11

Chapter I. Rewritten.

James Garrison, Larkin Rutherford, and J. Pigget, and they made the journey in 1781. They located themselves in what is now Monroe County, in South-Western Illinois, at a place called New Design. The second company came in 1785, among whom were Capt. Joseph Ogle, Joseph Morley and James Andrews, with large families. They came from Western Virginia, and the vicinity of Wheeling. And these again were reinforced the next year, 1786, by a third company, composed in part, at least, of James Lemen, Sen., James McRoberts, George Atchinson, and David Waddle, with their families.

These several companies formed five

12

or six neighborhoods, or "settlements" as they were called. Some were on the American Bottom, as the lands between the Bluffs and the Mississippi River were designated. Another took the name of Belle fountaine, a celebrated Spring; and still another was called Whiteside's Station, located a few miles North of Waterloo, the present county seat of Monroe County, in which all were located.

New Design seems to have been a kind of center for the settlements made up of American families. It was situated on an elevated plain "about thirty miles North of the town of Kaskasia, and from ten

13

to twelve miles from the Mississippi; also from three to six miles East of the American Bottom and contiguous bluffs." It was in the hill country of the county, and its center was three or four miles South of Waterloo. Over a considerable sweep of country these emigrants were scattered.

Says Mr. Peck, doubtless referring to a later period than the coming of these first companies, when the number of the settlers had become much increased; "The character of these American families was various. Some were theoretically religious people, both Baptist and Methodists; some were moral and respected the Sabbath; others were infidels,

14

or at least skeptical of all revealed truth. They paid no regard to religious meetings, and allowed their children to grow up without any moral restraint. They were fond of frollics, dances, horse-racing, card-playing, and other vices, in which they were joined by many of the French population from the villages. They drank tafia, and when fruit became plenty, peach brandy was made, and rye whiskey obtained from the Monongahela Country.

There has been a marked difference between these two classes of pioneers, down to the third and fourth generation. But a very few of the descendants of the immoral and irreligious

15

class are to be found amongst the present generation of the religious, moral, industrious and enterprising class. They followed the footsteps of their fathers, and have wasted away. Even the names of these pioneer families have been blotted out, while the children's children, of the virtuous class, are numerous and respected."

Of these early settlers, none of them were professors of religion, or, in other words, members of an evangelical Christian church, unless it were a Mrs. Bond, who, it was said, had been a member of a Presbyterian church. In the settlements, however, there were a few families, from their commencement

16

that had been trained up to attend the public worship of God, regard as sacred the Lord's day, and to acknowledge the claims of Christianity upon men, who were accustomed to meet together on the Sabbath, read portions of the scriptures, or a Sermon, and sing hymns. This usage was established before a preacher of the Gospel had been among them. They held to their Sabbath meetings at each others cabins, [The following is crossed out] alternately [End crossed out portion] and they were conducted by Shadrach Bond, Sen., (commonly called Judge Bond) James Pigget, and James Lemen, Sen. Thus they set a good example to others around them, and God blessed them and their children.

17

Perhaps it should be here said, that before the American Settlements began, for a long period there had been a French settlement at St. Louis, and others also on the Illinois side of the Mississippi River. They were of Canadian descent--Roman Catholic in religion, and those coming first, were mostly connected in some way with the Indian trade; Posts for which had been long established all through the North-West. They had their Catholic priests among them, who kept them in the faith and ceremonies of their religion.

The first Christian minister who visited the Illinois country was Rev. James Smith. He was a Baptist Minister from Lincoln

18

County, Kentucky, and his visit was in the summer of 1787. He visited New Design, and repeatedly preached to those of the people, who could be induced to hear him. The results were very happy. Not a few of those who had maintained the meetings already mentioned, professed to be converted under his preaching; among whom were the Rev. Shadrach Bond, Cap. Joseph Ogle, and his son-in-law James Lemen, Sen., their wives and other connections.

After Mr. Smith's departure these social Sabbaths meetings were continued, and with more interest, as there were men there who could pray and exhort in them. Mr. Smith made a second visit to this people in the spring of 1790, and preached

19

the Gospel with much success, and many more became deeply interested in the Salvation of Christ. But his visit was terminated by a very sad and fatal occurrence. At this period the Indians had become very troublesome to the American settlers. "On the 19th of May, as Mr. Smith was riding from the block house (as it was called) to Little Village, in company with a Frenchman and a Mrs. Huff, they were fired upon by a party of Kickapoo Indians, who were concealed in a thicket, near the present site of Waterloo. His horse, and the one rode by the Frenchman were shot, and the woman wounded. Mr. Smith had the presence of mind to throw his saddle bags, which contained valuable papers, into a thicket, and retreating to

20

the foot of the hill--fell on his knees, and prayed for Mrs. Huff, whom the Indians were butchering, and who had been seriously exercised about her own Salvation for several days. The Frenchman escaped, and Mr. Smith was made a prisoner; but his saddle bags were found the next day by his friends.

The Indians loaded their prisoner with a pack of plunder, they had taken him from the settlements, and began their march through the prairies. Mr. S. was a large, heavy man, and under a hot sun, with his heavy load, soon became fatigued.

Consultations were held by the Indians, as to how they should dispose of their prisoner. Some proposed to kill him, fearing the white

21

people would follow them, and pointed their guns at his breast. Knowing well the Indian character, he bared his breast, as though he dared them to shoot him, and then pointed upward, to signify that the Great Spirit was his protector. Having caught him while in the attitude of prayer, and hearing him sing hymns on his march, which he did to relieve his mind from despondency, they concluded he was a "great medicine," and held intercourse with the Great Spirit, and must not be killed.

They took him to their town on the Wabash river, from whence--through the agency of the French traders from Vincennes he obtained his freedom--the people at New

22

Design, though extremely poor, paying one hundred and seventy dollars for his ransom."

Mr. Smith visited Illinois the third time--obtained his saddlebags, and their valuable contents--returned to Kentucky where he lived and died. After his labors were terminated so painfully and suddenly by his capture on his second visit, the Social Sabbath meetings were continued, even more regularly, (except in times of Indian alarm) and were conducted with singing, prayers, reading the scriptures and sermons.

In January, 1794, while Judge Bond was conducting the worship, on the Sabbath, "a stranger came into the assembly. He

23

was a large portly man, with dark hair, a florid complexion, and regular features. His dress was in advance of the deer-skin hunting skins, and Indian moccasins of the settlers--his countenance grave, and his aspect so serious, that the mind of the leader of the meeting was impressed with the thought that he was a professor of religion--perhaps a preacher; and an invitation was given him to close the exercises if he was a "praying man". The stranger kneeled, and made an impressive, fluent and solid prayer.

There was a man in the company, of small talents, and rather narrow view, who, from his national origin, bore the Soubriquet

24

of Dutch Pete, among the people; or Peter Smith, as his name appears in the land documents. Pete was a zealous Methodist, and when his own brethren or preachers prayed, he felt moved by the spirit to utter anew at the close of every sentence. While the people were on their knees, of their heads bowed low on their seats, Pete manifested uneasiness during the prayer of the stranger. He figited one way and then another--uttering a low but audible groan, and to those near him seemed in trouble. The very impressive and earnest prayer of the gentleman excited his feelings beyond suppression. He might not be a Methodist; but Pete could hold in no longer, and balled out at the top of his voice: "Amen,

25

at a [unknown]."

The stranger proved to be Rev. Josiah Dodge, from Nelson County, Ky., who was on a visit to his brother, Dr. Israel Dodge, of St. Genevieve, Mo. Hearing of these religious people being entirely destitute of ministerial instruction, he arrived opportunely to preach to them. He remained some time in the settlement, preaching often, and visiting from house to house. In February, a new scene opened upon the New Design people, and those of the surrounding country. The ice in Fountain Creek was opened, and in the presence of a vast company for those times, Mr. Dodge baptized James Lemen, Sen., and his wife, Catharine; John Gibbons and Isaac Enochs. These were the first persons ever baptized in the territory of Illinois.

26

James Lemen, Sen., afterwards became a preacher, and labored successfully for many years, and died in 1823. He left four sons in the Baptist Ministry; the youngest of whom died in 1859, and the others have all died since.

Two years more passed after the departure of Mr. Dodge, without the enjoyment of any ministerial services by the people of New Design; yet without any organized Church or Society, the friends of Christ maintained their social religious Lord's day meetings, with the people continually coming into the country from older States were now and then members of Baptist churches, from which they came

27

so that in the Spring of 1796, these were probably a dozen persons, who had been members in churches in Virginia and Kentucky, in the several settlements. "Among these," says Mr. Peck, "was Joseph Chance, who was an exhorter, and also a lay-elder, from Shelby County, Ky. This office, now known in Baptist churches, was regarded in Virginia, and afterwards for a time in Kentucky, as an appendage to the pastoral office. Lay-elders had no authority in Government and discipline, as in a Presbyterian Church, but aided the pastor in conducting religious meetings by exhortation and prayer, visiting the sick, instructing the ignorant, and confirming the wavering. Mr. Chance finally became an ordained minister. He did not possess great talents as a preacher, but was faithful in the exercise of the

28

gifts bestowed upon him. He loved religious meetings, devoted much time in preaching and visiting destitute settlements, and died while on a preaching tour in 1840, aged seventy five years."

It did not seem to have been understood [The following is crossed out] then in and about New Design, [End crossed out portion] by the few Baptists, then in and about New Design, that they could organize themselves into a church, without any ministerial aid, and call into service such gifts as may have existed among them in conducting their worship. They certainly did, however, a very wise thing, as Christian disciples, whose residence was beyond the reach of their existing ministry, and on the frontier of civilization, far remote from

29

organized churches, to establish their Lord's day meeting--invite to it their neighbors and friends, and conduct worship in their humble way with the best talents and aids which they possessed. It was taking their stand, at an early moment, when planting themselves in a new country, and a new home, on the Lord's side, and thus showing their willingness to be known as the followers of Christ. Their course was happily adapted to string them their own religious habits--nurture their faith and spirituality--and effectually guard themselves against the temptation to desecrate the day of Christian worship, as many as were doing around them. It was a course worthy of Christian men and women, to set up their banner so early in the name of the Lord, and thus invite the serious-minded and the

30

more worthy class of their fellow citizens to unite with them in the worship of god. Their example in this course, is worthy of invitation by all the Christians, whose residence places them remote form organized churches, and where the Christian Ministry is not yet enjoyed; and especially in a new country where society is in a formative state.

On the 4th day of May, 1796, Rev. David Badgeley, of Hardin County, Virginia, reached the settlement of New Design. It was an event of great gladness, most surely to the Christian men and women who were dwelling here on the outskirts of civilization. To them ministerial visits from those who preached the word, "were few, and far between"; and their rareness made them more valuable, and led to a higher appreciation

31

of them when they were enjoyed. Mr. Bagdley immediately engaged in proclaiming the great salvation, and continued the labor by day and by night--indeed, they had a "protracted meeting" at that early day, which was carried through about four weeks, if not more; and the labor was not fruitless. God blessed it. And on the 28th day of May, the preacher baptized fifteen persons on their profession of faith in Christ; and on the same day, aided by Mr. Chance, Mr. Badgeley organized at New Design, the first Baptist church, and indeed, the first Christian Church ever formed in what is now the State of Illinois, [The following is crossed out] on the same day, at New Design, [End crossed out portion] composed of 28 members. They were scattered through the American settlements for some distance.

Mr. Peck gives the following as constituent

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male members of this first church. "Joseph Griffin, Wm. Whiteside, Larkin Rutherford, James Lemen, Sen., Isaac Enoch, John Simpson, James Gilham, George Valentine, Solomon Shook, ____ Teague, Thomas Todd, Joseph Anderson, and Joseph Ryan." The others may have all been females.

After Mr. Badgeley's departure, another year passed in which the brethren were obliged to rely on their own labors to maintain their Lord's day worship, as they were without ministerial aid. But we may suppose them in a better condition perhaps to do it, as they had an increase of numbers, and were in an organized capacity. And being left to their own resources of private talent, they fell

33

back into what had been their habit for years.

Mr. Badgeley appears to have made this visit to Illinois on an exploring expedition, in connection with other men, from the South Branch of the Potomac River, in Hardin County, Va. They remained months in the country, and decided to make their homes for the remainder of their lives in Illinois. On their return to Virginia they reported the result of their visit to their friends. So favorable was the impression they gave of the new country, that in the following Spring, 1797, a large colony, numbering in all one hundred and fifty four, among whom was Mr. Badgeley, arranged for their departure for Illinois.

34

Their preparations being complete, about the first of April, they commenced their long and toilsome, if not dangerous journey, for the distant Western land, in which they had purposes to make their future homes. They crossed the Mountains in wagons, on pack horses, and on foot to Morgantown, on the Monongahela River. And toward the close of May, with all their effects on boats, they commenced their descent of the river.

But it seems after all, that they were poorly prepared for so long and tedious a voyage. They had failed to provide their boats with any covering to protect their women and children, as well as themselves, from the frequent rains which they experienced, and also the burning sun. And at the end of a

35

protracted and toilsome trip they finally landed at Fort Massac, in which is now Massac County, after great personal exposures, and much suffering. And they had still a long journey considering those times, before them through a wilderness with their wagons and horses. The season proved to be one of frequent rains, and was therefore uncommonly wet--the Streams were full and over their banks. It was not alone wet, but unusually hot also after the rains. Mr. Peck says, "They were twenty-one days traveling through this wilderness, the distance of about one hundred miles, and much of it through dreary forests without a house between Massac and Kaskaskia." They finally "arrived in a deplorably famishing

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and sickly condition" at New Design.

The old settlers gave all the aid and relief they could, with their accustomed hospitality, to the suffering company. But with their single room cabins, as most of them were, they could not furnish house accommodations for so many, and therefore were obliged to witness sufferings which they were unable to relieve. Then the provisions of the country were very limited. The cattle of the settlers were few, and their grain for bread was scarce, and in every view it was a period sadly burdened with want. With their rifles they could supply themselves with a plenty of venison, but the weather was so hot and sultry that it would spoil before they could get it in a preserved condition. And

37

added to their other wants they were sadly without salt to preserve it or season it.

Because of their toils and long exposures in their journey, the summer and autumn proved to be exceedingly sickly to the emigrants. "A putrid fever, unusually malignant" prevailed among them, while the old settlers enjoyed their usual health. And it is sad to record that the disease was so fatal that before the close of the autumnal months nearly one half of this large and flourishing colony were laid in their graves. This colony is said to have been made up of an unusually large population of moral, industrious and honest citizens; and they brought with them influences and habits which were of great service to the old settlers.

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It is difficult to repress the conviction, that the leaders of this colony failed greatly in a just estimate of the necessities of such a journey as they had before them, and especially with so numerous a company. And particularly so in view of the fact that some, who were leaders undoubtedly, had been over the route of travel the year before. They surely ought to have gained all the information from those who had had experience in the removal of their families. We can hardly suppose they failed to make ample inquiries on the subject. And if they did not, it is a matter of surprise that they should not have taken such views of the possibilities of the journey, as to have led them to greater care in securing a fitness in their conveyances more adequate to so long a journey, and one of slow progress;

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and then also in the needful supply of provision so as not to reach their journey's end in an almost starving condition. It did not require much forethought to see, that such a journey, through such a country, at such a time, and by such modes of conveyance, under the best conditions of weather would be a tedious one; and under other conditions would be laborious and exhaustive. They seemed to have made great reliance upon their powers of endurance. The sad result, however, shows that those powers were overtasked, making a sorrowful beginning in a new country, and a new home.

In this company of Virginia men, was Rev. David Badgeley, the first Baptist minister that settled in Illinois; and indeed, the first

40

Minister of any evangelical church. He became the pastor of the New Design church, which he assisted in forming the year before. The Baptist were, as we have seen, the first evangelical Christians to enter and commence religious work in this magnificent State.

At the period of the organization of this first church, in 1796, the whole white population of Illinois, was about 2,700, two thirds of whom were French Catholica, mostly of Canadian descent, leaving the American population about 1000. As has been indicated, the early settlers were mainly from Virginia and Kentucky, and emigrated by way of the Ohio river. The emigration to the state had now become large, and was constantly increasing.

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After Mr. Badgeley had become settled as a Minister at New Design he was blessed in his labors, and a revival of religion was enjoyed, and in April, 1798, nearly a year after his removal to the state, he and Mr. Chance, on the American Bottom, a few miles above Harrisonville, numbering a membership of fifteen. Harrisonville was then the county seat of Monroe County.

To give a more extended view of affairs among the Baptists of Southern Illinois, at this early day, an extract will be here given from a communication to the Editor of "The Western Star," over the signation of an "Old Illinois Baptist," who then had the Records of the New Design Church. He is supposed to have been Rev. J. M. Peck. He is setting Forth the proceedings of this first church

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in Illinois.

At first the church met regularly for business twice each month. There were frequent cases of "distress" between brethren, and church meetings were sometimes the place for "hard speeches." In the summer of 1797, Elder David Badgeley moved his family to the country, and for many months after, his name is recorded as Moderator. He introduced a rule which has done much mischief and no good--to conduct all business touching fellowship by a "oneness," as the phrase was, or by a unanimous vote. Under the operation of his rule, where there is the least diversity of opinions, the minority however small, invariably govern.

In a little time the church had an "arm," as it

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was called, in the Bottom, which soon became an independent church. Another arm was formed in Richland, a settlement, a little north of the present site of Bellville, in St. Clair County; a third arm on Silver Creek; a fourth at Horse Prairie in Randolph county. All these "arms," as they were called, in time became independent churches.

For several years there was no fellowship between the New Design Church, and the one in the Mississippi Bottom, and contentions and bickerings prevailed in place of love and union. But after various attempts a reconciliation was effected, and these little churches became united in an Association.

In 1802, an attempt was made in New Design Church "to commence at the Lord's table with all

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God's children, who could give a reason of the hope that is in them." But the project failed.

The next year, 1802, The Articles of Union between the Regular and Separate Baptists in Kentucky were read in Church meeting, and the church resolved to sustain the "Union". The same year, a "distress came into the church about Slavery, and Brother Lemen and his wife dissected from the church and the Union, on account that they would not fellowship those members that held slaves." Seven years after the same subject, combined with other matters, produces a division in the Association, afterward formed, which has never been healed.

The resolution to sustain the Kentucky Union by the New Design Church was a strange, and in its

45

consequences, an unfortunate procedure, in a small church having no local connection with the parties engaged in the movement, and being in another state. UnFortunate in the sense of having made the sustaining of the Union a test of fellowship, as hereafter will be seen to have been the fact. These articles are alluded to as something of high importance, so much so as to make it proper, if not almost necessary that a feeble church, on the outskirts of civilization should burden itself with a formal resolution to sustain the "Union"; meaning thereby, the Articles agreed upon by five delegates of Regular, and four of the Separate Baptists of Kentucky. They are nothing more than a brief summary, or Articles of Faith as held by Baptists, and can be found in either of Benedict's Histories of the Baptists,

46

in the section relating to the denomination in Kentucky. The grounds of disagreement were of comparatively minor moment; yet they were held tenaciously by both parties, and were carried over form Virginia into Kentucky by zealous adherents, and never should have caused a formal separation. The Regulars were inclined to high Calvinism, and had adopted the Philadelphia confessions of Faith; while the Separates were leaning a little towards Americanism.

From the time this resolution to sustain the Kentucky Union was passed by the New Design Church, as strange as it may seem now, sustaining the Baptist Union of Kentucky, appears to have been the standard of fellowship in the few, small and weak churches of Illinois.

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From their history it is very natural to infer that the Baptists of an early day, at least in the South and West have been greatly inclined to divide up into small parties on differences too unimportant to be the cause of a separation. And this has been a sadly disastrous process for us as a denomination. Had there been an earnest devotion to labors to convert men to the truth, instead of absorbing all labor on internal contentions on differences of opinion, by early Baptists in the State the result would have been vastly more glorious.

"In the same year, 1802, in which the action above referred to was taken, a "distress came into the (New Design) Church about slavery. And Brother Lemen and his wife dissected from

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the Church and the Union, on account that they will not fellowship those members that hold slaves." Whether this led to their separation from the church is not known.

"On the 25th day of May, 1804, a church of eleven members were constituted at Mount tabor, Barress County, Kentucky, by Elders Alexander Davidson and Jacob Locke, and emigrated in a body to Illinois. The emigrant church first stopped at the New Design Settlement, and afterwards removed to an unsettled tract of country in the northern part of St. Clair County, and took the name of Richland. By the old book of records which we have, (Rev. J. M. Peck) we think the church made some progress, kept up meetings regularly, was attended monthly by

49

Elders Chance and Badgeley and other preachers; had some additions yearly, until the division on the Slavery question, in 1809, when it became weakened. One part formed the Ogle's Creek Church; but a large majority reorganized, adopted the principles of the Friend's to Humanity, and founded Canteen (now Bethel) Church. From this body, in 1808, was formed the church of Looking Glass Prairie."
Dr. J. M. Peck's Letter, Jan. 4, 1847.

"In 1806, Elder William Jones removed form Beaver Bridge Church, Knox County, Tennessee, and settled on Wood River, near the present site of Upper Alton. He with John Finlay, caused a meeting

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to be held for uniting the three divided churches of Illinois, on Jan. 9, 1807, at the house of Anthony Badgeley, St. Clair County. The meeting finally adopted a "Summary of Principles" which were approved subsequently by the churches."
The same letter.

"On May 31, 1807, The Wood River Church was formed of twelve members, and Elder William Jones became the pastor, and so continued until his death, in Jan. 1845. The church is now nearly extinct.
The same letter, Jan . 4, 1847.

In the old records of the Bethel Church is found this entry.
"Sep. 12, 1807, Richland Arm of the New

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Design Church was constituted as the Baptist Church of Christ at Richland Creek.
Joseph Chance, Robert Brazil, Edward Radcliff Council."
Prof. Badgeley's letters.

Thus far has been presented the early history of the Baptists in Illinois, as connected with the first--the original Church of New Design, and its branches, before they entered into an Associational organization.

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Chapter II. Revised, Rewritten. The First Association in Illinois.

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Having sketched the origin of the first Churches in Illinois, as definitely as the information at my command will permit me to do, I come to the period when it was thought advisable for the few then existing, to become as associated, after the manner of older churches of the brotherhood in older sections of our common country.

The first Association, sometimes called, "The Illinois Union", was organized, the third Friday in June, 1807, of five churches, namely; New Design, Mississippi Bottom, Richland,

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Wood River and Silver Creek. When united all had a membership of 62 persons. And there were belonging to the churches three ordained ministers: David Badgeley, Joseph Chance and William Jones. The New Design and the Richland churches had previously belonged to the Green River Association in Kentucky.

The Association was organized on the basis of the following Summary of Principles, adopted by a meeting in Jan. 1807 held at the house of Anthony Badgeley in the Mississippi Bottom, to which reference has heretofore been made. These Principles were afterwards approved by the churches and

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prior to the organization of the Association.

Principles.

1. There is one only true God;--Father, Son and Holy Ghost.
2. We believe, that the Old and the New Testaments, are the word of God, and the only rule of Faith and Practice.
3. We believe that by nature we are all fallen and depraved creatures.
4. That salvation, regeneration, sanctification are by the life, death, resurrection and ascension of Jesus Christ.
5. That saints will finally persevere through grace to glory.
6. That believer's baptism by immersion

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is necessary to the receiving of the Lord's supper.
7. That the salvation of the righteous, and punishment of the wicked are eternal.
8. We believe that no ministers ought to administer the ordinances until they come under the imposition of hands.
9. That it is our duty to be tender and affectionate to each other, and study the happiness of the children of God in general, and be engaged singly to promote the glory of God.
10. We believe in election by grace.
11. We believe that it is our duty to commune with orderly Baptists.
12. That each church may keep its own Government

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as to them it may seems best.

The Association held two sessions each year--one in June, the other in October. The Minutes of this first, and organizing session unfortunately have not been found.

Mr. Peck says, in his sketch of the South District Association, of this first Association, The Illinois Union, and its organization; "As a part of the churches and brethren were conscientiously opposed to Slavery, it was tacitly agreed in this "Union", that correspondence

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should not be carried into Kentucky."

Although the Minutes of this first session cannot be found, those of the second, and those following for some years are in hand. There is reason to suppose that the Summary of Principles which have been already presented did not contain all the rules which were adopted in the organization of the body.

The second Session of this Association "was held at the house of Isaac Enochs, in Richland Creek Church, St. Clair County, Indiana Territory, commencing on Friday, Oct. 9, 1807, and closing on Lord's day the 11th. As the Minutes of this meeting are before me, I will transcribe them, and thus furnish the reader with the order of Associational proceedings

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at an early day in Illinois. The spelling and the use of capitals will be corrected.

Friday, Oct. 9, 1807, at 12 o'clock, Elder David Badgeley delivered the introductory sermon from John 3:16. "For God so loved the world", &c.

Elder Wm. Jones was chosen Moderator. Letters from seven churches were read; their messengers were enrolled; and a list of their numbers was taken as follows:

Churches Messengers Baptized Rec.' by Letter Excluded Died Total
New Design Wm. Whiteside, Steven Terry and Geo. Dement 7 1     20
Missis. Bottom David Badgeley, Geo. Valentine, and D. Waddle 1       14
Silver Creek Joseph Chance, Edward Radcliff, and Ab. Teter 5 2     22
Richland James Downen, Rob. Brazil, and Valentine Brazil 7 1     19
Wood River Wm. Jones, Isaac Hill, and Joseph Cook   2     14
Cane Spring John Hendrickson, William______         7
Richland Creek James Lemen, Wm. Whiteside, and Isaac Enochs         17
    20 6     113

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Letters from the last the requesting admittance into the Association, were received and read. Said churches were admitted, their messengers names enrolled, and members taken. It was a little singular that the Association should be in Session with a church before it belonged to the body.

Elders David Badgeley, Joseph Chance, John Hendrickson, and James Downen, with the Moderator and Clerk, were chosen a select committee to arrange the business of the Association and make

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report.

Adjourned until 3 o'clock , p. m.

Met according to adjournment, at 3 o'clock, p. m.

The select committee made report.
1. The matter of the friend, Henry Walker, which was laid over from last Association to be done something with.
2. The request of the Richland Church to be taken up.
3. Some to be appointed to examine the fund, and make report to the Association.
4. A query by the Committee, to know how excommunicates from foreign countries are to be received.
5. That some more rules of decorum be enacted.
6. That some Elder be appointed to preach the introductory Sermon.

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7. That a time and place be appointed for the next Association.
8. That the Clerk be allowed out of the fund for his services.

The Committee adjourned.

The Association met according to adjournment. The Committee made this report which was taken up in order.
1. The matter of the friend Henry Walker, by the voice of the whole thrown out.
2. The request of the Richland Church, which was to send them supplies of preachers, to appoint the time themselves.
3. That Isaac Enochs and Stephen Terry be appointed

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to examine the fund, and make report. They reported that they find in the treasury $6.62.
4. It is answered, that the excommunicates shall give satisfaction to the church, and if that cannot be come at conveniently, the church to which application has been made shall write to the church which excluded such applicant, requesting the charge to be exhibited, with a request to have the privilege of acting in the matter. But if the church should be dissolved, then the church to which the application has been made by the excluded member, shall be clear in taking it up and acting as to them shall seem right.
5. An amendment to the 18th article of decorum

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that the moderator shall not give his judgement until the voice of the Association is taken; and further the Moderator shall not have a vote, except the Association be equally divided in opinion.
6. Any person speaking in disorder, and neglecting, or refusing to hear the Moderator shall be taken under dealing.
7. Ordered that the Clerk be allowed twenty-five cents for each copy of the Minutes of the Association.
8. Agreed that Elder Joseph Chance be appointed to preach the introductory sermon at the next Association, and in case of failure Elder John Hendrickson.

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9. Ordered that our next Association be at James Lemen's on the 2nd Friday, Saturday, and Sabbath, in June, 1808.
10. Agreed that our Association be called "The Illinois Association."
11. That William Whiteside be appointed to keep the fund.
Signed by order,
William Jones, Moderator.
William Whiteside, Clerk.

In the preaching minutes, one of the churches which was received into Association the same Spring, was in Missouri.

Several peculiarities in the proceedings of the body may properly claim a moments attention.

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And, first, a somewhat large committee, for the number of delegates, or Messengers composing the body, was chosen, to arrange its business. The 1st adjournment, until 3 p. m. seems to have been for the meeting of the Committee, which had the responsibility of considering every item of business before it was brought before the Association. And only what their report contained did come under the consideration of that body. With so little business as was done, and so little notice of devotional exercises and preaching as appears, it is difficult to see how the time for two days was occupied; allowing that the Lord's day was taken up in unrecorded religious services.

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So far as the action of the Association is to be our guide, it is difficult to see what was done with funds. There is only one item of expense named;--That of furnishing copies of the Minutes of the sessions of the body, to the churches, for each of which the Clerk was allowed twenty-five cents. At the June session of 1809 the Association was allowed him one month to supply each church with a copy, and each church was requested to send for its copy. And at a later session, in 1809, each church was appointed to send paper to next Association on which their own minutes were written.

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These were days in Illinois when printers were scarce, and neither easily reached, nor easily paid. Hence the arrangement already referred to of the Clerk supplying each church with a manuscript copy of the Minutes. The supply was therefore remarkably limited. These were pioneer times, and scarce times for both paper and money.

Sketches only, hereafter, con be given of what seems worthy of notice in the meetings of the body.

At the June meeting, in 1808, seven churches were represented; the same as at the previous session. There were

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received by baptism 27; by Letter 12; Excluded 4; whole membership 144.

The Richland Church asked the Association to ordain, as a preacher of the gospel, John Baugh. On this request this action was taken;--"Laid on Elders Joseph Chance, John Henrickson and Wm¨ Jones to be a Presbytery for that business. Also laid on them to appoint the time." Dr. Peck says the ordination was at this session.

This query came from the Kane-Spring Church. "Is it right to exclude a public man, and to restore him to his membership, and also to his public gift

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without helps from sister churches?" The Association this answered, "It is advised by the Association, that his membership may be restored, by the church to which he had belonged; but as the advice of this council, they had best call help to restore him to his public gift."

A query was also presented from the Wood River Church;--"What is to be done with a member, who transgresses before the world, and comes forward and confesses a part, and not (what the world say) is the whole?" The Association thus decided, "We leave it to each church to act concerning testimony as to them seems best."

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A query by the Select Committee. "Is there any society of people, professing Christianity, that we (Baptists) can receive into church fellowship, and they never submit themselves to the ordinance of baptism, in that way which we believe to be right; and if there is, who are they?" To this the Association answered;--"We know of none."

There seems to have been reports unfavorable to the moral character of some of the ministers belonging to the Association, either originating after they came to Illinois, or, following them from the States from which they came. And instead of being brought under the investigation and discipline

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of the churches to which they belonged, they were thrust before the Association in the form of queries, embodying personal references to the supposed guilty parties. But the Association did not decline their consideration, as they should have done, and by their action, taught the churches their duty to attend to any matter of inquiry and discipline affecting the character of their members in their own bodies.

The churches seemed to have no idea of doing anything to supply themselves with ministerial labors, but threw themselves upon the Association. A request was made for the Association to adopt some plan to supply every place with preaching.

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To this the Association answered thus;--"Agreed to send two together. Left to the clerk to appoint them as follows; Joseph Chance, and James Lemen; Wm. Jones, and Joseph Lemen; John Hendrickson, and Benjamin Ogle; John Baugh, and Robert Brazil."

This mode of procedure seems to be in the principle that the ministers were the property of the Association, to be disposed of as it might please. The churches therefore, solicit supplies of ministerial labor from it, and the association simply makes its Clerk a bishop to appoint and distribute its ministerial servants. This course is about as arbitrary as a system of Slavery--sending them

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whither it would labor without pecuniary compensation. Such a course would not be tolerated now, and ought not to have been then. Ministers belong to Christ, but not to associations, or churches; and neither the one, nor the other, has a right to their services, without a reasonable equivalent.

The question, who should preach the introductory sermon, was disposed of in this way. "The ordained ministers who meet at the Association shall point out one to perform this service."

The October session of the Association, in 1808, was held at Wood River meeting house. Eight churches were represented,

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but the statistics of only seven were received. Only 4 baptisms were reported. In all 128 members. Here we have the Baptist strength of Illinois in 1808.

The Wood River Church remonstrated against sending their preachers into the circuit;--upon which the practice was abandoned.

The Association began its first session, in 1809, in the Silver Creek meeting house on June 17th. Letters from ten churches were received, and among them Looking Glass prairie, and Cold Water churches, which asked admittance into the body, and were received. The latter church was in Missouri. The statistical returns were baptized 18; received by Letter 11;

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dismissed 23; excluded 4; died 2; whole number 188. There were seven ministers, and seven churches had pastors.

In answer to a query from the Richland Creek Church, the Association said;--"We believe an Association is an advisory council." And a second query from the same church was thus answered;--"We believe that the apostolic manner of setting men forward to the ministry, was to find the gift in the man; and then if thought fit by the Presbytery, set at liberty by laying on of hands."

The Association convened with the Mississippi Bottom Church on the 1st Friday in Oct. 1809. At the very opening

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of the session, after the Sermon, a disagreement was developed on the question of Slavery, and after much discussion on the subject of admitting Slave holders, the body divided. Dr. Peck says, "Two papers were drawn up; one was headed ‘United Baptists’--the other ‘Friends to Humanity’, and a third party consisting of the New Design and Richland Churches, and a few individuals in other churches held on to the name of the ‘Illinois Union’."

The first named party, under the final name of the "Illinois Union Baptist Association," organized and proceeded to business. Thus the minutes read. "The

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party desiring to support the General Union of the United Baptists at large, being assembled, chose Bro. Wm. Jones, Clerk, and proceeded to business." Letters from five churches were received and read, from which the following table was made:
Churches Messengers Baptized Rec.' by Letter Dismissed Excluded Died Total
Miss. Bottom Geo. Valentine, David Badgeley           11
Wood River John _____, Wm. Jones           28
Cold Water James Allen, Wm. Patterson 2         11
Look Gl. Prairie Wm. Brazil, Val. Brazil, Rob. Brazil           9
Feefe's Creek Rich. Sullen, James Walter, Alex. Clark 7 1       37
    9 1       96

This was an unfortunate break up, leaving just half the churches, which were represented at the June meeting about four months before.

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Dr. Peck says;--At the division, there were ten churches, (of which three were in Missouri) eight ordained ministers, (two in Missouri) four licentiates, and 188 communicants."

The first item of business done at this session, after the full organization, was to amend the 12 article of Principles, on which the Association was organized. That article read thus;--"That each Church may keep its own Government as to them it may seem best." And the amendment to this was, that no church have any right to make any rule to cross the Union of United Baptists at large. In this amendment the liberty

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of the original article was surely denied, and the two parts were in conflict. But something of the kind was undoubtedly considered necessary to justify their action in the division. But its adoption was too late, being a Post facto law.

A query came in from the church with which the Association was assembled, in the following form;--"Is it right for a church to give letters of dismission? If so, on what grounds?" The answer was, "We believe it right to give letters in case of the person moving out of the bounds, or wanting to join another church nearer to them of the same faith and order."

Another declaration of the Association

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was put upon its minutes in this form;--"We believe it right not to commune with those that have left the General Union at large."

The Association adjourned to hold another session in December, 1809, then future about two months.

Here it is proper, at the close of the session at which this division took place, to pause, and ascertain if possible the causes more fully of this sad rupture of fraternal harmony. And to do this it is right that we step back to the organization of this first Association. Dr. Peck says;--"As a part of the churches and brethren were conscientiously

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opposed to Slavery, it is tacitly agreed in this Union that correspondence was not to be carried into Kentucky. In 1809, attempts were made, by a party to open such correspondence, and after a day spent in discussion, much to free for peace and harmony, it was agreed to divide."

On Dr. P. testimony then we here have one of the causes distinctly set Forth, which was an attempt to violate a well understood, and solemn engagement by the pro-Slavery party. But another fact must be considered to get a more enlarged view of affairs on this subject.

Dr. Peck in describing the character

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of James Lemen, Sen., awards to him a very exalted character both as a man and a Christian, and among other things says of him;--"He took an active part in the lead of religious meetings, many years before he was licensed to preach. He was an opponent to Slavery, both from principle and policy, and came to this territory to live in a free country.

From some strong expressions which Mr. Lemen made on the subject of Slavery, while preaching at Richland Church, in 1809, (which ought to have been passed without notice) Larkin Rutherford, on of the members, took offense, and brought a

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complaint to the church." Reynold's Ills. p. 226.

Dr. Peck was mistaken is saying that this difficulty originated in "Richland Church". It was in Richland Creek Church, a mistake too important to be overlooked. I will here present an exact copy of the records from that church. It had been recognized as an independent church on Sep. 12, 1807, having, up to that time, been an "arm" of the New Design Church. And James Lemen, Sen., had been licensed to preach by it on July 9, 1808. The record reads thus;--
"July 8, 1809. A distress brought in by

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Bro. Larkin Rutherford, against James Lemen, Sen., for saying, that he disfellowshipped slave holders, and those that fellowshipped them. Then the question was put to the church to know whether Bro. Rutherford had a right to be distressed with Bro. Lemen for so saying. The church was divided in judgment, which threw them into confusion. The church called two meetings, to endeavor for a union, or fellowship, but all to no purpose." On account of the church being divided there were two meetings on the 9th of Sep. 1809; one at John J. Whitesides, and the other at Jacob Ogles. Three messengers were chosen to the Association,

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out of each part of the church; and at the Association both sets were refused a seat. And the Association being divided in opinion there was a split took place amongst them. One part professed to be in fellowship with the slave holding Union of Baptists at large. The other party professed to be Friends of Humanity, denying union and communion with all persons holding the doctrine of perpetual, involuntary hereditary Slavery." Bethel Church records from Dr. Bulkley.

Here is brought to light another cause undoubtedly having much influence in producing the discussion in the Association

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on the subject of Slavery; and finally, in the sad division of the body. Although the messengers from neither party in the Richland Creek Church were received into the Association, yet the subject of controversy was carried into that body.

It should not here be forgotten or overlooked that the Richland Creek Church, of which James Lemen, and L. Rutherford were members, had, on Feb. 13, 1808, nearly a year and a half before this distress was brought into the church, adopted what were called Tarraut's Rules concerning Slavery, and these were as decided against slave holding as were the remarks of Mr. Lemen in his preaching. In view of this fact,

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therefore, Mr. Rutherford had no cause for bringing in his "distress" to the church, for as a member of the church he had adopted, or at least given his consent to opinion sin harmony with Mr. Lemen's statement. And with Tarraut's rules on their Records, the wonder is that there should have been any members in the body, who would sustain the distress as having any just ground on which to rest. But the Spirit of pro-Slaveryism never could boast of great consistency or conscientiousness. And strange as may be the fact, among these few and feeble churches and members, a very important scripture for them, in their circumstances, seems to have been overlooked, the Spirit of which

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should have prevailed among them all. "Let us therefore follow after the things which make for peace, and things wherewith one may edify another." Rom. 14:19. Had this been duly regarded as a scriptural rule in those days, the history of our early beginnings as a denomination in Illinois would have developed vastly greater prosperity and growth. The causes of this most unhappy disagreement in our early churches are here discoverable. In the Association a violation of agreement, and in the Richland Creek Church a disregard of its own rules.

There can be no doubt that the Association came into an organized form

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before the discussion commenced. This was needful as preliminary to the introduction properly of any subject for consideration. When the purpose to divide was reached, the standing clerk, Wm. Whiteside, was not among the pro Slavery party. This made the election of a new Clerk necessary by those who reorganized under the name of the "Illinois Union Baptist Association."

It cannot escape the notice of the careful reader that with the leading party the support of the Union of United Baptists at large, was the grand test of fellowship--seemingly, it was regarded as the Standard of orthodoxy. The absurdity and folly of setting up

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such a Standard is commented on in the remarks at the close of the first chapter.

The pro Slavery part of the churches and members continued their Associational meetings under the new name of "The Illinois Association".

The third session, for 1809, was held in the Wood River Meeting House, commencing on the 1st Friday in Dec. in 1809. Six churches were represented, and the usual order of business was pursued. The Association found it necessary, in its shattered condition, to strengthen the things which remained, and therefore appointed Elders, "Thos. R. Musick, Robert Brazil, David Badgeley, D. Waddle, Wm. Jones, and brethren, Moses Short, Wm. Brazil and John Finlay to meet with the different churches

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to help them in their distresses, to establish those that wish to live with the United Baptists, and if need be, to constitute churches." The time for holding these meetings was definitely fixed in each place. And according to the arrangement, the Committee held meetings undoubtedly in the Churches of New Design, Silver Creek, Richland, Looking Glass Prairie and Wood River.

In this appointment the Association took to itself a little authority, that we are not accustomed to consider as being the right of these bodies. It assumed to direct the committee to organize churches if they deemed it necessary.

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This we regard as a matter resting wholly with the individuals who enter into the organization. With its associations have nothing to do.

No minutes of 1810 have been obtained. It may well be supposed that in such a conflict of opinions there would be differences among the members of the same church. The division could not be confined to church limits, so as to leave those composing each of all one sentiment. Dr. Peck says, "The churches seemed to be broken in to fragments."

In the Sep. session in 1811, with the Looking Glass Prairie Church, there were only four churches represented in the Association, and two of these were organized after the division

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The whole number of members reported was 56. The Ogle's Creek Church made a request that some previous action of the Association against the Emancipating preachers should be softened, but the desired action was not taken. To exactly what act of the Association this request referred we have no means of knowing. The Association "recommenced to the churches to make known their liberality by sending some money to the next meeting to pay the expenses of the same." The Association made arrangements for certain churches to be informed where the next session would be, and adjourned to meet again in two months.

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The meeting took place at David Badgeley's on Nov. 22, 1811, and messengers were present from eight churches. The Feefe's Creek Church in Missouri, had undoubtedly enjoyed a revival, for they reported 58 as having been received by experience, which at that time meant received on the relation of an experience before baptism, and the whole membership of the church as reported was 82. All the churches together reported 150 members.

As to the subject referred to, this, at the last, they said;--"To relieve the minds of any that may not understand us, we did not, nor do not mean, the rule concerning the emancipating preachers, to extend to any that have not departed from the General Union, or given hurts by disorderly conduct."

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Five churches made responses to the call of the previous session for money to the amount of $3.62 1/2. Elder James Reulfro was appointed Treasurer; and also to obtain a book, and record the Constitution, and all the business done by the Association therein and present it at the next session.

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[The following is crossed out.] all the business done by the Association therein, and present it at the next meeting session. [End crossed out portion.] Elder Wm. Jones was appointed to write a Circular Letter for examination at the next meeting of the Association. [The following is crossed out..] for examination [End crossed out portion.] Three brethren were appointed to preach the next day (The Lord's day).

Since 1809, the Association seems to have held only one session each year.

The minutes for 1812 have not been obtained. The session of the Association for 1813 was commenced Aug. 27, in the meeting house of the Wood River Church, in Madison Co. Illinois Territory. Elder Nathan Aruet was the preacher.

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Seven churches were represented, reporting 182 members. The second Circular Letter that the Association ever had written was in the manuscript Minutes.

The session of 1814, commenced Sep. 23. Eight churches were represented, reporting 171 members. Two of the churches, Prairie de Long and Femme Osage, were received at this Session. In 1815, the Association began its session Sep. 15, at Elder David Badgeley's. Elder Lewis Williams was the preacher. Nine churches were represented, having a membership of 216. The Turkey Hill Church not having been represented for two years caused the Association to take this

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action;--"We believe it right to appoint a committee to go to Turkey Hill Church, and inquire into the order of that church, and make report to the next Association--we authorize the committee to sit in church order with the Turkey Hill Church, as it respects anything that may be before them." A committee of 10 was appointed. This was certainly a stretch of authority by the Association that is not exercised at the present day, and would not be tolerated.

The Association made a strange arrangement for preaching on the Lord's day. The usual services included three sermons, and instead of appointing any of the ministers

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to preach, left it for those who "felt the impression."

We have failed to obtain the minutes of 1816. On the 4th Friday in Sep. 1817, the Association convened with the Wood River Church. Elder Charles Collard preached the introductory sermon. Nine churches were represented, and three presented requests to be received into the body and were received: Cantine Creek, Upper Quiver and Shoal Creek; in all making the membership 209. It appears that the year before, in 1816, correspondence was opened with an Association on the east border of the State, called the Wabash. Most of the churches were in Indiana. It

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was now voted to continue the correspondence.

At this session the Association was divided, the Mississippi River was recognized as the natural line between the bodies. The churches on the West side of the River formed the Missouri Association.

The Minutes of 1818 are not at hand.

The Association held its session in 1819, in the meeting house of the Looking Glass Prairie Church, commencing Oct. 8. Elder John M. Peck preached the introductory sermon, from Rom. 5:8. Ten churches were represented, and all being in the Counties of Madison, Bond, St. Clair, Monroe and Washington, in Illinois. Three churches were received at

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this session; One of them being Richland Creek Church. This is one of the churches that formed the third party in the division of 1809, and in which the Rutherford trouble originated. The number of members reported was 194, and 4 baptisms.

The Missionaries sent to St. Louis, in 1817, by the Baptist Board of Foreign Missions, Elders John M. Peck and James E. Welch, were present at this session, and both preached by appointment of the Association on the Lord's day. This year, the ministers are designated, and the number belonging to the churches was eight,

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and four visitors.

There were four Associations recognized as corresponding bodies; the Wabash, Missouri, Bethel, and Mount Pleasant. The last two are Associations of which we have not before heard.

Here we have the first recognition of Christian Missions by the Association. The record in the Minutes is as follows;--"Heard a Corresponding Letter from the Baptist Board of Foreign Missions, containing interesting intelligence of the prosperity of the Redeemers Kingdom.

The queries from the Wood River considered.

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Is it right to correspond with the Baptist Board of Foreign Missions?
Answer, Yes.
Is there any use for the United Society for the Spread of the Gospel, and if so, when does its usefulness consist?
Ans. Yes. And its use is to supply destitute places with preaching."

This was a pretty emphatic endorsement of Missions.

"Elder Badgeley reported that he had made some progress in composing an outline of the history of the Association, and requested some person to aid him."

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Elder Jones was appointed.

As a new feature Quarterly meetings were appointed.

We have no minutes of 1820.

The Association convened in its annual session of 1821, with the Richland Creek Church Aug. 25. Eld. James Street, opened the session with a sermon. Sixteen churches were represented, and reported 366 members.

No minutes of 1822-3 and 4 have been found.

The Association met in its Anniversary of 1825, with the Elkhorn Church, Washington County, Sep. 24. The introductory sermon was preached by Elder Wm. Kinney. Ten churches were represented, with eight ministers, and

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reporting 220 members.

From another source than the Minutes we have information the Association at the session of 1824 broke from its correspondence with the Board of Foreign Missions, and became an Anti-Mission body.

The minutes of 1826 have not been obtained.

The session of 1827, was held with the church on Ridge Prairie, Madison Co. commencing Sep. 22. Eleven churches were represented, reporting nine ministers, 10 persons baptized, and 228 members. Corresponding associations in Illinois were the Sangamon, Muddy River, and Wabash.

The minutes of 1828 and 1829 have not been obtained.

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The session of 1830, was held in the Wood River Church Meeting House, only a short distance from the present site of Upper Alton, commencing Sep. 25. Thirteen churches were represented, with seven ordained ministers; seven had been baptized; the total membership reported was 301. Four General meetings were appointed for the Associational year.

At its session in 1819, Elders John M. Peck and James E. Welch, missionaries of the Baptist Triennial Convention, the first General Organization among the Baptist for Missions, were present, and were by the Association invited to preach on the Lord's day. The Association also warmly

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approved and commended the work of Missions, and opened a correspondence with the Board at Boston. But at its session in 1824, the body for some reason changed its course, and came out with a declaration wholly [The following is crossed out] disapproving [End crossed out portion] opposed mission work, and refusing further correspondence with the Board. And now at this anniversary they thus give expression to their Anti-Missionism.

"Firmly believing those pretended liberal institutions of the present day to spread the gospel, to be without any license from the word of God; and as "the love of money is the root of all evil," we fear thy will only tend to sap the foundation of both civil and religious

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liberties. We therefore advise our brethren of the different churches to be aware of their stratagems."

Here we have exhibited that determined opposition to the work of Christian Benevolence, which had years before began to develop itself in this body, but not alone in this, it also had pervaded all the associations with which this was in correspondence. And as the influence of this opposition has been more and more manifested, the spirit of true religion has named, until churches and Associations have by gradual decline become extinct. Christian vitality could not be preserved in a living condition under the influence merely of a doctrinal

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theory, unaccompanied by earnest and harmonious Christian work, which is theory wrought into life, inspired by love for Christ, and for the souls of men.

The churches represented in the Association were Madison, Bond, Clinton, Washington, St. Clair, Randolph, Fayette and Macoupin Counties. The Circular Letter for this year was upon the Mission and Work of the Holy Spirit; and especially his necessary agency in the conversion of new.

The Anniversary of 1831, was held with the Sugar Creek Church, in Clinton County. Only eight churches were represented. Only seven had been received by baptism, and the whole number

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of members returned 247. The business was of the usual character, and in the usual order. It was ordered that 400 copies of Minutes should be printed, and five copies should be sent to each corresponding Association.

The following unusual action was taken. "The Association having understood that some difficulties have arisen in the Horse Prairie Church, that has prevented them from gospel travel; therefore, it is agreed, that Elders Silas Chrisler, Samuel Smith, Thos. Ray, Wm. Kinney and Eli Short, be appointed to go and inquire into those difficulties, and if any exist, to give to the Church such advice as they may think best calculated to lead them again into

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the faith and practice of our sister Churches, and make report to our next Association."

