurity and dread — the press cowering under a censorship — freedom of speech struck dumb by proscription — a standing army of patrols to awe down insurrection — the mechanic arts and all vigorous enterprise crushed under an incubus — a thriftless agriculture smiting the land with barrenness and decay — industry held up to scorn — idleness a badge of dignity — profligacy no barrier to favor — concubinage encouraged by premium, the HIGH PRICE of the mixed race operating as a bounty upon amalgamation — prodigality, in lavishing upon the rich the plundered earnings of the poor,

29

accounted high-souled generosity — revenge regarded as the refinement of honor — aristocracy entitled republicanism, and despotism chivalry.

It has desecrated our federal city, smitten with its leprosy our national temple, turned its sacred courts into human shambles, and provided seats for them that sell men. It is at war with the genius of our government, and divides it against itself. It scoffs at our national Declaration, brands us with hypocrisy before the nations, paralyzes the power of our free institutions at home, makes them a hissing and a by-word abroad, and shouts our shame in the ears of the world.

This is slavery — as it exists to-day, sheltered under the wings of our national eagle, republican law its protector, republican equality its advocate, republican morality its patron, freemen its body guard, the church its city of refuge, and the sanctuary of God and the very horns of the altar its inviolable asylum!

Against this whole system, we do with one accord, in the name of humanity and eternal right, record our utter detestation, and enter our solemn protest. Slavery being sin, we maintain that it is the duty of all who perpetrate it immediately to cease; in other words, that immediate emancipation is the sacred right of the slaves, and the imperative duty of their masters. — Ohio Declaration.

Immediate Emancipation.

By immediate emancipation we do not mean —

That the slaves shall be turned loose upon the nation, to roam ad vagabonds or aliens — nor

That they shall be instantly invested with all political rights and privileges — nor

That they shall be expelled from their native land to a foreign clime, as the price and condition of their freedom. But we mean —

That, instead of being under the unlimited control of a few irresponsible masters, they shall really receive the protection of law:

That the power which is now vested in every slave-holder to rob them of their just dues, to drive them into the fields like beasts, to lacerate their bodies, to sell the husband from his wife, the wife from her husband, and children from their parents, shall instantly cease:

That the slaves shall be employed as free laborers, fairly compensated, and fully protected in their earnings:

That they shall be placed under a benevolent and disinterested supervision, which shall secure to them the right to obtain secular and religious knowledge, to worship God according to the dictates of their own conscience, to accumulate wealth, and to seek an intellectual and moral equality with their white competitors. — Garrison.

Plan of operation.

We shall organize Anti-Slavery Societies, if possible, in every city, town and village of our land.

We shall send forth Agents to lift up the voice of remonstrance, of warning, of entreaty and rebuke.

We shall circulate, unsparingly and extensively, anti-slavery tracts and periodicals.

We shall enlist the PULPIT and the PRESS in the cause of the suffering and the dumb.

30

We shall aim at a purification of the churches from all participation in the guilt of slavery.

We shall encourage the labor of freemen over that of the slaves, by giving a preference to their productions; — and

We shall spare no exertions nor means to bring the whole nation to speedy repentance. — Declaration of the A.A.S. Convention.

You Know Nothing About the Subject.

Those who would paralyze our exertions and shut our mouths, in reference to our great national SIN, often tell us, that we at the north know nothing about slavery, and that we must have nothing to do with it. We answer, first, that in questions of duty we seek direction from the Scriptures of truth, and from the FOUNTAIN of wisdom, — not from any inferior source. Right and wrong are of the same nature, in all ages, and places. We need not leave our own firesides to learn that man has no right to hold his fellow man as property. Secondly, If we are ignorant, it is because the means of obtaining knowledge have been withheld. There has been a criminal neglect on the part of those who control the great avenues leading to the public mind. The men who repeats this objection, should blush with shame. It is adding infamy to sin. We are scattering light and knowledge throughout the world, and striving to abolish every unholy practice, which exists in the most remote nations; — but when we would turn our attention to a system of transcendent guilt in our own nation, we are met with rude rebuff, ‘Hands off: you know nothing about the matter.’ But we OUGHT to know something about it, and we cannot remain innocently ignorant. Give us information. Let slavery be exhibited in the light of day, it will bear the light. We are participants in the crime, and are under solemn obligations to acquaint ourselves with its nature and its fruits. It is the duty of all who have light on this subject, to spread it abroad, that we may act intelligently; for, as we are personally implicated in the matter, WE MUST ACT.

We are not, however, so destitute of information as our opponents wish we were. We derive much information from public documents. The following extracts will show that some of the important principles of northern abolitionists are advocated by southern legislators. The subject was discussed in the Virginia House of Delegates, Jan. 1832. The following are extracts from speeches made on the occasion.

A Voice from Virginia.

[Extract from the speech of John A. Chandler, of Norfolk Co.].

After referring to the language used in the Bill of Rights, he says, ‘Has slavery interfered with our means of enjoying life, liberty, property, happiness and safety? Look at Southampton. The answer is written in letters of BLOOD, UPON THE FLOORS OF THE UNHAPPY COUNTY.’ …‘But, sir, will this evil, this CURSE, not increase? Will not the happiness and safety of those who may come after us, be endangered in a still greater degree by it? How then can we reconcile it to ourselves to fasten this upon them? Do we not endanger our very NATIONAL EXISTENCE by entailing slavery upon them:…’

‘The truth is, that our ancestors had NO TITLE to this property, and we have acquired it only by legislative enactments, sanctioned by the necessity of the case. It may be argued that length of time has created a title. Some thirty years ago, a frigate sailed on a cruise, and has never been heard of since. Imagine, for a moment, that it was now announced tot his nation, that the ship had foundered on the coast of Africa, and her crew, or part of them, were SLAVES to some petty monarch in that country: — think you, sir, that we would listen to the plea of length of time? No; the voice of a mighty people, with resistless force, would proclaim that FREEMEN CAN NEVER BE MADE SLAVES, and the hum of preparation to demand our long-lost brethren, would soon resound throughout the land.’

31

[From the speech of Thomas J. Randolph of Albemarle.]

‘In the last 40 years, the whites in Eastern Virginia have increased 54 per cent; the blacks 186 per cent. Forty years ago, the whites exceeded the colored 25,000; the colored now exceed the whites 81,000; a net gain of the blacks over the whites in 40 years of 106,000; and these results too, during an EXPORTATION of near 260,000 slaves since the year 1790, now, perhaps the fruitful progenitors of half a million in other states.’…‘It is a practice, and an increasing practice, in parts of Virginia, to REAR SLAVES FOR MARKET. How can an honorable mind, a patriot, and lover of his country, bear to see this ancient dominion converted into one grand menagerie where men are to be reared for market, like oxen for the shambles? Is it better, is it not worse than the [foreign ] slave-trade which enlisted the labor of the good and the wise of every creed and every clime to abolish it? The trader receives the slave, a stranger in language, aspect, and manner, from the merchant who has brought him from the interior. The ties of father, mother, husband, and child, have all been rent in twain; before he receives him his soul has become callous. But here, sir, individuals, whom the master has known from infancy, whom he has seen sporting in the innocent gambols of childhood, who have been accustomed to look to him for protection, he TEARS from the MOTHER'S ARMS, and sells into a strange country, among strange, people, SUBJECT TO CRUEL TASK-MASTERS. In my opinion, sir, IT IS MUCH WORSE.’