This surely was forcing a council upon a church without being solicited; and certainly seemed somewhat dictatorial. According to common usage, it would have been in order, in view of the failure of the church to represent itself in the Association, for the body to have sent a committee to inquire the cause of their failure, and aid them in resuming their position in the Association. In this course there would have been no departure from associational prerogative; but to send a committee of five ordained ministers to inquire into certain difficulties which rumor

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said existed in a church which presented its harmonious progress, was quite another thing. It is generally supposed that advice from a council is timely when it is solicited.

It may be well in giving a faithful history of the sentiments of those known as Baptists in the early days of Illinois, to insert here an extract form the Circular Letter published this year in the Minutes of this body.

"Dear Brethren;--We are glad to have another interview in an associated capacity, and that there are so many that prove faithful in these trying times, when Antichrist , by his miraculous power has gained such an ascendancy over the hearts of so many of the citizens

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of our free country, that he has drawn many by his silver cord; and a great number of his servants are traveling through every part of our country, as well as other nations, to establish the different religious institutions, falsely so called; also a number of editors are sending their papers into every part, to succor their labor, persuading the people, that Missionary institutions, under the pretence of spreading the Gospel of God, such as learning young men to preach, and sending them Forth under perpetual pay; Bible, Tract, and Temperance Societies, &c; and lastly above all, the Sunday School Union! by which we think they expect to get the views of Government in their own

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hands, by training parents and children by their Sunday School books and papers, persuading them to believe that it is a Heaven born institution; and that it is a great thing to be a member of that institution--and so tread down Zion under their feet, and cause her members to pay tax to support their institution.

Already some of these misguided biggots say, that in a little time, the old Baptist preachers will have but few hearers, if any. Thus the enemies of the church expect shortly to gain the victory over her. It is much to be lamented, that so many are already led away by their wicked devices. Therefore, Brethren, be aware of the signs of the present evil day --

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the Holy Scriptures tell us of false prophets and false Christs, that should come, and that evil seducers should wax worse and worse, and that many should depart from the faith, and follow their pernicious ways, which should cause the truth to be evil spoken of. By their fruits they are easily known by all lovers of truth. Money, power and human accomplishments seem to be their chief aim--therefore they do not belong to the visible Church of Christ, consists chiefly of the poor of this world, whom God has chosen rich in faith, and heirs of the kingdom. But Antichrist's kingdom belongs to this world; therefore the world runs after it. The rich, the honorable, the

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mighty, and the greatest part of the aspiring community, that wished to make a fair show in the world are flowing into it, the framers of the great Mission plan with her multitude of the institutions of her auxiliaries. How full of boasting they are, that they are doing miracles by their means, in causing Emperors and Kings with their subjects to bow to them; and that for their labor God will give them great crowns of glory. Christ has promised to help his Zion right early, and may the true God and eternal life sustain you against all the false Missionaryisms, Campbellisms, Pedo Baptisms, and all the fallacisms that are afloat in the world--and may be deliver you from the power of the beast, his

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mark, the number of his name, and all that worship him."

The session of the Association in 1832, was held with the Elkhorn Church in Washington Co. commencing Oct. 6. Ten churches were represented. The baptisms had been 12, and the whole number returned was 239.

To as late a period as we have secured any of the minutes of this body its history has now been traced. And farther than we should have done had it not been the first Association organized in our State territory, and also a fair sample of all of this class. In obtaining a knowledge

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of this one we have a type of all the others, as their history is very uniform, there being no expansion or growth. The proceedings are stereotyped;--there is no religious progress, as the spirit which pervades them all is that of anti-effort, as well as that of Anti-Missions--one of a do-nothing character. And of course nothing is gained. The existence of these Associations, as of the churches of which they are composed, has really been a gradual death.

The Associations of this character, in 1832, so far as I have been able to learn

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were Wabash District, Sangamon, Muddy River, Kaskasia and Apple Creek.

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Northern Illinois
Having given our attention to the early settlement of Southern Illinois, which carried us back to 1778; and to the beginning of Christian labors by the early settlers, and the subsequent organization of the first Christian Church, which was a Baptist Church, in 1796. And having brought the history of our early denominational work there up to 1830, we now turn to examine the state of affairs at the Northern part of Illinois; and carry forward our historical investigations.

In 1831 and 1832, the Black Hawk War, so called, filled what few scattered settlements of people there were in Northern Illinois with alarm. That war was closed in August 1832. This

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event opened the country to settlement. And without doubt, many connected in some way with the military forces engaged in the various marches of the army., resulting in the final defeat of Black Hawk and his allies, were interested at the same time in making themselves acquainted with the country; having possible in view their final settlement in it. Whether this was true with any considerable number composing the military forces or not, the knowledge gained by the war, of the country, greatly facilitated its rapid subsequent settlement.

In passing into this department of our work, and in tracing our denominational planting, and our historical developments there from

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we need to begin with the foundations of society which were being laid largely by the people of Eastern States, who in great numbers, and coming with unprecedented rapidity, were settling themselves down in the country where they were purposing to make themselves new homes. And here at this stage of our work we shall avail ourselves of the labors of an aged pioneer minister, yet surviving, though laid aside for years from public labors, by a spiritual disease. He was an early settler in Northern Illinois, as a minister of Christ, employing himself in preaching the Gospel, and in aiding to give organized form to Christianity in this wide field of grand promise, and demanding patient and earnest labors.

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We refer to Rev. Jeremy F. Tolman, now residing in Sandwich, Ills. We intend to make ourselves debtors to him for a part of his Introduction to his "History of the Fox River Baptist Association."

It is a description of the country and the people, as viewed at an early stage of the settlement of the country; and then reviewed after a residence of twenty-five years; and who makes the record as an eye witness, who had viewed the scene at the beginning, and then saw in its stages the rapid and amazing growth of the country. Though the extract may be a long one, it is nevertheless a good one.

Of Northern Illinois he says:

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"In tracing the history of this section of country for the last quarter of a century, we are struck with the many unmistakable tokens of the Divine care and goodness towards it. Exceedingly great temporal prosperity has attended every branch of industry. The diligent hand has made rich, All have received a most magnificent reward for their labor. Spiritual blessings have also been shed upon its inhabitants, to an extent that calls loudly for gratitude and praise to Him, who is the giver of every good and perfect gift.

To an early settler here, it could not fail to be especially gratifying to note down the astonishing changes and rapid improvements which have taken place around him.

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Fancy yourself standing upon yonder swell of prairie twenty-five years ago, taking a survey of the country. It is fine. Your senses are regaled with the beauty of the landscape, the singing of birds, the fragrance of the air, wafting grateful odors from myriads of flowers of every imaginable variety of size, shape and hue, blushing in the sun-beam, and opening their petals to drink in his vivifying rays. While gazing enraptured you descry in the distance something moving slowly over the rich prairie, through the luxuriant herbage, and among the gorgeous flowers. As the object nears you, it proves to be a wagon

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drawn by a single team, containing a family and their earthly all. They are moving to the "Far West" in quest of a home. At length they stop and on the margin of a grove, rear their lone cabin, amid the chattering of birds--the bounding of deer--the hissing of serpents--and the barking of wolves. For all the native inhabitants of these wilds look upon the intruders with a jealous eye, and each in his own way forbids any encroachment upon his fondly cherished home, and his long undisputed domain. Look again and you see another, another, and yet another. From the same point of observation, look again, in mid-summer, in autumn, and in winter. And lo, fields

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are enclosed, waving with grain, and repairing for the former and latter harvest! A school house is erected of rough logs! How admirable the finish! But what is it? Not Gothic, nor Corinthian, but Frontierian order. The cracks hitched and daubed with mud. The roof "cobbed off," a slab-door on wooden hinges, and "puncheon" floor, the windows few and small, of glass, of oiled paper, as circumstances allowed. The fixtures all in perfect harmony with the building, so that an exquisite symmetry pervades the whole. This edifice "pays the double debt" of school room and house of worship. A school is opened; a church gathered; the word preached and the ordinances of the Gospel

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celebrated.

Look again after the lapse of five and twenty years; and what do you see? The waste has became a fruitful field, adorned with ornamental trees and shrubbery, waving in delightful beauty about commodious, and even elegant dwellings. Where was then a cabin is now a village or a city. In short, you behold a land flowing with milk and honey; abounding in spacious churches, academies, school houses, and other seminaries of learning. A land of industry and wealth, checkered with railroads, and having a gigantic canal. A land terminating with life and annually sending off surplus funds with hundreds, not to say thousands, of its sons, to

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people new regions beyond. A land whose resources and improvements are so wonderful as to stagger belief and surpass the power of description.

The settlement of the country was scarcely commenced until the close of the Black Hawk War, August 1832. At that time there were small settlements at Chicago, Dixon, Ottawa, Joliet, and a few other places, where are now (1854) none or ten populous cities, one of them containing above 100,000 inhabitants. Besides which, the skirts of the woodlands bordering upon the waters of the O'Plain, DuPage, Fox, and Rock and other tributaries, were here and there dotted with the white man's cabin.

Galena was the first considerable

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settlement made in Northern Illinois. The emigrants were from Kentucky and the Southern States. They began to work the Lead Mines in 1821. Some of the miners came from Southern portions of the State. Such usually spent the winter season at home, in preference to enduring the rigors of a Northern climate. On the opening of spring they returned to the mines at the time when suckers run; so that they might be said to ascend the Mississippi in company with the finny. This circumstance gave rise to their being called Suckers, which soon came to be the cant name of the inhabitants of Illinois. In 1826 the village was laid out. In 1827 the county of which it is the capital was

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organized. It is thus described by a resident, 1829. "Galena is the seat of justice of Jo Daviess County, and principal depot of mines, and contains about 550 houses and 800 inhabitants. The mail arrives weekly in stages from St. Louis and private hacks run from Galena to every part of the mining district." The county was named in honor of Gen. Joseph H. Daviess of Kentucky, who was killed in the battle of Tippecanoe in 1811. It comprised the present counties of Jo Daviess, Stephenson, Carroll, and parts of Winnebago, Ogle, Whiteside and Rock Island.

Galena was probably the only place in all Northern Illinois, that, in the beginning

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of 1832, was worthy the name of village, except in the Western use of the term. About this time villages were quickly made. A piece of Government land was claimed--a public square and a score of village lots staked out--a cabin erected--a name given, and it was a village indeed! One of great promise--centrally located--equi-distant from such and such a (would be) immense emporium--directly in the great thoroughfare between those cities. But these day dreams, marvelous as they appear, have already been realized to an extent so great, and in a manner so exact, as almost entitle them to the name of prophecies. To these general results there were exceptions. For the wild speculations of '35 and '36 stuck many

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a stake for a village that never grew into one. The monetary crises of '37 left not a few to rot down in solitude.

Of all the wild schemes projected for a village, there were probably none, that would compare in boldness of conception with the one undertaken by a Mr. Thurston. This gentleman laid out a village upon the summit of Buffalo Rock, La Salle Co. The lots were sold at public auction; and some of the choicest were struck off at $350 each.

To express the peculiar excellence and eligibility of one's claim, there was a proverb so common among the early settlers as to be in the mouth of every one. "Timber and Prairie adjoining; right in the heart of the settlement."

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This was ordinarily [The following is crossed out] with great exultation [End crossed out portion] iterated with complacency quite becoming; and occasionally with great exultation, where as yet there was scarcely another cabin in sight.

Chicago was occupied as a military Post at an early period. "On the surrender of Gen. Hull, at Detroit, in 1812, the garrison in the Fort at Chicago resolved to abandon it. Shortly after they had left the Fort they were attacked by the Indians. They defended themselves with bravery, and finally surrendered to a greatly superior force, with the promise that their lives should be spared. But after delivering up their arms, several of the men were barbarously murdered. An Indian approached Mrs. Heald, who was of the party, with a tomahawk raised for her

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destruction; but she disarmed his ferocity, and insured is protection by looking him fully in the face and remarking with a smile, ‘surely you will not kill a squaw’. This appeal to the magnanimity of an Indian warrior evinced great presence of mind, and knowledge of the Indian character."

From other, and reliable accounts of this sanguinary scene, we learn that Mrs. Heald was wounded during the engagement. But this does not, I the least, conflict with the foregoing statement. For there is nothing more common in savage warfare, than the inhuman massacre of the wounded, who unfortunately fall into their hands. Full truth of the truthfulness of this fact

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was given at the time, in the cold-blooded butchery of the wounded captives which was ensued.

The Indians after plundering the Fort destroyed it August 16, 1812. It was rebuilt in 1816. In 1823 the town of Chicago contained eight or ten houses and fifty of sixty inhabitants. In 1830 it was laid out into lots. In 1831 it became the seat of justice for Cook Co. There were four arrivals, two brigs and two schooners during that year. "After the Black Hawk was and near the close of 1832, it contained five small stores and 250 inhabitants. Since that time the growth of Chicago has been unparalleled. In 1835 there were two hundred and sixty-seven arrivals of brigs, ships and schooners, and nine steamboats, bring 5,015 tons of merchandise, and 9,400 barrels of salt. The value of merchandise

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imported was $2,500,000." It was then a snug, stirring village; but now a populous city of more than 100,000 inhabitants. The augmentation of its business and wealth, has more than kept pace with the astonishingly rapid increase of its population.

The counties of Cook and La Salle were created and organized at the same time. It was then customary, in organizing a new county, to attach to it a portion of territory lying outside of its organic limits. By this means the three counties--Jo Daviess, Cook and La Salle, exercised jurisdiction over the greatest portion of Northern Illinois, from 1831 to 1836, at which time other counties began to be formed from them.

The war of 1832 brought military forces and explorers from various places, who in their

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return home gave a glowing account of the goodly land. By this means the country was much better and more extensively known. The treaty with the Indians, and the tranquility which ensued, were favorable to its rapid settlement. A rush of immigrants to this land of overpowering enchantment, was mad e in 1833, when the choicest of the timber, and large tracts of prairie were claimed. Many of the first claimants took large portions of land, and afterwards sold parcels of their claims to new settlers.

We will now give a rapid glance at the character of the immigrants, and the special circumstances surrounding them; so that a few of the many difficulties which attended the propagation of religion, the formation of churches, and their subsequent prosperity may be seen.

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The early settlements consisted of frontier rangers, shrewd speculators, broken merchants, disappointed politicians, young doctors, unpracticed and broken down lawyers, and second rate ministers; also a few of the better sort in each of the professions, together with enterprising farmers and mechanics. What if some of the professional men were unpolished, and what if they now and then married the King's English? Taken as a whole, they were admirably adapted to their condition and work--just the men for the times.

The settlers, except at Galena, were principally from New York, New England, Ohio, Indiana, and Pennsylvania. New York probably sent the largest delegation, New England next, and each succeeding State fewer in the order in which

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they are mentioned. Nearly every State in the Union was also represented, as well as many of the countries of Europe. All had come to seek their fortunes. The restraints which former society had thrown around them, were no longer felt. Each individual was a law unto himself. All were under a like necessity of forming a new character in this "Far off Land". For whatever a man's character had been, it availed him nothing here in a community of entire strangers. Letters of Commendation, eminating from whatever source, were of little worth. Each succeeding immigrant was measured with a prairie reed and his worth estimating accordingly. To the new admeasurement he was obliged to submit, for there was no appeal.

Circumstances were every way calculated

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to develop the real character of all. And it is a painful fact, that in not a few instances there appeared to be but little regard for any thing but to secure a large claim, become rich, and in all things have the pre-eminence.

No land was in market, nor even surveyed, except along the line of the contemplated canal. Hence disturbances about claims, and especially about their boundaries, were of frequent occurrence. These contentions were always very annoying. Occasionally they assumed a fearful form when club and mob-law was resorted to and applied with great severity, and all the glories of "Squatter Sovereignty" stood revealed! In process of time, a standing "Committee on Claims", was

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elected in many of the precincts. This was a judicious measure, and much good resulted from it.

The Hoosier and the Buckeye came with their loose notions of liberty, cherishing inveterate prejudice against the Yankees. The Yorker was conscious of his superiority since he came from the "Empire State". The New Englander had his "Boston Notions". The clear headed Scotchman knew how they did up things in the "Ould Countrie". And the Englishman was not wholly free from a tinge of aristocracy. These several peculiarities were

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strongly marked and strikingly developed, especially on all religious subjects. For each religionist standing as the representative of his denomination, was exceedingly zealous to build up his own sect, and to do it precisely after the pattern he brought with him.

Sectarianism was now rampant, and like a powerful under current carried every thing in a contrary direction. The difficulties which it thru in the way of a faithful and successful discharge of ministerial duties were incredible to all who did not actually encounter them. They were more numerous than the plagues of Egypt. And so formadable, that like the great mountain before Zerubbabel, it required Divine power to remove them. This was,

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now and then, mercifully vouchsafed, and a blessed revival of religion ensued; but as soon as the gracious work subsided the Hydra reappeared to set things to rights, and with a zeal and sanctity peculiar to himself entered upon the important duty of dividing the spoil, which was ever done with characteristic magnanimity and impartiality.

Some few professors had designedly thrown off the restraints of religion, and left it behind, with the intention of returning for it when they were settled, and had amassed a handsome property--sufficient for the maintenance of so expensive a guest. Alas, Alas! Had such persons ever read the following passage? "Godliness is profitable unto all things, having promise of the life that now is, and of that which is to come."

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Others, having [The following is crossed out] far better [End crossed out portion] very different and far better intentions, either lost their religion in their perilous passage to this land of promise, or else were so deeply engulfed in worldliness soon after their arrival, as almost to extinguish the light that was in them. Nor were examples wanting, which were calculated to impress the minds of the observing with the ides, that individuals, not to say whole neighborhoods, imagined they had moved West of the Sabbath.

There were also formidable barriers to literary and religious improvements arising from local prejudices. Each settler, with few exceptions, had in his own opinion, by far the best site for a village or city. And such was the prevailing enthusiasm, as to induce nearly every one to believe his own

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cabin was the nucleus, around which a dense population would shortly cluster. Hence in the early settlements there were nearly as many sites offered for school houses and church edifices as there were claims. And however fanciful, or even ludicrous it may seem to be shown the site for a church which the generous doner had reserved, while as yet he had not even the color of title to his land; but where, in imagination, he saw a stately edifice in progress of erection. Therefore but few were willing to contribute toward erecting a public building, except upon his own favorite spot. Moreover it was quite apparent that some persons were so entirely under the blinding influence of prejudice, as to refrain from religious meetings, when they were held at a place not of their

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own choosing, especially if it were one, which they apprehended, might thereby become more popular as a site for the erection of a church edifice, than the one they had selected. O man, how fallen!!

To overcome these prejudices, national, local and sectarian; to mould and cement into a friendly social compact such a heterogeneous mass, brought together with such rapidity, and under circumstances so peculiar; to check the tide of worldliness which pervaded the entire community, threatening the destruction of everything good; to gain the ear, and especially to win the heart to Christ, and thus prepare materials for God's spiritual building, required no little skill, and no small amount of labor. Although the task was arduous, if the ministry and the churches had

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labored with all fidelity to the Master--if their zeal and self-sacrifice, has been commensurate to the greatness and importance of the work in which they were engaged; would not the result have been more signal and glorious? And would not both laborers and churches have thereby been greatly multiplied and strengthened? Nevertheless has not enough been done, by the blessing of God, to cheer the present laborers, and encourage them vigorously to pursue the work of faith and labor of love, till complete success shall crown their efforts, the top most stone be laid, and this whole valley join in one simultaneous and triumphant shout--"Glory to the Lamb"?

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First Association in Illinois
The Illinois Union.

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The first Association in Illinois.
Having sketched the origin of the first Churches in Illinois, as definitely as the information at my command will permit, I came to the period when it was thought advisable for the few then existing, to become associated, after the manner of older churches of the denomination, in older sections of our common country.

The first Association, sometimes called, "The Illinois Union", was organized the third Friday in June, 1807, of five churches namely: New Design, Mississippi Bottom, Richland, Wood-River and Silver Creek. When united they numbered 62 members. And there were belonging to the churches three ordained ministers: David Badgeley, Joseph Chance and William Jones.

The New Design and the Richland Churches had previously belonged to the Green River Association

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in Kentucky.

The Association was organized on the basis of the following "Summary of Principles", adopted by a meeting in January, 1807, held a the house of Anthony Badgeley, in the Mississippi Bottom, to which reference has heretofore been made. These Principles were afterwards approved by the churches, and prior to the organization of the Association.

Principles

"1. There is one only true God;--Father, Son and Holy Spirit.
We believe, that the Old and New Testaments, are the Word of God, and the only rule of Faith and Practice.
We believe that by nature we are all fallen and depraved creatures.
That salvation, regeneration, sanctification are by the life, death, resurrection and ascension of Jesus Christ.

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5. That saints will finally persevere through grace to glory.
That believer's baptism by immersion is necessary to the receiving the Lord's Supper.
That the salvation of the righteous, and the punishment of the wicked are eternal.
We believe that no ministers ought to administer the ordinances until they come under the imposition of hands.
That it is our duty to be tender and affectionate to each other, and study the happiness of the children of God in general, and be engaged singly to promote the glory of God.
We believe in election by grace.
We believe that it is our duty to commune with orderly Baptists.
That each church may keep its own Government as to them (it) may seem best."

The Association held two sessions each year--one in June, the other in October. The Minutes of the first the organizing session, unfortunately have not been obtained.

Mr. Peck thus speaks, in his sketch of the South District

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Association, of this Association, The Illinois Union, and its organization: "As a part of the Churches and brethren were conscientiously opposed to slavery, it was tacitly agreed in the ‘Union’, that correspondence should not be carried into Kentucky."

Although the minutes of this first session cannot be found, I am fortunate in obtaining those of the second, and those following for some years. There is reason to suppose that the "Summary of Principles" did not contain all the Rules which were adopted in the organization of the body, for its Government; as both Constitution and Rules of Decorum are referred to in subsequent proceedings.

The Second session of this Association was held at the house of Isaac Enoch's, in Richland Creek Church, St. Clair Co. Indiana Territory, commencing on Friday, Oct. 9, 1807, and closing on Lord's day, the 11th.

As the minutes if this meeting are before me, I will transcribe then, and thus furnish the reader with the order of Associations proceedings at an early day in Illinois.

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1807.
Minutes of Illinois Association of baptists holden at Isaac Enoch's in Richland Creek Church, St. Clair Co. Indiana teritory on Friday the 9th of October, 1807, and continued by ajournment Sunday 11th.

Friday the 9th at 12 o'clock, Elder David Badgeley delivered the Entroductory Sermond form John the 3d and 16th for God so loved the world that he gave his only begotten son that whosoever believeth on him should not perish, but have Everlasting life.

After Sermond Businys was op'ned with Prayer. Elder Wm¨ Jones chosen Moderator. Letters from the Churches was read their Mesingers Enrol'd and a list of their number taken which are as follows:

Churches   Rec. by Experience Rec. by Letter Excluded Died Total
New Design Wm. Whiteside, Stephen Terry and George Demint 7 1     20
Mississippi Bottom David Badgeley, Geo. Valentine and David Waddle 1       14
Silver Creek Joseph Chance, Edward Radcliff and Abr'm. Teter 5 2     22
Richland James Downen, Rob. Brazle and Wm. Brazle 7 1     19
Wood River Wm. Jones, Isaac Hill and Joseph Cook   2     14
Kaine Spring John Hendrixon and Wm. Null        17
 
Richland Creek James Lemen, Wm. L. Whiteside, Isaac Enochs         17
Total   20 6     113

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Letters from the two last mentioned churches. Requesting admittance into the assosiation was read--the said churches admitted, their mesingers names Eurold, and a list of their numbers taken. Elder David Badgeley, Elder Joseph Chance, Elder John Hendrixon on and James Downen with the Moderator and Clerk was chosen a select committee to arrange the businys of the assosiation and make report.

Ajourned til 3 o' clock.

Met acording to ajournment at 3 o' clock the select committee made report
1st. The matter of the friend Henry Walker which was laid over from last assosiation to be done something with.
2d. The request of the Richland Church to be taken up.
3d. Some to be appointed to Examine the fund and make report to the association.
4th. A query by the committee to know how Excommunicates from foreign countryes is to be receiv'd.
5th. that some be apointed to preach the Entroductory sermond.
7th. that a time and place be apointed for the next assosiation.
8th. that the clerk be alowd out of the fund for his services.

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The Committee ajourned.

The assosiation met acording to ajournment the committee made their report which was taken up in order.
1st. The matter of the friend Henry Walker by the voice of the whole thrown out.
2d. The Request of the richland church which was to send them supplyes of preachers was taken up and laid on the preachers to appoint the times themselves.
3d. That Isaac Enochs and Stephen Terry be apointed to Examine the fund and make report. They Report that they find in the treasury $6.62 1/2.
4th. it is answer'd That the Excommunicates shall give satisfaction to the church from whence They ware Excluded and if that cannot be come at conveniently the church to whom aplication has been made shall write to the church who Excluded such aplicant requesting the charge to be Exhibited with a request to have the privilege of acting in the matter but if the church should be desolv'd Then the church to whom aplication has been made by the Excluded Member shall be clear in taking it up and acting as to them shall seem right.
5th. an amendment to the 16th article of decorum that the

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Moderator shall not give his judgment until the voice of the assosiation is Taken and further the moderator shall not have a vote Except the association be Equally divided in opinion.
6th. any person speaking in disorder and neglecting or refusing to hear the moderator shall be taken under dealing.
7th. Order'd that the clerk be alow'd 25 cents for Each coppy of minutes of the assosiation.
8th. agreed that Elder Joseph Chance be apointed to preach the Entroductory Sermond at the next assosiation and in case of failure Elder John Hendrixon.
9th. Order'd that our next assosiation be at James Lemen's on the second friday saturday and sabbath in June 1808.
10th. agree'd that the name of our assosiation be called the Illinoy assosiation.
11th. order'd that Wm. Whiteside be appointed to keep the fund signed by order Wm. Jones Mod. and Wm. Whiteside Clerk.

Minutes of the Illinoy assosiation of Baptists begun and held at James Lemems in the new design St. Clair County Indiana Teritory on Friday the 10th of June 1808 and continu'ed by ajournment until saturday the 11th On Friday at 12 o' clock

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Elder Joseph Chance preached the introductory sermond from John 21st and 15 "Simon son of Jonas lovest thou me more than these". After Sermond businys was opnd with prayer. Joseph Chance, Moderator; letters from 7 churches was read their Mesingers names Enrol'd and a list of their names taken which are as follows: viz.
Churches   Rec. by Experience Rec. by Letter Excluded Dead Numbers
New Design John Griffin, Stephen Terry and George Demint 10       29
Silver Creek Jos. Chance, Jas. Garetson and Edw. Radcliff 6 3     29
Miss. Bottom David Waddell, George Valentine and A. J. Badgeley 4   4   14
Richland Creek John Steel, B. Ogle and Isaac Enochs 4 4     25
Richland Robt. Brazle, Wm. Brazle and James Downen 2 5     24
Wood River Joseph While, John Finley and Wm. Jones         15
Kainspring John Nicols, Thomas Comstock and John Hendrixon 1      8
 
Total   28 12 4   144

A select committee was chosen to arrange the businys of the Assosiation, viz; John Griffin, Isaac Enochs, Edw. Radcliff, Geo. Valentine, Jas. Downen, Jno. Hendrixon and Wm. Jones with the Moderator and clerk. ajourned until tomorrow at 8 o' clock. The committee met at 3 o' clock and finding nothing

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from the letters of the different churches only a request from the church at Wood river to have our next assosiation to be holden at the meeting house in wood river church--a petition by the deligates of the Richland church to the assosiation to ordain John Baugh as a preacher of the Gospel.

A query from the deligates of the Kainspring church whether it is right to Exclude a public Man and Restore him to his membership and also to his publick gift without helps from sister churches--a query from the wood river church to know what is to be done with a member who transgresses before the world and comes forward and confesses part and not (what the world says) is the whole.

A query by the committee is there any society of people professing Christianity that we (Baptists) can receive into church fellowship and they never submit themselves to the ordinance of Baptism in that way which we believe to be right and if there is who are they. the committee ajourned til tomorrow 7 o' clock.

Met acording to ajourn't on Saturday 11th after divine worship a query fro the arm of the Richland church--an Enquiry to know what is to be done with David Badgeley concerning his credentials.

A proposition or request to take into consideration some plan to supply Every place with preaching that no lack be in any place--proposition that the assosiation make some Rules for the better organization of our assosiation. A proposition by the wood river church concerning a letter from South Carolina concerning Thomas Musick. Some to be apointed to Examine the fund and make report. That something be said about an Entroductory sermond at the next assosiation the committee ahourn'd.

The assosiation Met acording to ajournment after divine worship proceeded to businys.

1st. a notion made to propose the apointing the place for holiday our next assosiation until the close of this meeting Laid over.
2d. a proposition to work on the ordination of John Baugh laid on Elders. Joseph Chance, John Hendrickson and Wm¨ Jones to be a presbytery for that businys caried and laid on the presbytery to apoint the time themselves.
3d. the query from the Kainspring it is advised by the assosiation that his membership may be restored by the church to whom he belong'd But as the advice of this council

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they had best call helps to restore him to his publick gift
4th. the query from the wood river church to be taken up and left to Each church to act concerning testimony as to them seem best
5th. a query by the arm of the richland church concerning disorderly members from other churches thrown out
6th. The matter concerning David Badgeley's credentials agreed that he keep them until the next meeting of the church where he was a member
7th. a proposition to supply the different churches taken up and agreed to send two together left to the clerk to nominate and apoint them as follows
Joseph Chance and James Lemen
Wm. Jones and Joseph Lemen
John Hendrickson and Benj. Ogle
John Bauhg and Robt. Brazle
8th. A motion made concerning preaching the introductory sermond shall stand as moderator until the letters is rec'd and read and then a moderator shall be chosen by private ballot.
10th. the letter from South carolina taken up and read
11th. it is the opinion of this advisory council that it is disorder to invite or suffer any disorderly Baptist to preach in our houses of to countenance them in it
12th Brethren Wm. Jones and Isaac Enochs apointed to Examine the fund they report they find in the hands of the treasurer $1.87 1/2
13th. Order'd that our next assosiation be holden on the first saturday and sabath and the friday before in October 1808 at the Meeting house in wood river church.
14th. query is there any society of people professing Christianity that we (Baptists) can receive into church fellowship and they never submitted themselves to the ordinance of Baptism in that way that we believe to be right and if there is who are they answered we know of none
Signed by order
Joseph Chance Moderator and William Whiteside Clerk

In the minutes of the two session copied the spelling and the use of Capital letters are as found in the originals.
J. D. Cole

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The second meeting in 1808. J. D. Cole.

Minutes of the Illinois Association of Baptists held in the Wood River Meeting house, St. Clair County, Indiana Territory on Friday the 30th of September, ano do, 1808, and continued by adjournment until Sunday the 2nd of October.

Friday Elder John Hendrickson preached the introductory sermon form 2.Cor. 5:20 "Now then we are embassadors of Christ" etc. After divine worship letters were received from the different churches, their names enrolled and a list of their numbers taken as follows:

Churches   Rec. by Experience Rec. by Letter Dismissed Excluded Dead Numbers
New Design Geo. Dement, Jas. Lemen, Jr., and S. Terry 2         30
Silver Creek Joseph Chance, J. Garetson and Peter Mitchell 1         30
Miss. Bottom David Waddell, Ant. J. Badgeley and Geo. Valentine     5     7
Richland Creek Jas. Lemen, Sr., Isaac Enochs and Ben. Ogle           26
Richland John Baugh and Rob. Brazle.(Letter not present)            
Wood River Wm. Jones, Joseph White and John Findley 1         16
Kain Spring John Hendrickson          8
 
Feefe's Creek Abm. Misick and James Richardson           11
Total   4   5   8 128

N. B. This last chh. appears here first, but there is no mention of its reception. J. D. C.

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The letter from the Richland Church was started to come and failed and the messengers took their seats as above.

A select committee was chosen to arrange the business of the Association; viz. Wm. Jones, Joseph Chance, and John Baugh with the Moderator and Clerk. Adjourned till tomorrow morning 9 o' clock.

Saturday, October the 1st, the association met persuant to adjournment. After divine worship the committee made their report, which was received and taken up in order as follows;
1st. A remonstrance from Wood River Church against sending their preacher into the circuit.
2d. The request to have the letters forwarded as soon as possible.
3d. A query by the committee Is it the duty of the Association to send a preacher to fill the stand if requested by the people?
4th. A query. Is it consistent with the gospel for a brother Baptist to go to law with a brother in the Union before taking gospel steps and if it is in what case.
5th. What way will this Association adopt for the receiving

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of queries?
6th. Some person to examine the fund and make report.
7th. When and where shall our next association be holden.
8th. Feefee's Creek Church desires this association to consider them with their ministerial helps.

1st. The motion concerning sending preachers into the circuit disanulled.
2d. The query of brother going to law with brother laid over to the next association.
3d. Answered that no query shall be received except it be by the authority of a church, or when the committee is queried by themselves.
4th. The examination of the fund passed over.
5th. The association to be holden at Silver Creek meeting house on the third Saturday in June next and Sabbath and Monday following.
6th. The request of the church at Feefee's Creek taken up and answered that the church shall be supplied monthly until next association by one preacher.
7th. The matter of the friend Thomas Musick taken up and considered, and it is the opinion of this association

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that he be taken into fellowship of this body of Baptists, and that if in future any further testimony shall come forward to convince this body of people that he was guilty of fornication they are to give him up to be as he was before, for we believe the testimony of Margaret Bridges was not sufficient to exclude the said Thomas Musick upon.
8th. The matter of the friend David Badgeley taken up and be received into fellowship on his acknowledgement.
Adjourned.
Signed by order of the association.
John Hendrickson, Moderator.
Wm. Whiteside, Clerk.

First meeting in 1809. J. D. Cole
At an association of Baptists; begun, and held at Silver Creek meeting house, on Saturday, the 17th of June, ano domino 1809; where Elder John Baugh preached the introductory sermon from Rev. 12:4. "And his tail drew the third part of the Stars of heaven, and did cast them to the earth:" etc.

After divine worship, John Baugh, Moderator; proceeded to business. Letters from eight churches were read,

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their messengers names enrolled, and a list of their numbers taken as follows:
Churches Messengers Names Rec. by Experience Rec. by Letter Dismissed Excluded Dead Numbers
New Design S. Terry, G. Dement and James Lemen 1   2     29
Silver Creek J. Chance, Jas. Garetson and M. Short 5 1 1   2 33
Richland Wm. Little, Jas. Downen and J. Baugh 1 4 15 3   14
Miss. Bottom Geo. Valentine, J. Henderson and D. Waddle 2   4     10
Wood River Jas. Gilham, J. Findley and Wm. Jones           19
Richland Creek L. Rutherford, Isaac Enochs and B. Ogle 8 3   1   39
Feefee's Creek Thos. R. Musick, Lewis Martin and Alexr. Clark   3 1     18
Kain Spring John Hendrickson 1         8
Looking Glass Prairie Rob. Brazle, V. Brazle and Wm. Brazle           9
Cold Water John Allen, Jacob Eastwood           9
Total   18 11 23 4 2 188

N.B. The last two mentioned churches were lately constitued and prayed admittance into the association, were received and their messengers took their seats as above.

A select Committee was chosen to arrange the business of the association. Adjourned until Monday morning 8 o'clock. When the association met, and after divine worship proceeded to business. The report of the Committee

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was called for, was received, and taken up in order.
1st. The query from the last association was taken up and thrown out.
2d. The question from Silver Creek called and voted out.
3d. The query from Kain Spring called and answered in the affirmative.
4th. The queries from Richland Creek called. 1st Query answered; we believe an association is an advisory council. 2d Query; we believe the aPostolic manner of setting men forward to the ministry was first, to find the gift in the man; and then if thought fit, by the presbytery set at liberty by laying on of hands.
5th. A request from Cold Water Church for ministerial helps; answered, we will strive to help them.
6th. In answer to the Mississippi Bottom request; we will try to help them.
7th. Brother J. Downen and S. Terry appointed to examine the fund and make report. They find the association in arears five shillings and three pence. The association allowed the Clerk one month to furnish the copies, and each church to send for their copy.
8th. Our next association to be holden in the Mississippi Bottom beginning on Friday before the first Saturday in October at the School house near James Garetson's.
Signed by order of the association.
John Baugh, Moderator.
Wm. Whiteside, Clerk.

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Second meeting of 1809. J. D. Cole
The first Friday in October, 1809 the Association met at the School house near Bro. Garetson's in the Mississippi Bottom, where the introductory sermon was delivered by Elder Robert Brazle, from 2. Chron. 4:3, 4, and 5.

After divine service, Bro. Brazle, Moderator, proceeded to business. The Association divided asunder, and the party desiring to support the General Union of United Baptists at large being assembled chose Br. Wm. Jones clerk and proceeded to business. Letters from 5 churches were received, their messengers names enrolled and a list of their numbers taken.

Churches Messengers Rec. by Experience Rec. by Letter Dismissed Excluded Dead Numbers
Miss. Bottom Geo. Valentine, D. Badgeley           11
Wood River John _______, Wm. Jones           28
Cold Water James Allen, Wm. Patterson 2         11
Looking Glass Prairie Wm. Brazle, Val. Brazle, Rob. Brazle           9
Feefee's Creek Rich. Sullen, Jas. Walton, Alex Clark 7 1       37
Total   9 1       96

A select committee was chosen to arrange the business of the Association, viz. D. Badgeley with the Moderator and Clerk.

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The Committee made their report and it was received.
1st. An amendment to the Union in the 12 article. We think that no church have any right to make any rule to cross the Union of the United Baptist at large.
2d. Query from the Bottom Church. Is it right for a church to give letters of dismission. If so on what ground? Answer;--We believe it right to give letters in case of the person moving out of the bounds, or wanting to join a church nearer to them of the same faith and order.
3d. The request from Wood River concerning Br. Musick laid over to the next Association
4th. We believe it right not to commune with those who have left the General Union at large.
5th. Agreed that our next association be held at Wood River meeting house on the Friday before the first Saturday in December.
Signed by order.
Robert Brazlle, Moderator.
Wm. Jones, Clerk.

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The record copied on the previous pages simply mentions the fact that the Association divided. From other sources I learned the fact that the division was on the question of correspondence with Associations I the Southern States where slavery prevailed, and was tolerated in the churches. On the part of the advocates of correspondence it was a violation of a tacit agreement at the beginning that such correspondence should not be opened. And this is the party that organized after the division. The pro slavery party.

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The third meeting in 1809. J. D. Cole
Minutes of the Illinois Association of Baptists convened at Wood River meeting house, St. Clair County, December, 1st Friday, 1809.

Elder David Badgeley delivered the introductory sermon from Rom. 3:9. "What then? Are we better than they? etc.
1st. David Badgeley was chosen Moderator and Wm. Jones Clerk.
2d. Letters from 6 churches were read and their delegates names enrolled.

Churches Messengers Rec. by Experience Rec. by Letter Dismissed Excluded Dead Numbers
Looking Glass Prairie Wm. Brazle, Valentine Brazle           9
Wood River Joseph White, John Russel, Wm. Jones            
Miss. Bottom D. Badgeley, Geo. Valentine, D. Waddle            
Cold Water Wm. Patterson, Jacob Eastwood           11
Silver Creek Dan. Stookey, Joseph Carr, M. Short            
Feefee's Creek Thos. R. Musick, Eli Musick, Alexr. Clark 1 1     1 39
Total   1 1     59  

3d. A committee was chosen to arrange the business of the Association namely; Wm. Brazle, Jacob Eastwood, Dan. Stookey, Thos. R. Musick with the Moderator and Clerk.
4th. Adjourned until tomorrow morning 9 o' clock.
5th. The Association met on Saturday morning

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according to adjournment, and the committee made their report, which was received.
6th. The reference from last Association thrown out.
7th. Cold Water request for visits to be paid them is left to the preachers.
8th. The Association appoints T. R. Musick, Rob. Brazle, David Badgeley, David Waddle, Moses Short, Wm. Brazle, John Finley and Wm. Jones to meet with the different churches to help them in their present distresses, to establish those that wish to live with the United Baptists, and if need be to constitute churches. The first meeting to be held with the Bottom Church on the 12 of February next at Daniel _______. The 13th at New Design; the 15th at Silver Creek, at Joseph Carrs; the 16th at Richland Creek, at Larkin Rutherford's; the 17th at Richland, at John Phillips'; the 18th at Looking Glass Prairie at Robert Brazle's; the 19th at Wood River.
9th. Advice to each church to send paper to the next association to write their own minutes on.
10th. Agreed to appoint some person to preach an introductory

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sermon at the next association.
11th. Concerning a corresponding letter laid over to next association.
12th. Next association is appointed at Feefee's Creek, Friday before the 2nd Saturday in October next.
13th. Appointed Br. Wm¨ Jones to preach the introductory sermon, and in case of failure Br. David Badgeley.
Signed by order,
David Badgeley, Moderator.
Wm. Jones, Clerk.

Minutes of 1811--September Meeting
Minutes of Illinois Association of Baptist held at the Looking Glass Prairie church the Saturday before the 4th Sabbath in September, 1811.

1st. The introductory sermon by Elder James Reutfro from 1.Pet.4:12, 13. "Beloved, think it not strange concerning the fury trial which is to try you," etc.
2d. Letters were received from 3 churches, read and delegates were unrolled.

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Looking Glass Prairie letter failed but delegates took seats.
Churches Messengers Rec. by Experience Rec. by Letter Dismissed Dead Numbers
Ogle's Creek David Badgeley, James Reufrew   11 2 1 19
Shoal Creek Wm. Jones, John Finley   8     11
Wood River James Buman         26
Looking Glass Prairie Robert Brazle and B. Chapman          
Total     19 2 1 56

3d. Elder Wm. Jones, Moderator. Robert Brazle, Clerk.
4th. The committee of the whole appointed to arrange the business of the Association.
5th. The report received and attended to accordingly.
6th. A request from the Wood River church, being destitute of a minister, for ministerial helps.
Elder James Reufrow appointed to attend the 5 first months, Elder David Badgeley the next 3 months, Elder Robert Brazle the next two months, Elder William Jones the next two months.
7th. A request from Ogle's Creek church to soften the matter concerning the emancipation preachers. Referred.
8th. Bro. James Reufrow appointed to notify the Bottom church, and Turkey Hill church; and James Buman to notify Feefee's Creek, and Cold Water church when and where our next association is to be held.
9th. We appoint our next association at Bro. David Badgeley's the Friday before the 4th

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Sabbath in November next, (1811); and that Thos. Musick preach the introductory sermon; or, in case of failure Elder Nathan Arnot.
10th. We recommend to the churches to make known their liberality by sending some money to the next meeting to pay the expenses of the same.
11th. Adjourned to time and place above mentioned.
Signed by order of the Association
Wm. Jones, Moderator.
Rob. Brazle, Clerk.

Minutes of the Association. Nov. 1811.
Minutes of the Illinoys Association of Baptists holden at Bro. David Badgeley's, in St. Clair Co. Illinois Ter. on Nov. 22, 23, 24, in 1811.

1. The introductory sermon was delivered by Eld. Thos. R. Musick from Isa. 61:1, "The Spirit of the Lord God is upon me;" etc.
2. Letters from six (6) churches were read and their messengers and names enrolled.

Churches Messengers Rec. by Experience Rec. by Letter Dismissed Excluded Dead Numbers
Feefee's Creek Thos. R. Musick, Christian T. Haltebrand, Jno McDonough and from an arm Seth Emmons 58   12 1 1 82
Cold Water David Burk 3         9
Wood River Jas. Buman, George Moore           24
Miss. Bottom G. Valentine, D. Waddle           6
Looking Glass Prairie Rob. Blazel, Wm. Blazel     2 1   6
Ogle's Creek D. Badgeley, Jas. Reutfro 1 3       23

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The Turkey Hill and Shoal Creek letters failed but brethren Nathan Arnot and Wm. Jones being present took seats with us.
3d. Bro. Thos. R. Musick chosen Moderator and James Reutfro, Clerk.
4th. The following brethren appointed to arrange the business of the Association Wm. Jones, R. Brazel, D. Badgeley, Seth Emmons, G. Moore, N. Arnot, G. Valentine, D. Burk with the Moderator and Clerk.
5. Adjourned til tomorrow 9 o' clock.
Nov. 23. The Association met pursuant to the adjournment, and after worship proceeded to

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business.

1st. The arrangement received and the committee discharged.
2d. A reference from the last Association considered; in answer to which, to relieve the minds of any that may not understand us, we say, we did not, nor do not, mean the rule concerning the emancipating preachers to extend to any that have not departed from the General Union, or given hurts by disorderly conduct.
3d. A request from Feefee's Creek for ministerial helps to ordain a minister. The association appoints D. Badgeley, N. Arnott, and J. Reutfro for that purpose.
4th. The case of the Bottom Church considered, they being destitute of a minister, the following brethren agree to tend them. J. Reutfro in Dec. Feb. and March, July and Aug. R. Brazel in Jan. and April. T. R. Musick in May and June.
5th. To inquire concerning money sent from the churches. Feefee's Creek $1.37 1/2, Ogle's Creek, 50, Wood River, 75; Bottom, 50; Cold Water, 50. Bro. J. Reutfro appointed treasurer, and also appointed to

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procure a book and record the Constitution and all the business done by this Association therein and bring it to the next Association.
6th. Bro. Wm. Jones appointed to prepare a Circular Letter for the next association for their inspection.
7th. The following brethren appointed to preach tomorrow T. R. Musick, N. Arnot and J. Reutfro and that worship begin at 10 o' clock.
8th. The next association to commune on the 3 Friday in September next and that it be holden at Bro Ellick Clerk's in Louisiana Ter. (now Missouri) and that Bro. N. Arnot preach the introductory sermon and in case of failure Bro Jas. Reutfro.
9th. Adjourned to the time and place above mentioned.
Signed by order of the Association.
Thos. R. Musick, Moderator.
Jas. Reutfro, Clerk.

Minutes of August 1813.
Minutes of the Illinois Association holden at Wood River meeting house, Illinois ter. Madison County, August 27-29, 1813.

1st. The introductory sermon delivered by brother Arnett from Psalm 126:6 "He that goeth forth and weepeth," etc.
2d. Letters from seven churches were read and their Messengers names enrolled.

Churches Messengers Names Rec. by Experience Rec. by Letter Dismissed Excluded Dead Numbers
Negrow Fork Abram. Helterbrand, Seth Emmons 1 1   1 2 12
Feefee's Creek Jno. Howdershell, R. Sullin, T. R. Musick     10 8 2 59
Looking Glass Prairie Robert Brazel       1   6
Turkey Hill Nathan Arnett       1 1 31
Ogle's Creek Rob. Stockton 1 10 6 2   66
Wood River Jas. Buman, Jno. Russel, Jas. White 1     1   24
Shoal Creek William Jones           8
Total   3 11 16 14 5 206

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3d. Brother Arnett chosen Moderator.
4th. A committee chosen to arrange the business of the Association, and make report tomorrow 9 o' clock. Brethren Jones, Brazel, Emmons with the Moderator and Clerk.
5th. Brother Rob. Stockton chosen treasurer pro. tem for the Asso'n. Contributions from the several churches $5.37 1/2 to defray the expenses of the Asso'n.
6th. Delegates met according to adjournment. The proceedings of the committee called for and read and the committee discharged.
7th. The Circular Letter called for read and received.
8th. Brethren Jones, Arnett and Mesick appointed to preach tomorrow.

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9th. Bro. Arnett appointed to prepare a Circular Letter for next Asso'n.
10th. The next Asso'n. to be holden at Bro. T. R. Musick's, and to commence on the 4th Friday in September 1814.
11th. Bro. Rob. Brazel appointed to preach the introductory sermon at the next Asso'n., in case of failure Bro. Seth Emmons.
The Association appointed Bro. Howdershall to examine the fund, pay the charges and return the overpluss to the treasurer. He reports after the expense is paid there remained $2.37 1/2.

The Circular Letter here received and written in the Minutes is the first I think that the Asso'n. ever had written. As a novelty I copy it. J. D. Cole.

Circular Letter.

The messengers composing the Illinois Association holden at Wood River Meeting house the 27, 28 and 29th of Aug. 1813. To the churches whom we represent, sendeth Christian salutation. Dear Brethren, From the accounts in the letters, and the very small additions &c since our last Asso'n. it appears to be a time of general decleusion in religion--a time when integrity abounds and the love of many waxes cold. Ought not this to be a matter of lamentation, and yet we fear there are but few that so sincerely lament it.
It is said in the scripture that much

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increase is by the strength of the Ox. O, brethren, what is the matter? Do you use your oxen well to make them strong? Do you pray for them? Do you endeavor to strengthen them by a due attendance on their appointments when in your power, and endeavor to practice what they teach you? "Wo to them that are at ease in zion." It is awful for professors of religion to grow so much Galleo like, as to care for none of these things. Brethren, we wish to rouse your feeling for there is need, and when you view the awful gloomy situation we are in don't let despair overwhelm your minds so as to discourage you. Remember, King John reigns and his love is as great, as when he sweated in Gethsemane, or bled in Calvary, shall he love us so much undeservedly, and we love him none, or but little? O let us try to search after his beauty, his glory and excellency and endeavor to love him because he first loved us. And then when we love him his yoke will be easy, and his commands delightful. Especially the new command to love one another. Yea, surely, is we love Jesus we shall love those that bear his image where ever we find it. This is charity, that one of the apostle says, covers a multitude of sins; and another says without it, I am nothing. This would lead us to make all reasonable allowance for human frailty, or the depravity of nature,--to take admonition kindly from each other, and to pray for each

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other that the grace of God may abound. Which may God grant for Christ's sake. Amen." Written by Wm. Jones
J. D. Cole.
Nathan Arnett, Moderator.
Thos. R. Musick, Clerk.