‘He [a member who preceded him] has attempted to justify slavery here, because it exists in Africa, and has stated that it exists all over the world. Upon the same principle, he could justify any of the abominations and enormities of savage tribes. Does slavery exist in any part of civilized Europe? No, sir, in no part of it. America is the ONLY CICIVILIZED CHRISTIAN NATION that bears the opprobrium! In every other country where civilization and Christianity have existed together, they have erased it from their codes, — they have blotted it from the page of their history.’

Have civilization and Christianity no efficacy, in this country? Shall they ever be a theme of reproach for the savage and the heathen?

[From the speech of James M'Dowell, Jr. of Rockbridge.]

‘Who, sir, that looks at this property as a legislator, and marks its effect on our national advance, but weeps over it as the worst of patrimonies? Who that looks to this unhappy bondage of our unhappy people in the midst of our society, and thinks of its incidents and its issues, but weeps over it as a curse upon him who inflicts, as upon him who suffers it?

If I am to judge from the one of our debate, from the concessions on all hands expressed, there is not a man in this body, not one, perhaps, that is even represented here, who would not have thanked the generations that have gone before us if, acting as public men, they had brought this bondage to a close.’…‘Proud as are the names for intellect and patriotism which enrich the volumes of our history, that name — that man — above all parallel would have been the chief, who could have blotted out this curse from his country.’

32

‘Slavery has come down to us from our fathers, and the question now is, shall we, in turn, hand it over to our children? Hand it over to them aggravated in every attribute of evil? Shall we perpetuate the calamity we deplore, and become to posterity, the objects, not of kindness, but of cursing?

Sir, you may place the slave where you please, — you may dry up, to your utmost, the fountains of his feelings, the springs of his thought, — you may close upon his mind every avenue to knowledge, and cloud it over with artificial night, — you may yoke him to your labor as the ox, which liveth only to work, and worketh only to live — you may put him under any process which, without destroying his value as a slave, will debase and crush him as a rational being; — you may do this, and the idea that he was born to be free will survive it all. It is allied to his hope of immortality — it is the ethereal part of his nature which oppression cannot reach; it is a torch lit up in his soul by the hand of the Deity, and never meant to be extinguished by the hand of man.’[How fanatical!]

‘Admitting the subject cannot be approached without danger now, the great question for us to determine is, whether, by delay, it may not become fearfully worse, and in process of time attain a magnitude far transcending our feeble powers’…‘Gentlemen say, let things alone; the evil will correct itself. We may let things alone, but they will not let us alone.’…‘There is a still small voice, which speaks to the heart of man in a tone too clear and distinct to be disregarded. It tells him that EVERY SYSTEM OF SLAVERY IS BASED UPON INJUSTICE AND OPPRESSION. If gentlemen disregard it now, and lull their consciences to sleep, they may be aroused to a sense of their danger, when it is too late to repair their errors.

‘If slavery can be eradicated, let us get rid of it. If it cannot, let that melancholy fact be distinctly ascertained; and let those who are now awaiting with painful solicitude the result of your determination, pack up their household goods, and find among the prairies of the west, that security and repose which their native land does not afford.’

Many interesting extracts from the same debate, are given in the "Testimony of God against Slavery," by La Roy Sunderland.

Produce of Slave Labor.

— by C. Stuart.

Why do slave holders keep slaves?

For the sake of the produce of their labor.

What makes them want the labor of slaves?

To make money by it.

How can they make money by it?

By getting people to buy, sell and consume its productions.

If they could not get any body to buy these productions, would they keep slaves?

Certainly not.

What relation then is there between slave-holders, and the buyers, venders, and consumers of the produce of slave labor?

The slave-holders are merely the hirelings of the consumers: — as slavery produces the slave-trade — so, buying, selling and consuming the fruits of slave-labor, produces slavery. — Appetite creates a demand for sugar, coffee, rice, cotton, &c., &c., and slave masters know

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that this appetite is strong and universal enough, to secure a market, however it is supplied. They do not make sugar in order to oppress or destroy the slave, but in order to make money; and their guilt is, that when they find, that they cannot make money so conveniently without oppression, they rather oppress than not make money.

The buyers, venders and consumers of slave produce hold out the lure and supply the motive. — They say, "We want sugar," &c. The slave-holders reply, "We will get sugar for you." — "How?" cry the consumers — "By the forced and unrequited toil of the guiltless poor," return the slave-holders. — "We wish you would get it for us," cry the others, "by paying your laborers fair wages, and by treating them like men." "That we will not," retort the slave-holders. — "But that is too bad," exclaim the consumers — "you are a set of men-stealers, and we abhor your system. — But we must have sugar! — We will raise societies against slavery. — We will petition Congress. — We will proclaim your guilt from the Pulpit, the Press and the Lecture room. — We know indeed that you would not keep slaves, if we did not hire you to do so. — but sugar we must have, cost what it may. — Here is our money. — Go — send your slaves to the field — drive on — never mind their wrongs — regard not their blood. — Yet, it is a horrible crime to keep slaves. — Oh, how we pity them!"

The consumers of slave produce consume it, not in order to support slavery, but in order to please their appetites. — Their guilt is, that when they find, that they cannot get sugar so conveniently without having and supporting oppression, they rather support oppression, than not have sugar — appetite calls. — The consumer holds out his money. — The slave-holder takes it and does the work. — The plundered and outraged slave is hastening to meet them both at the bar of God.

To Children.

Imitation of Miss Barbauld's Seasons.

Who is this that is walking to and fro in the land, with a forehead of brass, and a heart of steel? One of her hands is filled with whips and fetters. In the other she grasps the hire of the laborer, which is kept back by fraud. Wherever she sets her foot, the land is cursed. Thorns and briers spring up around her. Decay and ruin mark her path. Her breath is deadly poison. Churches and schools shrink away from her approach. The colored man is filled with horror as she advances. She crushes his energies, and seeks to blot out his mind. Shrieks and groans are the music she delights to hear. Hearts broken with anguish are her food. Blood and tears are her drink. She tramples the Bible under her feet, and defies its Author. She love darkness, and tries to cover herself with a thick veil. She has a multitude of flatterers, and many mouths are filled with her praise. She corrupts watchmen by bribery. They warn not the people against her. Lawgivers tremble at her frown. She laughs at their feeble efforts to oppose her. Youths and maidens, do you know this frightful monster? Can you tell me her name?

Mr. Thome of Kentucky once said, "The plantations of the south are grave-yards of the mind: the inexpressive countenances of the slaves are monuments of souls expired, — and their spiritless eyes are their epitaphs."

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The Laws of God and the Laws of Slavery.

Choose you this day whom ye will serve. — Josh. 24:15.
"Thus saith the LORD." "Ye have made the commandment of God of none effect."
1 Search the Scriptures. John 5:39. 1 Most of the slaves are not allowed to learn to read, and therefore cannot search the scriptures.
2 Not forsaking the assembling of ourselves together, &c. Heb. 10: 25. 2 In Georgia, say Justice of the Peace may at his discretion break up any religious assembly of slaves, and may order each slave present, to be "corrected, WITHOUT TRIAL, by receiving on the bare back twenty — five stripes, with a whip, switch or cowskin." Str. 91, 92. In Virginia, all evening meetings of slaves, or of free blacks or mulattoes associating with slaves, are forbidden. Laws of similar tendency exist in many of the slave-holding states.
3 Train up a child in the way he should go, & when he is old, he will not depart from it. Prov. 22: 6. 3 The Laws recognize not the parental relation as belonging to slaves. A slave has no more legal authority over his child than domesticated brutes have over their young.
4 What God hath hoined together, let not man put asunder. Mark 10: 9 4 The law affords no protection to the marriage of slaves. They may indeed be formally married, but so far as legal rights and obligations are concerned, it is an idle ceremony. The connection may at any time be legally broken up, to gratify the avarice or licentiousness of the master.
5 Go ye therefore and TEACH all nations. Matt. 28: 19. We unto you, lawyers, for ye have taken away the key of knowsedge. Luke 11: 52. Deut. 6: 7. 5 In Georgia, if a white teach a FREE, negro or slave to read or srite, he is fined $500, and imprisoned at the discretion of the court. If the offender be a colored man, bond or free, he is to be fined or shipped. Of course, a father may be flogged for teaching his own child! The law was passed in 1829. In N.C. it is unlawful to teach a slave to read or write,or to sell or give him any book or pamphlet, Bible not excepted. In Lou. the penalty for reaching slaves to read or write is one year's imprisonment.
6 Go ye into all the world, and preach the gospel to EVERY CREATURE. Mark 16: 15. Exhort oue another daily. Heb. 3: 13. 6 In N.C. it is unlawful for a colored man to preach the gospel, whatever his attainments or iety. In Geo. if a FREE negro preaches to his companions, or exhorts them, he may be seized without warrant, and whipped thirty-nine lashes, and the same number of lashes may be applied to each of his congregation.
7 Feed my lambs. John 21: 15. Come, ye children, hearken unto me; I will teach you the fear of the Lord: PS. 34:11 7 In Louisiana, the penality for instructing a free balck is a SABBATH SCHOOL, is for the first offence five hundred dollare, — for the second offence DEATH. Though similar laws do not exist in the other states, yet there are but very few Sabbath schools for slaves. In 1830, the number of slaves under the age of 24, was 1,322,499.
8 Wisdom is the principal thing; therefore get wisdom; and with all thy getting, get understanding. Take fast hold of instruction. Prov. 4: 7,13 8 In S.C. any assembly of FREE negroes, even in presence of white persons, "In a confined or secret place, for the purpose of mental instructions," is an unlawful assembly, and may be dispersed by the magistrate, who is authorized to inflict twenty lashes on each free negro, mulatto or slave attending the meeting. Stroud, 89.
9 Be not forgetful to entertain strangers. Heb. 13: 2. 9 In S.C. if a free negro entertains a runaway slave, he forfeits $10, and if unable to pay the fine, as must almost always be the case, he is sold as a slave for life. In 1827, a free woman and her three children were thus sold for harboring two slave children.
10 And the servant which knew his lord's will, and prepared not himself, 10 In Ky. white men suffer death for four crimes only, slaves for 11. In Va. there are 71 crimes for which slaves suffer death, and whites nothing worse than imprisonment.

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ther did according to his will, shall be beaten with many stripes. But he that knew not, and did commit things worth of stripes, shall be beaten with few stripes. Luke 12: 47, 48. In Mississippi these offecnes are 38 in number, and for several of them whites are not punished at all. The slave is without religious instruction, unable to read, too ignorant to comprehend legislation, and probably does not know of the existence of half the laws by which he suffers. thus slave-holders do in effect say, ‘Where little is given, Much shall be required.’
11 One witness shall not rise up against a man for any iniquity, of for any sin: at the mouth of two witnesses, or at the mouth of three witnesses, shall the matter be established. Deut. 19: 15. 11 Neither a slave or FREE colored person can be a witness against any free white man, in a court of justice, in any case, but they may testify against a slave or free colored man, even in cases affecting life. Stoud says, this law "places the slave, who is seldom in view of more than one white person at a time, entirely at the mercy of this individual." (p. 66) He has a full license to commit any CRIME with impunity, for it cannot be proved against him.
12 Thou shalt not deliver unto his master the servant which is escaped from his master unto thee. Deut. 23:15. 12 Not only do the slave — holding states break this law in their intercourse with one another, but the free states (as the Constitution is generally interpreted) have entered into a solemn compact with slave-holders to set it at definance.
13. Ye shall hallow the fiftieth year, & proclaim liberty throu out all the land, unto ALL the inhabitants thereof. Lev. 25: 10. 13 In this ‘land of liberty,’ slavery is declared by law to be perpetual. Laws exist in most of the southern states which forbid or discourage emancipation. Slavery has existed in this land two hundred years. Spread light and truth abroad, and soon the "Trump of Jublee" will sound.

The above are only a few of the many particulars in which the slave laws are in direct opposition to the laws of God. Are we presumptuous in saying that they are "before God utterly null and void," and that "they ought to be instantly abrogated?"

These laws afford a melancholy proof that "what begins in injustice must be carried on in crime." If slavery were a "rightful relation," it could not lean for support on laws of such heaven-daring atrocity. By enacting them slave-holders have published to the world that slavery is in its own nature anti-christian and tyrannical, and that it can only be supported by adding sin to sin. Slavery is the corrupt root from which all these bitter fruits proceed. Abolitionists are aiming heavy blows directly at the root, and every branch, twig and leaf of the system shows by its trembling, that the blows are taking effect. Reader, are you assisting in the work? If not, are you prepared with an excuse to render at the judgment of the great day?

Females of New England.

You, who are the favored inheritors of a country irradiated by the purest beams of heavenly truth; blest by freedom so perfect, that, feeling no fetter, you forget that you are free; you who surrounded by comforts, gratifications and luxuries, showered in rich profusion — you to whom the names of father, brother, husband, are filled with delightful meaning, you who can clasp your smiling babe to your maternal bosom, without feeling an awful apprehension that each opening of your door will usher in the ‘cruel spoiler’ of your happiness, — come forth, and engage in the defence of a large class of your fellow immortals, and of a countless host of ‘daughters yet unborn,’ who are doomed to cheerless bondage, compulsory heathenism, unrequited and unpitied toil, and who are shut out from all the tender charities and comforts of life. We ask you to engage in no enterprise of extravagant purpose, or of doubtful utility; but in the sober cause of truth,

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justice, and benevolence. Come forth, then, under the guidance of the three Christian Graces, Faith, Hope, and Charity. In full assurance of FAITH, founded on the rock of divine authority, and with HOPE, anchored on the same immutable basis, in every difficulty that may seem to impede the work, you may firmly ‘say to this mountain, be thou removed, and it shall be done.’ And when ‘tongues shall cease, and knowledge vanish away,’ that grace which ‘never faileth,’ CHARITY, ‘the bond of perfectness,’ shall finally unite the rescued race to those who have been made the favored instruments of their salvation, in the everlasting kingdom of their common Savior.

Petitions for the abolition of slavery in the Dist. of Columbia, to be signed by ladies, are to be had in Boston. Let not one of you fail to sign it. Congress will give you a hearing.

A Woman for Sale!

[The following is from the Portland Advertiser. It occurred in March, 1833.]

Within ten feet of the office of the Richmond Enquirer, there was on an auction flag the following amusing advertisement: ‘By virtue of an order of the Hastings Court for the city of Richmond, pronounced on the 22d day of February, [Washington's birth day, mark ye.] will be sold, in front of the High Constable's office, on Monday the 11th inst. One bright mulatto woman, about 26 years of age; (very likely,) also some empty barrels and sundry old candle boxes, &c., to satisfy the above attachment, and all costs attending the same.’ This was dated March 1st, and regularly signed. As I was going by the crowd, and this auction flag, I was struck with the question of the auctioneer, who seemed to have his eye on me. ‘Do you want to buy a woman?’ I then read the advertisement, and remembered that I was in a land where slaves and horses were commodities equally marketable. ‘Do you want to buy a woman?’ was the interrogation pressed upon every passer-by. The auctioneer was loudly exclaiming, two hundred dollars, only two hundred dollars for this likely woman. Two hundred and ten shall I say? Two hundred and ten, 210, 210 — who bids? 215, — only 215 — 215 — a good seamstress, stout, healthy — only 215 220 — is a good cook — 230, only 230 dollars bid — 235 — 240 — 245 — 250, 250 — going, a woman a going for only 250 dollars — 260, only 260, 260, shall I knock her off for only 260 dollars? 260 dollars is the only bid. 270, did you say? Yes, 270, 270, 270, as fine a woman as was ever under the hammer — 275 280 — 290 — 300 I am bid. 300 dollars for a woman worth 500 dollars. 310, going, a woman going for 310 dollars — fine, like, stout — 315, 320 dollars, a going, a going — speak quick, a going, a going, a going, going, and — and — and — a going, for 320 dollars — and — and — gone to Mr. --.