Minutes of Sep. 1814. J. D. Cole
Minutes of the Illinois Association holden at Elder Thos. R. Musick's, in St. Louis Co. Missouri Ter., the 23, 24, 25th of Sep. 1814.

1st. Eld. D. Badgeley preached the introductory sermon, from John 10:14. "I am the good shepherd, and know my sheep, and am known of mine."
2d. Eld. Badgeley was chosen Moderator.
3d. Letters from 8 churches were received and the names of delegates were enrolled.

Churches Delegates Numbers
Feefee's Creek T. R. Musick, Wm. Walton, ________ Hubbard, R. Sullen 32
Wood River George Moore 20
Ogle's Creek David Badgeley, David Sample 53
Negrow Fork Abra'm. Holterbrand 11
Cold Water Chas Collard, Jno. McDonald, Thos Ellace 14
Femme Osage David Dask, Thos¨ Smith 14
Prairie Delong Wm¨ Thompson 10
Beauf Lewis Williams, James Sullen, Wm. Hensen 17
Total   171

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4th. The committee chosen to arrange the business of the Asso'n. and to make report tomorrow, at 10 o' clock. Charles Hubart, Geo. Moore, David Sample, A. Helterbrand, Thos. Ellace, Thos. Smith, Jas. Sullen with Moderator and Clerk.
5th. The liberality of the churches was $4.75.
6th. Thos. R. Musick chosen treasurer for the Asso'n. pro tem.
7th. Adjourned until tomorrow 10 o' clock.
8th. Saturday the delegates met according to adjournment and proceeded to business as follows;
9th. The Committee called on to make their report; it is received and the committee discharged.
10th. The petition from Prairie de Long taken up. The church beg to be admitted into the Asso'n. Was received, and beg also ministers to visit them. Bro. John McDonald is to visit then at their November meeting; which is the 2nd Saturday in each month.
11th. The Femme Osage Church begs admittance into the Asso'n. Was received.
12th. Who to write the Circular Letter for next Asso'n.? Answer, Bro. T. R. Musick.
13th. Bro. John McDonald appointed to examine the fund and make report; after examination he pays the expenses of the

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Asso'n. and reports there $1.75.
14th. When and where the next Asso'n. is to be holden. Answer at Bro. David Badgeleys, in Illinois Ter. St. Clair Co., and to begin the Friday before the 3rd Lord's day in Sep. 1815.
15th. Who preach the introductory sermon? Answer, Bro. Lewis Williams, and in case of failure Bro John McDonald.
16th. Bro J. McDonald appointed to search the general fund and make report at next Asso'n.
17th. Minutes read and approved. Signed by order of Asso'n.
David Badgeley, Moderator.
Thos. R. Musick, Clerk.

Minutes of Sep. 1817. J. D. Cole
Minutes of the Illinois Association of United Baptists holden at Wood River meeting house, begun the 4th Friday in Sep. 1817, and continued by adjournments until Sunday evening following.

1st. Bro. Charles Collard preached the introductory sermon from 1.Johns 2:23. "Who so denieth the Son,"etc.
2d. Letters from 9 churches were read, and the names of their delegates were enrolled.

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Churches Delegates Numbers
Ogle's Creek Beunet Millen, Wm. Johnson, D. Badgeley 29
Prairie De Long Wm. Thompson 13
Cold Water John Allen 17
Femme Osage Flandes Caleway, Dan. Colgan 14
Negrow Fork Samuel Grayham, Lewis Williams 16
Beauff Charles Collard, Jas. Greenstreet, Jas. Brown  
Looking Glass Prairie Rob. Brazel, Wm. Brazel 15
Feefee's Creek Thos. R. Musick, Jno. Howdershall, Richard Sullen 52
Wood River Jas. Beman, Jno. Finley, Wm. Jones  
Total   156

3d. Three churches by letters and delegates beg admission into the Asso'n. They were Rec'd.

Canteen Creek Alexander Conlee, J. Guiterman, Alex'r. Still 39
Upper Quiver Chas Hubbard, John Null  
Shoal Creek Wm. Roberts 14
Total   209

4th. Bro Collard chosen Moderator. Liberality of the churches taken.

Prairie de Long $1.62 1/2
Cold Water 1.25
Femme Osage 3.00
Looking Glass Prairie 1.00
Feefee's Creek 2.50
Negrow Creek 1.25
Total $10.62 1/2
Beauff $1.00
Wood River 1.00
Ogle's Creek 3.00
Upper Quiver 2.00
Canteen Creek 1.62 1/2
Shoal Creek 1.00
Total $9.62 1/2

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5th. A Committee chosen to arrange the business of the Asso'n. and make report tomorrow, at 9 o'clock, consisting of Bro Jones, Brazel and Williams with Moderator and Clerk.

The Association met according to adjournment, and proceeded as follows
1st. The proceedings of the Committee called for, and received, and the Committee discharged.
2d. The man appointed to write the Circular Letter last year failed, and Bro. Collard appointed to write it and bring it forward.
3d. The Rules of Decorum were read as requested.
4th. shall we continue as the last Association appointed, to correspond with the Wabash Asso'n.? We shall.
5th. The letter that Bro. Rob. Brazel was to write last Asso'n. called for, read and received.
6th. The corresponding Letter called for read and received.
7th. It is thought necessary that a copy of the letter that Bro Rob. Brazel wrote to be kept Bro. Jones and Bro. Rob. to write it.
8th. It is thought right that our delegates be compensated and

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that they have ten dollars each.
9th. Men appointed to examine the fund and make report:--Report $25.00.
10th. Mount Pleasant begs dismission from this Asso'n. The Clerk is appointed to write them a letter of dismission.
11th. The request of Wood River Church taken up. Requesting to divide this Association into two Associations that the other or west side of the Mississippi be a separate association and that it bear the name of the Missouri Association. It is carried.
12th. Appoints the first Association, the Friday before the 4th Lord's day in November next, at Thos. R. Musick's old place.
13th. Wm. Brazel and Rob. Brazel to write a corresponding letter to the Missouri Association, and the same brethren to attend.
14th. The request of Cold Water, Prairie de Long, and Upper Quiver, requesting preachers to be sent to them. It is left to the discretion of the preachers.
15th. The Asso'n. appoints that the Clerk furnish this Association with one copy of the Minutes, and the other side of the River with one.
16th. Bro. Williams appointed to preach the introductory Sermon for the Missouri Asso'n. and in case of failure Bro.

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T. R. Musick.
17th. When and where the next Asso'n. to be holden? It is to be holden the Friday before the 2nd Lord's day in October, 1818 at Job Badgeley's, St. Clair Co. Illinois Ter. and Wm. Brazel to preach the introductory sermon, and in case of failure, Bro. Rob. Brazel. And Bro. Jones to write the Circular Letter for next Asso'n.
18th. The Asso'n. releases our treasurer from collecting the money from past treasurer.

The proceedings of the Asso'n. were read, received and signed by order and adjourned.
Charles Collard, Moderator.
Thos. R. Musick, Clerk.

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1821.
Saturday, August 25th 1821.
Minutes of the United Baptist Illinois Association, held at the Meeting-House at Richland Creek Church, on the fourth Saturday of August, the 25th, 1821, and following days.

1. According to appointment the Association met. Brother James Street preached the Introductory sermon, from 2.Tim.4:2. "Preach the word; be instant in season, out of season;" etc.
2. Brother William Jones chosen Moderator, and James Tunnel, Clerk.
3. See Table of Churches over the leaf.

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Table
Counties Churches Delegates Baptism Rec. by Letter Dismissed Restored Excluded Died No. Members Time of Church Meeting
Madison Cantine Creek David Sample, Alexander Conlee, Samuel Wood 1 5 2 1 1   57 4th
Bond Shoal Creek Edward Boze 1 3 7       21 4th
Madison Wood River William Jones, James Tunnell, John Vicery   1         35 1st
St. Clair Ogle's Creek David Badgeley, Burnett Million, Rison Moore   3     1   28 30
St. Clair Prairie de Long   2 1         17 4th
St. Clair Looking Glass Prairie John Riggin, Robert Brazil, Wm. Bridges           1 13 2d
Washington Bethel John Roe, John Creel 5 6 9   2 1 18 1st
Monroe Union Daniel Starr, Robert Haskins             6 1st
Total     9 19 18 1 4 2 195  

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Table continued.
Counties Churches Delegates Baptisms Rec. by Letter Dismissed Restored Excluded Died No. Members Time of Church meeting
Washington Elk-horn Israel Strait, Joseph Kinyon 4     1 2   19 3d
St. Clair Richland Creek John L. Whiteside, Wm. L. Whiteside, Wm. McKinney     1       28 2d
Montgomery Hurricane Fork James Street, John Jordan 1 2     2   24 3d
Green Providence Aron Smith, John Finley 1 4         25 2d
St. Clair 12 Mile Prairie Samuel Smith             5 1st
Sangamon Sangamon Claiborne Jones, Simon Lindley 6 7     2   43 1st
Monroe New Design Joseph Chance   1         19 1st
Washington Concord               8 2d
Total     12 14 1 1 6   171  
Prev. Table     9 19 18 1 4 2 195  
Total     21 33 14 2 10 2 366  

The last named church was received at this Association.

4. Corresponding Letter called for, but owing to our Association coming on earlier in the season than

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formerly, we received no intelligence.
5. Brother David Badgeley, Willliam Kinsey and Risdon Moore together with the Moderator and Clerk, be appointed a committee of arrangement.
6. Brother Aron Smith to write a corresponding letter to Wabash Association; Samuel Smith to the Missouri; Alexander Conlee to the Mount Pleasant; and Samuel Wood to the Bethel.
7. The Circular Letter called for, and delivered to the committee of arrangement for inspection.
8. Appointed brethren Aaron Smith, William Jones and James Street to fill the Stand tomorrow.

Adjourned till Monday morning 9 o'clock.

Lord's Day, August 26,
The above named in the following order, viz. Brother Smith from Eph.1:7; brother Jones from Eph.1:2; and brother Street from Isa.3:10, 11; in the evening brother John M. Peck, from 1.Tim.3:15, to large and seemingly well-affected congregations.

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Monday, August 27, 1821.
The Association met according to adjournment, and, after prayer, proceeded to business.
9. The report of the committee read, appointed, and the committee discharged.
10. The committee to which was referred the report of David Badgeley, made last Association, made their report, and the work was approved, and the Clerk authorized to fill it up with the records of the Association to the present time.
11. Corresponding letters called for.
The letter to the Wabash Association read, received, and brethren John Roe and Daniel Willbanks to bear it.
The letter to the Missouri Association read, received, and brethren David Badgeley, William Jones, and Samuel Smith to bear it.
The letter to the Mount Pleasant Association read, received, and brethren Aaron Smith and Alexander Conlee to bear it.
The letter to the Bethel Association read, received,

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and brethren Robert Haskins, and Robert Brazil to bear it.
12. The Circular Letter called for, read and rejected.
13. Appointed brethren William Kinney and James Street to receive and examine the Churches' contributions, who reported $26.68 3/4.
14. Appointed brethren Marshal, Peck, Roe, Rountree and Samuel Smith to attend at Elk-horn on the third Saturday of September next, to settle a distress in that church.
15. In answer to the petitions of the several destitute churches for preachers, we advise them, as the best plan of supplies to call upon any particular preacher or preachers for their time.
16. Query from Ogle's Creek and Richland Creek Churches. "When two churches are constituted in the same settlement, so as to occupy the same meeting-house, what advice would you give"? Answer, that one church dissolve by letter, and join the other.
17. The next Association to be at Wood River

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Church Meeting House on the fourth Saturday in August, 1822.
18. Brother Robert Brazil to preach the Introductory Sermon, and in case of failure, David Badgeley.
19. Agree to print 300 copies of our Minutes, and brother William Kinney superintend the same.
20. Appropriated $6.68 3/4 to the delegates to Mount Pleasant Association.
21. Brother Aaron Smith to write a Circular for next year.
22. Adjourned by prayer, till the 4th Saturday in August, 1822.
(Signed)
William Jones, Moderator.
James Tunnel, Clerk.

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1823.
Providence Church, Greene Co., Sat. Aug. 28.
"The Illinois United Baptist Association" held its annual meeting with the Providence Church, Greene Co., Aug. 23-4-and 5, 1823.

1. According to appointment, Elder Thomas Rhea, delivered the introductory sermon, from Luke 11:30, "For as Jonas was a sign unto the Ninevites, so shall also the son of man be to this generation.""
2. Elder William Jones, chosen Moderator, and James Tunnell, Clerk.
3. Letters from the following churches were read, and the names of their messengers enrolled:

Table
Counties Churches Messengers Names Baptism Rec. by Letter Restored Dismissed Excluded Died Present Members Time of Church Meeting
Madison Canteen Creek Thos. Rhea, Jacob Gunterman, Sam Wood   7   5   1 56 4th
Bond Shoal Creek James Long, John Ellis 2 2 1       22 4th
Madison Wood River Wm. Jones, James Tunnell, Able Moore 2 2   4     24 1st
St. Clair Ogle's Creek A letter but no messenger   2 1 1 17 1 9 3
St. Clair Looking Glass Prairie Wm. Bridges         3 1 9 2
  Bethel Alex Conlee, Isaac Conlee, John Roe 4 5 1 5 1 1 20 1

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Monroe Union A letter but no messenger     2       7 Saturday 1st
Washington Elkhorn Edward Kinian   2     1 18 3d
 
St. Clair Richland Creek Wm. L. Whiteside, Jo's Chance, Wm. Kinney   1   3     18 4
Montgomery Hurricane Fork No intelligence                
Greene Providence Aaron Smith, Jno Finley, John Drum 1 1         25 2
St. Clair 12 Mile Prairie Samuel Smith           1 4 1
Sangamon Sangamon Wm. Roberts, Strother Ball, Geo. Devenport 7 12   18 1 2 41 1
St. Clair Prairie de Long John Ralls 2     1 1 1 16 4
Washington Concord No intelligence;                
Greene Apple Creek Cha's Catching, Wm. Waltrip, Rich'd Griffin 1         1 12 3
Morgan Indian Creek Sam. Bristoe, Gorham Holmes 9 14         40 1
Sangamon Lick Creek Simon Linley, Henry Kinney, Alan Bridges 5 5 2       24 4
Montgomery Clear Spring John Jordan, George Shipman 11 8   3 1   26 2
Morgan Diamond Grove Jonaathon Sweet, Royal Tiff             14 4
Total 20   44 61 7 40 25 9 386  

Note--The three last named churches petitioned and were received this Association.
Note--Ordained Ministers names are in small capitals and licentiate Preachers in italics.

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4th. Received a letter from Rock Spring Church which was referred to the committee of arrangements.
5th. Received a corresponding letter and minutes from the Mount Pleasant Association by the hand of their Messengers, Edward Turner and Wm. Tharp, who were invited, and took their seats with us.

Also a letter and minutes from the Muddy River Association, by the hand of their messenger, Chester Carpenter, who was also invited and took his seat.

Also a letter and minutes from the Missouri Association, by the hand of their messenger John M. Peck, who was invited and took his seat.

The letter referred to the committee of arrangements.

Received no intelligence from the Bethel and Wabash Associations.
6th. The Circular letter called for, and referred to the committee of arrangement for inspection.
7th. Elders Thomas Rhea, Jonathan Sweet, and Samuel Bristoe, together with the Moderator and Clerk, were appointed a committee to arrange the business of the Association.

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8th. Appointed Elder Aaron Smith to write a corresponding letter to the Wabash Association, Elder Wm. Kinney, to the Mount Pleasant, brother Samuel Smith, to the Muddy River, brother Gorham Holmes, to the Bethel, and brother Samuel Wood, to the Missouri Associations.
9th. Elders Wm. Kinney, Samuel Bristoe, John M. Peck, Edward Turner and Chester Carpenter, were appointed to fill the stand tomorrrow.
10th. Adjourned by prayer, until Monday morning, 9 o'clock.

Lord's Day, August 24th.
The undernamed, preached in the following order, to wit: Brother Kinney, from John 5:30. Brother Bristoe from Rom.1:16. Brother Peck, from 1. Cor.15:10. Brother Turner from Solomon's Song 5:16, to a large and apparently attentive congregation.

Monday, August 25th.
The Association met pursuant to adjournment, and after worship proceeded to business.
1. The committee of arrangement made their report, which was approved of and the committee discharged.

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2d. The Circular letter was read and approved, and ordered to be printed.
3d. Brother Kinney and Samuel Smith, were appointed to examine the Association fund, who report as follows: State paper, in the hands of the Treasurer, $14.75. The churches' contributions in specie, $9.12 1/2, in State paper, $31.50; in all, $55.37 1/2.
4th.The Association agrees to receive and dismiss churches by a unanimous voice of churches, but if a minority shall object, they shall give their objection which shall be judged by the Association.
5th. The Association agrees, with regard to correspondence to receive the letter, and if aught be made apparent against the Messenger, if he neglects to give satisfaction, to debar from a seat with us.
6th. We agree to divide the Association and brethren, Thomas Rhea, Abel Moore and Simon Linley, be a committee to designate the line of division, who report that Providence Clear Spring and Hurricane Fork churches, and all the churches north of them, to form a new Association; to hold their first meeting at Lick Creek

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church, Sangamo county, Illinois, on the 4th Saturday of October next, which was agreed to, and Elders Wm. Jones, Wm. Kinney, Thos Rhea, Alex. Conlee, and Jo's chance, were appointed a committee to meet the new Association at their next meeting, to assist them in forming their constitution.
7th. Our next Association to be at Shoal Creek Church meeting house, Bond County, on the 4th Saturday of August, 1824.
8th. Corresponding letters called for; read and approved, as follows, viz: to the Missouri Association, and appointed brother Gorham Holmes and Samuel Smith, messengers to bear it; to the Wabash, and brother J. M. Peck. Agrees to bear it; to the Mount Pleasant, and send it by brethren Edward Turner and Wm. Tharp; to the Muddy River, and appoint brother Wm. Kinney, Alex. Conlee and John Roe, messengers to bear it; and to the Bethel, and appointed Brother Aaron Smith, messenger to bear it.
9th. Appointed brother Jonathan Sweet, Samuel Bristoe, Royal Tiff, Wm. Roberts and James Sweet, a committee to meet at Richland Creek Church

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meeting house, on the 2d Saturday in Oct. next, to make inquiry into any difficulties that may exist between the Richland and Ogle's Creek Churches, and also the Rock Spring Church, and report to the next Association.
10th. We agree to have 400 copies of our minutes printed, and that the Clerk superintend the same.
11th. Appointed Elder Wm. Jones, to write a Circular letter for next year.
12th. Appointed Elder Wm. Jones, to preach the introductory sermon, and in case of failure, Elder Wm. Kinney to supply.
13th. Allowed brother James Tunnel $10 for his services as Clerk.
Adjourned by prayer to the time and place above named.

Assigned by order and in behalf of the Associations.
James Tunnell, Clerk.
William Jones, Moderator.

There is a Circular Letter attached to these minutes, but I do not need to copy it.

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1826.
Horse Prairie, Ran. Co. Saturday, Sep. 23.
1. The Association met with the Horse Prairie Church for its annual meeting, Saturday, Sep. 23, 1826. Elder James Long opened the meeting with a sermon, from 2. Cor. 8:23, "When many do inquire of Titus, he is my partner and fellow helper concerning you:" etc.
2. William Jones, Moderator. William Ogle, Clerk.
Letters from the following churches were read, and the following accounts taken.

Counties Churches Messsengers Baptized Dismissed Restored Dismissed Excluded Died Pres. Numbers Church Meeting
Madison Canteen Thos. Ray, Alex Conlee, Abe Vanhorn 3 8 1 4 1 1 51 Sat. 4
Bond Shoal Creek James Long, Hesekiah Rowe   2         18 4
Madison Wood River Wm. Jones, Wm. Ogle 8     2 2 1 38 1
St. Clair Clinton Hill Joseph Reer, Aaron Badgeley 3     1   1 25 3
Clinton Sugar Creek John Crull, John Howe   2   5 1   12 1
Monroe Union Robert Haskin         2   4 1
Washington Elkhorn No letter nor Messenger, Conlee reported 2 1   5 1 4 11 2
St. Clair Richland William Kinney, Jo's Chance, Wm. L. Whiteside   1         19 2
St. Clair 12 Mile Prairie Samuel Smith   1         6 1
Randolph Horse Prairie Preston Brickey, Ed Ralls, John Ralls 2 1       1 21 4
Clinton Concord No letter              
 
St. Clair Big Spring John Baugh, John Hart   3 1 1   2 17 3
Total     18 18 2 18 7 10 222  

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4th. Received a Letter of correspondence from the Sangamon Association by the hands of their Messenger, Elder Aaron Smith, and Brother John Finley, who were invited and took both seats with us; Also a letter of correspondence and minutes from the Muddy River Association by the hands of their Messengers, Elders Eli short, and Silas Christler: Also a letter of correspondence from their Missouri Association, by the hand of Elder Wm. Kinney.
5th. Circular Letter called for, and delivered to the Committee of Arrangement for inspection.
6th. Appointed brethren Wm. Kinney, Thos. Ray, John Rowe, and Aaron Badgeley, together with the Moderator and Clerk, to be a committee to arrange the business of the Association, and make report on Monday morning.
7th. Appointed brother John Baugh to write to the Sangamon Association; brother Samuel Smith to the Mount Pleasant Association; And brother John Ralls to the Missouri Association.
8th. Appointed brother Aaron Smith, Eli Short, Wm. Jones and Silas Christler, to fill the stand tomorrow.
9th. Adjourned till Monday morning, 9 o'clock.

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Lord's Day, September 24.
The under named preached in the following order, to wit: Brother Christler from John 5:25; brother Short from Col. 2:6; brother Smith from Luke 24:46, 47; brother Jones from Rev. 15:2 to a seemingly well affected congregation.

Monday, September 25.
According to appointment the Association met, and after prayer proceeded to business.

1st. The Committee of Arrangement made their report and was discharged.
2d. The brethren appointed last Association to inquire into and report to this Association the situation of the Union and Concord churches, do report; As respects the Concord church, the male members have neglected to keep up their meetings; as respects the Union church, we have received a letter from them by the hands of their messenger, brother Haskin, giving us the information we desired to receive from the brethren appointed for that purpose.

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3d. Circular Letter called for, read and received.
4th. Our next Association to be held at Cantine Church, Madison County, on the 4th Saturday in September 1827.
5th. Corresponding letters to the different Associations were read and approved of, and sent in the following manner; brethren Wm. Jones and Thos. Ray to the Sangamon Association; brethren Wm. Kinney and Sam Smith to the Muddy River Association; brethren Jos. Chance and John Baugh to the Missouri Association; Also, one placed in the hands of the Clerk for conveyance to Mount Pleasant Association.
6th. Brother Alex. Conlee appointed to preach the introductory Sermon for next year, and in case of failure brother Jones to supply.
7th. Brother John Hart appointed to write the Circular for next year.
8th. Committee of Finance report the contributions of the churches is $12.
9th. Ordered that Wm. Ogle be appointed Treasurer, and that the contributions be placed in his hands; also,

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that he be appointed Clerk for this Association, and that he require the widow of the late Clerk of this Association to deliver over to him all the books and papers belonging to the Association, and that he also contract for the printing of our minutes for the present year.
10th. The Association having received information of the death of our brother James Tunnell, which we deeply regret, we join with the relatives and friends of the deceased in deploring the loss of so valuable a member of our body.
Signed by order of the Association.
William Jones, Moderator.
William Ogle, Clerk.

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1827.
Ridge Prairie, Mad. Co. Sat. Sep 22.
1. The annual meeting for 1827, the Association held at the house of Elder Alexander Conlee on Ridge Prairie, which was commenced with a sermon by Alexander Conlee from 1.Cor. 6:19, 20. "Ye are not your own," etc.
2. Eld. William Jones, Moderator. William Ogle, Clerk.
3. Letters from the following churches read, and the following accounts taken:
(For the table of churches see next page.)
4th. Corresponding letters were received, and approved of, as follows:
A letter and minutes from Muddy River Association, by the hands of their Messengers, Brethren John Baugh and John Moore, who were invited and took a seat with us. Also, a letter from the Wabash Association, by the hand of brother Wm. Kinney. Also, a letter from the Sangamon Association by the hand of their Messenger, Brother Wm. Thompson who was invited, and took a seat with us.

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Table.
Counties Churches Messengers Baptism Rec. by Letter Restored Dismissed Excluded Died No. Members Church Meetings
Madison Canteen Alex. Conlee, Abra. Van Hooser 1 6   5 1 1 57 4
Bond Shoal Creek James Long, John Smith   1 1       19 4
Madison Wood River Wm. Jones, Wm. Ogle, Abel Moore 6 6 1 1 2   46 1
Clinton Sugar Creek Jno. Rowe, John Creel         1   11  
St Clair Clinton Hill Abra. Martin, Jo's Beer, Abra Badgeley 1     2     25 3
Monroe Union No intelligence                
Washington Elkhorn Israel Strait             11 2
St Clair Richland Jos. Chance, Wm. Kinney, Wm. L. Whitehead           2 17 2
St Clair 12 Mile Prairie Jesse Chuniry, Tim Higgins, Samuel Smith 2 1         9 1
Randolph Horse Prairie John Ralls, Edward Ralls, Wm. Bridges       1   1 19 4
St Clair Big Spring Wm. Paydon, John Hart 1     4     14 3
Total     11 14 2 13 4 4 228  

Note--Ministers names are in small capitals.

5th. Circular Letter called for, and delivered to the Committee of Arrangement for inspection.
6th. Appointed Brethren Alexander Conlee, Ab'm Badgeley, and Samuel Smith together with the Moderator and Clerk, to be a Committee to arrange the business of the Association,

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and make report on Monday morning.
7th. Appointed Brother John Ralls to write a Letter of Correspondence to the Missouri Association, Brother Hart to Sangamon Association, Brother Rowe to the Muddy River Association, and Brother Kinney to the Wabash Association.
8th. Appointed Brethren Jones, Street, Moore and Bradley, to fill the Stand tomorrow.
9th. Adjourned till Monday morning, 9 o'clock.

Lord's Day, September 23, 1827.
The undernamed Brethren preached in the following order, to wit: Brother Moore, from Malachi 4:2, -- "But unto you that fear my name," Brother Bradley, from Heb. 3:1. "Wherefore holy brethren," etc. Brother Street, from Jonah 3:7 Arise, go to Ninevah, etc. Brother Jones, from Rev. 21:2 "And I John saw the holy city," etc. to large congregations.

Monday, September 24.
The Association met according to appointment; and after prayer proceeded to business.

1st. The Committee of Arrangement made their report, and they were discharged.
2d. Circular Letter called for, read, and approved.
3d. Corresponding Letters called for, read and approved,

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and sent in the following manner:
To Muddy River Asso. Brn. William Kinney, James Long, John Rowe, Samuel Smith and Alex. Conlee.
To the Missouri Asso., Brn. William Jones, Joseph Chance, Abraham Badgeley, John Hart, and William Bridges.
To the Sangamon Association, Brn. Thos Ray, John Ralls, William Jones, Jun., and Alex. Conlee.
To the Wabash Asso., the Clerk send it by mail.
4th. The distress of the Sugar Creek Church, with the Clinton Hill Church, taken up and laid over to the next Asso.; and the Clinton Hill Church be requested to make such statements as she may think proper to the next Asso., relative to a certain resolution of said Church, published in the Edwardsville Spectator.
5th. Brethren William Kinney, John Smith and William Bridges appointed a Committee of Finance, who reported that they find remaining in the Treasury; $2. 87 1/2.
The Contributions of the Churches, $13.06 1/4 which amounts to $15.93 3/4.
6th. Ordered, that 250 copies of our minutes be printed

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and the Clerk superintend the printing of the same.
7th. Our next Association to be held at Sugar Creek Church, Clinton County, on the 4th Saturday in September, 1828.
8th. Brother Joseph Chance appointed to preach the introductory Sermon for next year; and in case of failure, Bro. Samuel Smith to supply.
9th. Bro. William Kinney appointed to write the Circular Letter for next year.
10th. Adjourned to the time and place appointed by order of the Association.
William Jones, Sen., Moderator.
Wm. Ogle, Clerk.

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The Conquest of Illinois and the North West
by Col. George R. Clark in 1778 and 9.

The people of Illinois have a just pride in their magnificent State; while many of them know but little of its early history. It is well, sometimes, therefore, to look back over past events in the history of a people, and mark their progress, as they have been led to power. In such a review the reviewers may learn much , and the Christian mind may often trace God's hand in his Providence as clearly leading to the accomplishment of far-reaching and grand results, vastly surpassing the anticipations of those who were actors in their achievements. The providential ordering of Him, "who worketh all things after the counsel of his own will," in retracing such history, may too be distinctly reorganized in raising up men especially fitted for the part they were to act in promoting the settlement of a country, the growth of a people, and the advancement of civilization. Such may possibly be the result in looking back upon

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very early days in the history of Illinois.

In this survey, one figure stands out with remarkable distinctness. It is that of George Rogers Clark, afterwards known as Colonel. He was a native of Virginia, born in Albemarle County, Nov. 19, 1752. In his early manhood, like Washington, he was employed in land-surveying. He was a staff officer in Gov. Denemore's war with the Indians, in the campaign of the Sciota, and reached Kentucky in 1775.

The effects of the American Revolution were little felt in the distant west, because there were only here and there a few American frontier settlers to be interested, and because they were so remote from the military operations of the Atlantic States. The British, therefore, held quiet possession of the vast North-Western territory. The military hosts of the country from Detroit to the mouth of the Ohio, were under the command of British soldiers and had been from 1765. But if the Revolution was to succeed, the American flag must be unfurled over the western territory, as certainly as over the Atlantic States. This idea took very strong hold of the mind of Col. Clark, and with him it became a

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subject of deep interest to secure, in some way, the necessary transfer a control in the country to American power.

He was familiar with the dangers and hardships of frontier life, and Gov. Reynolds thus speaks of him, "He was a noble and talented representative of the hardy frontier men of those days. He possessed a great and comprehensive mind. It was moulded on the gigantic order. His mode of life, being in constant hostile array against the Indians, gave him a perfect knowledge of their character, and also, the want of sufficient military force to contend with them, compelled him to resort to stratagem, as well as to open daring and bravery."

The current of events was continually indicating by its advances westward that the Illinois country in a few years would be occupied by the adventurous Americans. Col. Clark himself had been for years among the men who were seeking to establish settlements in Kentucky, and he knew that the pioneer in Western Kentucky had only to cross the Ohio and he was in Southern Illinois. Hence it may well be supported that he considered the capture of the country not so important for what it then was, but as connected with what it was to be.

I should here say, perhaps, that there had been

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French settlements at various places in Illinois for long periods. Some of them had existed for more than one hundred years. The first French came into the territory from Canada, when that country and the Northwest were under the Government of France. These settlements were made around of near trading-Posts, and the people were in some way connected with the Indian fur-trade. Most of those in the country when it became a part of the American domain, were the descendants of the early comers--natives of the country. They were Catholics, and had their priests among them who kept them in the faith and ceremonies of their religion. The largest settlements were in extent from opposite St. Louis to Kaskaskia, along on the east side of the Mississippi. Among these people were a few Englishmen, Americans, and those of other nations, who as adventurers had made their way into these wild regions. I take a description of the French portion from "The Annals of the West." Thus the editor, J. M. Peck, D. D. speaks:
The leaders in all the French colonies in the Mississippi, were gentlemen of education and energy of character, while the large majority were illiterate people, who possessed little property and less enterprise.

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But they were a contented race, patient under hardships, unambitious, ignorant of the prolific resources of the country, and destitute of the least perception of its future destiny. They never troubled themselves with the affairs of Government; never indulged in schemes of aggrandisement, nor showed the least inclination for political domination. There were frank, open hearted, unsuspicious, joyous people, careless of the acquisitions of property."

I turn now again to Col. Clark's movements. While the Government has full employment in the management of the war in the Atlantic States Clark conceived the plan of capturing all the Forts and military stations that gave the British dominion over the country north of the Ohio river and west of what is now the State of Ohio. He saw that the Indians, where in great numbers, covering the territory now embraced in these north western states, under British influence, were unfriendly to the American people, and were thus incited to their murderous depredations upon the frontier settlers; and there was no possibility of changing their hatred into peaceship, he clearly saw, only by breaking up the whole system of British influence over them. And this be known could be done in no other way, than by capturing their military Posts, and thus freeing the whole country of their soldiery.

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He proceeded, therefore, to the seat of Government in Virginia, there claiming control over the Western country, and laid his plan of capture before Patrick Henry, then Governor of Virginia. Congress was already impressed with the necessity of securing these Western Posts. Clark was successful in securing the aid of Virginia; and on Jan. 2, 1778, received from her authorities his instructions authorizing him to enlist seven companies of fifty men each to go to Kentucky, subject to his orders, and to serve three months from their arrival in the West. He also received twelve hundred pounds in the depreciated currency of the time. Passing over his preliminary work which conscerned much time, I will proceed with the main features of the history.

At the Falls of the Ohio, where Louisville now is, he received a reinforcement to the man he enlisted for the expectation, and then informed his command that their real destination was Kaskaskia in the Illinois country, which was with the enthusiastic approbation of most of his men. His arrangements being completed, with four companies of the men he was authorized to raise, instead of the seven, with some private

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adventurers, on June 24, 1778, he began his descent of the Ohio to old Fort Massac where his plan was to leave the river and reach Kaskaskia by crossing the country a distance of one hundred and twenty miles. Before beginning his descent of the river he was made acquainted with two facts of great service to him in conquoring the country without bloodshed. One of these was these was that France had become the ally of the American Colonies, which would have the effect to bring into friendship with the Americans the French people, and the Indians in Illinois and the Lake country, as "France had never lost her hold upon her former subjects and allies, and England had never secured their confidence." The other fact was, that the inhabitants of Kaskaskia and other settlements had been led by the British to believe that the "Long Knives" or Virginians were the most cruel fierce and blood-thirsty savages. With this impression on their minds Clark saw that proper management would readily dispose them to submitt from fear, if surprised, and then when treated with unlooked for clemency to become friendly from gratitude.

Before reaching Massac, a party of hunters were sent just from Kaskaskia who have him valuable information. From them he learned that it was rumored there

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that the Virginians had planned an attack upon them, and that measures of safety were adopted and a thorough look-out was maintained. One of the hunting party, John Sannders, was engaged as their guide. Having landed and arranged for their march, they took no baggage beyond what each man could carry. For success Clark depended on surprise. There had been heavy rains,-- the weather was hot and sultry. A wilderness was before them without a path, through which they were to pass. Swamps, ponds, and deep, muddy, sluggish streams were to be forded. Game and water were scarce; and a rapid and secret march through the woods and prairies was necessary to their success. On the 4th of July, 1778, with their garments soiled and torn, and their beards of three weeks growth, this company of two hundred men came near Kaskaskia, and secreted themselves among the hills east of the river. Spies were sent out to carefully observe the movements of the people. The Fort near the tower, but on the opposite side of the river, had no regular garrison, but was kept in order as a place of retreat is necessary. In the darkness of night Col. Clark advanced and took possession of the house a little above the tower. Here boats were

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found. He then divided his men into three parties, ordering two of them to cross the river, while he in command of the other took possession of the Fort. There the place contained about two hundred and fifty houses. Men who could speak the French language were ordered to pass through the streets, and make proclamation, that all the inhabitants must keep within their houses, under penalty of being shot down in the street. The Col. was remarkable for the quickness and keeness of his sagacity. Knowing the impressions which had been made upon the Kaskaskians of their brutality and savageness, his plan was to produce the most alarming panic; and then conquor the tower without the shedding of blood and in this he was successful. Those who crossed the river, entered the quiet village, at extremes, while the people were asleep, yelling in the most furious measures. The cries in the streets commanded all to remain in doors or be shot. In a moment men, women and children, panic stricken, were screaming in their French language, "The Long Knives! The Long Knives!" In some two hours after the alarm the people had surrendered, and their arms were given to the invaders. Not a drop of blood was

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shed, though the victory was complete. The governor was taken in his bed chambers in the Fort but his public papers and documents were admirably concealed or destroyed by his wife.

As soon as the momentary alarm had subsided and given the people time for thought after the capture of Kaskaskia, the Catholic priest M. Gibault, with some elderly men were permitted to meet Col. Clark. The priest in a very humble and subdued manner said that the people expected to be separated, perhaps forever in this world, and through him they begged of their conquorer, to be permitted to assemble in their church, offer up their prayers to God and take leave of each other. Under certain restrictions, Clark gave them the liberty they asked, and closed the interview very abruptly.

His course from the beginning has been to impress and to terrify. The people had their meeting, as for the last time, not expecting to meet again. But so grateful were they for the favor shown them, that the priests and his associates returned to the Col. and expressed their thanks. They then proceeded to ask for some other slight favors. Col. Clark had now gained the object of his artful maneuver. He saw their fears were raised

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to the highest point, and abruptly he thus addressed them. "Who do you think we are? Do you think we are savages--that we intend to massacre you all? Do you think Americans will strip women and children, and take the bread out of their mouths? My countrymen disdain to make war on helpless innocence! It was to prevent the horrors of Indian butchery on our own wives and children that we have penetrated this wilderness, to subdue these British Posts from whence the savages are supplied with arms and ammunition to murder us. We do not war against Frenchmen. The King of France, your former master, is our ally. His ships and soldiers are fighting for the Americans. The French are our sworn friends. The people of Kaskaskia may side with wither party. To verify my words, go and tell your people to do as they please without any danger from me."

This speech wrought a wonderful change, and produced unbounded joy, and Clark was cheerfully acknowledged the commander of the country. Cahokia, another past a little below and opposite St. Louis was to be captured. Some gentlemen from Kaskaskia proceeded there in advance of troops, and prepared to give to the American soldiers a cordial reception, and when Capt. Bowman and his command reached there the Fort and

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people were taken without opposition. Quickness of movement and secrecy were victorious.

There remained yet another very important work to be accomplished to complete the enterprise that had been undertaken by Col. Clark. It was the capture of Fort Sackville, the military Post at Vincennes, Indiana. The colonel soon learned that the British Governor in command there had gave to Detroit, and that the Fort was in the hands of the citizens. Availing himself of this information a measure was soon put in train which promised success. An embassy headed by the priest Gibault was soon on the way to Vincennes to bring the people over to the American Cause, and this plan was immediately successfully executed. The French there declared for the Americans, and Gibault and his party returned to Kaskaskia with several gentlemen from Vincennes, with the glad intelligence that the Post was captured without soldiers.

The enlistment of Clark's men were about expiring. A part of them re-enlisted, and others were sent back to the falls of the Ohio, at Louisville, to be discharged. Col. Clark appointed Capt. Leonard Helm Indian agent in the Department of the Wabash. Capt. Helm was skilful in negotiating with the savages and soon brought the whole

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Wabash Indians through "Big Door", the chief of Piankashan nation to the American interest. Gov. Hamilton, hearing at Detroit that the country in his absence had been taken by the Americans was much chagrined. He collected his forces of 480 men, 30 regulars troops, 50 Canadians, and 400 Indians, and reached Vincennes, Dec. 15, 1778. The people made no defence. On Capt. Helm and our Americans the defence of the Fort devolved. When Gov. Hamilton came within hailing distance, Helm called out, "Halt"! This caused Hamilton to pause, Henry, the private, had a cannon well charged and placed in the open gate way, while Helm steed by it with a lighted match. Helm then exclaimed, "No man shall enter here, until I know the terms". Hamilton responded, "You shall have the honors of man". The Fort was thus re-captured by the British, and the one officer and the one private received the customary mark of respect for this brave defence. Hamilton's men were soon sent out to the frontiers to kill and scalp the inhabitants.

Clark was now in a very distressing and perilous condition. He had expected reinforcements, while no supplies of troops, or munitions of man reached him from Virginia. As had been stated, the country

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was infested with hostile Indians, direct from Detroit, and Hamilton was preparing to attack him at Kaskaskia. On mature reflection, he came to the bold and hazardous conclusion, that he would muster all his forces, and capture Hamilton; saying, "If I do not take him he will capture me". In the prosecution of his plan Clark engaged Col. Vigo, who resided at St. Louis, to go to Vincennes and reconnoiter Fort Sackville, and learn the disposition of the people. "No choice could have been better. Col. Vigo was an Italian by birth, but in his heart the principles of freedom and love for the American cause sank deep. He was a merchant possessing great wealth, all of which, together with most of his time, he spent in the cause of the American Revolution."

He with a servant started for Vincennes. At the Embarrass, five miles from the Fort, he was taken prisoner by the Indians, and brought before Gov. Hamilton. He was suspected as an American spy but being extremely popular with the inhabitants, and a Spanish subject, Hamilton did not detain or punish him as such. The people threatened to give no more supplies to Hamilton if Vigo was not suffered to depart in peace. Hamilton then consented on this consideration only, that Vigo, "was not to do any act during the war injurious to the British

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interest." He peremptorily refused to sign such an article; but agreed that he would do "no such act on his way to St. Louis". This was accepted, and he returned to St. Louis, where he remained only long enough to change his clothes, and immediately went to Kaskaskia to see Clark. From his Clark learned that many of the British soldiers were out with Indians on marauding expeditions; that Hamilton has eighty regulars in the Fort, and that the French were friendly to the Americans. He also learned that Hamilton intended in the early spring to conquor the Illinois Country. This information confirmed his purpose to capture Fort Sackville, to prevent Hamilton from taking him.

Clark, therefore, fitted up a boat as a gallery, carrying two four-pounders and four swivels with 46 men and provisions. The command he gave to Capt. John Rogers. He was dispatched to the Ohio, with orders to proceed up the Wabash as secretly as possible to a place near the mouth of the embarrass. He also organized two companies of Frenchmen into his army and all told, his fources amounted to no more than one hundred and seventy men. By the 7th of February, 1779 this band of heroes began its march for Vincennes. It is quite certain that this expedition was

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one of the most, if the most dreary and fatigueing of any that was performed during the Revolution. While on their march the weather was uncommonly wet. The water-courses were all out of their banks, and the larger streams had inundated the bottoms from Bluff to Bluff, often three or four miles wide. Yet, our handy back woods men, on foot with their knapsacks on their backs filled with parched corn and jerked meat, waded through wind and water to the forks of the Little Wabash river. The bottom here was three miles wide or more, and inundated three feet never under, and often four feet. Before the soldiers reached the Great Wabash they were nearly exhausted by fatigue and traveling in cold water, and when they came to it below the mouth of the Embarrass they were in the most exhausted, destitute and starving condition, and to their great disappointment their boat of supplies and reinforcements was not there to relieve them, and nothing was said in the history of the expedition as to what became of the boat or the men.

And now before these forlorn soldiers in their sad condition was a river with a breadth of water several miles wide. In crossing this and the bottom lands adjoining it the greatest difficulties and perils

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were experienced. It is a mystery how they kept their powder dry or any thing else. They waded and rafted, and suffered every sort of hardship except death itself. On finally reaching high ground, Clark addressed this note to the citizens of Vincennes

"To the inhabitants of Post Vincennes:
Gentlemen:--Being now within two miles of your village with may army, determined to take your Fort this night, and not being willing to surprise you, I take this method to request such of you as are true citizens, and would enjoy the liberty I bring you, to remain still in your houses. Those, if any there be, that are friends to the King, will instantly repair to the Fort and join the hair-buyer general, and fight like men; and such as do not go to the Fort, and shall be discovered afterward, may depend on severe punishment. On the contrary, those who are true friends to liberty shall be treated as friends deserve. And once more, I request them to keep out of the streets; for every one I find in arms on my arrival, I shall treat as an enemy.

This singular address had G. R. Clark effect, to make the people believe that Clark was there with a large army. By certain military movements, of marching and counter-marching, making a great display

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with few men, the impression of a large army was confirmed in the minds both of the people and the garrison. On the 23 of February. 1779, after dark the attack was made on the Fort, by Lieutenant Bailey and fourteen men. They were concealed by a bank of earth within thirty yards of the Fort, and secure from the guard of the garrison. Whenever a Post-hole was opened the bullets from the American rifles would whistle in wounding or driving the men from the guns, so that none dared to move the cannon.

At 9 o'clock, on the 24th, Clark sent a note into the Fort demanding a surrender, while his men were eating their first breakfast for six days. The letter of Col. Clark was characteristic of the man:
"Sir:--In order to save yourself from the impending storm that now threatens you, I order you immediately to surrender yourself, with all your garrison, stores, &c., &c. For if I am obliged to storm, you may depend upon such treatment as is justly due to a murderer. Beware of destroying stores of any kind, or any papers or letters that are in your possession, or hurting one house in town. For if you to, there shall no mercy be shown you.
G.R. Clark."
To Gov. Hamilton.

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The surrender was refused, and the attack was renewed with so much effect through the Post-holes that in fifteen minutes two pieces of artillery were silenced. For many hours this incessant fire alarmed the garrison. And Gov. Hamilton proposed a truce in a letter such to Clark.

To this, Clark sent the following reply:
"Col. Clark's compliments to Gov. Hamilton, and begs leave to say, that he will not agree to any terms, other than Mr. Hamilton's surrendering himself and garrison prisoners of discretion. If Mr. Hamilton wants to talk with Col. Clark, he will meet him at the church with Capt. Helm."

A conference was held between Clark and Hamilton. A surrender was demanded by Clark, or otherwise, he threatened a massacre of the leaders in the Fort for the gold given for American scalps. Clark was in earnest, and so the garrison believed.

In one hour, Clark dictated the following terms:
"1st Lieut. Gov. Hamilton agrees to deliver up to Col. Clark, Fort Sackville, and all the stores, &c., &c."
"2d. The garrison are to deliver themselves as prisoners of war, and march out with their arms and accoutrements.
"3d. The garrison to be delivered up tomorrow at 10 O'Clock

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"4th. Three days are allowed the garrison, to settle their accounts with the inhabitants and traders
"5th. The officers of the garrison are to be allowed their necessary baggage.

Signed at post St. Vincennes, this 24th day of February, 1779; agreed to for the following reasons: 1st. Remoteness from succor. 2d. The State and quantity of provisions. 3d. The unanimity of the officers and men in the expediency. 4th. The honorable terms allowed; and lastly, the confidence in a generous enemy.
Henry Hamilton, Lieut. Gov. and Superin't."

"Feb. 25, the Fort was surrendered to Clark, and all the arms and public stores of the Fort amounting to fifty thousand dollars, or more. Seventy-nine prisoners were sent off, on parole, to Detroit, and Col. Hamilton and Major Hay, with some other officers, were sent with a strong guard to the capitol of Virginia."

Thus I have sketch the remarkable campaigns of few men under Col. G. R. Clark to

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the Illinois country, then, now the great North West, and the capture of all the British military Posts by which it was held, and thus was brought its wide domain into the peacable possession of the American people.

"During the attack on the Fort the second day, a man party of Indians, ignorant of the presence of Col. Clark, arrived at Vincennes from an excursion to the frontiers of Kentucky, bringing with them two white prisoners, and camped in the vicinity of the Fort. Clark sent out an detachment against them, and in a short time routed the Indians with the loss of nine wariors. The remainder of the Indians, being terrified at the impetuosity of the "Long Knives," were well pleased to get off with their lives."

Intelligence was received at Vincennes immediately after the capture of the Fort, that a large amount of merchandise, with an escort of Soldiers, was on the way for Sackville; Clark, with his usual and unaccountable celerity and sagacity ordered Helm at the head of sixty men, to intercept the convoy and take the goods. After a few days absence, Helm returned with the escort, and goods amounting to ten thousand pounds, without the loss of a single

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man.

Col. Clark organized a Government at the Wabash, and returned to Kaskaskia. Gov. Reynolds ends his accounting of this marvelous record in these words:
"Thus terminated one of the most remarkable conquests of a country recorded in history. This small army was provided with nothing to sustain them, and guide to victory and horror, except the extraordinary talents of their commander."

These sketches will but imperfectly present to the people of Illinois, the hardships, perils and sufferings patiently endured by the hardy and heroic men of Revolutionary days, to give to them the peacable possession of this splendid State.

The authorities consulted were, "Reynold's Illinois"; and "The Arrivals of the West."

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The beginning of American settlements, etc.
The beginning of American Settlements in Illinois, and the early religious movements of the Settlers.

As has been recorded in the previous Chapter, the invasion of the Country by Col. Clark resulted in the capture of the military posts of England, and the transfer of the territory to the American domain. There upon Virginia under whose authority Clark had taken possession of it, organized a temporary government over it; and this opened the way for its occupancy by American settlers. And by this military visitation

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a knowledge of the country had been very greatly facilitated. Some of the volunteer soldiers who had aided in its capture, having seen its native richness and fertility, and looked with amazement upon its grand prairies, resolved, when discharged from their soldier service, that they would seek for themselves and their families a new home in it. In their return to their eastern homes and friends as would be very naturally supposed, they made a very favorable report of the country which they had visited. Then, as now, where a new country was open to settlement these were men ready to become pioneers in its occupancy. Accordingly, some of Clark's men proposing to their friends the project of a removal to the

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then distant possessions of the United States, gathered a number of adventurers who forced the first company of emigrants, that made the bold movement, as it would have been in a time of profound peace, to encounter the toils dangers and privations incident to a removal far into the wilderness of the West.