I give you details because they interested me beyond measure — and I think you have readers who will not be less interested then I was, in the details of the auction. The woman trotted off with her new master, and I busied myself with inquiring into the particulars. I learned that her husband was free, and that he bought her a slave, and then married her. Thus she was his wife and his slave, and he held her by a double tenure, and could sell her when he pleased. The husband got into debt and then ran off, — and his wife was attached as his slave, and sold by order of the Court, to pay the debt.

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Negro Hunt.

By the unsolicited kindness of Mrs. Child, we have been permitted to use some of the elegant engravings which appeared in the Oasis. We have placed one of them opposite the Calendar page for November, to remind our northern sportsmen that while they are amusing themselves in hunting the wild game of the forest, others are employed in hunting those whom God has stamped with his own image. The engraving, in the Oasis, accompanies a very interesting and affecting article, in which several "Negro Hunts" are mentioned, of which the author was himself a witness.

The writer speaks of the man with whom he resided, as "an opulent planter, in the interior of Georgia, in whose family the evils of slave-holding were palliated by every expedient that a humane and generous disposition could suggest." But through the proprietor "was distinguished for his generosity and kindness of heart," his overseer "was a man of depraved character, and a victim to brandy." This apparent anomaly is accounted for from the fact that a good man is seldom willing to become a slave-driver, and consequently the master is often obliged to employ bad ones or none.

Four of the slaves a this plantation, having been treated with extreme cruelty by the overseer, deserted, and took to the woods, where they had not remained long, however, before he discovered their retreat, and informed the master. They stayed in an extensive, swampy forest, and lived upon such provision as they could carry off from the neighboring plantations. A night was agreed upon between the overseer, and several adjoining planters, for a hunt. At midnight, when active preparations were making for the expedition, a scene occurred, which the writer thus describes: "The children of the family had partaken of the general excitement, and arisen from their beds. As I entered the room, I could hear one of the youngest of them say, ‘why, pa, you would not kill Ralph, would you?’ — ‘I would take him, and sell him, and get money for him,’ said the next in age. ‘You will only lame him, I suppose, so as to seize him,’ said the mother. ‘I would rather kill him, than the best fat buck in all the country’ replied the father, as he rammed down the heavy charge."

New England mothers, would the wealth of the world tempt you to expose your children to the influence of such a scene?

The hunt, that night, was unavailing; but a few days after, an invitation was sent, some distance, for a man whose dogs were famed for their scent, and whose death-dealing rifle had been repeatedly tried for a similar purpose. The gang which was to be taken consisted of the four slaves above mentioned, and several others, from different plantations, who had joined them. The rifle of the fortunate hunter laid Ralph bleeding upon the ground. Others were wounded less dangerously, and some were secured without injury.

Reasonable request. We are natives of this country; we ask only to be treated as well as foreigners. Not a few of our fathers suffered and bled to purchase its independence; we ask only to be treated as well as those who fought against it. We have toiled to cultivate it, and to raise it to its present prosperous condition; we ask only to share equal privileges with those who came from distant lands to enjoy the fruits of our labor. — Rev. Peter Williams, (a colored man) Rector of St. Philip's Church, New York.

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Extracts from a Christian Slaveholder's Diary.

SABBATH, May 21, 182-. Attended church to-day; heard Mr. — preach a Missionary sermon. Was very eloquent. Text — ‘Go ye into all the world, and preach the gospel to every creature.’ Displayed in glowing colors, the wretched state of the heathen, who are holden in the ‘bondage’ of sin; and most affectingly described the dark places of the earth, which are full of the habitations of cruelty. My feelings were greatly moved; — in the collection taken up at the close of the service, gave — dollars; all the profit which I made yesterday in trading off my negro Sam, to parson G. Should have given more, but for the loss I experienced last week in the death of Bill, who took cold after being ‘flogged.’ — Shall attend the auction to morrow, and if I make a profitable bargain — as I hope to, for the slaves of squire B. must be sold — I shall remember the poor heathen. After Church, had to wait ten or fifteen minutes for my coachman; wondered why he did not come — when he came, he was unwilling to tell the reason of his delay; promised him a flogging. When I reached home, found he had been looking at the pictures in my ‘great Bible,’ again, I would double the castigation. This evening, heard a great noise in my outer kitchen — approached, to learn the cause, and found Sal, wailing bitterly, because I sold her son Sam, yesterday. To Parson G.; told the foolish creature to be silent, or I would horsewhip her, as I could not be disturbed. — Finding she would not be quiet, I took my horse whip, and let her feel the lash two or three times, which stilled her for the night.

MONDAY, 22. — After morning prayers, ordered my coach, for the purpose of attending the auction at ‘Squire B’s. Sale commenced at 10 o'clock; — he had a fine lot of negroes, two or three elegant horses, and considerable other live stock for sale. One of his servants, however, had lost an eye, by the stroke of a whip: — strange that men will be so blind to their own interests, as not to be more careful where they strike, when they correct their slaves! Bought a very likely looking young fellow, of about five and twenty, who I think will answer admirable for a groom; — he had one boy, three or four years old, who was bought by brother C., whom I saw at the communion table, yesterday; — his wife was ‘knocked off,’ I think, to Rev. Mr. — of --, who wanted a wet nurse, she having lost her child, by having been worked a little too hard the day before its birth. — Bought several others, at a very low rate, whom I intend for the plantation. On returning home, found, to my sore vexation, that Sal had cut her throat, for grief at being separated from her boy, whom I sold last Saturday. This loss will so far counterbalance the good bargains I made at the auction to-day, that I shall not, for the present, be able to give any more for the conversion of the poor heathen.

TUESDAY, 23. — Rode to my plantation to-day; — looked into the cottage of my old slave, Sambo, and found him dead! — Poor fellow; — he was long a good servant, but for some time has not been able to earn his living. I intended to have given him his freedom, but it is now too late. — Wife says I must buy another woman to take Sal's place; — regret that I did not buy the wife of my groom; — though I suppose it would have disappointed the minister. Boston telegraph.

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Story of Malem-Boo

This is one of the pictures printed in the Oasis to illustrate the true and interesting story of Malem-Boo. One of the little boys in the picture is called Yazoo, a son of Malem-Boo. Some boys have come to see him, and they are playing together under the shadow of the Palm trees. His mother, who was at work in the house, looked out very often to see if he was safe. The boys were so pleased with their sports that they often laughed very loud, and his mother, hearing their voices, did not look out so often. Soon, it was all still.

Yarrima, for that was the mother's name, ran out to the place where she saw the children last, calling, "Yazoo! Yazoo!" but she heard no answer. Urged by a mother's love, she rushed forward, towards the hut of her nearest neighbor. But soon she saw the tracks of white men in the sand, and the foot prints of little children with them. At sight of these, she uttered a shriek of anguish, for then she knew that her little boy was stolen. These men, whose faces you can see at the left side of the picture, had carried off all the boys that had been so happy at their play. Though Yarrima knew that the men would catch her, if they saw her, yet she ran on towards the sea shore, calling "Yazoo," as loud as she could. She climbed to the top of the highest rock on the shore, and saw the white man's boat moving rapidly over the water towards a distant vessel. I have not room to tell you more. If you can get the Oasis, you will there learn what became of Yazoo, and his father and mother.

Those white men stole the little boys because they knew they could carry them to places where men kept slaves, and get money for them. There are a great many slaves in this country. The girls and

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Boys in Utica, N.Y. and the girls in Providence, R. I. and in some other places, have formed themselves into Anti-Slavery Societies, and have done something for the slaves. In Providence, the girls worked with their needles, and made watch-guards, bead bags, and many other pretty and useful articles. They put some little sentences about the slaves into the things they made, so that those who bought them might be often put in mind of those who are held in bondage.

One sentence used by them was this: "May the use of our needles prick the consciences of slave-holders." I once saw a pretty watchguard made by them, in which they had worked the sentence,

"O sons of freedom, equalize your laws; Be all consistent, plead the negro's cause."

When they had sold the things they had made, they had thirty dollars to send to the treasurer of the American Anti-Slavery Society. This is enough to pay for 3600 copies of the paper called Human Rights, or 4600 copies of the Slave's Friend. I think it will be so used as to "prick the consciences" of many slave-holders. If you will turn to page 12, you will see that the American Society rejoices in the formation of Juvenile Anti-Slavery Societies, and earnestly desires that they may be formed in all parts of the country. When the Almanac is printed for next year, I hope I shall be able to tell of many societies of children, who are showing their thankfulness for the blessings they enjoy, by doing something for the wretched slave children.

WHERE IS THY BROTHER?

"What mean ye that ye beat my people to pieces, and grind the faces of the poor? Saith the Lord God of hosts." ISAIAH.

What mean ye that ye bruise and bind
My people, saith the Lord,
And starve your craving brother's mind,
That asks to hear my word?

What mean ye that ye make them toil
Through long and dreary years,
And shed like rain upon your soil
Their blood and bitter tears?

What mean ye that ye dare to rend
The tender mother's heart;
Brothers from sisters, friend from friend,
How dare you bid them part?

What mean ye, when God's bounteous hand
To you so much has given,
That from the slave who tills your land
You keep both earth and heaven?

When at the judgment God shall call,
WHERE IS THEY BROTHER? say
What mean ye to the Judge of all
To answer on that day?
E.L.F.

All articles designed for insertion is the Almanac for 1837, must be sent to us before the last day of May 1836.

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To Slave-Holders.

[The following, though addressed to an individual, is designed for all, who hold human beings as their property.]

To D.S. Esq. — , VIRGINIA.

To justify yourself for keeping your fellow men in slavery, you allege that you treat them well. They have no reason, you say, to complain of their tasks, or food, or clothing. You do not allow them to be shocked with execrations, or cut with whips, or burnt with irons. You are a kind master, every way; and have no doubt, that your slaves love you tenderly and warmly. But all this is just nothing to the purpose. You do not touch the point where I would direct your eye and fix your thoughts. I was not charging you with guilt in treating your slaves cruelly; but in robbing them of what distinguished them from dogs. I charge you with seizing your own brethren, and, as far as you are able, reducing them to dogs. Your starving them or feeding them; your kicking then or caressing them is altogether an incidental thing. It does not reach the spot, where your blame lies. However, you may treat them, while you hold them as your slaves, you treat them not like men, as they are…; but like dogs, as they are not. And have you the face to say, that you are not to blame for turning human beings into brute beasts, merely because in doing so, you may not add some petty violence to this dreadful outrage? A skilful hand and a keen razor, then, by which the life of your child may, without affright or pain, be taken away, ought to clear the act from the guilt of murder! No, no. Your wickedness lies in robbing your fellows of their dearest rights. AND THIS ACT CANNOT BE SO PERFORMED AS TO CHANGE ITS NATURE. It is the act itself, however performed, which I call on you in the name of God and human nature, to hate, deplore and renounce. All nature is against you in this thing. And while anything of nature remains in me, I must still urge you to take your hand from your brother's throat; and while anything of nature remains in you, you cannot help feeling, that so you ought to do.

"But the Bible." I wonder much how, as a slave-holder, you came to betake yourself to the Bible for encouragement and support. To which of the precepts of the Bible does not the system, of which you are a living part, stand directly opposed? Which of these precepts may the slave obey? To ascertain his relations, duties, prospects, may he "Search the scriptures?" May he employ all the time and means, which may be requisite, to make him "GROW IN THE KNOWLEDGE." Of Jesus Christ; to enable him, "LEAVING THE PRINCIPLES OF THE DOCTRINE OF CHRIST," to "GO UNTO PERFECTION?" Thus may he "LET HIS LIGHT SHINE," by honoring the doctrines and precepts of the Savior? Dare you appeal to the Word of God, in support of a system of theft, and adultery, and murder? You know, that slavery, under every aspect and influence, is a direct and foul attack upon this broad precept of the Gospel; "Thou shalt love they neighbor as thyself." And yet you quote the Bible, to justify your slave-holding! For shame! Give over such a task to those bold blasphemers, who, in priestly robes and in sacred places, dare to throw the Bible, as a shield, over a system of pollution and blood.

You assure me, "that your slaves are not fit for freedom." How can that be? A number of them were born on your premises, and

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have always been under your control. Your own sons, trained by your hand, you regard as fit for freedom; and you assert, that you slaves have in no respect any reason to complain of the treatment they have received from so kind a master. Yet you now so boldly declare, that they are not fit for freedom! Strange kindness you must have shown them; to leave them twenty-five or thirty years so much neglected and degraded, as to be unfit to be trusted with themselves;That is to treat men like dogs, with a witness.

But you mean "to train them to act the part of freemen." How? By giving them the education of slaves! Why, you beat the fool, who said he never would trust himself to the water, till he had learned to swim! How can men be trained for freedom by being kept in slavery? To be trained for freedom, they must breathe the spirit and cherish the sentiments, and exert the power, and form the habits of freedom. And can they do this, with a yoke upon their necks? — But what are you doing to prepare them for the rights and privileges which your sons so freely enjoy and so exulting describe? Why; you keep them under the crushing force of iron laws and barbarous usages, which are adapted and designed to prevent them from escaping from the ignorance and degradation, which, you say, unfit them for freedom! When, at this rate, and under such influences, will they be prepared to walk at large?

But you dare not "let them go;" they would hurt themselves and injure everybody else. For What? What would drive them to those dreadful excesses, which you so pathetically describe? They love you now, you affirm, though you have robbed them of their dearest rights; but if you should turn around, and treat them like men: — yielding them their rights with a hearty good-will; — why, they would be sure to hate you! A conclusion too glaringly absurd to need refutation.

"But they would be unable to take care of themselves." Their brethren, even in Virginia, who have escaped from servitude, you fear would, if let alone, take care of themselves — as special pains are taken to depress their spirits and cripple their, efforts, TO PREVENT THEM FROM DOING SO. What would you think of a community, which should do everything in its power to discourage the enterprise and embarrass the industry of its poor; and then justify itself for putting them under hard measures, by the pretence, that such people cannot take care of themselves. This is covering cruelty with hypocrisy. — You have work enough now for your slaves, which they perform under the influence of motives, which are adapted to depress their feelings and cripple their energies. Would they not with higher motives, perform the same work as well! Give them wages instead of stripes, and see.