But this undertaking was in 1781, less than three years after Clark's military expedition, in the very midst of the great revolution, while the colonies were struggling for their independence, and the whole country was in arms, and where no one know in traveling, whether he would fall into the hand of a friend or a foe. Among the men of this party, were James Moore, Shadrack Bond, Sen., Robert Kidd,

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Larkin Rutherford, James Garrison, and James Piggot, who ventured at this early period to make the hazardous removal, largely through an uninhabited country, of 700 miles or more. They crossed the Alleghany Mountains, descended the Ohio river, and worked their way against the current of the Mississippi to Kaskaskia. The emigration of these pioneers was also during a bloody Indian war. They were for peace, and their aim was the settlement of the country, having with them their wives and children. They were not armed and prepared for war as a military expedition would have been. It was therefore, remarkable that they should escape all the dangers of the revolution, and Indian hostilities and reach Illinois in safety. Gov. Reynolds said of the safety of this removal, "It would seem

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that Providence was fostering the infant settlement of Illinois."

This party located themselves in the State, in what is now Monroe county, quite in the South-western part of our territory at a place to which they gave the name of New Design. In four years, in 1785, a second company came to the state among whom Dr. J. M. Peck gives the names of Capt. Joseph Ogle; Joseph Morley and James Andrews, who brought with them large families from Western Virginia, and not very distant from Wheeling. The next year added another company reinforcing the American settlers, in 1786. It was composed in part of James Lemen, Sen., James McRoberts, George Atchinson, and David Waddle and their families. These several companies formed five or "six settlements" as they were called in pioneer phraseology, some were on the "American Bottom", as the land between the Bluffs and the Mississippi river was called because of their settlement

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there. Another locality took the name Belle fountaine, from a celebrated spring, and still another was called "Whiteside's Station", located a few miles north of Waterloo, the present county-seat of Monroe county, in which all were located. Dr. Peck said there were other settlements on the American Bottom.

New Design seems to have been a kind of center for the American settlements, and was about four miles south of Bellefountaine. This location of emigrants was established as early as 1782, and then received the name of New Design. It was a beautiful country where on this settlement was made. It was on an elevated plain commanding a view of both rivers, the Kaskaskia and the Mississippi, and about thirty miles north of Kaskaskia, from ten to twelve miles from the Mississippi, and from three to six miles east of the American Bottom. It was the largest settlement made by Americans in Illinois, in early times, and

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was generally the first rendezvous of the emigrant. It was the head quarters, together with Bellefountaine settlement, of the whole American population. It was also the home of the Lemen family so distinguished among Baptists.

In Gov. Reynold's "Illinois" I find many other names beside those mentioned in the three companies whose coming to Illinois has been noticed. Among them were John Doyle, Robert Whitehead, a Mr. Bowen, and a Mr. Briggs, these beside some of those before named were soldiers under Clark in the capture of the country. And Reynolds says, "Toward the close of the Revolution many American families settled in Kaskaskia". Again he says, "George Lemsford, Henderson, Harris, Huff, Chaffin, Sybold and many other Americans, with their families resided in Illinois, and made improvements before the year 1783."

From Gov. Reynolds again I quote:
"On or before the year 1783, there were in Illinois about forty-five improvements made by Americans, that entitled the

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owners to four hundred acres of land, under the act of Congress passed in 1791. This act granted four hundred acres of land to all who made improvements in Illinois prior to the year 1788, (except in villages). All the American heads of families amounted to 75; and the Americans who resided in the country on or before 1791, who were capable of bearing arms as militia men, were only 65. All the heads of families in the country, French and Americans, who received 400 acres of land were 244. All the militia men amounted to about 300.

In the early settlement of the country the depredations on the Americans by the Indians were very severe, and this compelled them to erect block houses forts over the whole country for their protection. These were exceedingly important in war times. Yet, notwithstanding all precautions many were killed by the Indians. There attacks upon the settlers were very numerous and led to frequent battles. The settlers generally were men of great bodily vigor, great power of endurance, and of great courage.

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They were too, well skilled in Indian warfare, and hesitated not even when their number was greatly inferior to the number of the Indians, to follow them in their retreat from the settlements, and often overtake them and give them successful battle, and recover prisoners and property which they had taken. Many of these early emigrants to Illinois were men of excellent character, moral, honest, and though not educated in the schools, yet were possessed of strong minds and great force of character. But, as in all countries, there were those of a different reputation.

[Page is cut] to when the number of the settlers has become much increased, says, "The character of these American families was various. Some were theoretically religious people, both Baptists and Methodists; some were moral and respected the Sabbath; others were infidels, or at least skeptical of all revealed truth. They paid no regard to religious meetings, and permitted their children to grow up without any moral

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restraint. They were fond of frolics, dances, horse-racing, card-playing, and other vices, in which they were joined by many of the French population from the villages. They drank tafia , and when fruit became plenty, peach brandy was made, and rye whiskey obtained from the Monangahela country.

"There has been a very marked difference between these two classes of pioneer, down to the third and fourth generation. But a very few of the descendants of the immoral and irreligious class are to be found amongst the present generation of the religious, moral, industrious and enterprising class. They followed the footsteps of their fathers, and have

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wasstock-growers; and confined their agricultural operations chiefly to corn, and a small amount of wheat. They were brave, prompt and decided in war, yet liberal and magnanimous to a subdued foe. They showed great energy, and a just spirit of enterprise, in removing from five to fifteen hundred miles into a wilderness country, and pioneering out the way for the future prosperity of their descendents. They were hospitable, generous, and ready to share with their neighbors, or newly arrived strangers, their last loaf.

They were guided by Providence, preserved amid dangers, sickness and savage assault, and thus became the pioneers of civilization, the founders of a free government, and the extension of pure Christianity. They turned the wilderness into a fruitful field, and prepared the country to sustain a more dense population, and to increase in wealth and prosperity. Their habits and manners were plain, simple and unostentatious. Their dwellings were log-cabins, of the rudest and most simple structure. Their furniture and utensils and dress were the most simple and economical possible; for such only

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Chapter III. Early Religious Movements of the Settlers.

Of the early settlers of the country none of them were professors of religion, or, in other words, members of an evangelical Christian Church, unless our lady was an exception, a Mrs. Bond, who, it was said, had been a member of a Presbyterian Church. There were a few families, however, among the settlers, who from the commencement in their new houses were accustomed to meet together on the Sabbath, read portions of the scripture, or a sermon, and sing hymns.

They had been trained up to attend the public worship of God, to regard as sacred the Lord's day, and to acknowledge the claims of Christianity upon men; and they could not willingly consent to heathenize themselves and their children by utterly disregarding the

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Christian religion and its institutions. Their usage to which I have referred, was established before a preacher of the Gospel had been among them. Their Sabbath assemblies were held at each others cabins, and they were conducted by Shadrach Bond, Sen., (commonly called Judge Bond), James Piggot, and James Lemen, Sen., as prominent leaders in the movement. Thus they set a good example to others around them, and God blessed them and their children.

The first Christian minister who visited the Illinois country was Rev. James Smith. He was a Baptist minister from Lincoln county,

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Kentucky, and his visit was in the summer of 1787. He visited New Design, and preached repeatedly to those of the people who could be induced to hear him. The results were very gracious. Not a few of those who had maintained the meetings, to which I have referred, professed to be converted under his preaching; among them were Shadrach Bond, Sen., Capt. Joseph Ogle, and his son-in-law, James Lemen, Sen., with their wives and other connections.

After Mr. Smith's departure these social Lord's day meetings were continued, and with more interest, as these were men then who could pray and exhort in them. Mr. Smith made a second visit to this people in the spring of 1790, and preached the gospel

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with much success, and many more because deeply interested in the salvation of Christ. But his visit was terminated by a very sad and fatal occurrence. At this period the Indians had become very troublesome to the American settlers. "On the 19th of May, as Mr. Smith was riding from the block house (as it was called) to Little Village, in company with a Frenchman and a Mrs. Huff, they were fired upon by a party of Kickapoo Indians, who were concealed in a thicket, near the present site of Waterloo. His horse, and the one rode by the Frenchman were shot, and the woman wounded. Mr. Smith had the presence of mind to throw his saddle bags, which contained valuable papers, into a thicket, and retreating to the foot of the hill fell on his knees, and prayed

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for Mrs. Hull, whom the Indians were butchering, and who had been seriously exercised about her own salvation for several days. The French man escaped, and Mr. Smith was made a prisoner; but his saddle bags were found the next day by his friends.

The Indians loaded their prisoner with a pack of plunder, they had taken from the settlements, and began their homeward march through the prairies. Mr. Smith was a large, heavy man, and under a hot sun, with his heavy load, soon became fatigued.

Consultations were held by the Indians, as to how they should dispose of their prisoner. Some proposed to kill him, fearing the White people would follow them, and pointed their guns at his

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breast. Knowing well the Indian character, he bared his breast, as though he dared them to shoot him, and then pointed upward, to signify that the Great Spirit was his protector. Having caught him while in the attitude of prayer, and hearing him sing hymns on his march, which he did to relieve his mind from dispondency, they concluded he was a ‘Great Spirit’, and must not be killed.

They took him to their town on the Wabash river, from whence, through the agency of the French traders from Vincennes he obtained his freedom--the people of New Design, though extremely poor, paying one hundred and seventy dollars for his ransom. This truly was a noble act.

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Mr. Smith visited these settlements of Illinois the third time obtained his saddle bags, and their valuable contents and returned to Kentucky where he lived and died.

After his labors were terminated so sudenly, and so painfully, by his capture when on his second visit, the social Sabbath meetings were continued, even more regularly, (except in times of Indian alarm) and were conducted with singing, prayer, reading the scriptures and sermons. Prayer now became an added feature in them because there were those who could pray, "In January, 1794, while Judge Bond was conducting the worship, an the Sabbath, a stranger came into the assembly. He was a large portly man, with dark hair, a florid complexion, and regular features.

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His dress was in advance of the deer-skin hunting shirts and indian moccasins of the settlers-his countenance grave, and his aspect so serious, that the mind of the leader of the meeting was impressed with the thought that he was a professor of religion--perhaps a preacher; and an invitation was given him to close the exercises if he was a praying man! The stranger kneeled, and made an impressive, fluent and solemn prayer.

There was a man in the company, of small talents, and rather marrow views, who, from his national origin, bore the soubriquet of Dutch Pete, among the people; or Peter Smith, as his name appears in the land documents. Pete was a zealous Methodist, and when

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his own brethren, or preachers prayed, he felt moved by the Spirit to utter Amen at the close of every sentence. While the people were on their knees, or their heads were bowed low on their seats, Pete manifested uneasiness during the prayer of the stranger. He fidgeted one way and then another--uttered a low but audible groan, and to those near him seemed in trouble. The very impressive and earnest prayer of the gentleman, excited his feelings beyond suppression. He might not be a Methodist, but Pete could hold in no longer, and bawled out at the top of his voice; ‘Amen, at a [unknown].’

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"The stranger proved to be the Rev. Josiah Dodge, from Nelson county, Ky., who was on a visit to his brother, Dr. Israel Dodge, of St. Genevieve, Mo. Hearing of these religious people being entirely destitute of ministerial instruction, he had arrived opportunely to preach to them. He remained some time in the settlement, preaching often, and visited from house to house. In February a new scene opened upon the New Design people, and those of the surrounding country. The ice in Fountain Creek was opened, and in the presence of a vast company for those times, Mr. Dodge baptized James Lemen, Sen., and his wife Catherine; John Gibbons and Isaac Enochs. These were the first

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persons ever baptized in the territory of Illinois.

James Lemen, Sen. afterwards became a Baptist minister, and labored successfully for many years, and died in 1823. He had four sons, who also became Baptist Ministers; the youngest of whom died in 1859, and the others have all died since.

Two years more passed after the departure of Mr. Dodge, without the enjoyment of any ministerial services by the people of New Design; yet, without any organized church, or society, the friends of Christ

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maintained their social religious Lord's day meetings. With the people, continually coming into the country, from older States, were now and then members of Baptist churches, in the places from which they came so that in the Spring of 1796 there were a considerable number of members of Baptist churches in Virginia and Kentucky, in the several settlements. "Among these", says Mr. Peck "was Joseph Chance, who was an exhorter, and also a lay-elder from Shelby county, Ky. This office, now unknown in Baptist churches, was regarded in Virginia, and afterwards for a time in Kentucky, as an appendage to the pastoral office. Lay-elders

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had no authority in government and discipline, as in a Presbyterian church, but aided the pastor in conducting religious meetings by exhortation and prayer, visiting the sick, instructing the ignorant, and confirming the wavering. Mr. Chance finally became an ordained minister. He did not possess great talents as a preacher, but was faithful in the exercise of the gifts bestowed upon him. He loved religious meetings, devoted much time in preaching and visiting destitute settlements, and died while on a preaching tour in 1840, aged seventy five years."

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It did not seem to have been understood by the few Baptists, then in and about New Design, that they could organize themselves into a church, without any ministerial aid, and call into service such gifts, as may have existed among them in conducting their worship. If no more could have been found as Baptists than the persons baptized by Mr. Dodge, they could have constituted a church. True, the number would have been small, but there have been churches formed in Illinois since those days when the constituent members were only four. Canton church, in 1856 reported 526 members, and was there then the largest church in the State, and was organized June 14, 1833, with only four members. But the want of information on this subject can be easily accounted for in this instance. The four then baptized were unacquainted with the denomination to which they had then attached themselves, and unless Mr. Dodge had

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which they possessed. It was taking their stand, at an early moment, when planting themselves in a new country, and a new home, on the Lord's side, and thus showing their willingness to be known as the followers of Christ. It was well, that thus early they erected the standard of evangelical Christianity in the presence of Catholic formalism and bigotry, and infidel derision and scorn. Their course was happily adapted to strengthen their own religious habits--nurture their faith and spirituality--and effectually guard themselves against the temptation to desecrate the say of Christian worship, which was so prevalent with the multitude around

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them. It was a course worthy of Christian men and women to place themselves at once, in a position in which they could invite the serious minded, and the more worthy class of their fellow citizens, to unite with them in the worship of God. Their example, in this respect, is worthy of imitation by all Christians, whose residence places then remote from organized churches and where the Christian ministry is not enjoyed; and especially in a new country where society is in a formative state.

On the 4th day of May 1796, Rev. David Badgeley, of Hardin County, Virginia, reached the settlement of New Design. It was an event of great gladness, most surely, to the

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Christian men and women who were dwelling here on the outskirts of civilization. To their ministerial visits from those who "preached the word" were "few and far between"; and their rareness made them the more valuable, and led to a higher appreciation of them when they were enjoyed. Mr. Badgeley immediately engaged in proclaiming the great salvation, and continued the labor by day and by night,--indeed, they had a "protracted meeting" at that early day, which was carried through about four weeks, if not more; and the labor was not fruitless. God blessed it. And on the 28th day of May, the preacher baptized fifteen persons, on their profession of faith in Christ; and on the

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same day aided by Mr. Chance, Mr. Badgeley organized at New Design, the first Baptist church, and indeed, the first Christian church ever formed in what is now the State of Illinois. It was composed of 28 members; and they were scattered through the American settlements for considerable distance. Mr. Peck gives the names of the men who were constituent members of this first Baptist church. They were "Joseph Griffin, Wm. Whiteside, Larkin Rutherford, James Lemen, Sen., Isaac Enochs, John Simpson, James Gilham, George Valentine, Solomon Shook, ------- Teague, Thomas Todd, Joseph Anderson, and Joseph Ryan". The other members may have all been females.

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After Mr. Badgely's departure another year passed in which the members of the church were obliged to rely on their own labors to maintain their Lord's-day worship, as they were without ministerial aid. But we may suppose them in a better condition to do it, perhaps, as they had an increase of numbers, and were in an organized capacity. And being left to their own resources of private talent, they fell back into what had been their habit for years.

Mr. Badgeley appears to have made his visit to Illinois on an exploring expedition, in connection with other men, from the South Branch of

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the Patomac River, in Hardy county, Va. The company remained a long while in the country, and decided on their return to make their future houses in Illinois. And so favorable was the impression which the report of their visit made upon their friends, as to the new country, that in the following Spring, 1797, a large colony, numbering in all one hundred and fifty-four, among whom was Mr. Badgeley with his family, arranged for this departure for the Illinois country. Their preparations being completed, about the first of April, they commenced their long and toilsome, if not dangerous journey, for the distant Western land, in which

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they had purposed to make their future homes. They crossed the mountains in wagons, on pack horses, and on foot to Morgantown, on the Monongahela River. And toward the close of May, with all their effects on boats, they commenced their descent of the river, to Pittsburg, and them down the Ohio to Fort Massac.

But as results proved, they had failed to make wise preparations for their exposures on a voyage and journey so long and laborious, in which they were liable to meet with so many adverse occurences. They had failed to provide any covering for their boats to protect those on board, from the frequent rains which they experienced, and also from the burning sun. And at the

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end of a protracted and wearisome trip they finally landed at Fort Massac, in what is now Massac county, after great personal exposures, and much suffering. But their trails and sufferings were not ended. They had still a long journey, considering those times, before them through a wilderness with their wagons and horses. The season proved to be one of frequent rains, and was, therefore, uncommonly wet the streams were full and over their banks. It was not alone wet , but unusually hot also after the rains. Mr. Peck says, "they were twenty-one days traveling through this wilderness, the distance of about one hundred and twenty miles, and much of it through dreary forests, without a house between

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Massac and Kaskaskia." They finally "arrived in a deplorably famishing and sickly condition" at New Design.

The old settlers gave all the aid and relief which they could, with their accustomed hospitality, to the suffering company. But with their single room. Cabins, as must of them were, they could not furnish house accommodations for so many, and were therefore obliged to witness sufferings which they were unable to relieve. Then the provisions of the country were very limited. The cattle of the settlers were few, and their grain for bread was scarce, and in every view it was a period sadly burdened with want. With their rifles

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they could supply themselves with a plenty of venison, but the weather was so hot and sultry that it would spoil before they could get it in a preserved condition. And added to their other wants they were sadly without salt to preserve if or season it.

Because of their toils and long exposures in their journey the summer and autumn proved to be exceedingly sickly to the emigrants. A putrid fever, usually malignant "prevailed among them, while the old settlers enjoyed their usual health. And it is sad to record, that the disease was so fatal, that before the close of the autumnal month, nearly one half of this large

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and flourishing colony were laid in their graves. This colony is said to have been made up of an unusually large proportion of moral industrious and honest citizens; and they brought with them influences and habits which were of great service to the older settlers .

It is difficult to repress the conviction, that the leaders of this colony failed greatly in a just estimate of the necessities of such a journey as they had before them, and especially with so numerous a company. And particularly so, in view of the fact that some, who were leaders had been over the route of travel

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the year before. They surely ought to have gained all the information from those who had had experience in the removal of their families, that the case demanded. We can hardly suppose they failed to make ample inquires on the subject. And if they did not fail it is a matter of surprise that they should not have taken such views of the possibilities of the journey, as to have led them to greater care in securing a fitness in their conveyances, more adequate to so long a journey, and one of slow progress; and then also in the needful supply of provision, so as not to reach their journey's end in an almost starving condition. It did not require much

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forethought to see, that such a journey, through such a country, at such a time, and by such modes of conveyance, under the best conditions of weather would be one producing great fatigue; and under other conditions would be laborious and exhaustive. They seem to have made great reliance upon their powers of endurance. The sad result, however, shows that those powers were overtasked, and thereby caused a sorrowful beginning in a new country, and new home.

In this company of West Virginia men, as has been already stated, was Rev. David Badgeley, the first Baptist minister that settled in Illinois; and, indeed, the first minister of any evangelical denomination.

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In the history of those times, he stands prominently out in advance of all others as the first Christian minister, who ventured out into this then extreme western boundary of American settlements, with the intention of making it a home for himself and his family for the remainder of his life. The visit he made to the country the year before his removal was undoubtedly the means of causing him to form the purpose of becoming a citizen of the then prospective State of Illinois.

It can hardly be questioned that two facts connected with his tour of exploration had great weight in bringing his mind to that purpose. The one was his pleasedness with the country as having a character which would in a few years draw to it a large population. The other was the religious aspects of the case. The people, already the pioneer settlers of the country were religious by in a very destitute condition, and from them the Mac-[missing]

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the hunting-grounds of bands of roving savages.

At the period of the organization of the first church, 1796, Mr. Peck made this statement: "The whole white population of Illinois was about 2,700, two thirds of whom were of French descent, spoke that language, and followed the customs of Canadians from whence most of their father originated. In religion they were unusually Roman Catholics; in the morning of the Sabbath they attended mass, and in the afternoon visited, played the violin, danced, or engaged in other recreations or ruder sports out of doors."

The population of the State, estimated by Dr. Peck as above, would make the American portion not far from 1000. Rev. Ira M. Allen, however, in his "Baptist Annual Register for 1832" stated that the population, exclusive of Indians in the whole territory, in

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1800 was 250. This most certainly was a very great mistake. For, as I have stated, Dr. Peck put the number at 2,700 four years earlier. Other facts in the history of the State go to confirm Mr. Allen's error, and Dr. Peck's correctness. In another connection Dr. Peck gives the number of white persons in the State at about 3,000, in 1800; and in 1810, the census made the population 12,284, so great had been the increase.

As has been indicated, the earlier settlers were mainly from Virginia and Kentucky, while a few came from other Southern States. But the great route of emigrants was by the Ohio river, and the emigration to the State was now becoming large, and was constantly increasing. Among the incoming people these were persons who were members of Baptist churches in the places from which they came so far as they understood their duty, which

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they did if pastoral fidelity had controlled those holding the office in the churches where they were members, they would avail themselves of the first opportunity to transfer their membership to a church in their new home. From this class of persons the New Design church when organized received a portion of its members. For those who had been baptized by Elders Dodge and Badgeley were only nineteen, and supposing that they all went into the organization it would require nine to invite on letters to make up the constituted member of the church, which was twenty-eight.

In this connection it is worthy of note, that on going into a new country or place, there are more person holding letters of dismission from the churches which they have left, who need to be sought out and invited to become members of the church into the bounds of which they have removed, than these are persons who

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have religious force enough to hunt it and seek a church in which they can become members. In this fact is found one of the necessities for the labors of ministers and pastors to look up the scattering ones of Christ's flock.

The Baptists were, as has been shown, the first evangelical Christians to enter, organize, and commence religious work in what is now the magnificent State of Illinois. And now Mr. Badgeley having reached this field as a Christian minister, became by invitation the pastor of the New Design church. On entering on his work as pastor he was joined in the labors which the State and condition of the country demanded, by his associate in the organization of the church in the previous year,-lay-Elder Chance. They devoted themselves

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earnest Christian work, and were permitted before many mouths had passed to see that their labors were not in vain. A revival was enjoyed, candidates gave evidence of conversion and were baptized. April 28, 1798, they were permitted to organize another church of fifteen members near the Mississippi river on the American Bottom, and about twenty-five miles below St. Louis, called the Bottom church. It will be recollected that these little churches were on the very confines of Protestant Christianity, for on the opposite side of the great river the crown of Spain held possession, and the Romish hierarchy was the only religion tolerated by the laws.

In speaking of the New Design church Dr. Peck made his statement: "In a little time the church had an arm, as it was called (meaning a branch) on the ‘Bottom’, which soon became an independent church. Another arm was formed in Richland, a settlement a little north

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of the present site of Belleville, in St. Clair Co.; a third arm on Silver Creek; and a fourth on Horse Prairie, in Randolph Co. All these ‘arms’ as they were called, in time became independent churches."

Of proceedings in these early times I have learned much from a Letter sent to the Editor of the Western Star, a Baptist paper published in Jacksonville by Rev. A. Bailey, in 1845, over the signature of an "Old Illinois Baptists", who then had the Records of the New Design church. The writer was doubtless Dr. J. M. Peck. He is speaking of the early history of this First Church.

"At first the church met regularly for business twice each month. There were frequent cases of ‘distress’ between brethren, and church meetings more some times the place for ‘hard seeches’". The frequency of these meetings may have only tended to increase the evil by furnishing

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opportunities often for contention. The current of events did not move smoothly, and perhaps here is a fitting place to consider some events adverse to prosperity in the infancy of our cause.

At an early period in his administration of church affairs the pastor introduced a rule, of which Dr. Peck says he remembers the Elder was tenacious, but which "did much mischief and no good." It was to conduct all business touching fellowship by a "oneness", as it was called, or by a unanimous vote. Said Dr. Peck; "It is certainly exceedingly pleasant to have entire unanimity but in case of a diversity of opinion some body must decide, and if not majority, then the minority must govern. But a rule requiring a unanimous vote in an effectual barrier to all wholesome discipline, as rarely in their member with any degree of influence or tact at intrigue but can get at least one member to stand by him, and this one member by his negative vote, under the rule,

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controls the church. But this was not the worst difficulty. By a mistake of the inalienable right of man to exercise his own judgment, if a minority voted in opposition to a majority it was taken for granted (for so they were taught) that they were subject to discipline as refractory members and must be dealt with until their judgments and consciences were convinced that they had voted wrong, and until they had confessed the sin and voted with the majority, for the rule required oneness. We have seen enough of the mischievous effects of this rule to condemn it forever."

Another point of adverse influence was the rescinding of the above rule by the New Design church in the absence of the pastor and other members. But it was for a special purpose which increased the evil in the case. And that purpose was to welcome to the communion of the church unbaptized professors of religion. In other words, to vote the church

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an open-communion church. This case was subsequently submitted to the Green River Association in Kentucky with which the New Design church had united, and by that body the church was led back to strict communion.

Another event which caused trouble was in the arm or church which ever it was, at Silver Creek. That body voted that an unordained member should administer the ordinances. This, of course, was a violation of denominational views and usages.

These proceedings, both at New Design and at Silver Creek were condemned by the pastor, and by those who thought with him. And when the New Design church were expecting the observance of the Lord's supper, Elder Badgeley refused to administer the ordinance.

Another hindrance to great success was developed. Dr. Peck makes this statement: "the Moores, Ogles, Lemons, and others families were opposed to slavery and took up their long line of march for these wild regions, that they

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and their posterity might enjoy, uninterrupted, the advantages of a country unembarrassed with slavery." Yet at an early period, 1801, a "distress" came into the church about slavery. Exactly in what form it was presented no definite information is given, but it was no doubt in a way that obtain from the church an approval of the great wrong, as James Lemen and his wife dissented from the church and the Union, because they would not fellowship members that held slaves. This was the beginning undoubtedly, of pro slavery efforts in Illinois to make our churches the abettors of slavery. Whether this led to the separation of that Lemens from the church is not stated.

Another adverse event claims notice here. In a meeting of the New Design church in 1802, "the articles of union agreed upon by certain representatives of the Regular and Separate Baptists of Kentucky were read". As the result, the church resolved to sustain the "Union". The meeting of representative ministers who

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agreed upon these articles of union was, in 1801. In looking at the action of this body calmly, it came to be considered in any other light than as unwise and strange, and in it's consequences an unfortunate event. And especially so, as the church was small and had no local connection with the parties who were concerned in the movement, being far removed from the territory which they occupied, and the members residents in another state. It was unfortunate in the sense of having made the sustaining of the Union a test of fellowship, as hereafter will be seen to have been the fact.

These articles on which the Union was declared to be based are afterwards seemingly alluded to as some thing of high importance, so much so as to make it proper, if not necessary. That a feeble church on the outskirts of civilization, should

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burden itself with a formal resolution to sustain the Union; meaning, thereby, the articles of agreement of five delegates of the Regular and four of the Separate Baptists churches of Kentucky on which they would cease their controversy and cultivate a reciprocal fellowship. The question may, with great propriety be asked, Wherein lies their great power as a harmonizing expedient, to bring into interchanging and co-operating relations and fellowship two branches of the denomination that really never had any just ground for their separation?

The principles as set forth in writing are nothing more than a brief summary of doctrines, or Articles of Faith as held by Baptists, and can be found in either of Benedict's Histories of the Baptists, in the sections relating to the history of the denomination in Kentucky. The grounds of disagreement were of comparatively minor moment, yet they were

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held tenatiously by both parties, and were carried over from Virginia into Kentucky by zealous adherents, and then they must be brought by other zealous adherents, and then they must be bro0ught by other zealous partisans over the Ohio into Illinois to have on associational banners their meaningless and inharmonious insignia, the Regular Baptist Association, The UnitedBaptist Association, the Separate Baptist Association; all to mar the fellowship of ministers and churches, by keeping them reminded of unwise controversy, which has long served to perpetuate an unjustifiable and foolish, if not wicked, division. Far better would it have been for Illinois Baptists if the New Design church and all other churches and ministers too, had left all that purtained to the unholy division on the South side of the Ohio, to find its death and its grave. The Regulars, as they were called, and as they called themselves were perhaps inclined, some of

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them at least somewhat to high Calvinism, and had adopted the Philadelphia Confession of Faith while the Separates were leaning a little toward Arminianism.

From the time resolution was passed by the church at New Design to sustain the Kentucky Union, as strange as it may seem, sustaining the Baptist Union appears to have been the standard of fellowship in the few small and weak churches of Illinois. Hence the Illinois Association (of which I shall write hereafter,) in a session of 1809, adopted this as principle of their organization: "No church has any right to make any rule to cross the Union of the United Baptists at large."

Exactly what was meant by sustaining the union may not be easy to learn. In the articles of agreement there was no course of labor prescribed, that was to prosecuted by those adopting them, and in which sense the union was to be

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sustained holding, defending and propogating them. And in this sense, all true Baptist churches it is but fair to suppose, were their, and now are, sustaining them. They really demanded no change in the sentiments held by the New Design Church, nor in its practice, as can now be perceived. Resolving to sustain the Union, therefore by that church was an entirely unecessary and useless act--really an in incumbrance. And among the feeble churches of that day, it seemed to have been necessary to go through the formality of resolving to sustain the union to put them in fellowship with the denomination generally. Some of our Associations that have heretofore used one of these designating terms in connection with their name and been know as Regular, Separate, or United, have entirely discarded the useless appendage, as having no desirable place there. May the time soon come when neither of them will any longer disfigure an associational name in the State.

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From this history, it is very natural to infer that the Baptists of an early day, at least in the South and West, were greatly inclined to divide up into small parties on differences of views too unimportant to be a cause of separation. This was an evil sad and disastrous, leading to a waste of energies that could have been employed vastly more usefully for the glory of God and the conversion of men.

I now proceed history of the churches. I have alredy mentioned the formation of the second church under the name of the Bottom church. Whether this organization included the Arm of the New Design church on the Bottom, or was that arm transformed into an independent body and including the newly converted persons, or was a wholly new organization does not seem to be clearly expressed in any of the statements I have met with. Although there is no allusion to the arm, in

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connection with the coming into existence of the church, yet I cannot think otherwise than that the new body included it, for the sparceness of the population in the country did not demand that both bodies should exist, and every view of strength and usefulness would urge their union. This presumable that the controversial or alienating leaven had not yet began to work.

These were now two churches demanding or calling for the ministrations of these two men, and then there were other settlements that needed Christian culture, and it cannot be supposed that these servants of God would be heedless of their Macedonian cry. They doubtless found enough to do, to claim all the time that could be spared from the demands of a Christian care for the support and comfort of their families, as the laborer did not receive his hire though worthy of it.

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In the large immigration now coming to the State these were doubtless many Christians, and among them more or less Baptists, and religion, morality and good order gained ground. It would perhaps be unreasonable to look for a very rapid enlargement to this infant cause, when the ministerial laborers were but two, and the first and only church in all the country, at its organization in 1796, had only twenty-eight members, and these, by the location of its several "arms", which soon existed, were so widely scattered as to be in three counties--Monroe, St. Clair and Randolph; thus showing the extended field that these two men had before them for cultivation. I have not the means,

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however, of giving any information that would show how influential their labors were in adding members to the churches. But whatever may have been the measure of their success, peace and mutual harmony did not long exist; and for several years their was no fellowship between the New Design and the Bottom churches, and contentions and bickerings prevailed in place of love and union. This state of affairs may have, in part, originated from the attempt made in 1801, in the New Design church to commence at the Lord's table with all God's children, who could "give a reason of the hope that was in them." It is true this project failed, but the attempt as an element of discord still remained in force, as it unfortunately could not be entirely

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overcome by the act of the church which defeated the measure.

On the 25th of May, 1806, a church of eleven members was constituted at Mount Tabor, Barren Co., Ky., by Elders Alexander Davidson and Jacob Locke, which emigrated in a body to Illinois. John Baugh, a licensed preacher, was one of there company. This moving church first stopped, for a time, at Baptist headquarters in that early day, the New Design settlement, and after more acquaintance with their surroundings removed to an unsettled tract of country, in the northern part of St. Clair county, and gave to their church the name of Richland. Said Dr. Peck of it: "By the old book of records which we have, we think the church

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made some progress, kept up meetings regularly, was attended monthly by Elders Chance and Badgeley, and perhaps by other preachers, and for sometime had additions yearly, until the division on the slavery question in 1809, when it became weakened. One part formed the Ogle's Creek; but a large majority reorganized, adopted the principles of the Friends of Humanity, and founded Canteen (now Bethel) church. From this body in 1808, was formed the church of Looking Glass Prairie."

In 1806, Elder Wm. Jones removed from East Tennessee and settled on Wood River, near the present site of Upper Alton. He

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came from Beaver Bridge church, Knox Co., East. He was accompanied by another pioneer who was also a Baptist, named John Findley. Dr. Peck said in reference to them they were "good men", a very important and welcome testimony in view of subsequent events. From anything I have met with, I am unable to decide whether Elder Jones' companion, Findley, was a minister or not. Unfortunately, the three small churches that had been formed in Illinois, the New Design, Bottom, and Silver Creek,--were not in harmony with each other. And this to a devout Christian must seem very strange; that feeble as they were, and surrounded as they were, also by

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Catholic formalism and bigotry, and infidel derison and scorn, they should not have felt very deeply the importance of cultivating and maintaining the most sacred Christian fellowship and brotherly alliance, as one of the most effectual methods of honoring their master, and of impressing the minds of the irreligious with a conviction of the divinity of Christianity.

Under the circumstances in which Elder Jones, and his associate, Findley, found the Baptists in Illinois, and being all, except a few scattering Methodists, who had any claim to recognition as being true Christians in the infant State, they felt move to make some effort to harmonize the bodies that should have been in the truest fraternity. They, therefore, caused a meeting to

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be held with the worthy purpose in view, on Jan. 9, 1807, at the house of Anthony Badgeley, St. Clair Co. This meeting was successful in putting matters in a harmonizing train, by adopting a summary of principles, which will find a fitting place hereafter.

On May 31, 1807, the Wood River church, located not very far from the present site of Upper Alton, was organized with twelve members, and Elder Wm. Jones became its pastor. I have now recorded the existence of four Baptist churches in Illinois. So far as has appeared, two of them had no direct connection with the New Design Church in their origin, the Richland and the Wood River churches. There remained the Silver Creek body to be recognized

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in my estimate of the number of churches, doubtless, as a regular Baptist Church, although nothing has been yet found that makes it certain that it had become an independent church. Yet, in a short time after the organization of the Wood River church the first Association was formed and the Silver Creek body was acknowledged as one of the Churches constituting it. This therefore seems to settle the question as to its having been transferred from an arm of the New Design church to an independent church.

I will here insert the following, though in the order of time it comes in the lime of history after the organization of the coming Association, an account of which will be given in

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the next chapter.

In the old Records of the Bethel church this entry is found: "September 12, 1807, Richland ‘Arm’ of the New Design church was constituted (recognized) as the Baptist church of Christ of Richland Creek. Joseph Chance, Robert Brazil, Edward Radcliff, Council."

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Chapter IV. The First Association in Illinois.

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Having sketched the origin of the early churches in Illinois as definitely as the information at me command will permit, I come to the period when it was thought advisable for the few then existing to become associated after the manner of older churches of the denomination, in older sections of our common country.

The first Association, sometimes called "The Illinois Union" was organized, the third Friday in June, 1807, of five churches, namely: New Design, Mississippi Bottom, Richland,

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Wood River, and Silver Creek. When united all had a membership of 62 persons, and there were belonging to the churches three ordained ministers; David Badgeley, Joseph Chance, and William Jones. The New Design and the Richland churches had previously belonged to the Green River Association in Kentucky.

The Association was organized on the basis of the following summary of Principles, adopted by a meeting in Jan. 1807, held at the house of Anthony Badgeley in the Mississippi Bottom, to which reference has heretofore been made. These Principles were afterwards approved by the churches prior to the organization of the Association.

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Principles.

1. There is one only true God;--Father, Son and Holy Ghost.
2. We believe that the Old and the New Testaments are the Word of God, and the only rule of Faith and Practice.
3. We believe that by nature we are all fallen and depraved creatures.
4. That salvation, regeneration, sanctification are by the life, death, resurrection and ascension of Jesus Christ.
5. That Saints will finally persevere through grace to glory.
6. That believer's baptism by immersion is necessary to the receiving of the Lord's supper.
7. That the salvation of the righteous, and punishment of the wicked are eternal.

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8. We believe, that no ministers ought to administer the ordinances until they come under the imposition of hands.
9. That it is our duty to be tender and affectionate to each other, and study the happiness of the children of God in general, and by engaging singly to promote the glory of God.
10. We believe in election by grace.
11. We believe that it is our duty to commence with orderly Baptists.
12. That each church may keep its own government as to them (it) may seem best.

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The Association held two sessions each year--one in June the other in October. The minutes of this first and organizing session unfortunately have not been obtained.

Dr. Peck thus speaks, in his sketch of the South District Association, of this first Association, The Illinois Union, and its organization. "As a part of the churches and brethren were conscientiously opposed to slavery, it was tacitly agreed in this ‘Union’, that correspondence should not be carried into Kentucky."

Although the minutes of the first session cannot be found; those of the second, and others following for several years are in hand. There is reason to believe that the "Summary of Principles," which has been presented, did not contain all the rules which were adopted in the organization of the body.

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1807.
The second session of the Association was held at the house of Isaac Enochs, in Richland Creek Church, St. Clair Co., Indiana territory, commencing on Friday, Oct. 9, 1807. Having the minutes I will transcribe them, and thus furnish the reader with the order of associational proceedings at an early day in Illinois. The spelling and the use of capitals, etc, will be corrected.

Friday, Oct. 9, 1807, at 12 o'clock, Elder David Badgeley delivered the introductory sermon from John 3:16, "For God so loved the world," etc.

Elder Wm. Jones was chosen Moderator. (The Clerk was a standing officer)

Letters from seven churches were read; their messengers were enrolled, and a list of their members was taken, which were as follows:

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Churches Messengers Baptized Rec. by Letter Excluded Died Members
New Design Wm. Whiteside, Stephen Terry and Geo. Dement 7 1     20
Miss. Bottom David Badgeley, Geo. Valentine, and D. Waddle 1       14
Silver Creek Jos. Chance, Edward Radcliff, and Ab. Teter 5 2     22
Richland Jas. Downen, Rob. Brazil, and Valentine Brazil 7 1     19
Wood River Wm. Jones, Isaac Hill, Joseph Cook   2     14
Cane Spring John Hendrickson, William ______         7
Richland Creek Jas. Lemen, Wm. L. Whiteside, J. Enochs         17
Total   20 6     113

Letters from the last two churches mentioned, requesting admittance into the Association were received and read. Said churches were admitted, their messengers names enrolled, and numbers taken. The Cane Spring church was in Upper Louisiana (as Missouri was then called). It had been formed between the first meeting of the association and this meeting by Elders Badgeley and Jones, and

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they had ordered John Hendrickson as its pastor. Dr. Peck gave this testimony of him; "He was a good man, but soon died." It was a little singular that the association should be in session with a church before it belonged to the body.

Elder D. Badgeley, J. Chance, J. Hendrickson, and J. Downen with the Moderator and Clerk were chosen a select committee to arrange the business of the Association and make report.

Adjourned until 3 o'clock, p.m.

Met according to adjournment, at 3 O'clock, p.m. The select Committee made their report.

1. The matter of the friend Henry Walker, which was laid over from last Association to be done something with.
2. The request of the Richland church to be taken up.

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3. Some to be appointed to examine the fund, and make report to the Association.
4. A query by the Committee, to know how excommunicates from foreign countries are to be received. (By "foreign" is supposed to be meant distant states in our own country)
5. That some more rules of Decorum be enacted.
6. That some Elder be appointed to preach the introductory sermon.
7. That a time and place be appointed for the next Association.
8. That the clerk be allowed out of the fund for his services.

The committee adjourned.

The Association met according to adjournment. The committee made report, which was taken up in order.

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1. The matter of the friend Henry Walker, by the voice of the whole thrown out.
2. The request of the Richland church, which was to send them supplies of preachers, was taken up and laid on the preachers to appoint the time themselves.
3. That Isaac Enochs and Stephen Terry be appointed to examine the fund, and make report. They reported that they find in the treasury $6.62 1/2.
4. It is answered that the excommunicates shall give satisfaction to the church from which they were excluded, and if that cannot become at conveniently, the church to which application has been made shall write to the church which excluded such applicant, requesting the charge to be exhibited, with a request to have the privilege

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of acting in the matter. But if the church should be dissolved, then the church to which the application has been made by the excluded member, shall be clear in taking it up and acting as to them shall seem right.
5. An amendment to the 18th article of Decorum, that the Moderator shall not give his judgment until the voice of the Association is taken; and further the Moderator shall not have a vote except the association be equally divided in opinion.
6. Any person speaking in disorder, and neglecting, or refusing to hear the Moderator shall be taken under dealing.
7. Ordered that the clerk be allowed twenty-five cents for each copy of the minutes of the Association.

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8. Agreed that Elder Jos. Chance be appointed to preach the introductory sermon at the next Association, and in case of failure Elder John Hendrickson.
9. Ordered that our next Association be at James Lemen's on the 2nd Friday, Saturday and Sabbath in June 1808.
10. Agreed that our Association be called "The Illinois Association".
11. That Wm. Whiteside be appointed to keep the fund.
(Signed by order)
Wm. Jones, Moderator
Wm. Whiteside, Clerk

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Several particulars in the proceedings of this body may properly claim a moment's attention.

One is, that a very large Committee, for an association composed of twenty messengers, was chosen, including all the ministers beside others to arrange its business. This was an entirely useless procedure, consuming time without profit, as it really caused a repetition of the whole business of the meeting. Or, so to speak, the whole business was new through the will twice. Where as all might have come before the entire body, and been at once acted upon. And completed in the same time in which it was finally done by the Association.

Again; with so little business as was done and so little notice of devotional exercises and preaching as appears, it is difficult to see how

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the time of two days was occupied; allowing that all the Lord's day was taken up in unrecorded religious services.

And then, so far as the action of the Association is to be our guide, it is difficult to see what was done with funds. There was only one item of expense named, that of furnishing a copy of the minutes of the meeting to each church, for each of which the clerk was allowed twenty-five cents. One manuscript copy was surely a limited supply for a church. To supply this to each church would cost $1.75.

At the June session of 1809, the clerk was allowed one month to supply each church with a copy and each church was requested to send for its copy. And at a later session , in 1809, each

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church was advised to send paper to the next meeting on which their own Minutes were to be written. These were days in Illinois when printers were scarce, and neither easily reached or easily paid. Hence the arrangement already named of the clerk supplying each church with a manuscript copy of the minutes. These were pioneer times and scarce times for paper, as well as for printers and money.

Sketches, hereafter, only can be given of what seems worth of notice in the proceedings of the body.

1808.
New Design, St. Clair Co.
The third session of the Association was held at James Lemen's beginning, Friday, June 10, 1808, with a sermon by Joseph Chance from

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John 21:15,--"Simon, son of Jonas lovest thou me more than these?" etc.

Seven churches were represented by messengers and letters, reporting Baptisms 28; Rec. by Letter 12; Excluded 4; Members 144.
Joseph Chance, Moderator.

The Richland church requested the Association to ordain as a preacher of the Gospel, John Baugh on this request this action was taken. "Laid on Elders Joseph Chance, John Hendrickson and Wm. Jones to be a presbytery for that business. Also laid on them to appoint the time." The service was performed.

This query came from the Kaine Spring Church: "Is it right to exclude a public man , and to restore him to his membership, and also to his public gift without help from sister churches?" This was the answer

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of the body. It is advised by the Association, that his membership may be restored, by the church to which he had belonged; but as the advice of this council, they had best call help to restore him to his public gift.

There was a query from the committee of the Association. "Is there any society of people, professing Christianity, that we (Baptists) can receive into church fellowship, and they never submit themselves to the ordinance of baptism, in that way which we believe to be right, and if there is, who are they?". To this the answer given was:--"We know of none".

There seems to have been reports unfavorable to the moral character of some of the ministers belonging to the association, either originating after they came to Illinois, or following

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them from the states from which they came. And instead of being brought under the investigation and discipline of the churches to which they belonged, they were thrust before the Association in the form of queries, embodying personal references to the supposed guilty parties. The Association did not decline as should have been done, their consideration, and by their action thus taught the churches their duty to attend to any matter of inquiry and discipline affecting the character of their members in their own bodies.

The churches seemed to have no idea of doing any thing to supply themselves with ministerial labors, but threw themselves at once upon the association. A request was made for it to adopt some

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plan to supply every place with preaching. To this the association answered thus. "Agreed to send two together. Left to the clerk to appoint them which he did as follows: Joseph Chance and James Lemen; Wm. Jones and Joseph Lemen; John Hendrickson and Benjamin Ogle; John Baugh and Robert Brazil." This request seemed to be based upon the principle that the organized body had means and resources for this purpose that were not open to the churches and within their reach. These were eight ministers and seven churches, so that had each church taken care of itself, these would have been one minister to spare to other neighborhoods where there were no churches. But the association helped on the delusion in the response

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it gave.

This mode of procedure appears to have been on the principle that the ministers were the property of the association, to be disposed of as it might please. The churches, therefore, solicited supplies of ministerial labor from it, and the association simply made its clerk a bishop to appoint and distribute its ministerial servants as he thought best. This course was about as arbitrary as a system of slavery,--sending them whither it would to labor without any compensation for their services. Such a course would not be tolerated now, and ought not to have been then. Ministers belong to Christ, but not to associations, or to churches; and neither the one nor, the other, has any right to their services without returning a reasonable equivalent.

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In the ministerial distribution just recorded it will be seen that between the organization of the association, in June 1807, and this meeting, in June 1808, one year, there had been a large increase of ministers for those early times. At the first meeting there were but three ordained ministers, and only two of them, Chance and Jones, were among the eight above named. Within the year, therefore, there had been an increase of six and three of the six were not among the delegates. This increase was not of men who had moved into the country in the time, but men who had been put into he ministry by the churches, and had been in the country for years. Two of them were among the very early comers, and one of them had grown up form infancy at New Design. James Lemen and Rev. Jamis Ogle were brothers-in-law, and Joseph Lemen a son of the one and a nephew of the other. David

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Badgeley, the original minister, for some reason not explained, was not a delegate to the body, nor was he in any way recognized in its proceedings, indeed his standing was in doubt.

The question who should preach the introductory sermon at the next session was thus decided: "The ordained ministers who meet at the next association shall point out one to perform that service."

The October session of the Association, in 1808, was held at Wood River meeting house. After the usual devotional exercises John Hendrickson preached from 2.Cor. 5:20, "Now then we are ambassadors for Christ," etc.

The Feefee's church, in Missouri, was received, with eleven members. The churches were eight. Baptisms 4; Dismissed 5; Members 128.

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Here we have the Baptist strength in 1808. Taking out 19 for the churches that were in Missouri leaves the number 109, for Illinois, with only one more church than at the organization of the body. Thus in 12 years after the organization of the first church, in New Design May 28, 1796, the gain in members had only been 91. This was slow progress.

This rule was adopted as to receiving queries: "No query shall be received except it be by the authority of a church, or when the committee query for themselves." Two of the ministers were by a vote recognized as in full fellowship. They were T. Musick and David Badgeley. This implied that these had been some changed of delinquency against them. A rather singular query by the committee was presented to the association in these words: "Is it the duty of the association to send a

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preacher to fill the stand if requested by the people." This question had reference to a custom then prevailing, and even now in some associations south, of having a stand for preaching at a place where the body did not meet to transact its business. And often business was being done while there was preaching at the stand for the general congregation. It would be natural to suppose that a company of ministers would not wait to ask counsel of an association before answering a request from a waiting assembly for preaching. Christian propriety, if nothing more would seem to prompt an immediate compliance.

1809.
Silver Creek church, June 17, 1809.
The Association began its first session this year, June 17, with the Silver Creek church with usual services John Baugh opened the meeting with a sermon from Rev. 12:4. The Looking Glass Prairie church

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in Illinois, and Cold Water church in Missouri, each with 9 members were received. The letters from the ten churches gave; Baptists 18; Rec. by Letter 11; Dismissed 23; Excluded 4; Died 2; Members 188.
John Baugh, Moderator.

The Richland Creek church thus queried; "Does the association regard itself as an advisory council". Answer, "We believe an association is an advisory council." Another query from the same church as to introducing men into the ministry, was thus answered. "We believe the apostolic manner of setting man forward to the ministry was first to find the gift in the man; and then, if thought fit, to be by the presbytery set at liberty by laying on hands."

The committee to examine the fund reported the association to be in debt to the treasury "five shillings and three pence".

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The average numerical increase in thirteen years had now been two a year, which was indeed very slow progress, but in the sixty eight years that have since passed the Lord has blessed us as a denomination largely. With our present returns as a basis the average numerical increase yearly has been 958. And in this estimate those whom God has taken from our midst, in what time to the higher service of heaven are not of course included.

The second session in 1809, was with the Bottom church, on the 1st of Friday, in October. The introductory Sermon was by Robert Brazle, from 2.Chron. 4:3, 4, and 5.
Robert Brazle, Moderator.

Immediately upon the opening for business "a proposition was made to open correspondence

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with a slave-holding association in Kentucky".

This led to a long and unpleasant discussion when it was decided to open such correspondence, which was a distinct violation of the agreement at the organization of the association. This caused a sad division; and three parties were formed, "two of which opposed slavery, but disagreed on some minor points."