"The laws are in the way of emancipation." What have you done to get such laws repealed? Nay! I have heard you say strong things in their favor. Such laws, you said, are necessary and useful. How very convenient, to support laws which justify your crimes! — And then, do the laws oblige you to go to New York to hunt up and drag away the poor fugitives, who had escaped from your iron grasp? If you were not a tyrant, heartily in favor of oppression, you would let him alone. An honest man would sooner die, than obey a law, which required him to rob his brethren of their rights. Such laws are the grossest form, which human wickedness can take; if we except the

43

blasphemy, by which modern Baalams try to force God himself to speak in favor of such bloody legislation.

Ah, my friend; you cannot justify yourself in doing to others, what you would rather be crucified than have them do to you. Why not let go of your brother's throat? If you hold him fast, he may hurt you amidst the hard struggles by which he may try to get away. Prompt and hearty restitution may save you. Nothing else will do. You have hot iron in your hand. You cannot "let go" too soon. If you choose to hold on to your usurped authority, you will be sorry for your folly. But when God shall visit your iniquity upon your head, you shall not say, you were never warned.

Do the slaves desire their freedom? There are in the city of Cincinnati 476 colored persons who have paid more than TWO HUNDRED THOUSAND DOLLARS for their liberty. ($215,522.) And yet it is sometimes said, "They wouldn't take their freedom if their masters would give it to them." Will Yankees believe it?

YE WHO HAVE PENS PREPARE TO USE THEM NOW.

We feel very grateful to the few correspondents who have so kindly assisted us in preparing the matter for this number of the Almanac. They will not fail of their reward. We would respectfully suggest to the multitude of anti-slavery writers, who have shown their ability in the use of their pens, that there is probably no way in which they can accomplish more in the cause of human rights by the same amount of labor, than in writing for this Almanac. We wish to have a great variety of articles, to give life and spirit to the ensuing numbers. To those who write poetry, we would recommend the article on page 40 as a model. It combines simplicity, brevity, perspicuity and unity.

We have not the vanity to recommend and of our prose articles as models, but we must be permitted to offer a few hints to writers of prose.

1. Do not write unless you have clear, distinct and vivid impressions of the subject you intend to treat upon.

2. Use plain, direct and forcible language, so as to convey your ideas distinctly to the minds of your readers.

3. Carefully avoid all expletives, and superfluous words and phrases.

4. Articles for the Almanac MUST BE SHORT. If you have much to say, divide it into several short articles, but do not expect that we can insert a long one.

Mathematicians, who have leisure, can furnish us with a series of interesting population tables, founded on a comparison of the census of 1820 with that of 1830, exhibiting the number of slaves, free colored persons, and whites, in the several slave-holding states, for the years 1840,'50 '60, '70, &c. Facts, anecdotes, statistics, remarkable events, etcaetra, connected with the subject of slavery, will be very acceptable.

Correspondents can, if they please, forward their articles to us without taxing us with postage. The price of the Almanac is so very low that we cannot afford to pay any extra expense. When merchants or others are coming to Boston, hand your communications to them, directed "Webster & Southard, 9, Cornhill, Boston." If they are left at No. 144, Nassau st. N.Y. in care of R.G. Williams, or at the office of the Herald of Freedom, Concord, N. H. we can obtain them from either of those places.

44

List of Anti-Slavery Societies.

We have devoted much time and labor to the preparation of this list, and still it is imperfect and probably incorrect. Those who are aware of the difficulties of such an undertaking,, will readily excuse our errors, — to others it would be in vain for us to attempt an explanation. We thank those who have sent us information respecting the societies with which they are connected, and regret that we have not room to refer to any of them more particularly.

Name and Place President Secretary Date No.
American Arthur Tappan Elizur Wright jr. Dec 1833  
Addison co Vt Hon Joel Doolittle Oliver Johnson July 1835  
Augusta Me   Richard II Vose   50
Allegany co N.Y.        
Amesbury Mills Ms Jonathan A Sargent James Rowell Dec 1833 50
Amesbury Mills Female Mrs. Helen Howarth Miss Betsey Lincoln Dec 1833 70
Attleborough Ms Phineas Savery Nathaniel Wright    
Andover Ms Shipley W. Wilson R Reed Jan 1835 50
Austinburg Ashtabula co O Nathaniel Austin Henry Cowles    
Ashtabula co O Amos Fish Henry Cowles    
Auburn Theo Sem N.Y. Charles Wiley John J. Keep    
Ashburnham Ms Wm J Lawson Gilman Jones Nov 1834 50
Albany NY     May 1835 200
Andover Vt     July 1835  
Adams & Brown cos O   John C Poago Sep 1833  
Batavia Georgia co O        
Bath Me Samuel Jackson Nathaniel Swazey Mar 1833  
Barnet Vt        
Boscawen N H?(E par) Samuel Wood DD Abraham Robertson Jun 1835  
Bennington Vt Stephen?Hinsdill James Ballard July 1835 140
Brooklyn Ct Abijab Bigelow Herbert Williams Mar 1835  
" Female Lucy B Williams Frances MB Burleigh Mar 1835  
Bridgeton Me        
Buffalo NY Daniel Bowen E A Marsh    
Boaoton? N J Daniel H Stastoa John Grimes    
Baagor Me S L Pomroy      
Barrington R I        
Boxborough Ms Des Paul Hayward Samuel Hayward Jun 1835 60
" Female Mrs Paul Hayward Mrs Eben'r Hayward Jun 1835 100
Buckland Ms        
Brunswick Me   George E Adams    
Boston Young Men's Joshua V Himes? William S Porter Aug 1833 159
Boston Female Miss Mary Parker Melanin Ammidon Dec 1833 250
Bowdoia at Boston Joseph Tillsoa William H Hayward Nov 1834 35
Bennington Vt        
Bristol Vt     Mar 1834  
Bloomfield & Milburn        
Barnstable Me Mr Zacebeus Hamlin Rev D Chessman Feb 1835 109
Brandon Vt     Apr 1835 70
Cabot Vt Samuel Osgood Mi ton Fisher    
Canaan N H Col Isaac Towls Hubbard Harris Apr 1835 70
Clarkson A S S Pa Lindley Coates Eli Hambleton Dec 1832 60
Craftbury Vt Col French Cooke    
Chatham at Chapel N Y fem Mrs Green Miss Dorens? Bell    
Cleveland O John M Sterling      
Coventry R I        
Columbian 1 & Fairfield O Peleg Clark Wm Henry Anthony    
Cambridge Ms   Professor Follen    
Concord N H Edmund Worth John Farmer    
" Female Mrs George Kent Mary Clark    
Cuba N Y Kendall Wilder      
Chilicothe O Clayborn Yancey John N Templeton    
Cumberland R I        
Campton N H        
Champlain N Y   J Churchill    
Circleville O        