Dr. Peck made this statement of this controversy. "Two papers were drawn up; one was headed ‘United Baptists’; the other ‘Friends to Humanity’, and a third party consisting of the New Design and Richland churches, and a few individuals in other churches held on to the name of ‘The Illinois Union’." The first named party under the final name of the "Illinois Union Baptist Association,"

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reorganized. Thus the record reads: "The party desiring to support the General Union of United Baptists at large being assembled chose Bro. Wm. Jones Clerk and proceeded to business." Letters from five churches were read. They were from Miss. Bottom, Wood River, Looking Glass Prairie, Cold Water and Feefee's Creek. The first three only were in Illinois.

This was an unfortunate break up, leaving only three out of the seven Illinois churches that were represented in the June meeting of the same year. It was a breach never healed.

The first item of business done at this session, was to amend the 12 articles of Principles, on which the Association was organized. That article read thus; that each church may keep its own government as to them (it) it may seem

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best." And the amendment was "that no church have any right to make any rule to cross the Union of United Baptists at large". In this amendment the liberty of the original article was surely denied, and the two parts were in conflict. But something of the kind was undoubtedly considered necessary to justify their action in the division. But its adoption was too late to reach the existing evil, being an ex post facto law.

A query in from the church with which the body was assembled, in the following form; "Is it right for a church to give letters of dismission? If so, on what grounds?" The answers were; "We believe it right for a church to give letters in case of the person moving out of the bounds, or wanting to join a church nearer to them of the same faith and order."

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This also was put in the minutes: "We believe it right not to commune with those who have left the General Union at large."

The adjournment was to hold another session at Wood River meeting house in December 1809, their future about two months.

Here it is proper, at the close of this session in which this division took place to pause, and ascertain if possible the causes were fully of this sad rupture of fraternal harmony. And to do this it is right that we slip back and look at facts.

I have already at an earlier point in this history quoted Dr. Peck's statement, which being brief I may repeat here, of a tacit agreement at the formation of the Association: "As a part of the churches

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and brethren were conscientiously opposed to slavery, it was tacitly agreed in this Union that correspondence was not to be carried into Kentucky". On Dr. P.s testimony then we have here one of the causes distinctly set forth, which was the violation of a well understood, and solemn engagement by the pro slavery party. But another fact must be considered to get a more enlarged of affairs on this subject. Dr. Peck, in speaking of James Lemen, Sen., awards to ruin a very exalted character both as a man and a Christian, and said "He took an active part in the lead of religious meetings, many years before he was licensed to preach. He was an opponent to slavery, both from principle and from policy and came to Illinois to live in a free country.

From strong expressions which Mr. Lemen

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made on the subject of slavery, while preaching at Richland church, in 1809, (which ought to have been passed without notice) Larkin Rutherford, one of the members, took offence and brought a complaint into the church. The little church became divided--the association of churches also divided; and the issue was three parties of Baptists, who excited for ten years, and two parties much longer."

Dr. Peck was mistaken in saying that this difficulty originated in "Richland church." It was in Richland Creek church, a mistake too important to be overlooked. Lemen and Rutherford were members of the Creek church, and both had been delegates to the association from that church. I will here present an exact copy of the records of that church. It had been recognized

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as an independent church, on Sep. 12, 1807, having up to that time been an "arm" of the New Design Church; and James Lemen, Sen., had been licensed to preach by it on July 9, 1808. The record reads thus:
"July 8, 1809, A distress was brought in by Bro. Larkin Rutherford, against James Lemen, Sen., for saying, that he disfellowshipped slave holders, and those that fellowshipped them. Then the question was put to the church to know whether Bro. Rutherford had a right to be distressed with Bro. Lemen for so saying. The church was divided in judgment, which threw them into confusion. The church called two meetings to endeavor for a union, or fellowship, but all to no purpose".

"On account of the church being divided those

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were two meeting on the 9th of September, 1809; one at J.J. Whiteside and the other at Jacob Ogles. Three messengers were chosen to the association, out of each part of the church; and at the association both setts were refused a seat. And the association being divided in opinion there was a split took place amongst them. One part professed to be in fellowship with the slave holding Union of Baptists at large. The other party professed to be Friends of Humanity, denying union and communion with all persons holding the doctrine of perpetual, involuntary; hereditary slavery." Bethel church records from Dr. Bulkley.

Here is brought to light another cause undoubtedly having much influence in producing the discussion in the association on slavery; and finally

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in the sad division of the body. Although the messengers from neither party of the Richland Creek church were received into the association, yet the subject of controversy was carried into that body.

It should not be here forgotten or overlooked that the Richland Creek church of which of which James Lemen and L. Rutherford were members, had on Feb. 13, 1808, nearly a year and a half before this distress was brought into the church adopted what were Tarrant's Rules concerning Slavery , and these were as decided against slave-holding as were the remarks of Mr. Lemen in his preaching. In view of these facts, therefore Mr. Rutherford had no cause for bringing in his

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"distress" to the church, for as a member of the body he had adopted, or at least given his consent to opinion in harmony with Mr. Lemen's statement. And with Tarrant's Rules on their Records, the wonder is that these should have been any members in the church who would sustain the distress as having any just ground on which to rest. But the spirit of slavery never could boast of great consistency or conscientiousness. And strange as may be the fact, among these few and feeble churches and embers a very important scripture for them, in their circumstances, seems to have been forgotten, or entirely overlooked, the spirit of which should have prevailed over them all. "Let us therefore follow after the things which make for peace, and things where with one may edify another." Rom. 14:19. Had this scripture been duly regarded in those days the history of our early

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beginnings as a denomination in Illinois would have developed vast greater prosperity and growth. The causes of this most unhappy disagreement in our early churches are in these review clearly discoverable. In the Association a violation of agreement, and in the Richland Creek church a disregard of its own rules.

When the association passed the resolution to open correspondence with the association in Kentucky approving of slavery, the standing clerk, Wm. Whiteside was among the opponents of the measure. The Moderator, Rob. Brazil, being of the slavery party, remained in the chair, while the clerk retired making necessary a new election, by the party that contained in session as an association. It cannot escape the notice of the careful reader that with this party the support of the Union of United Baptists at large, was the

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grand test of fellowship,--seemingly it was regarded as the standard of orthodoxy. The absurdity and folly of setting up such a standard is commented in an earlier part of this work.

Making the record continuous, the third session of 1809, was held in the Wood River meeting-house, beginning on the 1st Friday in Dec. 1809, with a sermon by David Badgeley, from Rom. 3:9, "What then? Are we better then they?" etc.
D. Badgeley, Moderator.

Six churches were represented, and 4 of them were in Illinois. Baptism 1; Rec. by Letter 1; Died 1; Members 59. Business much as usual. The association found it necessary, in its shattered condition, for Dr. Peck said: "The churches seemed to be broken into fragments, to strengthen the things which remained, and therefore "appointed T. R. Musick, Rob. Brazil, D. Badgeley,

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D. Waddle, Moses Short, Wm. Brazil, John Findley and Wm. Jones to meet with the different churches, to help them in their present distresses, to establish those that wish to live with the United Baptists, and if need be to constitute churches. The first meeting to be with the Bottom church on the 12th of February next at Daniel _______; the 13 at New Design; the 15th at Silver Creek; the 16th at Richland Creek; the 17th at Richland; the 18th at Looking Glass Prairie; the 19th at Wood River." The meetings were doubtless held.

In this appointment the association took to itself a little authority, that we are not accustomed to consider as being the right of these bodies. It assumed to direct the committee to organize churches if they deemed it necessary. This we have regarded and do regard, as a matter resting wholly with the individuals

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who enter into the organization, and with it associations have nothing to do.

No minutes of 1810 have been obtained. These were doubtless different opinions prevailing among the members of the same church, which increased the troubles.

1811.
In this year, 1811, the meeting commenced on the Saturday before the 4th Sabbath in Sept., with the Looking Glass Prairie church, the sermon being by James Rentfro from 1.Pet. 4:12, 13 "Beloved think it not strange concerning the fiery trial which is to try you," etc.
Wm. Jones, Moderator. Rob. Brazil, Clerk.

Four churches were represented, and two of these were organized after the division: Rec. by letter 19;

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Dismissed 2; Died 1; Members 56.

The Ogle's Creek church made a request that some previous action of the body against the emancipation preachers should be softened. But the desired action was not taken. Arrangements were made for certain churches to be informed where the next meeting would be, and adjourned to meet again in two months.

The second session in 1811, was held at D. Badgeley's, St. Clair Co., beginning Nov. 22 with a sermon by T. R. Musick, from Isa. 61:1, "The Spirit of the Lord God is upon me;" etc.

Six churches were represented, and only 4 in Illinois. Baptisms 62; Rec. by Letter 3; Dismissed 14; Excluded 2; Died 1; Members 150. Feefee's Creek church reported 58 baptisms.
T. R. Musick, Moderator. James Rentfro, Clerk.

This explanation was given "To relieve the minds

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of any that may not understand us, we did not, nor do not mean the rule concerning the emancipating preachers, to extend to any that have not departed from the General Union, or given hurts by disorderly conduct." "Elder J. Rentfro was appointed to obtain a book and record the Constitution, and all the business done by the association, and present it at the next meeting."

The minutes for 1812 have not been obtained.

1813.
The association met with the Wood River church, beginning Aug. 27, 1813, with a sermon by Nathan Arnett from Psa. 126:6, "He that goeth forth, and weepeth," etc.

Seven churches were represented, 5 being in Illinois. Baptisms 3; Rec. by Letter 11; Dismissed 16; Excluded 14; Died 5; Members 206.

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N. Arnett, Moderator.

A Circular Letter was written by Elder Jones and received by the body, and written in a minutes.

1814.
The session of this year was with the Feefee's Creek church, and was held at Elder T. R. Musick's, commencing Sep. 23, 1814, with a sermon by D. Badgeley, from John 10:14, "I am the good Shepherd,"etc.
D. Badgeley, Moderator. T. R. Musick, Clerk.

Eight churches were represented and 3 only were in Illinois. Only the number of members in each is given, making aggregate 171 members. Of these 83 belonged to the churches in Illinois. Prairie de Long church in Ills., and Femme Osage church in Missouri were received.

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1815.
The Association met with the Ogle's Creek church, at David Badgeley's, Sep. 15, 1815, and was opened with a sermon by Lewis Williams from John 10:2, 3, 4,--"But he that entereth in by the door is the Shepherd of the sheep." Etc.

Nine churches were represented. The whole membership only is given, being 216. Only 4 churches were in Illinois, having 96 members.
W. Jones, Moderator. T. R. Musick, Clerk.

Turkey Hill church not having represented itself for two years, this entry was made in the minutes: "We believe it right to appoint a committee to go to Turkey Hill church and inquire into the order of that church and make report to the next association--We authorize the committee to sit in church order with the Turkey Hill church as it

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respects any thing that may be before them." A committee of ten were appointed.

The minutes were for the first time printed this year. The usual services for the Sabbath included three sermons. And the arrangement made was in this order. "Who shall fill the stand tomorrow? Answer, who feels the impression." We are not informed how this plan worked.

The minutes of 1816 have not been obtained.

1817.
The meeting this year was with the Wood River church, and commenced on the 4th Friday in Sep. 1817, with a sermon by Charles Collard, from 1 John 2:23, "Who so denieth the Son," etc. Nine churches were represented, beside three received, which were Canteen Creek, Upper Quiver and Shoal Creek. The members were 209.

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C. Collard, Moderator. T. R. Musick, Clerk.

At this session, the association was divided. The Mississippi river was recognized as the natural line between the bodies. The churches on the West side of the river formed the Missouri Association.

The minutes of 1818 were not obtained.

1819.
The Association met in 1819, with the Looking Glass Prairie church, the session opening with a Sermon Oct. 8, by J. M. Peck from Rom. 5:8, "But God commendeth his love toward us," etc.

Ten churches were represented, and all being in the counties of Madison, Bond, St. Clair, Monroe and Washington. Three

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Churches were received. One of them being the Richland Creek church. This was one of the churches that formed the third party in the division of 1809, and in which the Rutherford trouble originated. Baptisms 4; Rec. by Letter 18; Restored 1; Dismissed 14; Excluded 3; Died 3; Members 194.
D. Badgeley, Moderator. W. Jones, Clerk.

The Missionaries sent to St. Louis in 1817 by the Bap. Board of Foreign Missions, Elders John M. Peck and James E. Welch, were present at this session, and both preached by appointment of the Association on the Lord's Day. This was the first Associational meeting they ever attended in the State.

The minutes being this year printed, ordained ministers are designated by small capital letters

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and the number belonging to the churches was eight and four visitors.

There were four associations recognized as corresponding bodies: the Wabash, Bethel, Missouri and Mt. Pleasant. Of the last two nothing before has been heard.

Here we have the first recognition of Christian Missions by the Association. The record in the minutes was as follows: "Heard a Corresponding letter from the Baptist Board of Foreign Missions, containing interesting intelligence of the prosperity of the Redeemer's kingdom."

"The queries from the Wood River church considered. 1. Is it right to correspond with the Baptist Board of Foreign Missions? Answer, Yes."

"Is there any use for the United Society for the spread of the Gospel, and if so, wherein does its

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usefulness consist?

Ans. Yes, and its use is to supply destitute places with preaching."

These statements were a pretty emphatic endorsement of Missions.

"Bro. Badgeley reported that he had made some progress in composing an outline of the history of the Association, and requested some person to aid him. Therefore, brother Jones was appointed."

As a new feature Quarterly meetings were appointed.

On the Lord's day brethren Williams, Welch and Peck preached, and this remark closed the record, "The closing scene was quite solemn and affecting; and, we trust, will be long remembered by some present."

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The minutes of 1820, have not been obtained.

1821.
The meeting of 1821, was with the Richland Creek Church, beginning Saturday, Aug. 25, with a sermon by James Street, from 2. Tim. 4:2,--"Preach the Word:" etc.

The Concord church was received. The churches were 16. Baptisms 21; Rec. by Letter 33; Restored 2; Dismissed 19; Excluded 10; Died 2; Members 366.
Wm. Jones, Moderator. James Tunnell, Clerk.

At this meeting John M. Peck was present, and preached on Sabbath evening from 1. Tim. 3:14,--"But if I tarry long," etc.

"The committee to which was referred the report of David Badgeley, made last association, made their report, and the work was approved, and the Clerk authorized to file it up with the records of the Association up to the present date."

This refers doubtless to Badgeley's history of the Body.

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Query from the Ogle's Creek and Richland Creek churches. When two churches are constituted in the same settlement, so as to occupy the same meeting-house what advise would you give? Answer, that one church dissolve by letter, and join the other."

The minutes of 1822--23--and 24 have not been obtained.

1825.
Saturday, Sep. 24, 1825, the Association met with the Elkhorn Church, Wash. Co., and the meeting was opened with a sermon by William Kinney from Psa.133:1, "Behold, how good and how pleasant it is for brethren to swell together in unity."

Big Spring church was received. The churches were 12, but only 10 were represented.. The ministers were 7. Baptisms 28; Rec. by Letter 22; Restored 4; Dismissed 37;

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Excluded 11; Died 3; Members 220.
Wm. Jones, Moderator. J. Tunnel, Clerk.

Nothing more claiming my attention in the minutes.

From another source than the minutes, which I did not obtain of 1824, I have been informed that the Association in 1824 refused further correspondence with the Board of Foreign Missions, and became a bitter anti-Mission body.

The first minister who settled in the state, David Badgeley died Dec. 16, 1824, at the advanced age of 76 years. Yet in this first session after the event there was no notice of his death, nor allusion to it.

The minutes of 1826 have not been obtained.

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1827.
The association met with the Canteen church at the house of Alexander Conlee, Ridge Prairie, Mad. Co. Saturday, Sep. 22, 1827, and the meeting was opened with a sermon by Alexander Conlee, from 1.Cor. 6:19, 20--"Ye are not your own," etc.

The churches were 10, and 9 were represented. Baptisms 10; Rec. by Letter 15; Restored 2; Dismissed 13; Excluded 4; Died 4; Members 228.
Wm. Jones, Moderator. Wm. Ogle, Clerk.

There was nothing more in the Minutes that I needed.

The minutes of 1828 and 1829 are wanting.

1830.
The session of 1830, was with the Wood River Church commencing Sep. 25, with a sermon by William Kinney, from John 3:36, "If the Son therefore, shall make you free," etc.

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Long Run and Pleasant Mount churches in Macoupin Co., were received, one with 12, and the other with 9 members. The churches were 13. Baptisms 7; Rec. by Letter 43; Dismissed 39; Excluded 7; Died 1; Members 301.
Wm. Jones, Moderator. Wm. Ogle, Clerk.

The minutes report seven ordained ministers.

I copy the following from the minutes:
"The reference from the Richland church relative to a certain publication over the signatures of the publishing committee of the Rock-Spring and Edwardsville churches, published in the Pioneer of Feb. 6, 1830, directed to the Western Baptists, taken up and answered as follows: Where as, the Edwardsville and Rock Spring Churches have accused the Illinois Association of exercising power over churches and individuals, and have

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cast a stigma on the churches and Association in saying they were influenced by a few leading brethren, we think those churches have been mistaken in their views. The churches composing the Illinois Association have always considered themselves to be independent and influenced by none; and the general contents of former minutes were their united voices, through their Messengers; and they never felt a disposition to remonstrate against their former proceedings--firmly believing those pretended liberal institutions of the present day, to spread the gospel, to be without any license from the word of God; and as the love of money is the root of all evil, we fear, they will only tend to sap the foundation of both our civil and religious liberties. We therefore advise our brethren of the different churches to be aware of their stratagems."

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The Clear Spring and Shoal Creek churches were dismissed at their request.

In the quotation made from the proceedings of the Association, we have a full expression of the determined opposition of the body to the work of Christian benevolence, which had years before began to develop itself in this body, but it was not alone in this, it also had pervaded all the Associations with which this was in correspondence. And at this date it may be truly said so far as the Baptists were concerned was an anti-mission state.

1831.
With the Sugar Creek, in Clinton Co., the Association met, Oct. 1, 1831, for its anniversary, which was commenced with

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a sermon by Eli Short from 2.Tim. 4:2, "Preach the Word:" etc.

Eight churches were represented. Baptisms 7; Rec. by Letter 34; Restored 3; Dismissed 11; Excluded 6; Died 4; Members 247.
Wm. Jones, Moderator. Wm. Ogle, Clerk.

The business was both in character and in order as usual.

The following unusual action was taken.
The Association having understood that some difficulties have arisen in the Horse Prairie Church, that has prevented them from a Gospel travel; therefore, it is agreed, that Elders Silas Chrisler, Samuel Smith, Thomas Ray, Wm. Kinney and Eli Short, be appointed to go and inquire into those difficulties, and if any exist, to give to the church, such advise as they

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may think best calculated to lead them again in tot he faith and practice of our Sister Churches, and make report to our next Association."

This surely was forcing a council upon a church without it being solicited; and certainly seemed somewhat dictatorial. According to common usage, it would have been in order, in view of the failure of the church to represent itself in the association for the body to have sent a committee to inquire into the cause of their failure, and aid them in resuming their position in the meetings of their brethren. In this course there would have been no departure from associational prerogatives. But to send a committee of five ordained ministers to inquire into certain difficulties which rumor said existed in a church which prevented

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its harmonious progress, was quite another thing. It is generally supposed that advice from a council is timely when it is solicited.

As I am approaching the end of this historical sketch of the first association in Illinois, I will transfer some statements which this body claimed were historical:
"Whereas, Perceiving by the minutes of those people calling themselves the Baptized churches of Christ, Friends to Humanity, are setting forth things, we believe, to deceive the public into the belief, that they had not rent off, or separated themselves from the union of Baptists, as formed in this country, which then did compose the Illinois Association, and which was founded on the principles of the United Baptists; therefore, believing it to

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be our duty to give a fair and impartial statement of these things things as they are, and as they were then transacted, we have appointed Br's. Wm. Kinney, Wm. Jones, Sen. and Wm. Ogle, to extract from the records of this association; and also, from the records of such churches as may have any records relative to this circumstance; and when by them to taken, to be annexed to the minutes of this Association.
Signed by order and in behalf of this Association
Wm. Ogle, Clerk. Wm. Jones, Sen., Moderator.

We the undersigned, being appointed by the association, to extract from the records of this association, and such church books as may be relative to the situation or standing of the people calling themselves the Baptized Church of Christ, etc.; do find, that they went out from us, as is abundantly evident as appears from records. As also it appears by the same records,

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that this is the oldest Association west of the Ohio River, and was formed by the conjunction of three churches in 1807, which three churches had been constituted on the principles of the general union of the United Baptists, one of which traveled with her constitution from Kentucky; and this association formed by those churches, was also constituted upon the principles of the United Baptists, from which has since emanated, seven associations--four in this state and three in Missouri. At the first meeting of this association, which was in June 1807, in adopting her rules, the 22 question and answer, was as follows:--"Does this communion extend throughout the Union."? Answered. This communion shall extend throughout the union." James Lemen Sr., (now dead) who it is well known was the leader and founder of the people called friends to Humanity, etc, was a member

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of the Association when the above rule was adopted. All things appear to be peaceably and in order, until 1809, when said Lemen gave distress to the brethren of Richland Creek church, in which he was a member, and was taken under dealings by said church, which then belonged to the Association; and while the church was investigating the several charges against him, he rent himself from the body and refused to be dealt with by her, and drew a part of the member with him, some of whom are now, and ever have been amongst the leaders of that people; and as further evidence, that they went out or rent off from us, we quote the following extract from the records of said church.

The Baptist church of Christ, at Richland Creek, met according to appointment, on Saturday, 9th September, 1809, Br. Samuel Best, Moderator. 1st.

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The business of this day, to choose delegates to the Association. 2nd To exclude Br. James Lemen, Sr., for renting himself from the church, and drawing a party with him, and other accusations too tedious to mention, and to lay under censure, all those what justified him conduct. Signed by order of the church"
John Phillips, Clerk.

The Baptist church of Christ, met according to appointment on the 2nd Saturday in Oct, 1810, Br. Samuel Best, Moderator.--We, the members of Richland Creek church, have been accused of excommunicating Brother Lemen, for the principles of emancipation, and in order to show the world, and to convince him, and the rest of the members that went off with him, that we did not; we lay the excommunication of Bro. Lemen down, and set him on the same footing that he was before; that is, we

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hold him under censure for some distress which is not occasioned by the aforesaid principles, which has not been removed. Signed by order of the Church"
William Kinney, Clerk.

There is no record to show, as we can find, that a restoration of James Lemen, Sr., and those that went off with him, to the fellowship of the church ever took place. The same distress which commenced as above, together with that of emancipation, entered into the ensuing association, held in Oct., 1809; and there caused a division by drawing off a part of the members who attached themselves to James Lemen, Sr., and those that went from the church with him, which appears to be the cause of the association making the following record:--"We believe it right not to commune with those that have left the general Union." The next Association

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as appears from record, appointed a committee at attend the churches and inquire into the nature of the distress occasioned by members leaving them and joining the Lemen party, as it was called. This committee recommended that the churches should, when they excluded any of those that rent off, write as follows:--"They went out from us, and therefore they are no more of us." And the next Association says on the record, "We approbate the proceedings of the committee chosen at the last association to visit the churches"
Wm. Jones, Sr.
Wm. Kinney.
Wm. Ogle."

The above is the Committees report.

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It may be well in giving a faithful history of the sentiments of those known as Baptists in the early days of Illinois, to insert here an extract from the Circular Letter published this year (1831) in the Minutes of this body. It was written by Risdon Moore,--not a minister.

Dear Brethren;--We are glad we have another interview in an associated capacity, and that those are so many that prove faithful in these trying times, when anti-christ by his miraculous power, has gained such ascendency over the hearts of so many of the citizens of our free country, that he has drawn many by his silver cords; and a great number of his servants are traveling through every part of our country, as well as other nations, to establish the different religious institutions, falsely so called, also, a number of editors are sending their papers

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into every part, to succor their labor, persuading the people, that missionary institutions, under the pretence of spreading the Gospel of God, such as learning young men to preach, and sending them forth under perpetual pay; Bible, Tract, and Temperance societies, etc; and lastly above all, the Sunday School Union! by which we think they expect to get the reins of government in their own hands, by training parents and children by their Sunday school books and papers, persuading them to believe that it is a Heaven-born institution; and that it is a great thing to be a member of that institution--and so tread down Zion under their feet, and cause her members to pay tax to support their institution. Already some of these misguided biggots say, that in a little time, the old Baptist preachers will have but few hearers, if any. Thus the enemies

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of the church expect shortly to gain the victory over her. It is much to be lamented, that so many are already led away by their wicked devices. Therefore, Brethren, be aware of the signs of the present evil day--Holy Scriptures tell us of false prophets and false Christs, that should come, and that evil seducers should wax worse and worse, and that many should depart from the faith, and follow their pernicious ways, which should cause the truth to be evil spoken of. By their fruits they are easily known by all lovers of truth. Money, power and human accomplishments seem to be their chief aim--therefore, they do not belong to the visible church of Christ, for the church of Christ consists chiefly of the poor of this world, whom God hath chosen rich in faith, and heirs of the Kingdom. But Anti-Christ's Kingdom belongs to this world; therefore, the world runs after

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it. The rich, the honorable, the mighty, and the greatest part of the aspiring community that wishes to make a fair show in this world, are flowing into it, the framers of the great Missionary with her Multitude of the institutors of her auxiliaries. How full of boasting they are, that they are doing miracles by their means, in causing emperors and Kings with their subjects to bow to them; and that for their labor, God will give them great crowns of glory. Christ has promised to help his Zion rights early, and may the true God and eternal sustain you against all the false Missionaryisms, Campbellisms, Pedo-Baptisms, and all the falacisms that are a float in the world--and may he deliver you from the power of the beast, his mark, the number of his name, and all that worship him."

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1832.
The session of the Association in 1832 was held with the Elk horn church, Washington Co. commencing Oct. 6, with a sermon by Samuel Smith from June 24, "Now unto him that is able to keep you from falling," etc.

Hopewell church, Macoupin Co., received, with 14 members. The churches were ten. Baptisms 12; Rec. by Letter 31; Restored 1; Dismissed 31; Excluded 4; Died 5; Members 239.
Wm. Jones, Moderator. Wm. Ogle, Clerk.

The business was wholly local and associational. And here the sketch ends.

The Minutes of 1832 is the last I have been able to obtain, and perhaps brings down the sketch to as late a period as it would be profitable to carry it. Indeed, I might not have thought it best to extend it thus for had it not been the first association formed in the territory now embraced in this State, and also a fair sample of all of its class. In obtaining a knowledge

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of this one we have a type of all the others, as their histories are very uniform these being no expansion or growth. The proceedings are stereotyped. There was no religious progress, as the Spirit which pervaded them all was that of Anti-effort, as well as that of Anti-Mission--one of a do-nothing character. And of course nothing was gained. The existence of these associations, as of the churches of which they were composed has really been a gradual death.

The Associations of this character in 1832, so far as I have been able to learn were Wabash District, Sangamon, Muddy River, Kaskaskia and Apple Creek.

These had been one bearing the name of Mount Pleasant, but it disappeared some years ago from the Correspondence of this body.

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Chapter V. The Division of Baptists.

The division of Baptists taking the name of Friends of Humanity.
No. 1 Beginning in 1823
Thoroughly revised.
The only question is about printing the Circulars.

History of the Baptized Churches of Christ, Friends to Humanity.
The earliest minutes which have been obtained of the meetings of this division of Illinois Baptists are those of 1821. They did not take the name of an Association, as applied to their annual assemblage, but that of a meeting,--an annual meeting.

The meeting of 1821, was held with the New Design church, in Monroe Co., beginning Sep. 7th. There were but three churches represented. Another church made its report afterwards, which gave the members of all at 186. The churches were Cantine Creek, Fountain Creek, Silver Creek and Providence. The introductory sermon was by David Hilton, from 1st Tim. 4:8. "For bodily exercise profiteth little," etc.

There was a peculiarity distinguishing this meeting, and many subsequent ones of this people, and especially as they were in a new country, where so much destitution is ordinarily supposed to exist. It was that from the three churches represented there were fourteen

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delegates present, of whom nine were ordained ministers, equal to three from each church. Their names were, Benjamin Ogle, James Lemen, Jr, Joseph Lemen, John Clark, James Lemen, Sen., Daniel Hilton, Josiah Lemen, Moses Lemen and James Pulliam.

The same peculiarity existed in the First Association--the Illinois Association of United Baptists, in which the ordained ministers were very numerous for the number of members in the churches.

The range of business at these meeting was exceedingly limited. The number of persons baptized in the year in one church, Cantine Creek, was 42, in Fountain Creek church, one, in Silver Creek, ten--53 in all. So far as known this number of baptisms in one church, 42, had never been equalled in the State in one year before. The minutes brief as they are, together with the Circular Letter indicate, to those of little discernment that the class of persons in this body were a different people from those in the Illinois Baptist Association, in their general intelligence, and in their views of Christian duty. They were missionary in character

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and in Spirit; whereas, the others were not, and this fact indicates a higher grade of mind and of Christianity.

The Spirit of the body, and its character can be best learned from their Circular Letter, or Address, as they called it. And it will be here given entire. It was written by Rev. James Lemen, Jr., the last of ht this family of Pioneer Illinois Preachers, of widely known in their day, who was called to his reward, and whose death was but a year or two since.

A Circular Address.
From the ministers and delegates composing the Annual Meeting of the Baptized Churches of Christ, Friends of Humanity, to the churches

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they represent.
Beloved Brethren;
Although our present condition of life is such, that we are permitted to meet but occasionally, yet the Author of our existence has provided means whereby we may converse with each other, though absent in body, which is by way of letters. Therefore, we most gladly avail ourselves of this method of communication, and through the medium of a Circular, transmit to you a tender of our sincere affection and Christian fellowship. Be pleased to receive this as such.

We can inform you, that according to appointment, we, your delegates met at the time

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and place specified in our minutes; and, to our comfort and satisfaction, found suitable preparations for the comfortable accommodation of all who attended our annual meeting. The first day was spent in divine worship: on the second, the letters from the different churches were called for. Providence and Cold Water churches presented none; but we have since received a letter from Providence church, which informed us that their number was thirty-seven, and also requested a visit from some of our preachers. For further information relative to the manner in which our meeting was conducted, we will refer you to our minutes, an examination of which will furnish you

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with information relative to our present number, with the exception of the two churches above mentioned.

Dear Brethren, when by a retrospective glance, we retrace the roll of but a few seasons, and realize the commencement of our labors on the waters of Cantine and Silver Creeks, contrasting those times with the present, ought not the response of our hearts to be, "The Lord hath done great things for us where of we are glad." In 1810 , a small handful, seven in number, withdrew their membership from the general union, on the account of involuntary slavery, believing it to be an iniquity which ought not to be tolerated by Christian churches. Formidable indeed, were the powers which

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we then had to combat, and alarming were the oppositions which we had to encounter. But none of these things moved us, being sensible, that unmerited, involuntary, perpetual, absolute, hereditary slavery, is contrary to, and a violation of the principles of nature, reason, justice, policy and scripture. In 1811, the Lord was pleased graciously to move on the minds of a few faithful members on Silver Creek, (also seven in number) who called for a Constitution, 9 in February of the following year were constituted, three of whom have departed this life in the triumphs of faith.

Several years were spent, in faithful labor, ore there was a discovery of any fruits thereof. At length Almighty God smited

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propitiously on our efforts, and almost instantaneously swelled our number to its present, and is still making daily additions. Beloved brethren, while one behold that arm which quietly props the universe, thus gloriously displaying its power in our defence, do we not feel conscious that our cause is just? It is the cause of oppressed humanity. We have seen the slave sons of Africa torn from their native land by the hand of a ruthless enemy, and condemned to perpetual bondage, to be driven at pleasure, like hogs and sheep to market, there to be disposed of for silver or gold; where husband and wife, parent and child, are torn

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from the fond embraces of each other; where the groans of the distressed father or of the more deeply afflicted mother; the tear of the weeping child, are seen and heard only to be disregarded. Let humanity drop a tear, and blot from the catalogue of human offences the enormity of such crimes, that they may not be told in "Gath nor published in the streets of Askelon, lest the daughters of the Philistines rejoice, lest the daughters of the uncircumcised triumph." Alas! This evil has not only found its way in to our nation, and spread its poison there, but, restless to obtain still greater victories has approached the portals of the sanctuary of the Most

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High: and, lamentable to relate, has found admittance there, and defiled even the temple of the living God: causing the children of light (who have been redeemed from cruel bondage, and restored to the enjoyment of perfect liberty,) to grow forgetful of the change, and to impose involuntary servitude on their brethren in the gospel, and thus becoming masters, can say to our brother, come and he cometh, and to another, go, and he goeth: new maxims which the gospel knows nothing of. And will a God of equal justice rest quietly in his pavilion, when "justice has fallen asleep, and judgement gone away backwards;" while the "poor are bought for silver, and the needy for a pair of shoes?" Amos 8:6. Has

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he not already declared that "his people of late have risen up against him as an enemy, plucking off the robe with the garment from them that would pass by securely as men averse from war?" Micah 2.9--He has also declared what the consequences shall be. "Woe unto him that buildeth his house by unrighteousness, and his chambers by wrong; that useth his neighbor's service without wages, and giveth him not for his work." Jer. 22:13. "Behold the hire of the laborers who have reaped down your fields, which is of you kept back by fraud, crieth: and the cries of them which have reaped are entered into the ears of the Lord of Sabbath." James 5.4. Seeing God has taken cognizance of these things in the archieves of

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heaven, and is now looking through the window of his habitation to see whether any will appear on the side of the oppressed, shall we refuse to come up to the help of the Lord against the mighty? Will we not, like the men of Gideon, come forth in haste, unappalled, before a host of opposition, and exclaim in the consciousness of our rectitude, "We struggle for liberty? Our cause is just. It is the cause which induced our forefathers to quit their peaceful homes, and go forth in martial array to meet the enemy in the tented field, (with victory or death written on their foreheads), regardless of either their blood or treasure. And although some unfortunately

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found an untimely grave in the desolate wilderness, and went down to the chambers of silence without either a change of apparel, a sheet or a coffin, while the bones of others were left to bleach upon the mountains without a burial, yet their cause being righteous it still prospered in the hands of their survivors, who at length obtained a glorious conquest, which the pages of future history will be found to relate. Thus the enemy being driven life a flock of frightened goats before an impetuous storm, back to their native shore, to won the eclipse of their glory, the war-worn veterans of America could return in peace to their former habitations, bearing

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laurels of victory in their hands; at whose return the daughters of America could join in song with the daughters of Israel, and sing Britain hath slain her thousands, but American hath slain her tens of thousands.

Thus having obtained their freedom they could form a government of their own, the principles of which all nations are, or will be, proud to imitate; and we trust, that under the influence of a just providence, we shall be able to boldly and nobly defend our cause, and to build up a society, the government of which will be a pattern for societies yet unborn to follow. The holy scriptures are on our side, which will be seen from the

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passages to which you have been cited. More over, the constitution of the United States, and of this State, are both in our favor. The former declares "that all men are born equally free independent." While the latter states that "there shall be neither slavery nor involuntary servitude introduced into this State, otherwise then for the punishment of crimes where of the party shall have been duly convicted." Thus the scene is changed, and now instead of being charged with flying in the face of authority, we can exhort our congregations to be subject to the higher powers. But lest our address should appear more like a volume than a circular, we shall now conclude with

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a short exhortation. Recollect, brethren, that we are constituted on the scriptures of the Old and new testaments and have also taken them from our form of government. Must it not be said of them as was said of Goliath's sword, "there is none better." Therefore endeavor to become conversant with those holy pages. Read them prayerfully, that you may have a correct understanding of what you read for the doctrines we hold. The manner of our building up and governing churches is all drawn therefrom. Being thus taught, thus constituted, thus governed, possessing an established heart you can confidently "answer the messengers of the nation, "the Lord hath founded Zion, and the poor of his people shall trust

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in it." Isa.14.32 And also bid them turn in this way, and to walk about Zion, and go round about her: tell the towers thereof; mark you well her bulwarks; consider her palaces; that ye may tell it to the generation following" Psalm 48.12,13.

The minutes of 1822, have not been obtained. The Annual Meeting of the Friends of Humanity for 1823, was held at New Design, commencing Oct. 10th. The Rev. John Clark delivered the introductory sermon, from Psa.48.12,13. "Walk about Zion, and go round about her:" etc. Seven churches were represented, by 37 delegates, of whom 13 were ministers belonging to the churches. Baptisms 39; Rec. by Letter 4l; Restored 3; Dismissed 8; Excluded 9; Died 7; Members 237.

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The churches were Cantine Creek, Silver Creek, Fountain Creek, Turkey Hill, Merrimack and Cold Water, Grand Glaze and Crooked Creek. The Circular Address was written by Rev. Benjamin Ogle, which will be here given.

Circular
Dear Brethren,
The time having rolled on, which has favored us with another opportunity of offering to your serious consideration, things, which we conceive, to be most conducive to our own happiness, and the increase of the kingdom of our Redeemer; we, therefore, would call your attention to the duties which we owe to God, our rightful sovreign, and also the duties we owe one to another.

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Our blessed savior tells us, that to "love the Lord our God with all our heart, and with all our Soul, and with all our mind, is the first and great commandment; and that the second is like unto it, though shalt love thy neighbor as thyself." Mat. 22.37--We trust, brethren, that we have not, nor ever will forget this golden rule; which if observed by all, would unite all in one:
"How blest would every nation prove, thus ruled by equity and love; All would be friends without a foe, and form a paradise below."

Are we not, brethren, under the strongest obligation to serve our God, when we consider for

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a moment, his great goodness towards us, without going back to the time when we espoused, as we believe, the best of causes. Ought not our hearts to glow with love and gratitude unto him when we call to mind our infantile state; when we were but very few in number and our opposition very great: when we had to go through deep water, and even through the fire. Yet, has he brought us through all unhurt, according to his promise, "when then passest through the water, I will be with thee," etc. Isa.43.2

The lord has been, and still is, carrying on his work among us; adding to our number, we trust, such as shall be saved. Have we not often times been astonished as his goodness

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towards us, notwithstanding our many failures, when we have assembled together to worship our God. And often times in the presence of our foes, while discharging our duty, trusting in the Lord, has he not poured us out such a blessing as there was scarcely room enough to contain it; even to the astonishment of our opponents. Might we not then, in confidence, say with the Psalmist, "thou preparest a table before me in the presence of mine enemies; thou annointest my head with oil; my cup runneth over. Surely goodness and mercy shall follow me" etc. Psa.23:5,6. But we must still remember, that we remain in a state of trial, and that it is not the least of our trials to have lost several

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eminent characters, who were pillars in the house of God. But our loss is their infinite gain. They were honorably discharged, and now are reaping the fruit of their labor; while we are left to combat with the world, the flesh, and the devil, without their aid. Yet, let us remember, that we are fighting under the same commander (for whose sake, saith the Apostle, we are killed all the days long, we are accounted as sheep for the slaughter,) who will, ore long, bring us off more than conquerors.

Among the worthies whom we have lost for a season, and who died in the full triumph of faith, was our venerable friend and father and brother in the gospel, James Lemen, Sen.

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of blessed memory. Though called by some very rigid and austere , because like the prophet Michaiah, he never would prophesy good concerning them but evil; for the most of them, Ahab like, were not willing to quit their sins.

As an evangelical preacher, nothing could deter him from traveling by day or by night, through heat and cold, wet and dry, to hear the glad tidings of salvation to a world of dying men and women; crying aloud and sparing not; lifting up his voice like a trumpet; going on in the discharge of his duty; doing the work of the Lord faithfully, notwithstanding the many persecutions and the oppositions which he had to encounter.

Yet none of these things seemed to move him, so that he might finish his course with joy. And so it seemed that he did.

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Brethren, though we are left a while to mourn the loss of one, whose help is so much needed at this present time; yet, let us not murmur at the providence of God; nor ask for a moment, why it is, that such useful men, both in church and state are taken away, while so many who seem to be of little use, are spared. But let us endeavor to justify the ways of God to man, and ore long, we shall be called to join our brethren; where we with them, shall be able to comprehend the mysteries of his providence. For the apostle Paul saith, "Now we see through a glass darkly but then face to face: now I know in part; but then shall I know, even as also I am known."

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Friends of Humanity
No. 2 Thoroughly revised. The only question is whether all the Circulars shall be printed. Aug. 28. 1878.

In our former circulars, we briefly touched on the enormous crimes prevailing in the land of light and vision--the land of professed liberty and equality; trusting that our state possessed a sufficient number of true, real republicans, lovers of their country, who would forever guard our constitution and soil from being, in the least degree, poluted by the heaven-daring crime of oppression. But to our utter astonishment, we have such men, who have exerted every nerve to introduce the barbarous, God-provoking practice of unmerited slavery into our happy, peaceable, and highly favored state, under the borrowed, not to say stolen, cloak of humanity. Many of them have the assurance to tell us, that they are as much opposed to the spirit and practice of slavery as any one. What a contradiction

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is this! Let the most distressed character, if he be a person of color, apply for redress! Will they hear his complaints? Are they not deaf to the cries of the most broken in heart? O where is judgment! Is not their backs turned toward it? Is not justice for from them? Is not truth disregarded, and trampled, as it were, under their feet, while equity is barred out from among them? What shall we say, or what character shall we attribute to such people? Let the Lord by the mouth of the prophet Isaiah speak concerning such characters. "A people who delighted in transgressing, and lying against the Lord, and departing away from their God, speaking oppression and revolt, conceiving and uttering from the heart words of falsehood; and judgement is turned away backward, and

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justice standeth afar off; for truth fallen in the street; and equity cannot enter."

When we take these things into consideration, should we not be up and doing; standing continually on our watch-tower; particularly those who are called of God to be watchmen, placed as it were, on the walls, looking out for the enemy? When they see the evil coming; should they not warn the people, and that faithfully? Is not the door threatened to be open for the introduction of an evil into our State, which is the most afflicting that ever was introduced into any State or nation; for it is a source that has brought forth all other abominations, and will bring down ore long, if not prevented by repentance, the most severe judgements; even the devouring sword which is

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threatened against the disobedient; "If ye refuse, also rebel ye shall be devoured by the sword, for the mouth of the Lord hath spoken it."

Some tell us that it is a political evil, and does not belong to our mission; therefore, we ought to be silent on the subject. But we would ask; Is it not a moral evil? Is it not a transgression of the moral law of God? It must be answered in the affirmative. If so, then we may conclude, that it is not only our privilege, but our indispensable duty to cry against, not only one, but every abomination. The truth is, they dread the preachers, for they are me of considerable influence, at least some of them; and had their opponents it in their power, they would soon place them where they would no more dread them; even, where they would no

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more be troubled with their reproofs. What would not the Spirit of oppression do? To what lengths would it not go? But let us be thankful to God for the good laws of the land, and particularly, for those of our own free state; that secure to all men their just rights; that declare all men to be born equally free. But not withstanding all the advantages and encouragements which we have, let us not forget that mighty weapon prayer, but be instant in supplication at the throne of grace; calling daily upon God, who is able to turn the counsels of the wicked into foolishness, and bring off his chosen victorious. Let us not forget, brethren, while we feel compassion for the oppressed, to exercise pity for the poor oppressors, and pray, not as some have done,

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for fire to come down from heaven to consume them; but that God would have compassion on them; and cause them to see their folly , that they may put away every evil, and seek that repentance that needeth not to be repented of; that their souls may be saved with an everlasting salvation. Remembering, brethren, that the Lord hath said in his work, "That he came not to destroy men's lives but to save them." And, again, "I will have mercy and not sacrifice."

1825.
The minutes of 1824, have not been obtained. The Annual Meeting of the Friends of Humanity, for 1825, was held in the Bethel meeting House, with the Cantine Creek church commencing September thirteenth, Friday.

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James Lemen opened the session with a sermon, from Dan. 10:21, "But I will show thee that which is noted in the scripture of truth." Twelve. Eleven were represented by 54 messengers, of whom 16 were ministers. Baptisms 81; Rec. by Letter 15; Dismissed 12; Excluded 9; Died 6; Members 411. Four of the churches were in Missouri. The largest church and the first on the list was Cantine Creek, numbering 76 members. This is believed to have been the largest church in Illinois in that day, and is now the Bethel church St. Clair Co. there was another church in the same vicinity, in 1825, called Cantine Creek, belonging to the Illinois United Baptist Association, an anti-mission body. At this session a Treasurer was appointed,--brother Theron Brownfield.

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Circular
Writer brother Thomas M. Hamilton.
Dear Brethren.--As the hopes of the conventionists have been recently blasted , and the Demon of Oppression seems to be receding from our happy land, and the light of true benevolence and humanity is spreading its exhilerating beams, and the Spirit of Philanthropy and virtue seems to be rising superior to every opposition; we feel no disposition to enter upon the subject for which we have been so much censured, and call your attention to matters of peculiar moment, as Christians, and as members of the church.

Christianity is distinguished

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from other religions by several institutions not to be formed in any other religious system; these, although often considered as not bearing any original relation to their object; will be found, when duly considered, well adapted to the nature and end of the Christian religion, and to render the system more perfect. Our churches, being constituted upon the Scriptures of the Old and New Testaments, in which we believe are sufficient rules for Christian faith and practice, are better adapted to church government then any which the human mind could devise.

Our rules of Decorum which are given to govern each church when sitting in a

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church capacity, can be altered as the church thinks proper. These rules declare that all matters of debate shall be decided by a majority except in receiving and expelling members. As the duty of church government devolves upon the members, (the ministers or preachers being considered as private members in the church to which they belong, and amenable, as well as other members) let us with due diligence and care, prayer fully watch and guard against all disorderly conduct, that we may preserve peace within, and a good report without.

Another matter which should claim our attention, is, that it becomes the duty

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of each church to set forward, and ordain preachers, whom the Lord hath chosen to declare his word. The office of the Christian Ministry was instituted by Christ, just before he ascended to Glory. After he had prepared his Apostles for so important a service, he said to them, "Go ye into all the world and preach the Gospel to every Creature"--"do teach all nations, baptizing them in the name of the Father, the son and the Holy Ghost: teaching them to observe all things whatsoever I have commanded you: and, lo, I am with you always even unto the end of the world." These were to commit the preaching of the Gospel to other faithful men, and they again to those whom the Lord should call to the work, (under the redeemer's

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gracious promise,) unto the end of time.

The appropriate work of a minister or preacher of the Gospel is, to preach the Gospel, administer baptism, gather believers into the church, and administer the Lord's supper. It is required that ministers or preachers be men that are eminent in the knowledge and faith of the Gospel, in the Christian temper or graces of the spirit, and of such superior abilities and attainments in knowledge, and ministerial gifts and accomplishments, as to be able to teach others, and lead the public devotional exercises;--men whose lives and manners do honor to Christianity, and who have a good report from those without. Since so much devolves on the members of our churches, and as

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we all profess to have received the gift of faith, and tasted the good word of God, and the powers of the world to come. And as the Lord has added greatly to our numbers the past year, of such as we trust shall be saved, let us, therefore, match into prayer, standing in our places, having an eye single to the glory of God, as becometh Saints. Let us also daily search the scriptures wherein our duty is made plain, the duty of doing good to all, that the world may observe how Christians love one another.

Finally, brethren, farewell. Be of one mind; live in peace; and may the God of love and peace delight to dwell with and bless you. Amen." (The writer was not a minister.)
Thomas M. Hamilton,

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1826.
The Annual Meeting of the Baptized churches, Friends of Humanity for 1826, was held with the Macoupin church, Green County, beginning Sep. 29.

Rev. John Clark opened the session with a sermon from Isa.27:6, "He shall cause them that come of Jacob to take root: Israel shall blossom and bud, and fill the face of the world with fruit."
James Lemen, Moderator. Elijah Dodson, Clerk.

Eleven churches were represented by 48 delegates of whom 15 were ministers. Baptisms 28; Rec. by Letter 8; Restored 2; Dismissed; Excluded 6; Died 8; Members 410. It was agreed that the Annual Meeting for 1827, should be with the New Design church and should be a camp meeting.

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The Circular Letter written by "Father Clark", being read was received and ordered printed with the minutes. It is copied here that the reader may have some idea of the character of this venerable servant of God, who made his way at so early a day into these outposts of civilization, and served almost gratuitously the people, in the double capacity, of preacher and school teacher.

Circular
Very Dear Brethren,
The Apostle Jude, in his general epistle, exhorts the faithful to contend for

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the faith once delivered to the Saints; which faith means the doctrines of the Gospel. The same exhortation has been, and will be necessary still, until the great promise be fulfilled, that the watchmen should see eye to eye, and the knowledge of God cover the earth as the waters do the great deep. Till that happy period come, even the children of God are liable to err, both in doctrine and practice: especially those who have strong minds, and depend too much on their own understanding, and who have not considered the wonderful simplicity of the gospel; (adapted to the weak as well as to the strong;) but vainly imagine that they can fathom the immense

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depth of the mystery of godliness, by the inadequate line of human reason (a task too profound for angelic minds;) not considering that the gospel is calculated to hide pride from self-wise, self-potent man, and to secure the primary glory of Salvation, to God alone. To this cause, though not to this only, we may attribute the introduction of the Unitarian doctrine, which, of late, has been infused into the minds of thousands, who, notwithstanding, truly fear God and work righteousness. But the main cause, is our ignorance of the various dispensations of the Gospel; such as the heathen, patriarchal, Mosaical, John Baptists or the beginning of the Gospel, and the luminous

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dispensation of the Spirit that commenced on the day of Pentecost. Each of these dispensations has its proper faith plainly described in the old or New Testament; and strange as it may appear, even people in this enlightened age, are converted under one or another of these dispensations. Few, very few, of late years, have received, at their conversion the luminous faith of the day of Pentecost, they seem, like Apollos, to know only the beginning of the Gospel; i.e. the baptism of John.

Another grand cause of all the mischievous errors that ever disturb the peace of the church in almost every age, was, and is, this false maxim, "that we are not to believe what we cannot comprehend." But according

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to this trite rule, we can neither be Christians, Deists, nor Atheists. We believe in miracles, the immortality of the soul the resurrection of the body, and in one God existing in three distinct persons, though we cannot comprehend the manner. Neither can we be Deists on that plan; for a Deist must believe in the eternity, omniscience, omnipotence, and omnipresence of God. Nor can we be Atheists on that principle. If Atheism consist in believing that all things existed from all eternity, and are governed by blind chance."

Another article of the faith which we must closely adhere to, and contend for, is salvation by faith alone. For though Antinomianism has been made to hide her deformed face for years,

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yet Pharisaims stalks abroad without a vail. The gospel doctrines of justification, new birth, and sanctification by faith above, or is tantamount, the righteousness of Christ imputed to, and implanted in the penitent believer, is exploded by some, as antinomian rant, and our Christless obedience is laid as the only foundation of our hope. The name of Jesus which St. Paul mentions ten times in one paragraph, is Seldom mentioned in preaching or praying; as if such teachers were determined to exclude him out of the church which he has founded, and out of the world which he has created and redeemed.

But there is one thing more to be particularly treated on, and that is the injustice and unmerited cruelty exercised on the poor, sable posterity of Ham; and that in a land in which equal rights, liberty, and philanthropy are much boasted of. But such boasting is preposterous, while more then fifteen hundred thousand souls, or perhaps one fifth of our population, are kept in abject bondage, and treated, in many respects, as beasts of burden! But the mercy of God appears to be interposing in behalf of these outcasts of man. Colonization and manumission societies are forming, and auxiliaries increasing and extending from Boston even to St. Louis, for qualifying, if needful, and transplanting them to the native land of their ancestors; wherein they may enjoy their inalienable rights, and prove an everlasting advantage to the natives of that

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benighted quarter of our globe. But what may we expect will eventually follow, if the slave-holding states will not avail themselves of this momentous opportunity that now offers, not only to avert the just and tremendous judgments of Jehovah, but to extricate the nation from a most dangerous part of its population, increasing rapidly in number, and exasperated to the highest pitch of revenge, by the most unmerited, unjust, barbarous and degrading treatment, which has been, and still is exercised on them, without any means or hope of redress, till their number and prowess mile awfully effect it! We say, what may we expect to follow, but an awful storm, perhaps now impending over guilty land!

And may we not look for the heaviest part to fall on the professors of the most benign religion that ever existed, who keep in continual countenance this shocking system, by their unprecedented example? For how shall the avaricious unawakened sinner be ever convinced of the enormity of this horrid practice, or of the reality of the Christian religion, while gospel churches, so called, receive into their communion, and hold in high esteem, those who buy and sell, whip, drive and pinch without remorse, those whom they profess to believe are the offspring of Jehovah, and the purchase of this blood!

But it is said that some professors use them well;--they feed and cloth them well and work them moderately, and neither buy nor sell. But will this plea answer before the flaming

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bar of God? Will not the just Judge of all the earth inquire, "Have you diligently used every necessary means to qualify those heirs of endless duration, for the enjoyment of all the blessings, in time and eternity, which I have purchased for them; and which, ye knew, were their unalienable right? Or, have you fared sumptuously, day by day, on the fruit of this involtary labor, and bequeathed them at your death, to drudge for your graceless children or friends, that they might live in luxury, and soar in pompt and splendor, as if you were resolved that they should live the life and die the death, not of the righteous, but of the right glutton."

O brethren, was there ever a time that called louder for a reformation than this time? And the reasons are evident; for never were a people

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more enlightened, more favored, and sinned more gregiously! Let us never forget the appellation by which we are distinguished, that we bear not that significant title in vain; but that we evidence our detestation, by every prudent means, to a practice, the terpitude of which, baffles human language to describe. Let our prayers be frequent and fervent, that the Fountain of Mercy and Grace, may grant such repentance, as shall through the intercession of the Friend of Sinners, avert his righteous judgments, and raise his church on the ruins of all anti christian doctrines and practices,--pure, without spot or wrinkle,--"fair as the moon, clear as the sun, and terrible as an army with banners."
John Clark

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1827.
September 20, 1827, the Friends of Humanity, commenced their Annual Meeting at New Design, Monroe Co. with a sermon by Moses Lemen from Rev. 20:14 "And death and hell were cast into the lake of fire."
James Lemen, Moderator. Thos.M. Hamilton, Clerk.

Six new churches were received. They were Movahstar, Morgan Co.; Henderson, Carrollton, and Salem, in Grene Co.; and Boeuff, of Franklin, and Bethel of Jefferson Counties, Mo. They had been recently constituted. There were 17 churches represented, 57 delegates, of whom 17 were ministers. Baptisms 30; Rec. by Letter 10; Restored 2; Dismissed 57; Excluded 15; Died 4; Members 458.

Four of the churches were in Missouri.

The Circular was written by a brother not in

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the ministry, and may afford some ideas of the mutual ability possessed by the members in the churches in those early times. The writer was Bro. John J. Lofton.

Circular Address to the Friends of Humanity. In the States of Illinois, Missouri, and Elsewhere.
Very Dear Brethren,
In our last Circular, we aimed to point out, in a brief manner, what we humbly deemed to be the most pervicious deviations from the pure and salutary doctrines of the Gospel, with their causes and obvious effects; which have been and still are prevailing among the professors of Religion, in a very extraordinary degree; and very probably, well continue to prevail, until by an over ruling Providence, it has its usual and unavoidable effect;

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that is, like bodily pain, when arrived to a certain degree, be its own executioner.

But it may be inquired, what is the cause of this overflowing tide of different religious opinions so universally abounding? Several causes might be assigned, but the most conspicuous seems to be this; that the sovereign Rules of the Universe is about to fulfill his gracious decree, "That the earth shall be full of the knowledge of the Lord, as the waters cover the sea." Isa. 11.9. In order to effect this glorious purpose, a spirit of liberty and free inquiry, has first been infused into the minds of the people of North America; and through their instrumentality it is likely to leaven all Europe, Asia and Africa. By this powerful engine, viz: the Spirit of liberty and free inquiry,

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we may expect that truth and error shall be propagated and thoroughly investigated, till truth like the light of the sun, disperse the gloomy shades of error, night and darkness, and usher in a day without night, in which the sun shall no more go down, neither shall the moon withdraw itself for a thousand years.

But it is not dangerous tenets only, that we are bound to expose and guard against, but practices that cry aloud, like the souls under the alter for vengence unto a holy and a sin avenging God. And from us, especially, who are called Friends to Humanity, it will be expected, that we raise a stentorious warning voice, from pulpit and press, against a practice, whose turpitude beggars all description; and has not only disgraced both churches

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and states, but exposed them to the contempt, not only of infidels at home, but the very heathen abroad. How mortifying and discouraging to the friends of mankind, of every denomination, who are exerting every nerve to christianize the bemighted heathen, who for ages have sat in the region and shadow of death, that the enemies of the only true religion in the universe, have too much ground to expose the landable exertions of the zealous Missionaries from our States, and their pious coadjutors to contempt.

The following extract is one instance out of many; and though we have reason to believe that it is a spurious piece, yet we are grieved that we are obliged to say, that it might with too much propriety, be authentic. The

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extract is copied from the Village Record, certifying that the Pagan Priests, in one of their addresses to their people, said "That their intercourse with the people of North America had given them a knowledge of that unfortunate people; that there were more than fifteen hundred thousand of their fellow men, who were held in the most deplorable bondage; that they were sold like cattle or goods at public auction, often chained together and driven under the whip of an overseer, with every mark of degradation which can be applied to the brute creations--that husband and wife have been torn asunder and sold to different masters; children rent from the bosom of their mothers; their heart rending and

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piteous cries unheeded; and their remonstrance deemed presumptuous, and replied to by the blood-reeking scourge."

When we seriously consider the present state of our slave-holding States, and slaveholding churches, who have every necessary means of information, and yet remain seemingly insensible of their awful situation, may we not fear that they are judicially blinded, like the Jewish nation before its dissolution, and the British Parliament before the American Revolution! To endeavor to instruct an ignorant Turk, or an Arab, of the inexpressible turpitude of unmerited slavery, would be our indispensable duty; but to undertake to inform those who justly boast of having

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the best human constitution that ever was formed; and having free access to the best book in the world,--the Bible, we say, that to undertake to instruct these, of the indescribable turpitude of unmerited, involuntary, hereditary and perpetual slavery, would be preposterous. And yet, notwithstanding all that has been done, or said, toward and alarm them of impending danger, some will gravely tell us, "That they did not enslave them;--that they bought them honestly with their money; or, that they were left them by their ancestors." And there is reason to believe that their ancestors gladly received them from the worst of miscreants,--men-stealers, and their posterity most heartily approve of the God-provoking deeds of their

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ancestors. And it is highly probable they will continue to do so, till they fill up the measure of their fathers, that upon them may come all the innocent blood of the inoffensive Africans shed in africa, and on the Atlantic Ocean, and on the American plantations for hundreds of years!

But lest this Circular should swell beyond its intended bounds, we will conclude with the following suitable verses, which accord with the above hits respecting those who trafic in flesh and bones, or in the bodies and souls of men women and children.

How heinous the crime of those men concerned in such trafic as this! Banditti, compared unto them,

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are innocent men I profess; of miscreants these are the chiefs, that annals of history unfold, yet, receivers are worse than the thieves; they encourage them on with their gold.

America answer to this, Stern justice must have a reply; the blood of the African race, cries loudly from earth to the sky; form Africa's desolate shores; from waves of the briny abyss; from your houses, your lands and your stores, it cries for an awful redress.

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1828.
The Annual Meeting of the Baptized churches of Christ, Friends to Humanity, commencing Sep. 19, 1828, with the Cantine Creek church

The session was opened with a sermon by James Pulliam, from Titus 5:1, "But speak thou the things which become sound doctrine."
Joseph Lemen, Moderator. Robert Lemen, Clerk.

Nineteen churches were represented by 66 delegates, of whom 25 were ministers. Baptisms 54; Rec. by Letter 35; Restored 8; Dismissed 20; Excluded 7; Died 4; Members 525. Two newly constituted churches, the Illinois Church and the New Hope church, both in Greene County were received. Five of the churches were in Missouri.

So far as the minutes show the range of business was very limited. But at this session an important change was arranged, at the their annual

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Meeting. It was agreed to divide the body into three parts, locally, while it should maintain its unity. This was on account of the increase of the Friends of Humanity. The churches in Illinois were divided into two districts called the North and the South. The line of separation was that between the counties of Madison and Green, running East and West. The churches in Missouri were also made a district, the Mississippi River being of course the line of division. Each division was to have its separate annual meeting, yet the minutes were to be printed jointly, and some committees were to be made up by each district appointing its won members. The Circular Address was to be presented to each meeting, and receive its approbation.

The address for this year was written by Rev.

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James Lemen, and merits an insertion here as setting forth the views of the Christians.

Circular Address
From the Ministers and Delegates composing the annual meeting of the Baptized churches of Christ, Friends of Humanity in Illinois, Missouri, and elsewhere, to the churches they represent.
Beloved Brethren,
Scattered, as we are, in our state of residence; inhabiting different counties and different states; how welcome is the return of our annual meeting, which affords us an opportunity, not only of hearing from each other, but also of setting together (if not in an individual) in a delegated capacity, for the purpose of devising measures not only for our own furtherance in the

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Christian life, but for the promotion of the Redeemer's Kingdom, both at home and abroad. And still more welcome is the reception of our Circular Address, which enables us, dispersed as we are, sweetly to converse with each other.

Dear Brethren;--If not in each, yet in the major part of our former addresses, your attention has been directed to the deplorable condition of the unpitied descendants of African, and this by some, would no doubt, be received as a sufficient apology for silence on such a subject in the present publication. But can we be silent, while a number of human being in our boasted land of liberty, (equal almost to that of the American nation, when she declared her independence, and maintained the same against the united forces of Great Britain.)

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are groaning under the most bitter oppression, such as the pages of neither ancient nor modern history afford a parallel. Oppression, such as the uncultivated tribes of Barbary, or the wild Arabs of the desert, (on whose bemighted minds, the light of science, or of Christianity has scarcely shed one ray) would blush to inflict on their most unworthy captives. And this degrading oppression, inflicted by a nation, the first among the nations of modern times, to throw the yoke of political bondage from her own neck, and assert the equal right of man. Under circumstances like this might not silence be construed as a connivance? It may be argued by some, that, as slavery is a political evil, it is therefore a subject, which should only concern political men.

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But, brethren, it is a moral, as well as a political evil, and therefore deeply concerns the Christian professing part of the community. Are not Christians said to be "the light of the world"--"the salt of the earth?" Are they not co-workers with God? Does not God employ their instrumentality in destroying evil; in ameliorating and changing the moral condition of this guilty fallen world? Every minister of the Gospel of every denomination, is placed by omnipotence, as a watch man upon his tower, and bidden to declare the whole counsel of God, as to an individual, so to a nation.

Therefore, while the thunder of our cannon on the fourth of each July is bellowing forth our independence, we should tell the leaders of our nation, that the groans and cries of

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millions of our fellow creatures, are finding their way to the lofty throne of Jehovah, bearing report of their wrongs in a language well understood by the Most High, which will be heard and finally answered:--We should request them to examine the histories of antiquity, which furnish tragical evidence, that tyranny and oppression, with other concomitant crimes have been severely chastised by the visitation of the Divine displeasure; nor may those modern times, who imitate them, in whole or in part, expect to escape the chastisements of injured justice, and long insulted Omnipotence.

President Jefferson observes, "That

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the liberties of man are the gifts of God and cannot be violated but with his displeasure. I tremble for my country when I reflect that God if just-that his justice cannot sleep forever;-- that considering the number, nature and natural means only, a revolution in the wheel of fortune--an exchange of situation is among possible events--that it may become probable by supernatural interference--The almighty has no attribute that can take part with us in such a contest. Slavery, wicked slavery, has not only tarnished our political, but has stamped an indelible blot on our religious character, and justly exposed us to the following lines of an African:--

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"Christians are our sore oppressors, if its right to call them so: fellow mortals our possessors, and the cause of all our wo. Christian tyrants, buy and sell us, make us labor, starve and bleed; tear our wives and children from us, whom the God of heaven has free'd."

Let the watchman of Zion of every order, make a solemn pause while they cast their eye over their flocks, to see whether any over whom they have control, are justly implicated in the preceding lives. Let them remember that they are entrusted with an awful charge,--that they blood of Souls is to be required at their hands. Therefore should they be careful that they

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lift a just standard for the people, clearly discriminating between the clean and the unclean. But lest we be tedious, we will next direct your attention to the Heaven provoking crime of intemperance. The prevalence of this evil is truly alarming;--it has spread its baneful influence through all the various circles or branches of both civil and religious society. Wealth and honor, learning and talents fall before it. The judicial bench nor yet the holy pulpit has entirely escaped its ravages; not the most infectious plague to which human nature is incident; nor even the sword itself can boast an equal number of its slain. While we behold this dreadful evil thus contaminating the living, and thus rapidly peopling not the land of silence only, but the dungeon of despair, shall we stand

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as silent spectators of the gloomy scene? Should it be asked what can be done? The reply would be,--let the framers of our laws by legislative enactments make it the duty of every officer, civil and military, to exercise his influence against an evil so pernicious. Let ministers of the gospel of every order, lift up a warning voice over their congregations. Let Christian churches of every persuasion, contract with a rigorous hand the cords of their discipline and expunge from their societies such as indulge in habits of intemperance. Let fathers, in their earnest instructions to their sons, place drunkenness among crimes of the most disgraceful cast. Let them enforce these instructions by pointing to those

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unhappy mortals, who, by excessive drink have degraded themselves to a condition unfit to mingle in the lowest walks of civil society. Let mothers in their first advice to their daughters relative to their choice in matrimony, teach them to shun the approaches of young men addicted to intemperance, as they would the approaches of a deadly foe. Let them enforce their advice by pointing with the finger of commiseration, to the stripes and tears and beggarly children of those unfortunate women, who like unoffending deer in the grasp of tigers, are chained by marriage to men of drunken habits. Let the sober and the thinking part of community at the polls of every election speak to intemporate candidates in a

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language not to be misunderstood;--let them declare as with the voice of a trumpet that drunkenness totally disqualifies an individual to fill the most humble station in the lowest branch of civil government. The adoption of those measures would form a phalanx which would strike terror to all the abodes of the drunken and chase them from their polluted haunts.

As the limits of a Circular forbid a detail of the numerous evils which mark the present times, we will therefore invite your opposition and implore your influence against every practice derogatory to the to the Christian religion. We should ever recollect that the kingdom of Christ, and the kingdom of this world are separate and distinct kingdoms and that

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those discriminating marks should be visible in our whole deportment; our apparel, our conversation and our actions should all unite in testifying that we are obedient servants of Him who was meek and lowly.

Being accused by some of not having been sufficiently explicit in our former addresses, relative to who and what we are, as a religious society, we will therefore simply reply, that we profess to be scripture advocates, or Bible Christians, having adopted the word of God both as our constitution and book of discipline. In our church records and in our Circular publications, we subscribe our names, the Baptized churches of Christ, Friends to Humanity.

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We say, the Baptized churches instead of the Baptist churches, because the word baptized includes both preachers and private members, while the word baptist includes the preachers only. We add Friends to Humanity, because we believe it to be our duty to extend our friendship, (that is, justice and mercy) to human nature, let it appear in whatever dress or complexion God may see fit to order, whether white, yellow or black, and not when it appears in white only. We are not tenacious however, about names, neither will we stickle for them, as they are only designed for temporary purposes. But as we wish to be plainly understood, we believe, First, That the church of Christ consists of believers, and therefore we receive none into

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our societies but such as profess to have received a change of heart and have faith in Jesus Christ. That Baptism by immersion is the only scriptural mode of baptism, and that it ought not to be administered in any other form, and that to believers only.

That the Lord's Supper belongs only to the household of faith, and that it ought not to be administered to any, but such as have faith in Christ, having entered into the church through the legal or visible door of baptism by immersion--being opposed to slavery, intemperance and every other violation of the holy law of God;--walking humbly before him as becomes his children.

That washing the Saint's feet is a scriptural command, or ordinance and intended by Jesus Christ to be perpetuated by his churches through

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succeeding generations.

That the church is the highest ecclesiastical authority, and that annual meetings, associations, conferences, synods and ought to be under the control of the churches, and not the churches under the control of them.
By order of the Conference,
James Lemen.

According to the plan for separate annual Meetings arranged at the session of 1828, the several district meetings were held this year, 1829. Thus the record opens;--

Joint minutes and Circular of three separate Annual Meetings, held by the Baptized churches of Christ, Friends to Humanity

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1829.
The churches of the North District convened by their delegates in their Annual Meeting, on Friday, Aug. 14, 1829, with the Henderson Creek church, Greene Co.

Elijah Dodson opened the session with a sermon from 2. Thes. 2:15, "Therefore, brethren, stand fast, and hold the traditions which ye have been taught." Etc.
John G. Lofton, Moderator. Aaron Hicks, Clerk.

Eight churches were reported with delegates from seven. The mount pleasant church was received. There were 18 delegates of whom 5 were ministers. Baptisms 3; Rec. by Letter 8; Restored 2; Dismissed 15; Excluded 2; Died 0; Members 132. The joint committee were requested to draft rules for the government of the Annual Meetings.

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The Missouri District does not belong to our history, and I make no record of it.

1829.
The annual meeting of the South District churches was held with the Silver Creek church, St. Clair Co. opening Sep. 11 with a sermon by David R. Chance, from Isa.62:10."Go through, go through the gates, prepare the way of the people," etc.
James Lemen, Moderator. Joel Jackson, Clerk.

Nine churches were represented. Delegates from seven numbered 37, of whom 18 were ministers. Statistics; Baptism 11; Rec. by Letter 17; Dismissed 4; Excluded 2; Members 360. The Orkshers Creek church was received at this meeting.

The minutes of this session affirm

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that one of the duties of the joint committee was to act on all matters which may be calculated to promote the interests of the General Union, and to advance the Redeemer's Kingdom.

The minutes have a little more expansion, and perhaps the body itself took a wider range of action than before. The following item in the minutes indicates this.

"On motion of Rev. Elijah Dodson the following preamble and resolution were adopted.

"Whereas, efforts are now making, throughout the U.S. by the American Bible Society, its numerous auxiliaries, and the pious and benevolent of all the various denominations to supply al the destitute families in the U.S. with

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the Holy Scriptures. And whereas, the Baptized Churches of Christ, Friends of Humanity, received the word of God, as the sole rule of faith and practice and the foundation upon which our union is based, and as the object of the American Bible Society and its Auxiliaries, is solely to encourage the further circulation of the word of God, without note or comment, and of the common translation now in use; therefore, "Resolved, that the South District conference, cordially approbate, and recommend the above object to all our churches, and the members thereof, and to the public at large."

The circular Address was written by

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the venerable, Rev. John Clark, which is worthy of preservation.

Circular Address.
"To the Baptized churches of Christ, Friends to Humanity and C.
Beloved Brethren,
The best model that can be imitated, in writing religious circulars is the incomparable epistles and tracts of the inspired Apostles. The scope of which was to rectify whatever was amiss in the churches to which they wrote; to congratulate and encourage the faithful to persevere in will-doing; and to warn them of the delusive spirit and practices of the times. Therefore, in conformity to this rule, our former addresses have been attempted; and in this the same rule has been carefully observed.

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It is more than probable that the present age in which it is our lot to be placed, will exhibit the most stupendous, momentous and interesting displays of Divine Providence that ever will transpire, till the Second coming of the Judge of quick and dead. And as we may expect, that the Great Ruler of the Universe, will still observe the same rule, in his righteous government, for the time to come, as in ages past; we think, that the present times, imperiously call our most serious attention to a retrospect view of past dispensations, that we may be the better prepared to meet and improve the future to the best advantage.

But it must be allowed, that the usual bounds of a circular, as well as our inadequate

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abilities, will scarcely admit, of even a slight glance at those profound scenes, which admiring angels desire to look into. Nevertheless, that we may accomplish, in some degree our present purpose, we will in the first place observe, that, in the past dispensation of infinite Wisdom in the government of the human family, justice and mercy have gone hand in hand, ever since our first parents fell from their pristine state, and will continue so to do, till time shall be no longer.

To elucidate, in some degree, this important proposition, we will offer a few instances: when our first progenitors fell, justice doomed them and their posterity to perpetual labor, pain and death; but through the all-prevailing, all-atoning

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merits of the second Adam, and influence of the Spirit of Grace, this very sentence is, even pregnant with incomparable mercy and parental kindness; for it is intended as a powerful antidote, to raise the fallen race, far superior to the eminence from which they fell. Again, when all flesh had corrupted his way, in the days of Noah, justice swept the guilty culprits from off the face of the earth; but mercy interposed not only to save a seed alive, but to save hundreds of millions of immortal Souls who had not arrived to the years of accountability; besides others, who had not

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attained to the state of invincible obduracy. But time would fail to enlarge on God's righteous judgments on self-hardened Pharaoh, and his great mercy to humble obedient Israel; The awful destruction of the Amorites when they had filled up the measure of their iniquities;--his just judgments on Israel for their repeated acts of disobedience. And lastly, The final overthrow of both their church and polity, even to this day. Yet, this awful dispensation prepared the way for, and preceded a greater display of God's love to mankind than ever was exhibited, since the first promise was made to the first guilty pair. And now,

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a thousand instances, of extraordinary, acts of Divine Providence, are rousing our attention, to look for the greatest dispensation of mercy that ever transpired on our globe, to be right, even at our very doors. A dispensation this, in which the knowledge of God shall cover the earth as the waters do the great deep.

But it may be inquired, what signs or tokens appear now, that this memorable event is at hand? We answer, that though the tokens are many, yet, we can only take a very slight view of one or two of the most conspicuous. The first to which we shall advert, is the down of the latter-day glory, or the morning star, that, probably, precedes the dawn of that illustrious

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day; which evidently appeared above ninety years ago, when the glorious light of the gospel broke out, as in the primitive days, in England, Scotland, Ireland, North America, and in different parts of the Eastern Continent; which still continues, and will continue to spread, till the kingdoms of this world will become the kingdom of the Lord and his Christ. Again, were there ever such exertions made, and such means used, to prepare the way of the Lord to the remotest parts of the habitable globe, since the apostles left the earth? Myriads are nobly employed to inform the judgments, and reform the practices of the rising generation at home, and the hundreds of millions of heathen abroad, who,

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for ages past, have sat in darkness and in the shadow of death. And many of the faithful, of every denomination almost, are laying aside their former bigotry, and cordially writing in the work of a general reform.

But after all, how shall we reconcile this laudable zeal, with the general apathy that exists, both in many churches and States, with respect to one of the greatest moral evils that ever existed in, or does, even now exist on our globe; and that is the case of the enslaved Africans in this Christian land of liberty, so called; which is, not only a most heinous crime in

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itself, but a source of the blackest crimes that ever disgraced the human family! To say nothing of ignorance, lying, swearing, Sabbath-breaking, etc. But fornication, adultery, incest, theft, robbery, murder, etc., etc. Who does not see, (unless he is judicially blinded,) that this practice is pregnant with every enormity that ensures (soon or late, and the later the more awful) a most awful visitation of the righteous judgments of Jehovah, whose judgments cannot slumber!

But, we would ask again, what is the cause of this strange, unaccountable indifference, in both churches and states, to the most important case that any

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church or state can be involved in? Is it not generally acknowledged, that if there be not a speedy reform, inevitable ruin will ensue? Are they given over to judicial blindness? Or, may we hope for better things: things that account any salvation? Are these not many honest hearts in those States and churches, who are not so much blinded by avarice, as by example, custom and false arguments? Arguments founded on the practice of those who lived in the dark patriarchal and Mosaic dispensations, in which, even poligamy and concubinage, were winked at! And have we not sufficient reason to hope that the light of the gospel will increase so fast, that, in a little time neither slavery nor any other unscriptural practices, nor tenets shall be allowed

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so much ground, within Zion's hallowed walls as to set their cloven feet on?

But does not the history of nations, families and individuals, as well as revelation, teach us, that judgments on the impenitent precede mercy, and the trials of the faithful precede their comforts, as sure as winter precedes summer, and a storm a calm? And can we expect to see those haley on days before a vindictive storm precedes? Do we not see symptoms of such eruptions ready to break out (to say noting of States and kingdoms,) in many churches, as shall be productive of such scenes as shall scan every system of doctrine and discipline to the very bottom, and root up every pant that shall not be of God's planting.

And now dear Brethren, what remains

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for us to do in these trying, sifting times, but to watch and pray, that we may stand approved in the day of Christ; for we wrestle not against flesh and blood only, but against principalities, against powers who now work by fraud, and, very likely, ore long, by force. If the grand adversary can only divide and scatter, those who are united against him, his end will be easily accomplished. If ever we prevail, and come off acquitted, we must be rooted in, and clothed with humility, by being deeply impressed with a continual sense of our own ignorance and weakness, that we may not for a moment lean to our own understanding, but be continually, and entirely relying upon Christ, as our wisdom, to guide us by his

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word and Spirit into all necessary knowledge. To whom, with the Father and Eternal Spirit, be equal honor and glory forever ascribed. Amen."

We now come to the Anniversaries of 1830, in which the several District meetings take a more completely organized form, and adopt the name each of an Association. They had hitherto been rather annual mass meetings; so far as we have seen, having no written rules for their guidance. They now adopt a Constitution and Rules of decorum; and in these respect put themselves in advance of many associations in 1830, in New York, and other Eastern States.

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1830.
The North District Association met on Friday, Sep. 3, with the Macoupin Church, Greene Co. The session was opened with a sermon by Sears Crane, from 2. Cor. 5.17, "Therefore if any man be in Christ he is a new creature," etc.
Sears Crane, Moderator. Elijah Dodson, Clerk.

Ten churches were represented with 21 delegates, of whom five were ministers. Baptism 18; Rec. by Letter 17; Dismissed 35; Died 1; 157 members. A standing Secretary, or Corresponding Secretary was appointed,--Elijah Dodson, and Alexander Smith, Treasurer.

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1830.
The South District Association convened with the Crooked Creek church, Marion Co. Friday, Sep. 24, Joseph Chance opened the session with a sermon from 1. Peter 2:17, "Unto you therefore," etc.
James Lemen, Moderator. Robert Lemen, Clerk.

Shoal Creek and the African Churches were received. Baptisms 87; Rec. by Letter 33; Restored 2; Dismissed 22; Excluded 5; Died 5; Members 465. Nine churches were represented by 46 delegates, 20 of whom were ministers. The additions by baptism in some churches would indicate that they were blessed with revivals of much power.

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One received 30 by baptism, another 22, and two others 12 each and another 9.

The Constitution adopted by both Associations was brief, and quite similar to those of other Associations. I will only give the 5th article.

"The Annual Meeting shall possess authority to adopt all such measures, as may be considered best calculated to promote the prosperity of the General Union, and to advance the Redeemer's Kingdom; to advise and consult on all matters which the churches may at any time present; to receive and drop churches from its union. But no legislative authority whatever, is by said meeting to be exercised over the churches".

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Ordained Ministers in 1830.
South District, Cantine Creek Church.
Benjamin Ogle,
James Lemen,
Joseph Lemen,
Samuel Woods,
Joseph Chance,

South District, Fountain Creek Church.
Peter Rodgers,
Josiah Lemen,
Daniel Hilton,
Moses Lemen,

South District, Turkey Hill Church.
James Pulliam,
Nathan Arnett,
Baker Phenix,

South District, African Church.
John Livingston,
Robert Crawford,

South District, Crooked Creek Church.
David R.Chance,
Samuel Short,
Wilcot Lewis,

South District, Orkshire Church.
Philip Wells,
James Bellows,

South District, Cold Water Church, Missouri.
John Clark,

North District.
Sears Crane, Carrollton Church
John Osinms, Manvrestowe Church
Elijah Dodson, Henderson's Creek Church
Major Dodson, Mt. Pleasant Church
John M'Rea, Apple Creek Church.

Other Churches were,
Silver Creek, Shoal Creek, Macoupin, Salem, Illinois, Cahokia, Plumb Creek.

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Friends of Humanity.
No. 3
After 1835 the South and North District Associations were separated in their active and printed Separate minutes. Thoroughly revised. Aug. 28 '78.

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It will be seen that a fundamental principle with Baptists, is in this article of the Constitution fully recognized; the sole authority in the church for its own government. That Associations have no legislative power that can reach the church.

There is a note appended to these minutes, which I will here insert, as it affords us the means of looking into the management of these meetings, and the method of improving the time, beyond any thing which has before been given to us. As has been seen, the business done in them was very limited, and could only consume a small portion of the time devoted to them. It is true, it might be supposed, that the time was mainly employed in

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religious exercises. But we are quite willing to be released from the necessity of conjecturing as to the course pursued in them, by having an intelligent statement of what was done.

"Each of the meetings commenced on Friday and continued till Monday. Camps were provided, and ample accommodations made, in a plain but hospitable manner, to entertain strangers. Preaching, exhortation, singing and prayer were attended to in due order, and the Lord's Supper administered. At each meeting it was manifest that the Lord was there. Many sinners were convicted and came forward for prayer, and a member of precious souls professed to be converted. Entire harmony and brotherly affection existed during the deliberations

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and each could say at the close, ‘it is good to be here’".

The circular Letter for this year was prepared by the Joint Committee, made up of one member from each of the three Associations. It is on the communion largely, but also embraces a defence of themselves against misrepresentations as to this course, especially in separating from the Illinois Association. In view of these facts it merits insertion here, as giving to the reader their own defence of their conduct, and as giving a clearer insight into the conduction of parties at this comparatively early period in Illinois.

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Circular Letter
"The Ministers and Messengers composing the Associations of the Baptized Churches of Christ, Friends to Humanity, in Illinois and Missouri, to the churches they represent, send Christian love.
Dear Brethren;--
The love of revealed truth, supreme love to Zion's King, and sincere regard for the order of the churches of God, should prompt us to seek for the right way, and never depart from it.

Our society is not only charged with strictness of communion at the Lord's table, to the same extent as other branches of the Baptist denomination,

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but we have been charged repeatedly, though unjustly, of debarring from the Lord's Supper the great body of orderly Baptists. And though there is not a word on our records that admits of that construction, nor has there been a refusal made by churches of our order that would imply such a restriction, yet the impression has been reproduced to some extent, that we are an exclusive people, and that we shut our doors against all others, however regular their standing, or exemplary their conduct. To obviate these objections, and present the subject in a proper light are reasons why we address you on it.

The phrase communion has different

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uses in the Scriptures, and the language of Christians. It sometimes signifies that manifestation of the Divine presence which it is the privilege of believers to enjoy with their Divine Head. The saints are united to the Lord by one Spirit. Christ is their life; in him they live; his quickening Spirit vivifies their souls, so that this fellowship is with the Father, and with his son Jesus Christ. This communion has no necessary connection with church relationship, or the use of religious ordinances, nor is it confined to place, time or company.

It was felt by Jacob in the wilderness of Paran; by the penitent thief on

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the cross; by Paul and Silas while bound in the inner prison; by John in the Isle of Patmos; and by martyrs in the flames. In this sense God communes with his people, and all who are united to Christ by a living faith, are the subjects of this communion.

The term communions employed to devote the kindred feelings and holy affections that exist in the hearts of God's people, towards one another; and is made one of the discriminating marks of the newbirth. "We know that we have passed from death unto life, because we love the brethren. He that loveth not his brother abideth in death." 1 Jo. 3.14. This is a communion in a far more extensive sense than church fellowship. "But if we walk in the light as he is in the light, we have fellowship

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one with another." 1. Jo 1.7. Used in this sense, the term communion expresses the affection felt and the interest taken by Christians in each other, as far as they are known to one another, and can never be measured or limited by the order of the visible church, or the ordinances of the gospel. Individual believers, who never unite in the same church relationship, and who never approach the Sacramental board in company, commune together after this manner. It is wholly a spiritual act. It is the free intercourse of mind with mind, that has drank into the same Spirit. Individuals attached to various denominations, as Baptists, Methodists, Presbyterians, Quakers, etc. whenever by intercourse, they form such an acquaintance as gives to each the

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evidence of the other's character as a Christian, participate in this communion.

But in the Scriptures, the word communion is used to express the connection of professed believers in church relationship, and particularly in celebrating the Lord's Supper. Hence the Apostle says, "The cup of blessing which we bless, is it not the communion of the blood of Christ? The bread of which we break, is it not the communion of the body of Christ? 1. Cor. 10.16.

The question, therefore, to which we invite your attention, and that of other Christian people, is, what are the terms of this communion? What are the prerequisites to a Scriptural and orderly reception of the Lord's Supper?

Here we must premise a few things without occupying

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time to furnish extensive proofs. It is required in the gospel that the people of God shall openly and publicly profess their allegiance to Christ--that this shall be done by being baptized in his name, agreeably to his command, and when thus baptized, they must be formed into societies called in the New Testament, churches. These churches are to be composed only of professed believers, who have been baptized, and whose lives and conduct afford seasonable evidence that they are really religious. These societies may be formed more or less contiguous to each other; may consist of a smaller or larger number, and may meet in one or more places, as circumstances on their own convenience may point out. This association must be voluntary, and when members are thus united they still possess all the inherent rights as

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Christians, which they previously possessed, being still bound to their brethren by the same laws, and by none other, then they were before thus uniting. That which was improper to do before joining a church, so far as it respects their brethren, is still improper after the union is consummated. And that which was lawful before uniting in a church state, would still be right. When thus united, a church formed upon the principles of the gospel is strictly and substantially independent, and has the exclusive right to regulate its own internal concerns according to the laws of Zion's King. A church has no right to act in a legislative capacity, and make rules and laws for the regulation of the affairs of Zion, or the conduct of its own members. It's authority is exclusively executive. "The Lord is our law given; the Lord is our King."

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and when conceived as a spiritual body to sit in judgment on its members, or its concerns, the only inquiry should be "What saith the Lord."

In partaking of the Lord's Supper, the church is to act as a body, and not as persons, each in his individual capacity, as may be done consistently in most parts of religious worship. The Apostle reproves the church of Corinth for the disorderly conduct of its members in relation to the Lord's Supper; one part of which, was eating and drinking by themselves, under pretence of partaking of the Lord's Supper, and he commands them to tarry one for another.

Having laid down these premises, we proceed to consider and answer the question, "What are the terms of communion at the Lord's table?"

And here we remind you again, brethren, that we must be governed exclusively by scriptural authority, and Apostolic example. We have no right to consult our feelings, partialities or desires, but to be governed solely by the laws of Christ, and his practices of the Apostolic churches. In the second chapter of the Acts, we have the order of the church marked out on this subject. The Apostles were acting for the first time, under their renewed and enlarged commission. The world was the field of their labors, and they were commanded to preach the gospel to every creature; to teach, that is, make disciples of all nations, baptizing them in the name

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of the Father, Son, and Holy Ghost, and then teach them to observe all things commanded, amongst which was "showing forth the Lord's death until he come."

On the day of Pentecost, under the preaching of Peter and the eleven, the multitude were pricked in their hearts. The conviction and the acknowledgment of guilt, is the first step to the kingdom. As awakened, convicted, anxious sinners, they cried out what shall we do? The instruction was to repent and be baptized for the remission of sins;--they gladly received the word-this was the second step. Evidence was now given of their conversion; they were baptized; this was a public avowal of their allegiance to Christ-a public profession of faith in him. They then united with the church; three thousand souls were added to the 120 disciples in one day. During all these proceedings, so definitely recorded by the historian, they were taking the necessary steps to become qualified for the reception of the Lord's Supper. It was a church ordinance, and they must take the regular steps to come into the church first. When thus embodied, and while acting in a church capacity, they celebrated, for the first time, the Lord's Supper. "And they continued steadfastly in the Apostles doctrine, and fellowship, and the breaking of bread." etc. Here we notice the first celebration of the Lord's supper, after the savior's resurrection, and while the gospel kingdom was in its primeval glory. Let us review the steps:--they were

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pricked in the heart-they gladly received the word-they were baptized-they were added to the church--they broke bread--they continued steadfastly in the Apostle's doctrine. Unless we can find evidence of a departure from this Apostolic precedent in their subsequent acts it must remain as a perfect example of the order of the house, and binding on the followers of Christ till the end of time. We do not feel at liberty to depart from it, for no departure from this order is recorded in their subsequent transactions. Consequently the terms of communion are unequivocal. They are fixed by the great Head of the church, and we do not feel willing to violate them.

The Scriptural terms of communion then are, 1st, conviction for Sin; 2nd, Faith, or gladly receiving the word; 3rd, Baptism, which means immersion; 4th, joining a church; 5th, continuing steadfastly in the Apostle's doctrine. Whenever we find brethren thus qualified, we feel bound to invite them to the Lord's table. That baptism is a prerequisite to communion, is evident from the uniform practice of the Apostolic churches. No instance of a contrary practice appears on record, while the members of the different churches are addresses as though they and obeyed this Divine command--had put on the Lord Jesus Christ by baptism. Indeed, this is a sentiment usually admitted by the various denominations who practice water baptism. The question then arises, what is baptism? And who are to be baptized? Those who usually complain

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of the Baptists about strict communion, do in reality require us to renounce our views on baptism, and adopt theirs. They admit that baptism in some form is a prerequisite to the Lord's table, and they complain of the Baptists for not recognizing their baptism, and admitting them to a seat at the Lord's table. With our present views we must regard them as unbaptized. A relinquishment of our practice in relation to communion must be preceded by a relinquishment of one of the following principles. Either we must deny that baptism upon a profession of faith is a prerequisite to communion, or we must give up immersion upon a profession of faith as necessary to a valid baptism.

Those among the Baptists who have advocated a more general communion, have taken the former ground and attempted to maintain that baptism is not in all cases indispensable to communing at the Lord's table. With the proceedings of Pentecost before us, this we cannot do. To deny that baptism is immersion, and is indispensable to the right administration of the ordinance, is to reject the clearest evidence--to shut our eyes against the light of the sun. There is a way, however, so far as the subject relates to professed believers, by which the difficulty can be removed, and involve no sacrifice or principle--no surrender on the part of any one of a single conscientious obligation. Our Brethren; who differ from us, universally believe that immersion upon a profession of faith is

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valid, gospel baptism. They often immerse when converts desire it. They can give up the practice of sprinkling, pouring, or partial washing, and practice immersion. Not a conscientious principle would be surrendered on their part. They believe immersion upon a profession of faith to be gospel baptism. Why not universally practice it? This would remove one, and a chief barrier to communion at the Lord's table.

But it is alleged against us as a society that we have declared non-fellowship with the whole body of the Baptists, and have broken off in disorder from the Union. This we deny, and challenge any one to point out such a principle in all our records.

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As the professed followers of the Holy Redeemer, we declare non-fellowship with all unrighteousness, and so far as the slavery and commerce of our species is unrighteous, we feel bound to lift our voices against it. We have certainly thought it unexpedient to open an indiscriminate correspondence with all branches of the Baptist denomination, however oppressive and unrighteous may be the conduct of the members; but we have erected no barrier against Baptists as a body, nor as individuals, whenever they are found walking agreeable to the laws of Christ.

In the early settlements of this country, and upon the first start of

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the Baptists in Illinois, nearly twenty-five years since, some of the churches adopted principles which they believed consonant with the word of God, to reject from membership those who possessed the spirit, and were in the practice of unconditional, hereditary, and perpetual slavery. But even in these principles, provision was made, under certain restrictions, and limitations, so as not to exclude from membership such as were opposed to the spirit and the practice, should they even be in the possession of slaves, yet prevented by unjust laws from emancipating them, as may be seen from our books of records. With the spirit and practice of slavery,

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we are certainly not in fellowship; yet, we do not wish to shut out our brethren, who make it manifest that the spirit of slavery does not reign in their hearts, and influence their conduct.

It is alleged that we broke off from the "Illinois Union", and this departed from the principles on which the Union was formed. The Illinois Union as it was called, was an Association of Baptists formed in the early settlement of this country, in 1807. Some of the churches were opposed to the principles of perpetual, hereditary slavery, believing it to be contrary to the spirit and doctrine of Christ--that it was unjust and oppressive, and that it tended to

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destroy moral obligation on the part of the slave, except unconditional subjection to his master. That as free born citizens of America, and members of the redeemed family of Christ, we were bound to set our faces against it, and that in consonance with these principles we deemed it inconsistent to open an indiscriminate correspondence with Baptist Associations in slave holding states. With this understanding the Union was formed, and for a time maintained in harmony, until the year 1810, (the minutes show it to have been 1809) when a part of the Union were for forcing the rest to open a correspondence with the slave holding Baptists in Kentucky, against the principles upon which we united.

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In our views and practice there has been no substantial change. We retain the same principles that we did before the division took place; and what is worthy of particular notice, we have identically the same principles, that long afterwards churches possessed, when they were received into the Illinois United Baptist Association, and which they continued to possess after being thus united.

Doubtless at the period of twenty years one by, many things may have been said on all sides, that are to be regretted, and ought to be mutually forgiven and forgotten; but that we as a body, have departed in any material respect from the

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principles upon which the Baptists set out in this country, we cannot admit.

From what we understand, a large number of Baptist churches in Indiana, Ohio, and probably in other free states have long been acting on principles similar to ours. They decline correspondence with Associations in slaveholding states, without subjecting themselves to the reproach of disorganizers or schismatics. In this, they infringe upon the right of no one; even those who differ from them on the subject, can claim no authority to compel them to open a correspondence with all Baptist associations and other religious bodies under pain of censure, and the

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charge or disorder. Those who have made the most complaint against us on this subject, have denounced those Baptists with whom they pretend to be in Union, in no very sparing terms for engaging in Missouri, Bible societies, Sunday schools, etc. when, if we are rightly informed, a very large majority of the Baptist denomination are engaged in these charitable and benevolent works. They, certainly, have no right to complain of us for declining to correspond with Associations where slavery is admitted and justified, while they debar from communion and Christian fellowship those who are connected with missionary societies.

Dear brethren, in our address to you in

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1828, your exertions and influence were requested against the Heaven provoking crime of intemperance, the intimate associate of slavery. And we trust you have not been slothful to the request; for we can assure you that we are astonished at the change which two years have effected, both in the sentiments and conduct of many in relation to intemperance. We flatter ourselves it will not be long until the bottle will be excluded both from the sideboard and the closet, and buildings will be nearer, harvests gathered, and even the suffrages of all classes of our citizens procured without resorting to the means of intoxicating liquors.

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But to sum up our observations on the terms of communion; those who have been pricked in the heart-who have gladly received the word-who have been baptized-who have been added to the church, and who continue steadfast in the Apostle's doctrine, doing to others, as they would that others should do to them. We feel bound to invite to unite with us in our commemoration of the dying love of the son of God."
Committee.
North District, Elijah Dodson.
Missouri District, John Clark.
South District, James Lemen.

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1831.
Minutes of the united though separate Associations, Friends to Humanity in Illinois, for 1831.

The churches of the South District Association met to hold its anniversary, Sep. 2, at Bro. Clement Bostwick's; on High Prairie, with Turkey Hill Church, St. Clair Co.

The session was opened with a sermon by Josiah Lemen, from 1. Cor. 3:11, "For other foundation can no man lay, than that is laid, which is Jesus Christ.
James Lemen, Moderator. Wm. Jas. Coolley, Clerk.

Twelve churches were represented, three of which were received this session. The delegates were 62, of whom 22 were ministers.

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Baptisms 109; Rec. by Letter 38; Dismissed 49; Excluded 8; Died 3; Members 572. The churches received were three: Salem, Asher's Creek and Bellville. Crooked Creek church reported 52 baptisms, Fountain Creek 9, Orkshire 9. One church only failed to report baptisms.

"It was ordered that the Association recommend to the churches, the appointment of a standing Presbytery, to examine and ordain Ministers, and that this appointment be annually made by the Ministers and Delegates at each Association."

This certainly was a new thing, among Baptists, but not to be condemned without thought and even trial.

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1831.
The churches of the North District Association convened by delegates in their annual meeting with the Hendersons Creek Church (now Whitehall), Green Co., on Friday, Sep. 20. The session was opened with a sermon by Major Dodson, from 2. Tim. 2:15, "Study to show thyself approved unto God," etc.
Sears Crane, Moderator. Elijah Dodson, Clerk.

There were 13 churches, only 10 of which were represented, by 23 delegates, of whom 6 were ministers. Four churches were received; Big Spring, Bear Creek, Sand Prairie and Mount Tabor. Baptisms 64; Rec. by Letter 11; Dismissed 14; Excluded 1; Died 2; Members 229.

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Seven of the churches had been enlarged by baptisms; and Bear Creek had received an addition of 41. The same measures as to a Presbytery, was recommended to the consideration of the churches by this body, as that by the South District Association to its churches.

"Unanimously Resolved, that we approve of Sunday Schools, and rejoice in the efforts of the A.S.S. Union in establishing Sunday Schools throughout the valley, and that so far as their operations have come to our knowledge that Union is perfectly free from every sectarian bias. And conducts all its concerns in such a manner as may justly inspire.

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Christians of all denominations with confidence."

At the close of the several sectional meeting minutes is inserted the following:
"The Missouri Association, with the North and South District Associations, have concurred in the following advice to the churches of which they are composed,
"That each Association at its next session be authorized by the churches to choose at least three, (and if thought more advisable, as many as five) experienced ministers of the Gospel, who shall constitute a Presbytery to continue for one year, whose duty it shall be to examine and ordain to the work of the ministry, such gifts as may be raised up on the district to which they belong; and that when a church belonging to said district, has made satisfactory proof of the gifts of a minister

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and the individual is, in the judgment of the church, ripe for ordination, such church will proceed to notify such presbytery, upon which the presbytery shall, as soon as practicable, convene within the bounds of the church making the application, and shall carefully examine into the standing, or character of the candidate, and also question him on all important doctrines of the gospel; after which, should the presbytery, or a majority thereof, consider the person thus examined, qualified for the imposition of hands, then shall they proceed to the laying on of the hands of the presbytery. But should the individual prove deficient, then he shall be returned to the church to which he belongs, for a fuller proof of his qualifications. And in order that the most experienced gifts in the ministry may be obtained

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from year to year, this presbytery is to be chosen annually at each Association."

The joint Circular was written by Rev. Mosses Lemen. It cannot be inserted here for want of room, though worthy of being perpetuated in some abiding form.

1832.
The Anniversary of the South District Association began with the Fountain Creek church, in Monroe Co., Friday Sep. 7.

The venerable Peter Rogers opened the session with a sermon from Gen. 5:18. Thirteen churches were represented by 61 delegates, of whom 23 were ministers.
Daniel Hilton, Moderator. W. J. Coolley, Clerk.

Bethel church, a new church, received into the Association.

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Baptisms 86; Rec by Letter 30; Restored 3; Dismissed 41; Excluded 28. Died 7; Members 606.

The following query was placed before the Association:
"Query:--whereas some of the brethren of this Association feel it to be their privilege and duty to contribute towards the support of such preachers of this body as devote the whole, or a part of their time to the ministry of the word,--now we inquire if it would be a bar to fellowship in any ones mind, if such brethren should go forward in this business, as a free-will offering, with the understanding that each member of the churches has the liberty to give or not to give, as he may deem his duty.

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Answer:--This Association unanimously sys, it is the privilege of each member to give freely to support the gospel, with the understanding, that each member is at liberty to judge of his duty. And the Association urges and recommends upon the brethren to be tender of each other's feelings and privileges, and not to accuse each other of improper motives."