45

Cumberland County Me Gen James Appleton Prof W Smyth    
Chester Geauga co O        
Catskill N Y Ezra Hawley Charles Sturtevant May 1835  
Cornwall Vt     Jun1833  
Chester Vt     July 1834  
Cazenovia N Y     Apr 1835  
Danville Vt Isaac D Newell Samuel Collins    
Dorchester Ms Samuel Mulikin Rev David Sanford May 1835 186
Dunbarton N H Dr Harris Rev Mr Putnam    
Dover N H     Feb 1835  
" Female     Feb 1835  
Essex County Ms Gardner B Perry Thomas Spencer Jun 1834  
Essex st Boston Sidney Allen John A. Allen May 1835 50
Enosburg Vt        
Foxborough Ms Willard Peirce Otis Hodges    
Franklin N Y W Hines Esq Joseph H Merrick    
Franklin Ms Dr. Nathaniel Miller Milton M Fisher    
Farmington Trumbull co O Daniel Miller      
Farmington Me Rev Issac Rogers John Titcomb    
Farmington N Y Asa? B Smith J C Hathaway    
Farmington Mich George Hornell Wm E Prier    
Fall River Ms Nathaniel B Bordon A Brownson July 1834 112
Fairhaven Me     Apr 1835  
Ferrisburg & vic Vt Martin Stoddard Rowland T Robinson    
Fayston Vt        
Fairfield Vt        
Fairfax Vt        
Freetown Ms     July 1833  
Goffstown N H Jonathan Aiken David A Bunten   170
Greenbush N Y     Apr 1835 70
Gardiner Me T E Glazier Joel Cowee Feb 1835 50
Geneva N Y(colored)        
Anti-Colonization Soe Anthony Freeman Ephraim Murray    
Gustavus Trumbull co O   G Hezlip Sep 1833  
Groton Ms Dr A Farnsworth      
Great Falls N H     Jan 1835  
Granville Vt     Jun 1835  
Genesoe County NY     May 1835  
Georgia Vt        
Holdon Ms Rev George Waters Charles White Apr 1834 210
Hanover Ms     Jun 1835 65
Harwich Ms     July 1835  
Haverbill Ms Hon Gilman Parker John G Whittier    
" female Mrs R Loagley Miss EH Whittier    
Henaiker N H        
Hebren? Me     May 1835  
Hudson Portage co O   Dea Asabel Kilbern   30
Harrisville Harrison co O   Samuel Lewis    
Hallowell Me Ebenezer Dole Geo shepard Oct 1833  
Hudeon N Y Female Mary Paddock Ann Marriot Jr    
Hamilton N Y Zebulon Weaver Thomas Pothecary    
Hancock Vt     Jan 1835  
Holliston Ma Elijah Demond Bucklin Fitts July 1833 80
Jamaica Vt P B Fisk Joel Holton Apr 1833  
Jericho Vt     Nov 1834  
Kingston Me Rev A Jackson Matthew S Cushman Nov 1834  
Kentucky State Prof J M Buchanan Luke Munsell Mar 1835  
Lowell Ms Asa Rand Wm Twining Mar 1834  
" Female Mrs Twining Mrs Mary H Saffbrd Mar 1834 75
Lynn Ms Jonathan Buffum Esq Edward S Davis    
" Female Mrs. Alonzo Lewis Anna Purinton May 1835 90
Leyden N Y John Fisk Ezra Cortin    
Lenawe? County Mich Darius Comstock Thomas Chandler    
Lexington O (colored) Job Pears Honas Crosby    
Limingtoa Me Lewis Whitney Joseph Brackett Mar 1835 98
Lorain co O Rev John Monteith Albert A Bliss    
Loudon N H William chamberlain James B Abbott May 1835  
Monkton Vt Free Produce        
Monroe County N Y Elder Enoch Galusha W W Reid    

46

Middlebury Vt Joel Doolittle Oliver Johnson Jun 1835  
Middleboro Ms Horatio G Wood Nath'l A Eddy Dec 1834 37
Middletown Ct G F Parkis E A Stillman    
" Fem (colored) Mrs Nancy Beman Mrs Clarissa M Beman    
Miami Univ'y Oxford O        
Muskingum County O   H C Howells    
Milbury Ms   J S Keguin July 1834  
Medina O   Charles Oleutt Esq    
Middlesex County Ms Sewall Harding Wm Twining    
Maine State Samuel Pond George G Adams Oct 1831  
Massachusetts State Joseph Southwick Samuel J May Jan 1832  
Mahoming Stark co O   John D Elliott    
Mount Desert Me Samuel Millikon Rev C L Carey Apr 1835  
Morrissville N Y     Apr 1835  
Muskingum co Female Mrs Horace Nye Mrs Hezekiah Sturges Apr 1835  
Nantucket Ms (colored) William Harris Edward J Pompey    
New Garden O Joseph A Dugdale Wm Griffith    
Newburyport & vic Ms Amos Pettingill Phineas Crandall Apr 1834 110
" Female Mrs Jane Hervey Miss Susan Wood May 1834 129
New Bedford Ms William Rotch Jr John Burrage    
New York City Jarvis Hanks Charles W Donlson Oct 1833  
New York Young Men Dr Abraham L Cox J F Robinson May 1834  
New York Female Mrs E B Falconer Mrs A L Cox    
Newark N J (color'd) Henry Drayton A B Ray    
New Haven Ct Dr Ives J E P Dean Esq Jun 1833  
Norwich & vic Ct   Alphens Kingsley    
" Female   F M Caulkins    
New Rowley? Ms        
New Hampton The Sem N H John G Richardson Edwin R Reynolds Aug 1834 30
New Sharon Mo John a Vinton Samuel Mason    
Nelson Portage co O Rev B Fenn Stephen Baldwin    
New Hartford N Y Dr U H Kellogg      
North Yarmouth Me     Dec 1834  
New Lisbon O        
New Hampshire State Rev David Root John Farmer Nov 1834  
New England Wesleyan Shipley W Wilson Phineas Crandall Jun 1835 70
Oneida County N Y Benjamin P Johnson Pelatiah? Rawson May 1835  
Oneida Institute N Y Isaac S Platt A Judson July 1833 90
Old Colony Plym co Ms Rev John Allen Geo Russell    
Ohio State Hon L King A A Guthrie Apr 1835  
Orwell Vt        
Providence R. I. Josiah Cody Benj L Farnsworth Jun 1833 110
" Female Mrs. Lucy Blain Miss Hannah Farnum Apr 1835 101
" Juvenile Female Sarah Miller Almira Bollca Dec 1831 35
Pickaway County O Dr W N Lockey J B Finley Mar 1833  
Portland Me Samuel Fesseddeu? P H Greenleaf Mar 1833 40
Portland Young Men George Ropes James F Otis Oct 1834 100
Portland Female Mrs King Portor Mrs Miriam Husecy Apr 1834 80
Plymouth N H Wm Webster N P Rogers    
" Female Mrs A Cummings Mrs N P Rogers Feb 1834 102
Philadelphia Pa David Paul Brown Benjamin S Jones 1834 80
Philad'a Pa Young Men        
Philadelphia Female        
Pawtucket R I        
Plainfield & vic Ct Rinaldo Burleigh   Aug 1834  
Peacham Vt Jesse Merrill Esq Dr. Zebioa Pang born? Aug 1833  
Plymouth Female Ms        
Pittsburg Pa Rev Robert Bruce Rev Samuel Williams    
Phoenix & Arkwright R I        
Paint Valley O Thomas Rogers James H Dickey May 1833 1000
Putnam County Ill Samuel D Laughlin George B Willis    
Pomfret Ct        
Portage County O Greenburg Keen James S Carpenter    
Poughkeepsie N Y        
Peru & Chesterfield N Y Samuel Keese Thomas B Watson Mar 1835 450
Peterboro N Y        
Plymouth County Ms J Allen George Russell July 1834  
Perry Genesee co N Y Jabez Ward Josiah Andrews    
Pine at Boston Charles Drew Charles C Barry Jun 1834 30