It can hardly be supposed that this "Query" and "Answer" were introduced into the Association to meet any special necessity found to exist in the body, from any conflict of sentiment among its members, on the right of each member to aid with his money in the support of the ministry, or in carrying forward any benevolent work.

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For there had been a virtual approval of the religious use of many in the Circular Addresses which had been adopted, and the Spirit of missions or of Christian benevolence had pervaded the brethren of the Association. And even the contributing of money for religious purposes had been approved by the direct act of the Association.

They were made undoubtedly the subjects of action in the Association to give an opportunity to put its views on record, on the question of ministerial support, and also on the right of each member of the churches to use his money for religious purposes as his own sense of duty should dictate, for an example to Anti-Mission Associations

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around them.

1832.
The North District Association met with the Bear Creek church for its Anniversary, Friday Aug. 3, John McRae opened the session with a sermon from Titus 2:1, "But speak thou the things which become sound doctrine."
Elijah Dodson, Moderator. Anselm Moody, Clerk.

There were 13 churches, 12 of them were represented by 28 delegates, 9 of whom were ministers: Baptisms 48; Rec. by Letter 24; Dismissed 23; Excluded 4; Died 7; Members 246.

The Association recommended that one or more protracted meeting should be held in each church during the year, at which time all the ministering

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brethren were requested to be present.

This certainly was an unreasonable request, which no Association should be guilty of making, in view of the fact, that the churches had not yet begun to give to the ministers who served them any compensation for their services.

And then, the churches numbered 13, which would require if a week only were given to each church a quarter of the year, and should each church have two meetings a full half of the year would be consumed in the service by each of them. How then could their families be supported? It is strange that the actual injustice of asking for, and of receiving ministerial services without rendering any compensation for them should not have been both seen and felt.

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And it is stranger still, that Christian men should not have discovered, in their Bible reading that the duty of rendering a fair support to those who preach the gospel, by those who receive their ministrations, in very decidedly and plainly taught in that sacred book, and therefore was a decidedly Christian duty.

The Circular was the last written by the venerable John Clark.

1833.
The South District Association met for its Annual Meeting with the Canteen Creek Church, St. Clair Co., Oct. 4.

James Bellows opened the session with a sermon from Psa.133:1, "Behold how good and

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how pleasant it is for brethren to dwell together in unity?"
Moses Lemen, Moderator. James H. Lemen, Clerk.

The Beaver Creek, Loop Creek, Liberty and Seven Miles churches were received. The churches were 17; only 15 were represented by 78 delegates, 24 of whom were ministers. Baptisms 260; Rec. by Letter 80; Restored 13; Dismissed 57; Excluded 13; Died 7; Members 793. This singular Query was given to the Association;--"Have churches the right of choosing Pastors?" It was decided in the affirmative.

A petition was presented by brethren in the eastern part of the Association asking for the organization of a new Association. The request was granted, and brethren were appointed to attend the

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meeting for organizing. The name given to the new body was Saline I think.

1833.
The North District Association held its Anniversary with the Henderson Creek church, Greene Co., beginning on Friday, Aug. 30. The session opened with a sermon by J. Osimns, from 2. Cor. 5:22. "Now then we are ambassadors for Christ, as though God did beseech you by us:" etc.

Manchester and Antioch churches were received. The first named with 15 members, and the last with 18.
Sears Crane, Moderator. Justus Rider, Clerk.

The churches were 14, and 13 were represented by 31 delegates, 7 of whom were ministers.

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Baptisms 171; Rec. by Letter 29; Dismissed 28; Excluded 10; Died 3; Members 353.

The joint Circular was written by Rev. James Lemen, and was on Church Government. Eleven of the churches of the South District Association had been favored with additions by baptism. Canteen Creek church had received by this ordinance 102, Silver Creek 18; Fountain Creek 13; High Prairie 9; Orkshire Creek 7; Shoal Creek 12; Belleville 22; Beaver Creek 27; Loop Creek 19; Liberty Church 30. It must have been a year of revivals. In the North District the Macoupin church received 43, Carrollton 22, Salem 7. Henderson Creek 13, Cahokia 37; Apple Creek 36; Manchester 5, and five other churches less members. In the two bodies 431 were baptized.

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1834.
The South District Association was entertained by the Beaver Creek church, Bond Co. while holding its Anniversary, commencing on Friday, Oct. 3.

The meeting commenced with a sermon by Moses Lemen, from 2. Peter 1:5-7, "And besides this, giving all diligence, add to your faith virtue; and to virtue knowledge;" etc.

The Mud Creek, Diamond Spring, Ebenezer, and Upper Silver Creek churches were received. The churches were 15 and represented by 57 delegates, of whom 17 were ministers.
Moses Lemen, Moderator. W. J. Coolley, Clerk.

Baptisms 90; Rec. by Letter 35;

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Restored 1; Dismissed 58; Excluded 28; Died 9; Members 727.

The death of the venerable John Clark, commonly called Father Clark, was noticed by the Association, and Revs. James Lemen and John M. Peck were requested to complete the life and compile the writing which Mr. Clark had commenced of himself for publication. Mr. Peck and published his life under the title of "Father Clark, or the Pioneer Preacher", in 1855.

1834.
The North District Association, convened, on Friday, Sep. 19, with the Apple Creek church, Morgan Co.

Elijah Dodson opened the session with a sermon from 2. Tim. 1:13, "Hold fast the form

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of sound words, which thou hast heard of me," etc.

Salt Creek, Island Grove, Bethel, Indian Creek and Lake Fork churches were received. The churches were 14. Kahokia church was not present. Baptisms 102; Rec. by Letter 31; Dismissed 34; Restored 1; Died 8; Members 391.
Sears Crane, Moderator. Moses Lemen, Clerk.

I find the following in the Minutes:
"This Association having received gospel evidence that John Osborn has been guilty of lying and other immoral conduct, we therefore think proper to drop his name from our minutes, as not being worthy to be enrolled among us,--and we also advise the churches

513

to be aware of this man." Mr. Osborn was a professed minister.

These resolutions were in the minutes:
"Resolved, that we feel thankful for the aid afforded our preaching brethren by the friends abroad.--and that we recommend our churches to be more active in promoting faithful preaching amongst the destitute churches and settlements.

"Resolved, that this Association send as delegates all that feel disposed to attend the Union Meeting, to be held at White Hall, Greene Co., on Thursday before the Second Friday in October, 1834."

This was the meeting which organized the "Baptist Convention of Illinois."

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Chapter VI. South District Association.

From 1835 the South and North District Associations became entirely separated. They are a continuation of the Friends of Humanity.

Thoroughly revised. Aug 28. 1878

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The South and North District Associations were one body until 1828, when it was arranged to have three divisions. They were designated South and North Districts, and the Missouri District. In 1835, another change was made, and each became independent Associations.

As "The Friends of Humanity" I have brought down the history in Chapter V. Now I begin the history of the South District as an independent body.

1835. 15th Anniversary.
The South District Association met with the Silver Creek church for its annual meeting, in the Salem Meeting House, St. Clair Co., Sep. 4, 1835; and Nathan Arnett opened the Session with a sermon from Heb. 13:1. "Let brotherly love continue."

Of the 15 churches 13 were represented by 58 delegates, 16 of whom were ministers. Baptisms 41; Rec. by Letter 33; Restored 9; Dismissed 41; Excluded 26; Died 15; Members 695.

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Joseph Lemen, Moderator. James H. Lemen, Clerk.

The association on re-consideration decided it best to continue the practice of having Circular Letters. Up to this meeting the two Associations, the South and North Districts were in certain things united. Beginning with this year they became independent each of the other.

Business took its usual course.

1836. 16th Anniversary.
The Association for its session in 1836, met with the High Prairie church, St. Clair Co. which commenced on Friday Sep. 30 with a sermon by John Lee, from Ezekiel 1:16.--"The appearance of the wheels and their work was like unto the color of a beryl:" etc.

The second Shoal Creek church was received with 13 members. Diamond Spring church was dismissed to the Salem Association. The churches were 13, and were represented by 69 delegates, of whom 16 were ordained Ministers, and 3 were licentiates. Baptisms 38; Rec. by Letter 19; Dismissed 23; Excluded 18; Died 8; Members; 616.

The new Association formed from this,--the Saline, is in correspondence with it.

A committee of five was appointed to arrange and

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digest the business for the body. This was a new feature in the proceedings. Another committee to arrange the preaching during the session was appointed.

The range of business was a little extended. I find the following in the minutes:
"Whereas, the Baptists in the State have formed a Convention for the purpose of supplying the destitute throughout its borders with the preached Gospel: Therefore,
"Resolved, That Nathan Arnett, Clement Bostwick, David Howell, James Mason, Samuel Rogers and Simon Stookey be appointed delegates to attend the annual meeting of said convention, at Bethel meeting house, St. Clair Co., commencing the second Thursday in October, 1836.

"Resolved, That this Association consider it the undispensable duty, and do request of all the heads of families to worship God by prayer, etc., in their families.

"Resolved, That this Association deeply deplore the neglect of the Lord's day, by too many members of our churches, and for this reason, do earnestly request a more strict and Christian observance of the same."

The Association very strongly commended the "Am. and For. Bible Society," to the liberality of the churches and members. The Circular Letter was

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written by Rev. John Lee.

1837. 17th Anniversary.
The association met with the Fountain Creek church, Monroe Co., to hold its session of 1837, Sep. 22, which was opened with a sermon, by Joseph Lemen, from Psa.102: 16,--"When the Lord shall build up Zion, he shall appear in his glory."

The Waterloo branch of the Fountain Creek church, and New Salem and Pleasant Grove churches were received. The churches were 18, ordained ministers 20, and licentiates 9. Baptisms 62; Rec. by Letter 26; Restored 5; Dismissed 74; Excluded 18; Died 14; Members 734.
James Lemen, Moderator. Daniel Converse, Clerk.

Committees as last year were appointed.

The Cold Water church in Missouri was dismissed to the Missouri Association.

The churches were urged to contribute a sufficient amount to cover the expenses of delegates to corresponding associations.

The following resolutions were in the minutes and they indicate an advancement in the views

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of Christian duty entertained by the members.

"Resolved, That we advise the destitute churches to make choice of some preacher or preachers to supply them with regular preaching, and that they contribute to their temporal necessities as God may prosper them.

"Resolved, That we recommend to the churches to encourage the religious and moral instruction of children and youth through the medium of Sabbath schools.

"Resolved, That we cheerfully co-operate with the Illinois Baptist State convention, in endeavoring to supply the destitute of our State with the preached Gospel."

An application of the second Shoal Creek church, for the ordination of Brother Wm. Burge to the Ministry, the Association advise it said church to appoint a suitable presbytery, to examine and ordain such candidate.

Resolved, That a collection be taken up tomorrow, to sustain the gospel ministry, and that the Moderator nominate a committee

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of five, to take charge of the amount raised, and appropriate it on Monday, as shall appear to them most advantageous to the cause of Christ."

Such Committee was appointed.

Resolved, that we consider the Western Pioneer, now published under the Supervision of a committee, as the organ of the Baptist denomination, and edited by brethren J. M. Peck, W. Leverett and E. Rodgers, as an ably conducted weekly periodical, worthy of extensive patronage. We, therefore, recommend that all the brethren in the bounds of the Association patronize said paper.

Resolved, That this Association appoint Elders James B. Olcott and James Lemen, a committee on the Pioneer, to act in conjunction with the committee appointed on the part of the Edwardsville Association.

The preachers on Lord's day were John Lee, Moses Lemen, J.M.Peck, at the close of whose sermon the collection voted for the day before was taken amounting to $36.78.

Nicholas Carper, a colored Cumberland Presbyterian

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preacher, in the afternoon preached, and was given a collection of $35.37, because he had lost his house and furniture by fire. I think these were the first public collections ever taken in the Association.

The meeting was continued until the following Sabbath, and was blessed of God and 44 converts were baptized.

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1838. 18th Anniversary.
The South District Association held its Anniversary with the Canteen Creek church, at the Bethel meeting house, beginning, Oct. 5, 1838.

The session commenced with a sermon by James Pulliam, from Acts 20:28, "Take heed therefore unto yourselves, and to all the flock over which the Holy Ghost hath made you overseers,"etc.
James Lemen, Moderator. Robert Lemen, Clerk.

The churches of Waterloo and Georgetown were received. The churches were 15 and all were represented.

The Colored Union church at Alton, and the St. Clair Ogle's Creek church, at their request were received into the body. This latter I suppose was a colored church. And immediately these churches and the Sinai church, which I suppose to be the African, which for years had belonged to the Association requested to be dismissed from the body to unite forming another Association. The request was granted and the names of the two churches

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received at this session never appeared in the table of churches. The Missouri churches were also dismissed. And though in the minutes there is no action recorded showing that the bodies which had been called districts agreed to become each an entirely independent body or Association; yet it seems they did so, and published their minutes separately, as I have the minutes of the North and South District Association in separate pamphlets for 1836. The last year in which they printed their minutes jointly, so far as I can learn, was in 1835. In these early times explanations were not always given by clerks when they should have been, of changes in their proceedings.

The delegates from the 15 churches were 87, of whom 18 were ordained ministers, and 10 were licentiates. Baptisms 136; Rec. by Letter 30; Restored 11; Dismissed 18; Excluded 22; Died 6; Members 695

Committees on religious exercises, and on arranging business were appointed

The resolutions on the churches choosing pastors

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and compensating them,--on co-operation with the Illinois Convention,--on encouraging Sabbath Schools,--on family worship and on the deplorable neglect of the Lord's day were all republished in the minutes of this year.

In view of the great destitution of a preached gospel in the South part of the State the Association virtually organized itself into a missionary Society to attempt the employment of missionary labor there.

This resolution was adopted, which seemed to be rather a late movement, as correspondence with the Association had exerted more or less for some time.

"Resolved, That Elder N. Arnott, and brethren Samuel Rodgers and Isaac Griffin, be a committee to prepare a letter of correspondence to the Edwardsville Association, setting forth our principles and doctrine, particularly relative to slavery, and ask of them a letter declaring their principles and doctrine to the same subject, and whether slavery exists in any of the churches of that body."

Some of the churches had been blessed with revivals as appears from their additions by baptism.

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Canteen church had thus received 18, Fountain Creek 23, Upper Silver Creek 46, Waterloo 8, New Salem 13, Second Shoal Creek 10, and other churches less numbers.

This year a general Corresponding Letter was prepared by a committee and printed in the minutes. Hitherto there has been one prepared for each Association and not printed. In the Letter it is said, "our churches generally are in favor of the various forum of Christian benevolence; and many of them are engaged in promoting the circulation of the Scriptures, and Foreign and Domestic Missions. We shall endeavor to keep you advised of our condition and prospects, and to co-operate with you in every good work. And, relying upon the blessing and provisions of God, let our field of labor be the World; and the object of our prayers and efforts the subjugation of our fallen race to the dominion of the Prince of Peace."

At the close of the second sermon on the Lord's day a collection and subscription was taken of $105.00 for their missionary work.

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1839. 19th Anniversary.
The Upper Silver Creek church entertained the Association while holding its Anniversary which commenced Oct. 4 on Friday.

James Lemen opened the session with a sermon from Math. 9:37, 38. "The harvest truly is plenteous but the laborers are few. Pray ye therefore the Lord of the harvest, that he will send forth laborers into his harvest."

The churches were fifteen, the same number as last year, but there have been changes of which the minutes give no explanation. Baptism 100; Rec. by Letter 43; Restored 6; Dismissed 25; Excluded 9; Died 6; Members 761.
James Lemen, Mod. David Converse, Clerk.

The Missionary Committee appointed at the previous meeting to attempt missionary work in the Southern part of the State reported that the sum of $97.56 had been collected, and they had paid $90 to four brethren for missionary labor South and east of Kaskaskia river.

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The resolutions printed for two years were again adopted and put in the minutes. The following resolutions also were adopted by the Association.

"Resolved, That Eld. James Lemen be appointed to attend every church in this association, in the course of the ensuing year, and report at the next annual association their State and condition; and that a public collection be made to pay said minister for is labors.

"Resolved, That the churches of this association be requested to hold a protracted meeting in conformity with Bro. James Lemen's arrangements in visiting the different churches; and said churches are requested to furnish funds to help compensate brother Lemen for his labors in visiting them.

"Resolved, That the theological Seminary at Upper Alton, is regarded as an indispensable appendage to the College, with a view to the training

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of our young brethren for greater usefulness in the ministry; and that the churches be urged to look out such gifts as God seems to designate for the ministry, and provide means for their theological education.

"Resolved, That we again urge the principle of Temperance, in abstaining from all intoxicating drinks; and recommend to our churches and brethren vigorous and persevering action; and we would especially call their attention to the act of the Legislature, by which a majority of the voters in each Justice's district, by petitioning the county commissioner's court, can prevent any more licenses being granted to sell intoxicating liquors."

Correspondence was opened with the Springfield Association. A committee was appointed to prepare a Corresponding Letter to be publish in the minutes. They did so by reprinting the one of the previous year. This was an easy way to avoid labor, and was a very common way in those days to make reports or any other form of writing.

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1840. 20th Anniversary. The annual meeting was held with the Silver Creek church, St. Clair Co., commencing Sep. 18.

John Padou opened the session with a sermon from 2. Cor. 5:9, "Wherefore we labor, that, whether present or absent we may be accepted of him."

The churches were 19, numbering 4 more than the year previous without any explanation as to the difference. From two there was no intelligence. Baptisms 72; Rec. by Letter 39; Restored 5; Dismissed 38; Excluded 18; Died 20; Members 812.
James Lemen, Mod. James H. Lemen, Clerk.

Corresponding brethren were received. The usual committees were appointed.

The resolutions published in the minutes the year previous were printed in those of this year.

The following were added this year:
"Whereas, the Baptist Board of Foreign Missions; the American Bap. Home Mission Society; the

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American and Foreign Bible Society; and the A. Bap. Publication Society, as organized bodies, by our denomination, have been formed to send the gospel to the heathen, supply the destitute in our own country with preaching, translate and publish the pure word of God, and furnish religious books and tracts for family reading and Sabbath Schools: therefore,
"Resolved, That our churches and brethren be affectionately urged to sustain these institutions by their influence prayers and contributions.

The report of Elder James Lemen as appointed to visit the several churches in the Association at the previous Anniversary was presented read and accepted. The committee appointed to receive and appropriate money for the mission paid Eld. Lemen $75, and he received from the churches $38, making for his Services $113.

The following was passed by the body:
"Resolved, That we recommend to the churches, that when an individual manifests impressions to preach the gospel, and promises to be useful, to call

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for a Presbytery of ministers, for his examination on experimental religion, his call to the ministry, and whether he is sound in the faith, in order to his receiving license.

1841. 21st Anniversary.
For its Annual Meeting the Association met with the Georgetown church, Randolph Co., Sep. 17. 1841.

Samuel Rogers opened the session with a sermon from John 1:46, "And Nathaniel said into him, Can there any good thing come out of Nazareth? Philip said unto him, Come and see."

The churches were 18, but 3 were not represented. There are changes in the number and names of the churches every year but there appears no record of them.
James Lemen, Mod. Ashford Smith, Clerk.

Ordained ministers 18, Licentiates 8. Baptisms 170; Rec by Letter 77; Restored 9; Dismissed 44; Excluded 34; Died 17; Members 914.

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The Female Society of Bethel church sent into the Association $15 to aid paying the missionary of the body. Joseph Lemen had been employed as a missionary during a part of the year and was paid $93.

The following resolutions were adopted by the Association.

"Resolved, That we are highly gratified that so many of the churches have made choice of pastors, and are in some degree attempting to sustain them, and we would still recommend to those who have not, to do so as soon as God in his Providence shall permit.

"Resolved, That we recommend to each of our churches to make all reasonable efforts to have the gospel preached within its bounds, every Sabbath of each month in the year.

"Resolved, That we also recommend to the churches to sustain prayer and conference meetings once a week within their respective bounds.

"Resolved, That it affords us pleasure to believe that a large number of the members of our churches, who are heads of families, sustain daily the worship of God in their hours, and we would affectionately entreat.

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those who do not, to enter upon the discharge of a duty at once to obvious and beneficial."

Others, which were much the same as the year before were reprinted this year.

There were five sermons on the Lord's day and a collection of $11.56.

1842. 22nd Anniversary.
The Fountain Creek church entertained the Association while holding its Annual Meeting, which commenced, Sep. 16, 1842.

The session was opened with a sermon by John Peters from Nehe. 4:19, 20, "And I said unto the nobles, and to the rulers, and to the rest of the people," etc.

The following churches Rhenault, Chester, Little Marie, Richland, Elkton, and Rock Creek, Iowa Ter., were received. The churches were 23, from two of which there was no inteligence. The ordained ministers were 23, and the licentiates 9. Baptisms 174; Rec. By Letter 63; Restored 11; Dismissed 69; Excluded 29; Died 18; Members 1074.

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James Lemen, Mod. James H. Lemen, Clerk.

A ministerial conference was recommended to be composed of ministers and deacons and any other disposed to co operate in it.

Churches failing to represent themselves for two years were to be removed from the list of churches. The resolutions of last year were inserted in the minutes of this.

Five of the churches had received 20 or more members by baptism, and 4 had received 8 or more and others smaller members.

1843. 23rd Anniversary.
The association met with the Waterloo church, Monroe Co., to hold its session, commencing, Sep. 15, 1843.

James Lemen opened the meeting with a sermon from 2. Tim. 2:15, "Study to show thyself approved unto God," etc.

The Looking Glass Prairie church was received. The churches were 22, from three there was no intelligence.

536

Baptisms 216; Rec by Letter 52; Restored; Dismissed 65; Excluded 30; Died 21; Members 1304.
James Lemen, Moderator. Nathaniel Smith, Clerk.

An unusual number of committees were appointed and in the course of the meeting made their reports on the ordinary forms of benevolence, and on business.

The Missouri Baptist published in St. Louis, Mo., by Rev. I. T. Hilton was recommended to the patronage of the brethren, and also the Association recommended the "Voice of Truth" published at Jacksonville, Ill. by Rev A. Bailey be united with the Baptist.

From a Query submitted to the Association the following answer was given;
"Your committee regard repentance, faith, baptism, church membership, and the partaking of the Lord's Supper always necessary, invariably preceeding ordination at the hands of an unbaptized presbytery, or the ordination of an unbaptized

537

candidate to the ministry, is not valid. Therefore, we command, that any brother now in this Association, or hereafter desiring admission, who may have been ordained by an unbaptized presbytery, before his baptism, be ordained again."

The closing item in the report on the query about communion is in these words:
"Further: communion at the Lord's table is no test of fellowship. Christ says, "Do this in remembrance of me; as oft as ye eat this bread and drink this cup, ye do show the Lord's death till he come. When we regard communion as an evidence of liberality to Pedo-baptists, we substitute our feelings and notions for our guide, instead of Bible truth. All denominations regard baptism as a requisite to the Lord's supper, and we do the same."

There was a collection of $20 for Shurtleff College, and also one of $26 for Foreign Missions during the session, and also four sermons beside those of the Lord's day. Our church had received over 50 members by baptism, two over 30, two 20, five 12 or over, and seven less members.

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1844. 24th Anniversary.
The annual meeting of the Association was held with the Elkton church, Washington Co., commencing, Sep. 13, 1844.

A. B. Harris opened the session with a sermon from Psa. 68:11, "The Lord gave the word, and great was the company of them that published it."

The Pleasant Ridge church was received. The churches were 20. Three in the previous minutes were removed from these without recorded cause. Baptisms 82; Rec. by Letter 44; Restored 9; Dismissed 71; Excluded 32; Died 28; Members 1224.
John Peters, Moderator. Nathaniel Smith, Clerk.

Business took the usual course. Much time was given to preaching and devotion.

And the meeting closed with a very good State

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of religious feeling.

The ordained ministers were Joseph Lemen, James Lemen, Nathan Arnett, John Padon, Josiah Lemen, A.B. Harris, C. Bostwick John Peters, Peter Rogers, James Pulliam, W. F. Boyakin, H. S. Gordon, W. Lemen, W. Rountree, J. S. Brown, A. B. Rountree, J. Whitechurch, J. Michell, Atlas Moore, Baker Femix, John Kenyon and Samuel Rogers. 22.

Licentiates were J. T. Stillwell, A. Barkin, T. W. Dawson, W. Holcomb, J. O. English, L. Bostwick, J. Kinyon, H. S. Streeter and Samuel Roach. 9.

1845. 25th Anniversary.
The Bethel church entertained the Association while holding its Annual Meeting commencing, Oct. 17, 1845.

The opening Sermon was postponed until evening. The churches were 19, all being represented. Baptisms 37; Rec. by Letter 32; Restored 2; Dismissed 62; Excluded 24; Died 28; Members 1080.

540

John Peters, Moderator. J. H. Lemen, Clerk. many committees were appointed

The Annual sermon was preached by W. F. Boyakin, from Rom. 10:15, "How beautiful are the feet of them that preach the gospel of peace," etc.

The usual resolutions were adopted on the several branches of benevolent labors.

The first day of January, 1846, the churches were requested to observe as a day of fasting and prayer. The pastors were recommended to encourage sisters of their respective churches to form societies for contributing to domestic missions, and or manufactoring articles of clothing for beneficiaries of Shurtleff College. Churches having no pastors were agreed to obtain them. A missionary committee was appointed to carry forward a mission within their own bounds and vicinity.

The committee on Shurtleff College said this in their report:
"The committee on Shurtleff College understand that ten new students have entered the

541

present term. The Quincy, Springfield, and North District Associations have come forward nobly and promised aid in sustaining the faculty the present year. It is supposed that $500, with avails of tuition will sustain the professors and employ a tutor. This is a very desirable object. From $85 to $90 will sustain a student for the year." The college was warmly recommended to the liberality of the churches and the community.

James Lemen had been employed a portion of the year as a missionary.

The ministers present agreed to hold a "Ministers Meeting" at "Salem meeting house," Silver Creek, on the last Friday in November, 1845.

The meeting closed with the preaching and public devotions of the Lord's day, and a happy state of religious feeling prevailed.

1846. 26th Anniversary.
The Association met the Silver Creek church and held its annual session, which commenced, Oct. 2, 1846.

542

T. W. B. Dawson opened the session with a sermon from Acts 13:30, "And by him all that believe are justified from all things, from which they could not be justified by the law of Moses."

The list of churches was reduced in some unexplained way to 14. Baptisms 106; Rec. by Letter 45; Restored 4; Dismissed 60; Excluded 38; Died 32; Members 987.
John Padon, Moderator. D. L. Phillips, Clerk.

Twelve Committees were appointed. The missionary committee did little work and asked to be discharged from further service.

The plan of a southern organization in the State, auxiliary to the General Association of Illinois was approved.

There was nothing in the reports of committees unusual in character. The name of the Union Church was changed to Troy.

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1847. 27th Anniversary.
The annual meeting was held with the church in Troy, Madison Co. beginning Oct. 1, 1847.

The session was opened with an essay, on the New Testament order of churches and their convention, by W. F. Boyakin.

The churches were 13. Baptisms 11; Rec by Letter 25; Dismissed 52; Excluded 30; Died 22; Members 849.
James Lemen, Moderator. D. L. Phillips, Clerk.

Committees were appointed. The "Watchman of the Prairie" was very highly recommended, as a denominational paper, which had just been commenced in Chicago by Rev. Luther Stone. The reports of committees were of an ordinary character.

1848. 28th Anniversary.
The Bethel church entertained the Association while holding its anniversary.

The session was opened, Sep. 29, with a sermon by D. L. Phillips from Mark 16:15. "And he said unto them

544

go ye into all the world, and preach the gospel to every creature."

The churches were 12. Pleasant Grove church. Risdon Post Office, disappeared from the Minutes, having united with the Nine Mile Association. Committees were appointed. Nathan Arnett, Moderator. D. L. Phillips, Clerk.

Baptisms 50; Rec. by Letter 26; Dismissed 30; Excluded 26; Died 17; Members 866.

The committee on Sabbath Schools reported that they found taught on union principles, schools in the following churches:
Bethel, a school of 100 scholars; Fountain Creek, 50; Silver Creek, 50; Troy, 50; Waterloo, 80; New Hope, 3 Schools, including 100; Pleasant Ridge, 35; Renault Grant, 45; Bellville, a school six miles west, of 25; High Prairie, none; Ebenezer, a school at Millstadt, of 25; Richland church, 45. Total scholars 625.

Churches and their Post Offices. Bethel, Collinsville; Fountain Creek, Waterloo; Silver Creek, Mascoutah; Troy, Troy; Waterloo, Waterloo; Bellville, High Prairie, and Richland. Each has Belleville; Elkton; New Hope, Edwardsville; Pleasant Ridge, Troy; Ebenezer, Millstadt.

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The meeting closed with the worship of the Lord's day. J. M. Peck preached a missionary sermon, after which a collection was taken of $31.65.

J. D. Newell closed with a very solemn sermon from Ezekiel 33:11. "Say unto them, as I live, saith the Lord God, I have no pleasure in the death of the wicked; but that wicked turn from his evil way and live."

1849. 29th Anniversary.
With the Belleville church the annual meeting was commenced, Thursday Sep. 27, 1849.

James Lemen opened the session with a sermon from 2. Cor. 8:23. "Whether any do inquire of Titus, he is any partner and fellow helper concerning you: or our brethren be inquired of, they are the messengers of the churches, and the glory of Christ."

The Rhenault church was received. The churches were 13. Baptisms 50; Rec. by Letter 30; Dismissed 35; Excluded 23; Died 35; Members 857.
James Corwin, Moderator. D. L. Phillips, Clerk.

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The course of business was of the ordinary character and a pleasant session was closed on the Lord's day. Beside the opening sermon there were seven others before the end of the meeting. There were 14 ordained ministers, and 5 licentiates.

1850.

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1851. 31st Anniversary.
The annual meeting was held with the Fountain Creek church, beginning on Thursday, Oct. 2, 1851.

The opening sermon was by T. W. B. Dawson from Eph. 4:3, "Endeavoring to keep the unity of the Spirit in the bond of peace."

The churches were reduced to 9, and eight were represented. Ministers 13, licentiates 4. Baptisms 11; Rec. by Letter 26; Restored 6; Dismissed 14; Excluded 14; Died 14; Members 812.
John M. Peck, Moderator. James H. Lemen, Clerk

Committees were appointed.

In the Minutes I find the following:
"Whereas, For several years passed reports have been made and resolutions passed, that have occupied considerable time in the Association, and space in the minutes, without producing corresponding acts in the churches; therefore, the committee recommend the following for this year:

"Resolved, That while we entertain the same interest in the "Am Baptist Missionary Union,"-"The

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Am Bap Home Mission Society,"--"The Am and Foreign Bible Society,"--Shurtleff College and Ministerial Education,"--"The Am Bap Publication Society,"--"Sabbath Schools, and every other object of Gospel Benevolence, as in former years, we deem it unnecessary to make special reports on the subjects."

On each of these subjects short addresses were made. At this time the brethren were very much interested in a mission among the Germans in their section of the State.

The Association urged the churches to appoint Solicitors to call on the members quarterly and get subscriptions for benevolent objects; and also to have a public collection taken up during each quarter in January-for Foreign Missions.
In April--for The Bap. Convention of Southern Illinois and Home Missions.
In July--The German Mission.
In October--The Am and For Bible Society.

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An extended report was made on the Local German Mission. A brother Kupper who preached both in German and French was employed to labor among settlements of these people. He had organized as French church of Seventeen members.

A standing committee was appointed to have this work in charge, and were to meet monthly in Belleville.

A revised Summary of Faith, constitution and Rules of Order were printed in the Minutes.

1852. 32nd Anniversary.
The Richland church entertained the Association while holding its annual meeting, which commenced, Thursday, Sep. 30, 1852.

After devotional services Joseph Lemen preached from John 9:14, "I must work the works of Him that sent me while it is day, the might cometh when we man can work."

The Nine Mile Creek, and Harmony Churches were received. The churches were ten. Ministers belonging to the churches 14. Licentiates 2.

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Baptisms 52; Rec by Letter 25; Restored 3; Dismissed 46; Excluded 15; Died 21; Members 792.
John Padon, Moderator. D.M. Howell, Clerk.

On the cause of benevolence the Association re-enacted the proceedings of the previous year. There had been some missionary labor performed among the Germans under the direction of the missionary committee by Elders Kupfer and H. L. Deppe.
The Bethel, Fountain Creek and Troy churches reported benevolent contributions amounting to $133.30. there was the usual preaching during the session and on the Lord's day, and the meeting continued over Monday, and several persons were received as candidates for baptism.

Finding the following historical sketch in the minutes of this year I transcribe them.

"Origin.--This association of churches commenced its existence as a body, in 1820, of three churches: its first annual meeting, of which minutes were printed, was held in 1821. It had five churches, Canteen Creek (now

551

Bethel,) Silver Creek, Fountain Creek, Providence, and Cold Water--the last two in Missouri.

The number of members in all the churches was about two hundred. The ordained ministers were James Lemen, Sen., James Lemen, Jun., Joseph Lemen, Benjamin Ogle, John Clark and Daniel Hilton, a circular Letter, written by James Lemen, Jun, (now senior,) is found in the minutes of that year.

Bethel (then Canteen Creek) church was organized, December 10, 1809, with seven members, of whom three are yet living. And are members of that church. Elder James Lemen, Jun, was received by letter the next day, who makes the fourth survivor.

Silver Creek church was formed from the scattered members of older one in that settlement, in 1811.

Fountain Creek church organized on the New Design church, which was dissolved in June, 1821. Of thirty-five members.

Providence church was formed in the Boon's Lick county, Mo., in 1820, and soon because scattered.

Cold Water church was formed at an earlier period, (date not known) in St. Louis county, by Elder John Clark.

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South District Association, in 1828, had 19 churches, 25 preachers, and 550 members. Next year the body divided in to three districts, which eventually became distinct associations; one in Missouri and two in Illinois.

In the earlier period of its history, the ministers of the association performed extreme itinerant labors, by preaching two in a company, as the disciples were first sent out. Their labors were voluntary, elf-sacrificing, and extensive, and they now sleep sweetly in the grave, or, (if alive) are sustaining the infirmities of age, and patiently wait for the Master to say, "Come up hither".

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1853. 33rd Anniversary.
The annual meeting was held with the Silver Creek church beginning, Thursday, Sep. 29, 1853.

T. A. Morton opened the session with a sermon from Rom. 13:12, "The night is far spent, the day is at hand; let us, therefore, cast off of works of darkness, and let us put on the armor of light."

Muscoutah church was received. The churches were eleven. Ordained ministers were 14; Licentiates 2; Baptisms 57; Rec by Letter 53; Restored 6; Dismissed 41; Excluded 13; Died 18; Members 828.
Josiah Lemen, Moderator. James H. Lemen, Clerk.

The resolution embracing the several organizations for Christian work was re-adopted, and a short address were made on the several objects.

A missionary Committee was appointed to employ an itinerant missionary and supervise the work, and report their doings at the next association.

I transcribe the following resolution, as showing

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the feelings of the body toward the colored race.

"Resolved, That it be recommended to our brethren, and all good people, to aid the people of color in Illinois in establishing and keeping up Sabbath and week-day schools; and that we give them our encouragement in every effort they make to improve their condition."

Meetings were held each night, and prayer-meetings in the morning at sunrise and at nine o'clock, and the preaching of the Gospel was attended with divine power.

At the close of the morning sermon on the Lord's day a collection was taken of $26.85, for the Baptist convention of Southern Illinois.

And at the close of the afternoon exercises the Executive Committee on Missions circulated a subscription and obtained about $150 toward sustaining an itinerant missionary.

The contributions reported by the churches to benevolent purposes in the year:

Bethel, $305; Silver Creek, $60; Fountain Creek $40;

555

Bellville, $490; Troy $300; Waterloo $250; Richland $40; Pleasant Ridge $385; Harmony $48.

Of the 14 ordained ministers, several, from advanced age and infirmities; were unable to perform much active service.

1854. 34th Anniversary.
The annual meeting was with the Pleasant Ridge church, St. Clair Co., commencing, Thursday, Sep. 28, 1854.

The opening sermon was by John Peters, from Heb. 10:24, "Let us consider one another, to provoke unto love, and to good works."

The Salem church was received. The churches were 12. Baptisms 209; Rec. by Letter 66; Restored 25; Dismissed 43; Excluded 18; Died 19; Members 1048.
John Peters, Moderator. J. H. Lemen, Clerk.

A committee to arrange, digest and prepare business was an established usage in the body, and had been for years.

The Missionary Committee reported that they

556

had employed D. H. Lowell as their missionary at a salary of $300 per year which they had received from the churches, and had paid him.

The missionary made his report for eleven months, having one month yet to serve. "Had preached 129 sermons, given 167 exhortations, attended 44 prayer meetings, made 301 family visits, baptized 37 converts, administered the Lord's supper five times, distributed 4,000 pages of tracts, sold and donated 19 bibles, sold 34 hymns books, traveled 2,517 miles and taken part in organizing one church, called Salem, in Monroe Co. in performing the above labor, I have visited Sugar Creek, Lebanon, Mascoutah, Belleville, Anderson's school-house, Ogle's school-house, Turner's school-house, Rider's school-house, Silver Creek, Richland, Harmony, Waterloo, Salem, Prairie-de-long, Redbud, Nine Mile Creek, Sparta and Ruma.
D. Mason Howell."

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The general resolution commending the several general organizations for denominational Christian work was again adopted, and on each organization an address not exceeding fifteen minutes by some minister was made.

The committee on business recommended, that J. Peters, J. Mason and J. Rogers, be a committee to report what action the churches can take in order to supply the destitution of exhorters, so much felt. This committee thus reported:
"We, your Committee, by leave to urge upon all the churches forming this association the great importance of seeking out among themselves such as may have any gifts, and that they give every encouragement to such of their members as, in the judgment of the church, shall appear to have any qualifications for exhorting, and that the church direct them by a committee, or otherwise in their labors; and we also recommend that some member of our body be directed to prepare for publication a Circular Letter upon this important subject to be presented to our next associational meeting."

This report was adopted and Eld. T. A. Morton was appointed to write the Letter.

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A missionary Committee was appointed, and were instructed, if they could raise sufficient funds to pay them, to employ two missionaries to labor within their field. The continued cordial co-operation of the Association with the Convention of Southern Illinois was affirmed. Elder Morton read a communication he had received from brother Jirah D. Cole, the agent for the American Baptist Missionary Union, strongly urging the claims of that society upon the Baptists of Illinois. The cause of temperance was strongly set forth in the report of a committee, and in addresses. Within the past year Eld. James Pulliam died.

1855. 35th Anniversary.
Troy, Thursday, October 4, 1855.
With the church in Troy, the Association held its anniversary.

D. Mason Howell opened the session with a sermon, from 2 Peter, 3:14, "Wherefore, beloved, seeing that ye look for such things, be diligent that ye may be found of him in peace," etc.

559


The Lebanon and Eagle Prairie churches were received making the churches 14. Richland was not represented, nor was Nine Miles Creek church. Baptisms 170; Rec. by Letter 21; Restored 10; Dismissed 56; Excluded 36; Died 16; Members 1049.
T. W. Dawson, Moderator. D. M. Howell, Clerk.

Correspondence by appointment delegates with other associations was given up, and correspondence by letter was made the rule.

The particular consideration of the several departments of Christian and benevolent work under the controll of Societies, the Association decided to abandon, with the distinct avowal of their unalterable attachment to them, and warm sympathy for them; but did not deem it best to make them the subjects of special consideration at each meeting of an hour each morning continuing from 8 to 9 o'clock.

The Missionary committee employed the same minister, D. M. Howell, the previous as year, to serve the association as its missionary, at a salary of $400.

560

He served six months and then resigned, and the committee succeeding in raising and paying him $200, leaving a balance of $5. His due.

The missionary made the following report of his labors: "Sermon preached 79, exhortations given 100, addresses made 5, prayer meetings attended 19, family visits made 55, converts baptized 27, the Lord's supper administered 5 times, miles traveled 1077, and assisted in one ordination."

The committee on the field and its destitution embraced in the Association made the following report:
"That the South District Association embraces an area of some two thousand five hundred square miles, and in all this vast district of country there are but three Baptist churches that sustain regular Sabbath preaching, and there are some three or four that have preaching twice a month, and there are some older churches on the decline, that do not have preaching more than once a month, and often they have none, while there are several small and feeble

561

churches that have very little preaching, and some none that they can depend on, while all the rest of this vast district of country is one moral waste. To supply this great destitution we have on our minutes the names of some ten or twelve ministers, one half of whom, from age and infirmity, are able to perform but little or no ministerial labor. Thus many of our churches are famishing for the Bread of Life, and all the Eastern, Southern and Western parts of this vast territory is entirely destitute of preaching by Baptist ministers, and have very little from any other denomination."
Adopted. John Padon, Chairman.

The committee on the Letters from the churches reported thus:
That they have carefully examined the correspondence from the various churches, and when necessary, have solicited fresh information from the brethren sent to sit in council with us, and the result of our labor is very painful. Only four of our churches report any additions during the past year, and several of them report a decrease of membership. But from the statistical

562

table above the true condition of all our churches cannot be learned. Some of them are in a very cold and dangerous position; in others the discipline is alarmingly lax; others again have been making exertions to purge themselves from all disorderly persons, and are in a much better condition, although decreased in number, than they were last year. Your committee would most earnestly implore all the churches to awake up to their duty on this virtually important matter, all to get rid of all members who will not live up to their covenant obligations, so that our churches may become, indeed and in truth Lights unto the world. Your committee would also recommend, that in each church a bible class be held weekly, and that the weekly attendance be reported to the next Association, and that the churches be more particular in their information concerning the Sabbath Schools, so as to unable the Association to publish the average number of teachers and scholars who attend.
J. Peters, Chairman."
Adopted

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1856. 36th Anniversary.
The Association met with the Bethel church to hold its annual meeting, Thursday, Sep. 6.

Josiah Lemen opened the session with a sermon. (text not given)

Oak Hill and New Hope churches, in St. Clair county were received. The churches were 15. Baptisms 38; Rec. by Letter 18; Restored 2; Dismissed 80; Excluded 58, Died 17; Members 1013. Bethel reported 15 baptisms, and Fountain Creek 18. All other churches only 5.
T. A. Morton, Moderator. E. J. Palmer, Clerk.

The Committee on the State of the churches say in their report; "Your committee find with sorrow that there has been an aggregate decrease in the membership of the churches composing the Association, of a most alarming magnitude. All the churches but two have decreased, which are Oak Hill and Fountain Creek, one of them a new church, and the other not increased

564

so largely as to raise the number of its membership up to a measure of former years. Had we time it might be profitable to trace the causes that have produced the increase in individual churches, and the decrease in the aggregate membership of the whole Association, but time forbids. We are pained at the existing facts, but can only deplore." Much of the loss mentioned in the individual churches does not arise from the changes reported of the present year, but because the total membership of the previous year as reported was too great, or that of the present year is too small. It is a sad truth that we have many church clerks who do not keep correct statistical records. The committee close their report with the following resolution:
"Resolved, That we recommend to the churches which we here represent, that on each Lord's day they meet together, as churches, a for social worship, and when no ministerial services can be had, that they make it a point of duty to keep up their own

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visibility by holding social worship at their usual place of meeting on every Lord's day in the year.
E. J. Palmer, Chairman."

The report was adopted.

The report of the Executive Committee on Domestic Missions presented but little missionary work as actually done. The great want in the Association is efficient ministers. Those who have been long in the service of the churches in this Association are passing away, or are super-animated, and their day of work is passed. In the early days of the body the number of ministers belonging to the churches was very large when compared with the number of members in them. And for years there was an unusually large number of licentiates. Whether they have even ceased to be licentiates, or on going fully into the ministry, have sought other fields of labor is to the writer unknown. The committee on the State of the churches should not have failed to trace the causes of their embarrassment. It was the essential part of their work.

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1857. 37th Anniversary.
The Association met with the Belleville church September 3, 1857 to hold its annual meeting.

J.H. High of Lebanon, opened the session with a sermon, from John 1:47, "Behold an Israelite indeed, in whom there is no guide."

The Urbanna, Fayetteville and Athens churches because members of the body also Collinsville church. The churches were 21. Baptisms 112; Rec. by Letter 63; Restored 16; Dismissed 134; Excluded 26; Died 14; Members 1091.
James Lemen, Moderator. James H. Lemen, Clerk.

There was an individual member of agents present.

J. B. Olcott for Chicago University; R.W. Bickell, for German Missions; B. B. Hamilton for Shurtleff College.

The business committee presented the following which was adopted:
"Resolved, that as an Association, we look with sorrow and amazement on the frequency with which

567

Divorces are granted in our country, and that too often without a scriptural cause, and that we recommended the churches that they be very cautious that they adhere closely to the scriptures in all things."

A committee on a query from the Troy Church presented the following report; which was adopted:
"Is it expedient for a church to grant letters of dismission to members to join other churches, such members continuing to live in the midst of the church granting the
letter"
?

"Your committee think it inexpedient, as it involves the idea of disaffection, and it would not be proper to give a letter in full fellowship to the disaffected; if a member, however, having a good reason, and is not disaffected towards the church, or brethren, ask for it, such a letter may be granted.

Your committee would recommend further to the churches, that great caution be used, with due discrimination, in giving letters to applicants intending to remain in the midst of the church."
Elijah Dodson, Chairman.

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Two missionaries had been employed, one nearly eight months and the other one fourth of his time. Some changes were proposed in the manner of conducting their mission work, and carried out.

The following resolutions were adopted.
"Resolved, That in view of the low state of spirituality in our churches, and the worldliness that prevails, the Association recommends them to observe the last Monday in December as a day of fasting and prayer for the revival of the work of God.

"Resolved, That the Association requests the ministers of this body to itinerate as much as they can during the year, and to report their voluntary labors from time to time to the Executive Committee."

The ordained ministers of the Association, belonging to its churches were 18, and 8 of them at this writing, July 1877, had died in Illinois.

The licentiates were seven.

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1858. 38th Anniversary.
The [The following section is crossed out.]thirty eighth[End crossed out portion.] annual meeting [The following is crossed out]of the Association[End crossed out portion] was held with the Waterloo Church beginning, Thursday, Sep. 2, 1858.

Elijah Dodson opened the session with a sermon from 2. Cor. 13:5."Examine yourselves whether ye be in the faith; prove your own selves."

The Harrisonville Church was received. The churches were 21. Two were not represented. Baptisms 71; Rec'd. by Letter 37; Dismissed 82; Excluded 34; Died 15; Members 1097.
Elijah Dodson, Moderator. Logan Sleeper, Clerk.

A committee was appointed to prepare a report on the death of J. M. Peck, D. D. and Rev. J. F. Stillwell.

The Committee in the State of religion in the churches made the following report, which was adopted.

"The Committee on the State of Religion in the Churches [The following is crossed out]of the Association[End crossed out portion] would respectfully report:
That your Committee, with a view to elicit such facts as would throw light upon the actual internal condition of the Churches, more fully in connection

570

with what appears in the letters to the Association, propounded the following inquiries
to the Delegates of the several Churches:
Is your Church at perfect peace?
2. How many heads of families hold family worship?
3. What proportion of the whole membership regularly attend the Communion?
Have any difficulties attended from your method of electing a pastor?
Have you any members that do not attend the Covenant meetings?

The Delegates, with commendable frankness, responded to our inquiries, and of the mass of information this derived your Committee have deemed it necessary to communicate such facts only as are most important.

Thus, in one Church, twenty-five members out of eighty are all that attend regularly the Communion meetings; another, only one fourth; another, only one half; another, only five ninths are working members; another, only one fourth; another, one

571

half attend church meetings; in several one half, and others only one-fourth attend to family worship. The Churches are mostly at peace among themselves, though several cases of difficulty have occurred, growing out of the selection of a pastor, in view of which your Committee offer the Resolution appended to this report. While in some few Churches peace and an earnest performance of covenant duties, and a hopeful and encouraging state of religious feeling are reported as existing, yet, in the great majority of the Churches there appears, from the tenor of letters and the communications of the Delegates, a great deficiency in the performance of covenant duties on the part of the members,--a seemingly stand-still, indifferent, careless feeling in religious interest, and a want of thorough, working and personal activity in the cause. In view of this state of things, deplorable, and to be lamented by every member of the Church, your Committee would ask of the brethren, What shall we do?

Resolved, That we recommend to all the Churches in this Association, to adopt as a standing rule in the selection

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of Deacons and pastors the following: All Elections for Pastors and Deacons shall be by strictly private ballot, without nomination and debate.
Adopted.
E. J. Palmer, Chairman.

This most certainly could only be a very partial and inadequate remedy for the state of things complained of in the Churches. The causes for the evils mentioned were too deep to be reached by a remedy so superficial. The first principles underlying a Christian life were very feeble in a large part of the members of many of the churches, if existing at all. Therefore the remedy demanded, was surely a thorough dealing with the hearts of the members in the application of the teachings of the scriptures, as to the grounds of Christian hope, by the ministry. An earnest enforcement of the bible evidences of personal godliness. Thought the Report was long, the Committee would have done well to have added somewhat to its length in dealing more thoroughly with the sad state of things which they had brought to light in their inquiries. And what they proposed to have made a standing rule

573

it would hardly seem to be wisely practicable in many cases to carry out. How on votes of so much moment could there be the hope of union and harmony, without a consistent Christian comparison of views among the members?

The Committee on Sabbath Schools say in their report; "While we look with pleasure upon what is being done, we must believe their influence for good is in some degree hindered by the following causes:--
They are sustained generally by individuals, and not by the Church.
In too many cases the teachers are either unconverted persons, or members of other denominations.
The books used are often not sufficiently denominational. Your Committee therefore earnestly recommend, that the Churches, as such, foster the Bible Classes and Sunday Schools, and have proper care for the character of teachers and books.
D. M. Howell, Chairman."