47

Randolph Portage co O Lot B Coe Seymour W Coe    
Reading Ms Dea Caleb Wakefield Wm Wakefield Jr Mar 1833  
" Female Mrs Eunice Pickett Mrs C Pendester Mar 1833  
Rochester city N Y Lindley M Moore G A Avery Nov 1833  
" Female (colored)        
Rock Creek Tenn James Kennedy Allen Lceper Jun 1835 9
Rome Oneida co N Y Oliver C Grosvenor Benjamin P Johnson July 1834 184
Ryegate & Baract        
Richland Oswego co N Y A H Stevens      
Ripley Brown co O Hon Alex Campbell      
Rutland Vt        
Rupert Vt        
Rochester Vt   A Johnson Jfeb 1834  
Sanborntoo N H     Jan 1835  
Sandwich Ms Joseph Mash Josiah Gifford    
Starksboro & Lincoln Vt Nathan Page Jonathan Batty May 1834 132
Salem & vic Ms C P Grosvenor Geo B Cheever Jan 1834 479
" Female Mrs C P Grosvenor Miss L L Dodge   153
South Reading Ms Dea Jacob Eston Jeremiah Chaplain Apr 1834 129
Shushan Washington co NY Bethuel Church Jr Daniel Valentine jr    
Scipio N Y   Enoch Honeywell    
Smithfield & vic N Y Rev S T Mills Colquhoun? Grant Dec 1834  
Scituate Ms Rev Edward Seagrave Jacov Vinal    
Sudbury Ms Female Mrs Ruth Smith Miss Mary Rice    
Sherburae N Y John Harrington Jr J Copeland   100
" Female Mrs C Lee Mrs H Avery Apr 1835  
Shoreham Vt       234
Tallmadge Portage co O Norman Sackett Elizur Wright Apr 1833  
Taunton Ms William Reed Hodges Reed May 1835 100
Turin N Y H Page Esq Wm White    
Turner Me       90
Troy N Y John P Cushman Esq William Yutes Apr 1835 150
" Female        
Uxbridge Ms Effingham L Caproa Richard Battey Mar 1834 310
Utica N Y Alvan Stewart Esq     *****
" Juvenile Male     Apr 1833  
" Juvenile Female     Apr 1833  
Vermont State John Ide Waterbury Orson S Murry Orwell May 1834  
Verson Trumbull co O        
Vioana Trumbull co O   Festus Reed    
Vassalboraugh Me        
Waitesfield Vt Col Orsoa Skinner ?thamar Smith    
Walden Vt        
Wallingford Vt        
Westford Vt     Nov 1834  
Weybridge Vt     Mar 1834  
Whiting Vt     Apr 1834  
Waltham Ms Dr George Mansfield Geo A Williams    
Weston Ms Lotham Haven Lewis Gourgas    
Wreatham Ms George Hawes Joseph B Gerauld    
Woburn Ms Rev Luther Wright Henry A Woodman Nov 1834  
Windham N H David Cambell Daniel L Simpson    
Windham county Ct Nicholas Branch Thomas Huntington May 1834  
Western Reserve O Elizur Wright Rev John Mosteith Aug 1833  
Western Reserve Coll F W Upson      
Windham Portage co O Rev Wm Hanford      
Waterville Me Eliphalet Gow George L Le Row    
Winthrep Me David Thurston Stephen Stewall Esq Mar 1834  
Weld Oxford co Me Dr Lafayette Perkins Jaacob Abbott Esq Mar 1834  
Whitesburo Ny Fem Mrs Dea Holbrook Miss Berry    
Wethersfield N Y Abel W Potter Morris Sutherland    
Washington Wash'n co Pa Joseph Henderson Robert F Biddle    
Whippany N J Rev Mr Burch Rev W Newell    
Whitestown N Y Benjamin S Walcott Rev L H Loss    
Worcester Ms Alpheus Merrifield John R Morse Mar 1835  
Weare N H Mr Breed Moses A Cortland Mar 1835  
Wesleyan Geo Storrs Cone'd NH Nath'l Dunn NY City May 1835  
Wesleyan N Y   M Floy    
Windsor N Y        

Many of the numbers given above are those which were reported when the societies were formed. There are many abolitionists who are not members of societies.

*****

263 societies reported. In 62 societies there are 12021 members. Average No. if the remaining 201 societies average 100, the whole number is 32121.

48

Anti-Slavery Publications.

[Most of these are to be had at the office of the A.A.S.S. 144 Nassau st. N. Y.; at the A.S. Office, 46 Washington st. Boston and many of them at the office of the Herald of Freedom, Concord, N.H.]

The Oasis, by Mrs. D.L. Child, of Boston, $1.00
An Appeal in favor of that class of Americans called Africans, 50
Jay's Inquiry into the character &c. of Col. And Anti-Slavery Soc. 38
Bourne's Picture of Slavery in the United States, 50
Phelps' Lectures on Slavery, 50
Rankin's Letters on Slavery in the U.S. 25
Clarkson's History of the abolition of the African slave-trade. 38
Paxton's Letters on Slavery, 56
The Testimony of God against Slavery, 38

Anti-Slavery Reporter. First and second Annual Reports of the A.A.S.Soc. Address of the N.Y. Young Men's A.S. Soc. The Maryland Scheme. Man-stealing and slavery denouned by the Presbyterian and Methodist churches. Letter of H. B. Stanton; Speech of James A. Thome, and a Letter of Dr. S.H. Cox. First Annual Report of the N.E.A.S. Soc. Second do. Report of N.E.A.S. Convention. "Extinguisher" extinguished. Wright's sin of Slavery. Shield of Slavery. Picture of a slave in chains, with the Negro's Complaint in poetry. Our countrymen in chains, with poetry, by J.G. Whittier, Esq. Mirror of Slavery. Abolitionist. Declaration of the Philadelphia Convention. Birney's Letter on Colonization. Birney's Letter to the Churches. British opinions of the Am. Col. Soc. Examination of Thomas C. Brown, a colored man from Liberia. A brief Review of the First Annual Report of the American Anti-Slavery Society, by David M. Reese, M. D. of New York, Dissected by Martin Mar, Quack M.E. The Injustice and Impolicy of the Slave-trade, illustrated in a Sermon by Rev. Jonathan Edwards, D.D. Address before the Anti-Slavery Society of Salem, Mass. by Rev. C.P. Grosvenor. Address to the People of Color in the City of New York. By members of the Executive Committee of the Am. Anti-Slavery Society. The Wesleyan Extra, a Tract of 24 pages, containing Wesley's Thoughts upon Slavery, published in the year 1774. A statement of the reasons which induced the Students of Lane Seminary to dissolve their connection with that Institution — Emancipator Extra. Anti-Slavery Record. The Slave's Friend, for children.

PERIODICALS, published monthly at No. 144, Nassau st. N.Y.

1. 1st week in each mo. HUMAN RIGHTS, Small folio. Single copy, 25cts. Per ann. 20 copies to one address, $3.50. 40 do. $5.80 do. $8.

2. 2d week, ANTI-SLAVERY RECORD. A pamphlet of 12 pp. It is sent to those who contribute 12 1/2 cts. Or more per month, as an acknowledgment of their donation. It is sold at the office for $1.50 per hund.

3. 3d week, EMANCIPATIOR. Large imperial sheet. Single copy, 50cts. Per ann. 16 copies to one address, $5. 40 do, $10. 100 do. $20.

4. 4th week, SLAVE'S FRIEND,for children. Single No. 1 ct. 12 Nos, or 1 year's subscription, 10 cts. 100 Nos, 80 cts. 1000 Nos, $6.50.

The following are not published by the A.A.S.S.

LIBERATOR,31, Cornhill, Boston. Weekly. Garrison & Knapp. $2 per annum in advance. HERALD OF FREEDOM, Concord, N.H. Semi-monthly. Joseph H. Kimball Editor. $1 per ann. In adv.

PHILANTHROPIST, and Advocate of Emancipation. Danville Ky. Weekly. James G. Birney Editor. $2 per annum in advance.

nts

Notes.

1. A common practice — answering the double purpose of adding to the torture, and of hastening to restore the lacerated victim, that his master may not lose his time.

2. And yet, if you relieve them from this dreadful curse, you must — give them Compensation!