The business of the Association was of the usual character. The Missionary Committee had employed one missionary through the year at a compensation of

574

$400. In his report he makes the following summary:
"Total sermons preached, 196; baptized, 14; cash collected, $327.85; miles traveled, 1575; besides family visiting, prayer-meetings attended, and many exhortations." J. W. Thoring.

The Committee had also employed H. S. Deppe, one fourth of the time, who made a report of "40 sermons preached; 700 miles traveled; 45 family visits made, and the sum of $35.20 collected."

The Committee on the death of J. M. Peck, D. D. made a long report, which cannot be here transcribed. I will only transfer a paragraph.

"The five months that have elapsed since the solemn event of his death have been months of mourning to our churches. Wide-spread, to our country's bounds, has been the sorrow produced by the death of this missionary of early times. From far distant points have come voices of lamentation for the toil-worn-pioneer of Education and Evangelization, in the precious seed-time period of the history of the great West--fallen at last in death." He died March 14, 1857, aged 67 years. His life sketch is in the biographical part of this work.

575

The Committee reported the following Resolution on the death of J. F. Stillwell.

"Resolved, That in the recent death of our Brother Stillwell, we realize that we have lost a pious, exemplary brother, who was, also, long a faithful pastor and worthy minister in this Association; and we sincerely condole with the family and church in their affliction under this heavy stoke; and that we all endeavor the more faithfully to serve, and more diligently to watch, from year to year, as we know not how soon to us all the Lord may come." Six orphan children were left, the mother having died some years before the father. See his life sketch among the biographies.

The Clerk makes this entry about the Sabbath meetings.
"The preaching appointments filled on Sabbath at the Methodist Church and at the Baptist Church. Were interesting occasions, long to be remembered at Waterloo. To the funds of the Ill. Bap. Education Society, for the education of poor ministers at Shurtleff College, there was contributed in cash and pledges the sum of $80, as a just response to the faithful appeals of President Read."

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1859. 39th Anniversary.
Oak Hill, Thursday, Sep. 1, 1859.
The Association met with the Oak Hill Church, St. Clair Co. to hold its annual meeting, Sep. 1.

John Peters opened the session with a sermon from 1.Cor.13:12. "For now we see through a glass darkly but then face to face."

The churches were 21. Four of the churches sent neither letters nor delegates, but statistics were reported verbally as the year before. Twenty-five of the delegates were marked as absent. Baptisms 56; Rec'd. by Letter 22; Restored 5; Dismissed 40; Excluded 45; Died 18; Members 1103.
T. W. B. Dawson, Moderator. D. Mason Howell, Clerk.

A point that arrests my attention is the discrepancy which exists between the aggregate membership of the last year and of this year. The returns from the churches show that the decrease in the body was 20, and the total number a year ago was 1097; from which take the decrease appearing from the statistics of

577

the present session, 20. Would make the entire number of members this year 1077. Instead of this number that given is 1103. Either the returns of the last year were 26 members below the real number, or the aggregate returns of this year are too high by 26 members. This is a matter of fact much to be regretted, that discrepancies of this kind are often found in most, if not all, the minutes of our associations. This shows clearly that the records of many of our churches are, for the want of care or ability on our Church Clerks, very inaccurately kept.

The following Resolutions were adopted:--
"Resolved, That we believe it to be inconsistent with Baptist principles, and contrary to the laws of Christ, for men to hold and exercise the functions of the ministerial office while they are not members of any church.

"Resolved, That we believe it is to be the duty of each of our churches to see that its ministers sustain a good moral character, and so far as possible, to defend their characters from every assault of the enemy whatever."

Such resolutions have their origin generally in some occurrences of a local character, which seem

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to call for them, at least in some minds. Thus doubtless it was in this instance.

The Missionary Committee has employed the same brother as a missionary a part of the year, as in the preceding year, but came out deficient in funds. The labor performed for the time being, was about in the same proportion as in the previous year.

A Committee was appointed to report on the death of Ministers, Moses Lemen, Elijah Dodson, and John Bell.

The Report is too long to be transcribed. Brethren Lemen and Dodson were men long and widely known in the northern half of southern Illinois. With both the writer was personally acquainted. They had been very laborious and very successful ministers and eminent men. Bro. Lemen's active ministerial life was through a period of thirty-six years; and Bro. Dodson's through one of more than thirty years. The one died very suddenly in his 62nd year, the other after a short illness when 59 years of age. Their life sketches are in the biographical part

579

in this work.

Of Brother Bell, I have no knowledge beyond the fact that the year previous he was recognized in the minutes as the Pastor of the Salem Church.

1860. 40th Anniversary.
The [The following is crossed out]fortieth[End crossed out portion] annual meeting [The following is crossed out]of the Association[End crossed out portion] was held with the Troy Church, commencing, Thursday, Aug. 30, 1860.

The session was opened with a sermon by H. Thompson, from John 15:1,2. "I am the true vine, and my Father is the hustband man." etc.

The Churches were 21, but 8 were not represented. Baptisms 22; Rec'd. by Letter 25; Restored 9; Dismissed 37; Excluded 15; Died 8; Members 982.
T. W. B. Dawson, Moderator. D. M. Howell, Clerk.

The reported number of members of the previous year and of this year do not harmonize with the changes in members as reported by the churches. There is little of historic interest in the proceedings.

The Committee on the State of the Churches

580

reported six resolutions. I shall condense what I deem it wise to introduce here.

The state of Religion it was thought demanded deep humiliation and fervent prayer. The Churches were requested to observe the second Saturday in December as a day of fasting and public and private prayer for a deeper work of grace in the hearts of the members, and for a revival of religion, and that one of the principal stimulants of covetousness in the churches was want of a system in money matters; and as the Scriptures classed covetousness with idolatry, it became a proper subject of discipline. The Committee recommended the reviving of the old Ministers' and Deacons' Conference, or the forming of such a body, to meet quarterly. The Committee also advised the carrying out in good faith their old plan of Domestic Missions.

The last resolution I will give in their words.
"Resolved, That, in all the intercourse between the churches, the cavity of churches ought to be strictly regarded; and

581

that each church ought to hold its ministers to a strict account for all violations of county, committed by them, by constituting churches out of excluded members, or by inviting ministers into their pulpits, or otherwise encouraging a spirit of insubordination either among preachers or people."

The report was adopted.

1861. 41st Anniversary.
Thursday, Aug. 29, 1861.
Collinsville Church entertained the Association while holding its [The following is crossed out]forty-first[End crossed out portion] annual meeting, which began Aug. 29, 1861.

John Shepherd opened the meeting with a sermon from John 7:41, "Others said, this is Christ."

Bushy Grove Church was received. The churches were 14. Without any Associational action 8 of the churches were dropped from the minutes. Some of them were present at the session the year previous. One of them the Fountain creek Church, was one of the original churches that organized the body and in its last report returned 102, members. There must have been something

582

more than is made known in the minutes working disastrously among the churches.

Baptisms 65; Rec'd. by Letter 28; Restored 12; Dismissed 34; Excluded 7; Died 12; Members 792.
T. A. Morton, Moderator. John H. Mize, Clerk.

An unusual number of Committees were appointed, and on subjects that have for many years been grouped in one approving resolution.

The Brushy Grove Church requested the Association during its meeting to ordain as their pastor Bro. John Swift. This the Association declined doing because it had no power to ordain ministers.

The messengers of the Church present were allowed to choose from the Association the persons whom they wished to have compose the Council, and the Association yielded to the Council time for the service, and the brother was ordained.

A Committee reported on the proper observance of the Sabbath; Another on Family-worship and Prayer meetings; Another on Shurtleff College and Ministerial Education; Another on Sabbath Schools;

583

Another on Bible Societies; Another on Publications and Periodicals; another on Domestic and House Missions; and still another on Temperance.

The obituary Committee reported on the death of Rev. Joseph Lemen. He was a devoted, self-denying, hardworking minister of this Association, who had been one of the organizing, or original ministers of the body. For about fifty-two years he was devoted to the work of the Gospel, ministry; and mainly in Illinois. Truly an Illinois Pioneer. He died at the age of 75 years. His life sketch is among others in the biographical part of this work.

The minutes contain a Digest of the Letters of the Churches. The first ever printed. There is a voluminous report on the State of the Churches in the Minutes.

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1862. 42nd Anniversary.
For its [The following is crossed out]forty-second[End crossed out portion] annual meeting the Association met with the Urbana Church, at Freeburg, St. Clair Co., Thursday, Sep. 4.

The opening sermon was by John Peters, from 2.Corin. 2:28, "Besides these things that are without, that which cometh upon me daily, the case of all the churches."

The churches were 15, Athens Church appearing again in the minutes. Baptisms 102; Rec'd. by Letter 45; Dismissed 33; Excluded 17; Died 18; Members 880.

Most of the reports of the previous year were re-adopted. R. C. Keele had been employed as a missionary. The number of persons baptized during the year is larger than for several years, but all had united with seven churches.

The Committee on the State of the Churches made the following report, which was adopted.

"While considering the condition of our churches, we have seen in some of them, the blessed effects of protracted meetings. We therefore recommend to them

585

the following resolution:
"Resolved, That the churches of this Association severally hold, at least one protracted meeting during the coming year; and that they invite, to assist them, such ministers as they deem best suited for that work, and compensate them for their labors. All which is respectfully submitted.
H. S. Deppe, Chairman."

During the session a sermon was preached by each of the following brethren: Howell, Mize, Read, Shepherd, Fryrear, and Peters.

1863. 43rd Anniversary.
The [The following is crossed out]forty-third[End crossed out portion] annual session [The following is crossed out]of the Association[End crossed out portion] was held with Belleville Church, beginning, Thursday, Sep. 4, 1863.

D. M. Howell commenced the meeting with a sermon, from John 14:27, "Peace I leave with you, my peace I give unto you; not as the world giveth, give I unto you," etc.

The churches 15, the same as last year. Baptisms 69; Rec'd. by Letter 32; Dismissed 22; Excluded 20; Died 17; Members 934.

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John Peters, Moderator. J. H. Mize, Clerk.

The missionary Bro. Keele had labored for four months.

The majority of the Committee appointed to prepare the business [The following is crossed out]of the Association[End crossed out portion] made the following report:
"Whereas, Several questions foreign to the appropriate business for which we have come together; questions calculated to minister strife rather than godly edifying, have been brought before us through some of the letters from the churches:

"Your body is asked for instance, to decide whether it is lawful to hold men in involuntary servitude; and again, whether it is lawful to go to war to put down rebellion, and other such like questions, that we, as an Association, are in no way empowered to answer.

"It is our duty, as Christians and citizens, to be subject to the laws and government under which we live; and scrupulously to avoid even the appearance of rebellion.

"But this Association ought not to undertake

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the responsibility of deciding on points of law; this is the duty of our national law courts; nor have we, as an Association, any authority to decide for the Churches any such matters. We, a majority of your Committee, therefore recommend to the Association, not to entertain, discuss nor attempt to answer any such questions, as we believe they are calculated to cause divisions and to be productive of strife, while it is our duty to endeavor to keep the unity of the Spirit in the bond of peace."
Signed by eight of the Committee, which numbered thirteen.

On being presented to the Association its adoption was sustained by 27 votes, while there were 21 negative votes. The whole number of delegates was 68. This showed that 20 did not vote.

The Lebanon Church had long been especially regarded as claiming the liberal aid of the Association and was so commended at this session. This singular vote was passed:
"Voted, That the letters from the Churches to the Association be printed, leaving out the statistics."

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Most of the Committee's Reports adopted at the Anniversary two years preceding, were again re-adopted. It is presumable that the Committees found this the easiest way to do the work assigned them, to recommend the adoption of the old reports.

The movement to print the letters of the Churches was a measure intended to make prominent and public the churches which troubled the body with questions, undoubtedly.

1864. 44th Anniversary.
Bethel Church entertained the Association during its [The following is crossed out]forty-fourth[End crossed out portion] annual meeting, commencing, Thursday, Sep. 1, 1864.

H. S. Deppe began the session with a sermon from Rom. 12:18, "If it is possible as much as lieth within you live peaceably with all men."

The Churches were 15. Baptisms 123; Rec'd. by Letter 53; Restored 16; Dismissed 51; Excluded 21;

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Died 20; Members 1005.
D. Mason Howell, Moderator. R. C. Keeler, Clerk.

Several Committees were appointed. S. M. Osgood presented the cause of Foreign Missions and took a collection of $32.50. Also G. S. Bailey presented State Missions, or the claims of the General Association and received $100.95. The reports on the several branches of Christian work were of the ordinary character. In the business that was done there was nothing claiming my particular attention. Sabbath congregations were large and the services were interesting. President Read raised over $200, for the Education Society. The preachers were D. M. Howell, Pres. Read and W. J. Roseberry. There was also preaching each day at 11 o'clock A.M. and in the evening.

1865. 45th Anniversary
The Association met with the Pleasant Ridge Church, Madison Co. commencing, Thursday, Aug. 31. The appointed preachers were not present. After prayer the Association proceeded to business. The churches

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only numbered ten. Baptisms 14; Rec. by Letter 23; Dismissed 39; Excluded 12; Died 12; Members 779.
John Padon, Moderator. J. H. Mize, Clerk.

For some reason not even referred to in the proceedings of the Association the Silver Creek, Athens, Brushy Grove, Fayetteville, Harmony and Lebanon churches failed to be represented, and most of them ceased to be recognized in the body afterwards.

I find this item in the minutes:
"Voted, that Bro. Padon, in the absence of the appointees, preach the introductory Sermon this evening at 7 o'clock."

Accordingly the venerable John Padon preached in the evening, from 2. Tim. 4:2 "Preach the Word"

The Sermon was followed by Rev. G. J. Johnson who presented the claims of the Publication Society and took a collection of $21.85.

Six committees were appointed on different departments of benevolent work, who in time made their reports, which do not need any further mention here as they were on common subjects.

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I find this item and transfer it.
"The committee to prepare business in its last report recommended that ‘This body do now offer its formal thanks to Almighty God for the return of peace’. Prayers were offered by J. Pardon and J. Peters."

After a sermon by Bro. John peters on the Lord's day a collection for Foreign Missions was taken amounting to $33.85. There was the usual course of preaching during the session.

1866. 46th Anniversary.
The Association met with the Troy church for its annual meeting, Thursday, Aug. 30, 1866

The opening sermon was by John Padon from Psa. 51:10, "Create in me a clean heart, O God."

The churches were 11. The statistics are given in a new form, such as I have never

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before met with. They are in three columns.
Gain, Loss, Present Number.
144, 83, 832.
T. W. B. Dawson, Moderator. C.L. Cook, Clerk.

C. F. Tolman preached in the evening and took a collection for the Missouri Union, amounting to $48.30.

The Association in committee of the whole considered the following query from one of the churches: "Can we, as a Baptist church, give a letter of dismission to a member who probably will join no other church, and avows himself a believer in open communion, and denies the authority of the church to determine who shall be communicants at the Lord's Table"?

The Association was recommended to answer this query negatively, and a committee was appointed to put in form this answer. But the minutes do not contain their report.

The Committee on Business recommended the passage of various resolutions.

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The following was in the minutes:
"Whereas, We feel the great need of more spirituality in our Association, therefore:--
Resolved, that we again engage in our Ministers' and Deacons' Conference, quarterly, as in former years."

The following report on the Observance of the Sabbath and on Family Worship I transcribe:
"Whereas, The Sabbath is the Lord's day, for him and his service alone should it be spent; and,
"Whereas, It is highly displeasing to God to devote any part of it for our own work or pleasure of words or thoughts, as we learn in Isa. 58:13. Therefore,
"Resolved, That we should spend a portion of each Sabbath in the public worship of God, and if we cannot have preaching, we should assemble in God's house in his name, for prayer and praise, and be instructed by the reading of his word, and thus hold communion with God, and Christian intercourse with each other.

"Resolved, That as a means of the highest importance and the most explicit duty, we should as parents and heads of families, have our altars erected in the family

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circle, where upon to offer our morning and evening sacrifices. That religion begins here, and renders us capable of exerting a proper influence over our own families and those with whom we mingle, and fits us for the work of the sanctuary, and the enjoyments and employments of that Sabbath which shall never end!"

The obituary Committee presented a very interesting biographical sketch of Rev. David Mason Howell, who was for years a very laborious and successful minister in this Association. He died comparatively young, Jan. 27, 1866, in his 40th year, of a cancer on his under lip. He was ordained in July, 1852, and had therefore been in the ministry, after his ordination 13 years. It is said, that hundreds under his immediate ministry were hopefully converted, of whom he baptized five hundred. His sufferings were very great, and were equaled by the patience with which he bore them.

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South District Association from 1867 to 1876.
No. 5.

1867. 47th Anniversary.
The Association met with the Waterloo church for its session Aug. 29, 1867.

The meeting was opened with a sermon by Niles Kinne from 1.Chron. 12:32,--Mat. 16:3.--and Jude 3.

The Church at O' Fallon was received. The churches were 11. The Collinsville and Mascoutah churches disappeared, and the Bushy Grove church appeared again in the Minutes. No explanation in either case.

Baptisms 178; Rec. by Letter 65; dismissed 80; Excluded 27; Died 7; Members 877.
E. J. Palmer, Moderator. J.H. Mize; Clerk.

The committee on Temperance presented one resolution, which seemed to imply conduct on the part of some of the members of churches which was disgraceful, and if the implied habit existed should have been a cause for disciplining of guilty. It read thus:
"Resolved, That we should, as churches, require our members to cease tippling, or any way patronizing saloons, and that they should exert their united influence against the use of all

596

intoxicating liquors as a beverage."

There were many new resolutions passed, and several old ones readopted. During the session a sermon was heard from each of the following named brethren: Kinne, Mize, Mahan, Green, Tolman, T. S. Mize, Deppe and Lappin. The collections were, for Home Missions $15.30, for Foreign Missions $52.85; for the General Association $22.

1868. 48th Anniversary.
The annual Meeting was with the Oak Hill church, St. Clair Co. beginning, Thursday, Sep. 3, 1868.

W. T. Green opened the meeting with a sermon from Gab. 6:14, "God forbid that I should glory, save in the cross of our Lord Jesus Christ, by whom the world is crucified unto me, and I unto the world."

Shilow Valley church was received. Collinsville appeared again as silently as it disappeared. The churches were 13. Baptisms 133; Rec. by Letter 69: Restored 11; Dismissed 80: Excluded 31; Died 15; Members 1020.

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Niles Kinne, Moderator. W. J. Green, Clerk,

The proceedings were of a usual character, fully benevolent in resolutions, but failing in acts.

The committee on Resolutions reported as follows:
"Your Committee on resolutions would report as standing rules of this body, the following resolutions:
"1st Resolved, That we, hereafter, cordially invite the agents of our Denominational Societies to meet us at our Annual gatherings an present their respective claims before us, but that no collections be taken for these objects.

"2nd, Resolved, That we earnestly recommend to the churches composing this body to enter into a liberal and systematic plan of contribution to our benevolent denominational Societies."

This was a movement prompted by covetousness, though the movers may not have been conscious of it. Had the members of the Association made but slight observations over the history of the body in the years then passed, they could not have failed to se that resolutions were both very cheap things and without any force in the

598

way of securing or promoting benevolence in the churches or in individual members. They had been numerous enough, in the fifteen years then passes, to have made the Association a very great contributor to the cause of Christian benevolence, had they had any power in that direction. If carried out in the future these would serve to close up one outlet form the pockets of the members of some small sums for benevolence.

The Association voted to organize a Sabbath School Convention in connection with it.

Several of the old resolutions were re adopted with an adequate supply of new ones. In these days we have many kinds of sermons, but the Association noted to have one of a new kind on Sabbath afternoon. It was to be "Chalk sermon". In many of those of these days there is in them more of invention then of Gospel:

The following brethren preached during the session: W. L. Green, I. Clark, S. M. Osgood, H. S. Deppe, L. Hill and N. Fox, beside those who preached on the Lord's day.

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Pastors and their Post Office address.

J. M. Cochran, Pastor at Bethel P.O. Collinsville.
H. S. Deppe, Pastor at Freeburg P.O. Freeburg.
T. V. Greer, Pastor at Bushy Grove P.O. Upper Alton.
W. T. Green, pastor at Belleville, P.O. Bellville.
F. Hill, Pastor at Collinsville, P.O. Collinsville.
Niles Kinne, Pastor at Troy, P.O. Troy.
E. J. Palmer, Pastor at Waterloo, P.O. Freeburg.
W. D. Ross, Pastor at Pleasant Ridge P.O. Lebanon.
J. W. Swift, Shilow Valley, P.O. O'Fallon.
Daniel Shipman, Pastor at Red bud P.O. Red Bud.

Other Ministers.

T. W. B. Dawson, Ordained, P.O. Troy.
James Lemen, Sen., Ordained, P.O. Collinsville.
T. J. Koetzley, Ordained, P.O. Belleville.
John Padon, Ordained, P.O. Troy.
Volucy Lingerfelt, Licentiate, P.O. Lebanon.
Samuel P. Roach, Ordained, P.O. Millstadt.
J. S. Short, Licentiate, P.O. Freeburg
Lyman Barber, Ordained, P.O. Troy.

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Belleville, 153 members. Bethel, 107 members. Bushy Grove, 48 members. Collinsville, 81 members. Freeburg, 138 members. Lebanon, 50 members. Troy, 116 members. Oak Hill, 61 members. O'Fallon, 57 members. Pleasant Ridge, 82 members. Red Bud, 37 members. Shilow Valley, 28 members. Waterloo, 62 members.

Belleville and Troy churches are the leading ones.

1869. 49th Anniversary.
The Association met with the Bethel church to holding its annual meeting, Thursday, Sep. 2, 1869.

J. M. Cochran led the meeting with a sermon from Isa. 9:6 "The government shall be upon his sholder."

The churches the same as last year, 13. Bushy Grove, O'Fallon and Shilow Valley not represented. Baptisms 96; Rec. by Letter 28; Restored 7; Dismissed 72; Excluded 12; Died 11; Members 902.

601

H.S. Deppe, Moderator. M.W. Weir, Clerk.

The Business Committee presented the following resolution which with a slight amendment was adopted.

"Resolved, that the several churches composing this Association be requested to prepare a brief history of their respective churches, for the tale of their organization, and that the several histories thus prepared be published recessively in the Minutes, commencing with the oldest church and continuing in the order of their organization until the history of each church shall have been published."

The three oldest churches were requested to have their history prepared so as to be presented at the next annual meeting.

A series of resolutions was presented from the Louisville Association, by a messenger from that body, the aim of which was to secure the co-operation of this body with that Association in calling a general meeting of the Baptist in the South half of the State

602

to consider the importance of organizing a "Baptist convention of Southern Illinois," for evangelical purposes in that section."

The resolutions were adopted by this body as they came from the Louisville body. And two brethren were appointed to act with others in issuing a call, and in deciding on the time and place of the meeting.

The general missionary resolutions were adopted. In the p.m. of Saturday the Sab. School Convention met, and during its meeting an interesting report was made of its years work.

There were the usual Sabbath services.

1870. 50th Anniversary.
The annual meeting was held with the Collinsville church, commencing, Thursday, Sep. 1, 1870.

The sermon opening the session was by Cyrus Thomas, from Eph. 4:5 "One Lord, one faith,

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one baptism."

The New Silver Creek and the High Prairie churches were received. The churches were 15; and five were not represented. Baptisms 36; Rec. by Letter 27; Restored 1; Dismissed 70; Excluded 11; Died 15; Members 899.
T.W.B. Dawson, Moderator. M.W. Weir, Clerk.

Committees were appointed. Associational mission work arranged. The churches requested to adopt a system of quarterly collections. The histories of the Bethel and the Troy churches were received. The obituary committee reported the death of James Lemen, Sen. with a sketch of his life. He was the last of the four Lemen brothers in the Baptist ministry. Moses, Joseph and Josiah had died before him. See a biographical sketch of him in the biographical department of this work.

The following Resolution was adopted:
"Whereas, God, in his wisdom and goodness, has seen fit to remove from us our loved brother, Rev. James Lemen, therefore,

604

"Resolved, That in his death the ministers and churches of this Association have lost a staunch friend and a wise counselor. That by his form adherence to and advocacy of Bible doctrine, coupled with his consistent Christian life, he not only endeared himself to us while he lived, but left a name and a memory that unite us to him and the God whom he loved--a memory that gives warning endanger, cheerfulness in adversity, and humility in prosperity, continually re-animating us with Christian hope and zeal. That in this heavy blow we recognize Him who handles the rod and that we praise him for his grace, which enabled the departed and ourselves to know it was for our mutual, eternal good. That we sympathize with the afflicted relatives, hoping they may so imitate the virtues of the departed that he shall not prove to be lost to them, but only gone before."

The history of Bethel church bridged by a committee was printed in the minutes.

The usual course of business being completed the Association adjourned.

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The Sabbath school Missionary and colporter in connection with the Publication Society gave the following summary of his labors: "Labored 183 days;--traveled 1,550 miles;--Sold 60 copies of the Word of God, gave away 75 copies;--Distributed 5,500 pages of tracts;--Made 52 Sunday school addresses;--Held and attended 62 meetings for prayer;--Visited 1,225 families, and conversed with many of them on religion;--Found 24 families destitute of the Bible, and supplied 64 families with it;--Organized 10 Sunday Schools, employing 50 teachers, and having about 350 scholars in attendance;--Sold $160 worth of religious books, and gave away $75 worth, including papers and tracts;--Collected on pledges, $87, and received for his labors $200, being the full amount due him by your Association."

1871. 51st Anniversary.
The Association held its annual meeting with the Belleville Church, beginning, Aug. 31, 1871.

W.S. Post opened the session with a sermon

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from Mat. 28:19,20. "Go ye therefore and teach all nations," etc.

The Richland church formerly belonging to the Association was re-admitted a member. The churches were 15, one was not represented. Baptisms 19; Rec. by Letter 20; Restored 1; Dismissed 50; Excluded 22; Died 21; Members 860.
W.S. Post, Moderator. Jas. P. Slade, Clerk.

Many Committees appointed.

J.M. Cochran had been the missionary employed by the missionary Board, for six months. He gave the following summary of his labors:
"I have preached 68 sermons, at 24 different points in the Association, have traveled 1892 miles; given away 45 Bibles, 138 Testaments, 101 Religious Books and 2290 pages of Tracts; made 40 addresses; attended 17 prayer meetings; visited 314 families--found 14 families without the Bible, and supplied 28 families with it; 2 persons have been baptized, and 3 others are soon expecting to be; one church has been resuscitated."
J.M. Cochran, Missionary.

607

The committee on Family worship submitted the following:
"Whereas, the Bible, in Gen. 18:19, and 35:2; Job. 1:5; Acts 10:2, makes known the duty of religious parents to hold family worship; and,
Whereas, Regeneration is a change of man's moral nature creating a disposition of heart which delights and takes pleasure in the will of God, Prov. 3:17; Mat. 11:29; Rom. 14:17; 2 Pet. 1:4l; therefore,
Resolved, That neglect of their duty, and a want of disposition to enjoy it, give fearful evidence of the want of conversion, and that we should in such cases recommend the duty of personal examination".
It was adopted.

Committees reported on the ordinary benevolent subjects under consideration at the anniversaries.

The Sabbath School convention held its meeting after the close of the Association.

The Association directed the clerk to print the History of the Troy church in the Minutes. And the Belleville church was requested to have its history ready for the next meeting of the Association

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1872. 52nd Anniversary.
The annual meeting was held with the Freeburg church, opening, Thursday, Aug. 29, 1872.

John H. Mize introduced the session with a sermon from Rom. 8:9, "If any man have not the spirit of Christ he is none of his."

The East St. Louis and the New Athens churches were received. The churches were 16, five of them were not represented. Baptisms 39; Rec. by Letter 22; Restored 1; Dismissed 27; Excluded 19; Died 13; Members 792. Those figures do not include the unrepresented churches.
W.S. Post, Moderator. E. J. Palmer, Clerk.

Committees were appointed; On Family Worship, Temperance, Home Missions, Foreign Missions, Observance of the Sabbath, Periodicals, Publication Society, and to prepare Business.

The committee on the Associational Mission submitted the following which was adopted:
"Whereas, we have tried for many years to support

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a missionary in our bounds, and have almost failed, and yet are more needy now than ever-some of our churches are destitute, and many destitute neighborhoods, where the gospel ought to be preached, are all neglected; therefore,
"Resolved, That the Ministers and Churches of our Association, will hold protracted meetings in their own churches, and that the churches which are supplied, will assist the destitute churches and neighborhoods by allowing their Pastors to take some of their time in holding protracted meetings with them, and also assist and encourage in organizing Sabbath Schools in destitute neighborhoods."

The committee on Temperance submitted the following report which was adopted:
"Whereas, the use of intoxicating liquors is filling our prisons with criminals, our poor houses with paupers, and hell with immortal souls, and
"Whereas, Its use is the source of heavy expense to all classes of persons; being the source of crime, making our court sessions long and expensive, and whereas

610

our State Legislature passed and our Governor signed a law, the best in our judgement that could have been passed for the suppression of the use and sale of intoxicating liquors, therefore,
Resolved, That we recommend to all Christians and especially the members of Baptist Churches that they not only abstain from all use of alcoholic, liquors, but that they see to it that our temperance law is enforced."

"Voted, That Bro. Cole (John) be requested to hold a protracted meeting with the Lebanon Church during the winter, and that Bro. Deppe assist him."

The Collinsville church brought in a complaint against the Troy church for receiving dissatisfied members of their body into their church. The whole subject was submitted to an able committee of seven brethren to thoroughly consider the subject and report their views of the case.

The committee after mature deliberation presented a long report which cannot be copied here, embracing six Resolutions, in which they set forth errors

611

as they thought, in the conduct of both churches, and give their advice to all concerned as to what they should do.
The report was unanimously adopted by the Association because of the soundness of the views presented I will copy the last Resolution.

"Resolved, As the sense of this body, that the entire practice, becoming too fearfully prevalent, of receiving into our churches members from other churches without letters, or who have been excluded from said sister churches, is disorganizing, and utterly subversive of all New Testament church polity, and hence we recommend that in all similar cases in the churches of our Association in the future, we discourage and disapprove any other method of settlement than the one indicated in the fifth resolution of this report, which makes it the duty of the church to whom application for membership by such aggrieved persons is made to seek the concurrence of the other church in the call for a council whose decision shall be regarded as final."

There is no evidence that Belleville church presented

612

to the Association her history as she was requested to do at the previous session. The Freeburg church was requested to have its history presented at the next meeting.

The Sabbath school convention followed the session of the Association. The minutes do not contain a church history.

1873. 53rd Anniversary.
The Oak Hill Church entertained the Association while holding its annual meeting beginning Thursday, Dec. 4, 1873.

There was no opening sermon. Prayer was offered.

The churches were 16, but 5 were not represented. Baptisms 13; Rec. by Letter 38; Restored 2; Dismissed 28; Excluded 28; Died 14; Members 763.
J. Cole, Moderator. Cyrus Thomas, Clerk.

The Committee on Resolutions presented a series on several branches of Christian work.

613

which were adopted. The Red Bud church was dismissed to the Nine Mile Association. The committee appointed in 1871, on John B. Lovingston's offer to erect a building in East St. Louis, from the funds of the "Home Request," costing not less than $10,000, to give our denomination control of the same, provided we would raise $10,000 to endow a professorship therein, reported.

The report is too long to be copied. The aim and purpose of the committee had been to secure the establishment of the "Home Literary Institute", under our denominational control in East St. Louis.

The venerable John Padon an aged minister had died during the year, aged 79 years. The Hon. Silas L. Bryan gave a stirring address in behalf of the Higher Education of women, presenting the case of Almira Female college at Greenville, Ill.

At the Sabbath School Convention it was voted to merge the Sab. School Association, in that of the South District Association. No church history for the minutes.

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1874. 54th Anniversary.
The Association met with the Bethel church for its Annual Meeting, Thursday, Sep. 3, 1874.

The opening sermon was deferred into; evening and was delivered by W. J. Chapin, from Mat. 13:38, "The field is the world; the good seed are the children of the Kingdom;" etc.

The churches were 15. The New Hope church was received. Three churches made no report. Baptisms 148; Rec. by Letter 33; Restored 4; Dismissed 43; Excluded 25; Died 7; Members 872.
W.S. Post, Moderator. T.W.B. Dawson, Clerk.

The usual committees were appointed. There is a biographical sketch of Rev. John Padon, who died at the age of 79 years, in the minutes. There were full committee reports on the several branches of benevolent and Christian work.

East St. Louis, Lebanon, New Silver Creek, New Athens and High Prairie churches sent no report to the Association. The course of business in this Association has been very much the same yearly

615

for a long time. Large resolutions, but small acts.

Pastors: Belleville, W.S. Post; Collinsville, L.C. Carr; East S. Louis, S.F. Holt; Troy, W.J. Chapin; Oak Hill, H.S. Deppe; Pleasant Ridge, H.S. Deppe.

Bethel, Freeburg and New Hope churches have not pastors. Baptisms reported by churches, Belleville 31, Collinsville 17, Pleasant Ridge 42, Troy 32. Six other churches reported from 762.

1875. 45th Anniversary.
Pleasant Ridge, Thursday, Sep. 2, 1875.
The Association met with the Pleasant Ridge church, in Madison Co., to hold its annual meeting, commencing, Sep. 2, with a sermon by L.C. Carr from James 3:17, "First pure, then peacable."

The churches were 15, but from 6 of them there were no reports. Baptisms 8; Received by Letter 27; Restored 1; Dismissed 30; Excluded 10; Died 7; Members 768.
H.S. Deppe, Moderator. L.C. Carr, Clerk.

The Committee on business gave a half hour to talking over the wants of the Association. And subsequently

616

assigned this question to the consideration of the body: "What shall be done by this body, to revive the weak and decaying churches?"

The usual order of business was observed.

Rev. Peter Klein had been employed as a German Missionary, but failing health prevented his laboring more then ten weeks and he retired from the field.

There was nothing in the Resolutions demanding my special attention. They favored our benevolent work. Bethel church had received by baptisms 3, East St. Louis 5, and Troy 8. The pastors were much as the year before. Several ministers remained over the Lord's day, and the Sabbath was a day of religious interest.

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1876. 46th Anniversary.
Troy, Ill. Thursday, Aug. 31, 1876.
The Association met with the church at Troy, Mad. Co., for its Anniversary, which commenced Aug. 31, with a sermon by W. S. Post, from Mat. 12:31,32 "Wherefore I say unto you, All manner of sin and blasphemy shall be forgiven unto men: but the blasphemy against the Holy Ghost shall not be for given unto men." etc.

The churches in the table were 15, of these 5 were not represented and of them no statistics were given. Baptisms were 53; Rec. by Letter 12; Restored 4; Dismissed 48; Excluded 23; Died 14; Members 762.
W.S. Post, Moderator. T.W.B. Dawson, Clerk.

The Committee of Arrangements devoted one hour to consider the condition of the churches that had made no report. The result of the conference was not reported.

These resolutions were adopted
"Resolved, That next to the support of that Gospel in our own churches we should devote special labor

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to the feeble churches in our own Association, and to the preaching of the gospel in such places as promise favorable results.

2nd That it is the duty of the entire membership of our churches to engage earnestly in the Sunday School work by personal attendance and service, and by contributions for its support."

Other resolutions were passed urging the claims of the Publication Society, Foreign Missions, Education, the Sabbath, Temperance, and the Family.

R.C. Keele reported ten weeks of missionary labor. The reported items were; 862 miles traveled; 62 sermons preached, and 50 other addresses and exhortations made; 150 families visited; 36 conversions and baptisms.

"The committee on the Southern Illinois Convention reported the following preamble and resolution, which were adopted:
"Whereas, a convention of Brethren from the Southern part of the State, recently held at Ashley, decided to organize a Baptist Convention for Southern Illinois, and have called a meeting for that purpose,

619

to be held at Ewing, on Nov. 9th, next.

"Resolved, That, while we are in hearty sympathy and accord with the General Association and our Brethren throughout the State, and have no desire to sunder or weaken these bounds of union, we feel a like sympathy and pledge like co-operation with the proposed Southern Illinois Convention in their peculiar local work."

For some reason the meeting was held in the Presbyterian house of worship, in Troy. The pulpits of the place were supplied on the Sabbath by Baptist brethren. Sabbath School meetings were held morning and afternoon on the Sabbath.

The Pastors were six--ministers eight. The Troy church had received by baptism 39; the Belleville church 10; Oak Hill and O' Fallen each 2. The other churches had received no members by this ordinance.

621

Histories of Bethel and Troy Churches South Dis. Asso.

Church Histories.

Bethel Baptist Church.
The Bethel Baptist church; St. Clair Co., Illinois, had its origin in an arm of the New Design Church the 14, day of June, 1806. The following is a record of its first meeting:--"Arm of the Baptist church of Church of Christ at New Design. Met according to appointment in Richland, on Saturday, the 14th day of June, 1806, at Wm. L. Whitesides.
Joseph Chance, Moderator. 2. The Arm agrees with the church at New Design in the appointment made in order to try to gain a fellowship with the Baptist brethren in the Illinois. The Arm found in peace, signed by order of the Arm. Benjamin Ogle, Clerk."

This arm was constituted an independent church by the name of Richland Creek, Sep. 12, 1807, by Revs. Joseph Chance, Robert Brazele and Edward Ratcliff. On account of a difficulty arising from a difference of views among its members upon the subject of Slavery the church was divided on Dec. 9, 1809. One part retaining the name of Richland Creek church; the other taking

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the name of "the baptized Church of Christ, Friends to Humanity, Denying Union and Communion with all persons holding the Doctrine of Perpetual, Involuntary, Hereditary Slavery." And on the 10th day of Dec. , 1809, were duly constituted and publicly recognized as a regular Baptist church, by Rev. James Lemen, Jr. and Rev. John Baugh. And for thirty years afterward were known by the name of "Canteen Creek church, Friends to Humanity." And through all the vicisitudes of its history, it has never lost this distinctive feature of its character "friends to humanity."

Officers.

The following ministers have been ordained by the Church, since its constitution, Dec. 10, 1809. Benjamin Ogle, Feb. 3, 1810; James Lemen, Sen. and Joseph Lemen, (father and son) Feb. 4, 1810; James Garretson, June 20, 1813; Henry Ross, (previously a Cumberland Presbyterian) Oct. 7, 1832; Joel Terry, April 7, 1839; and Samuel Kelley, April 7, 1847.

Persons licensed to preach by this church, and ordained after leaving it; Austin Symms, Feb. 2,

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1822; James Pulliam, April 1822; Samuel Woods, Jan. 1822; Daniel Murphy, Aug. 1830; Wm. H. Briggs was received as a licensed preacher into the church, Dec. 1836, subsequently dismissed and afterwards ordained to preach the gospel.

Members that became Ministers of the Gospel after being dismissed from the church; Josiah Lemen, Moses Lemen, Harmon Dace, Lynn Craig, Wm. J. Pritchett and Warren Beadle.

Ordained Ministers received as Members of this Church: James Lemen, Jr. Dec. 10, 1809; Daniel Hilton, April 1821; Joseph Chance, March 1829; J. M. Peck, April 6, 1851; W. T. Rawson, Feb. 10, 1856; E. J. Palmer, Oct. 6, 1860; J. M. Cochran, July 4, 1868.

Ministers elected who have served as Pastors of the Church: Rev James Lemen, elected Nov. 7, 1840, and served two years; Rev Moses Lemen, elected Jan.1, 1846; and served one year; Rev J. M. Peck, D. D. elected Feb. 1, 1851, resignedc Oct. 9, 1853; Rev James Lemen, Jr. and Rev Joseph Lemen, elected co-pastors Nov. 5, 1853; and served one year.

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Rev D. M. Howell, elected, April 7, 1835, resigned March 7, 1857; Rev J. High, elected May 1, 1858, for a term of six months; Rev Elijah Dodson , elected, Jan. 1, 1859., and died on or about April 1, 1859; Rev E. J. Palmer, elected, Jan. 14, 1860, and served two years; Rev H. S. Deppe, elected Dec. 3, 1864, and served three years; Rev J. M. Cochran elected Dec. 7, 1867, and was serving the church when this history was written.

Deacons.

Stephen Terry (the first deacon) was elected Sep. 20, 1820. He was a faithful servant and died in 1827. He was the father of Elder Joe Terry.

Gideon Scanlan, chosen and set apart or ordained deacon in March, 1827, and after faithful service, died April 17, 1833.

Samuel McClain, chosen and set apart to the work of the deaconship at the same time with Bro. Scandland. He was dismissed from the office

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by his own request in 1829.

John Hart, chosen and set apart tot he service of deacon, July, 1831. He magnified his office and died beloved by all his brethren, Nov. 1, 1832, aged forty-seven years.

Elisha Freeman, appointed deacon, Feb. 1833. He honored his office until age and infirmities discharged him from active service, and died Jan. 28, 1854.

William Hart, elected deacon, in the place of Gideon Scanland, Aug. 3, 1833, and served the church faithfully till the Master called him home, Dec. 2, 1842.

George C. Hart, son of deacon John Hart chosen and ordained deacon in May, 1843. He removed to Belleville in 1846, and at his request was excused from serving in that office.

Samuel Baird, was also a chosen and ordained to the deaconship at the same time with Geo¨ C. Hart, and died April 1, 1856.

Lewis Scanland, elected and ordained deacon, in 1851, and dismissed to go into a new church organization at Collinsville, Feb. 7, 1857.

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Warren Beadle, chosen deacon, Aug. 2, 1851 and dismissed to unite with Unity Church, April 4, 1857.

Levi Piggot, elected deacon, June 5, 1858, ordained July 4, 1858, and still served the church in that office.

James B. Lyon, chosen deacon, June 5, 1858, ordained July 4, 1858, Dismissed April 7, 1860.

Silvester Lemen, elected deacon, Nov. 3, 1860, ordained Jan. 6, 1861, dismissed to go into a new church organization at O'Fallon, Feb. 2, 1867.

Augustus D. Beadle, elected July 6, 1867, Ordained Aug. 4, 1867, dismissed in 1869 to unite with the Baptist Church in Kansas City, Mo.

Samuel Simpson, chosen and ordained deacon, in 1870.

Church Clerks.

Robert Lemen, was chosen clerk of the church at its organization in 1809, and served till Oct. 5, 1844, nearly 35 years.

James H. Lemen, elected clerk April 4, 1845, and served faithfully till Feb. 9, 1856, eleven years.

James Heart, elected clerk Feb. 9, 1856, and served

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till April 4, 1857, one year and two months.

G. W. Bowler, elected clerk May 2, 1857, served till July 6, 1861; four years and two months.

S. Whitlock, chosen clerk Nov. 2, 1861; and still serves the church with much acceptance.

Membership.

The constituent members were, James Lemen Sr. and Catherine Lemen, his wife, Robert Lemen, and his wife, Hetty Lemen, Joseph Lemen, and his wife Polly K. Lemen, and Benjamin Ogle.

Rev. James Lemen, Jr. who assisted Rev. John Baugh in constituting the church, joined at night after its organization, Dec. 10, 1809, and retained his membership in the church for more than 60 years, a faithful soldier of the cross, till the great Captain of our Salvation promoted him to higher service and honor in the Church Triumphant.

The number added since its organization, is by Baptism, 543. By Letter, 170. By Restoration, 10. Making in all as near as can be ascertained from the records 723 members who have belonged to the church.

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Of these 393 have been dismissed by letter, a large portion of whom to form new churches; 112 have been excluded, 21 dropped from the roll of membership, and 142 have died, making the present number of member 113. But the reported members at this election was 102.

In the early history of the church its monthly meetings, where held in the settlement south of Canteen Creek, and at New Design, Monroe County, alternately. The places of these meetings were about thirty-six miles apart. The church had no regularly appointed pastor for many years, but was supplied with preaching at its monthly meetings in most cases by Elders James Lemen, Jr. and Sr. and Joseph Lemen, Benjamin Ogle and James Garretson. In the intervals of monthly meetings, the preachers of this church were engaged on the Sabbath and frequently on week days in preaching to the destitute in the scattered settlements on both sides of the Mississippi River. There was no failure of monthly church meetings during the first ten years of its history, and for nearly eleven years the church had never elected

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a deacon.

In 1824, the church erected its first house of worship. It was a frame building 30 by 40 feet, which for several years they occupied in an unfinished state, with rough benches for seats. The house cost about 4550.

During the ten years from Dec. 1830, to Dec. 1840, this church was prosperous and made progress. The whole number baptized during this time was 208. It was during this period the church adopted the practice of making contributions for missions and other benevolent objects, and at the same time began to make some compensation for the services of their ministers.

In 1838, the church adopted measures to erect a new meeting-house (the one it now occupies). The house was finished and opened for public worship. Sep. 5, 1849. The dedication sermon was preached by Rev. J. M. Peck. D. D.. It cost about $4,100. Upon the opening of their new house of worship the name of the church was changed from Canteen Creek to Bethel.

The records show that the church had been

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distinguished in Revivals and Baptisms. There have been thirteen distinct revivals since May 1819, during which a series of meetings were held day and night from one to four weeks.

Another marked feature of the church, is its adhesion to one of the fundamental principles of its constitution, that is, its opposition to slavery both in its spirit and letter. The constitution of the church was extraordinarily marked for its anti-Slavery character, and when ever called to act without reference to this subject, the church has always adhered tenaciously to this primary fundamental principle of its constitution.--"Friends to Humanity, Denying Union and Communion with all persons Holding the Doctrine of Perpetual, Involuntary, Hereditary Slavery." To illustrate this we take a few extracts from its records:
"May 1, 1830, Bro. Gideon Scanland, a member of this church, an heir with others to the price of a certain negrow man, comes forward and asks the advice of the church. ‘What use should be

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made of the money?’

Answer, According to the principles of humanity, the opinion of the church is, that the most charitable and best use that can be made of the money is to pay it over to the Negro Man, who is the proper owner, it being a part of his price, believing that the sale of human souls and bodies is a violation of the Law of God. To which Brother Scanland submitted. Robert Lemen, Clerk."

April 7, 1832. Mr. Jenkins, Sr¨ offered his membership to this church, but was rejected in consequence of being an heir, with others to the price of a certain portion of negroes and intending to receive the money, and keep it from the proper owners, the church considering that each negrow was the proper owner to the price of himself. R. Lemen, Clerk.

Saturday, May 7, 1864. The case of Bro. E. J. Palmer was taken up on the charge of Bro. B. Scott of "helping fugitive slaves to obtain their freedom." Bro. Palmer plead guilty to the charge. Whereupon the following resolution was offered, and after a motion to adopt it, the ayes and noes were called for, and resulted in 31 in favor and 12 against the resolution as follows:

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Resolved, That the church do not criminate, Bro. Palmer on the charge of assisting fugitive slaves to escape from their masters’."

In consequence of this action of the church, certain persons, members of other churches attempted to obtain a censure or disfellowship of Bethel church, by the South District Association at its meeting in 1868, in Oak Hill, but most signally failed, and instead brought upon their own heads severe and deserved reprobations.

New Churches Organized.

The following churches have been formed in whole or in part from the membership of Bethel Church: Fountain Creek church, Madison Co., 1821; Union (now Troy) church, Madison Co., 1833; Rock Spring (now extinct), St. Clair Co., 1835; Turkey Hill church, 1823; Oak Hill church, St. Clair Co., 1852; Collinsvile church, Madison Co., 1857; O'Fallon church, St. Clair Co., 1867.

Truly has Bethel church been a Mother in the Israel of our Zion. And it is proper and just that now in the seventh decade of her labors, sufferings, and triumphs in the kingdom of Christ,

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and in view of the providential and merciful dealings of God in all her history, she should present this brief sketch, setting it up as a memorial stone in the annals of the Association, "Calling it Ebenezer, saying, Hitherto hath the Lord helped me."

Published in the Minutes of 1870.

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Brief History of the Troy Baptist Church, Madison Co., Ill.

The Troy Baptist Church was organized in the year 1833, by Elders Joseph and James Lemen, (brothers) with 15 members, at the house of John Lindly, in Madison Co., Illinois, near Silver Creek. It received the name of Upper Silver Creek first, afterwards that of Union Baptist Church of Christ, Friends to Humanity. The expression, "Friends to Humanity," meant their opposition to Slavery. Before it removed to Troy it enjoyed many precious seasons of revivals of religion; and many were gathered into the pale of the Church under the labors of many different ministers.

We find on the church records, the names of the following ministers who served the church either as pastors or supplies:
James and Joseph Lemen, Charles Lucy, Samuel Wood, John Padon, A. B. Harris, T. W. B. Dawson, Elijah Dodson, E. J. Palmer, John H. Mize, W. D. Ross, Niles Kinne, George Silver and H. S. Deppe.

Its licentiates were as follows:
Lynn Craig, Wm. Vonhooser, Valentine Vonhooser, Asa Parker, Charles Lucy, Lyman Barber, and

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John H. Mize.

Its regular pastors have been:
James and Joseph Lemen, John Padon, T. W. B. Dawson, Elijah Dodson, E. J. Palmer, John H. Mize, W. D. Ross, Niles Kinne, Geo. Silver and H. S. Deppe. This church has called for the ordination of but two ministers, John Padon and John H. Mize.

It received its name, Union, in 1840, and when it removed from Troy in 1846, it received its present name.

Its first meeting-house was a frame, as was its second at Troy. The meeting house at Troy was built with many difficulties, and very long delays. Before its present place of worship was finished, the church was permitted to occupy the present Presbyterian meeting-house one-half the time.

The Baptist meeting house at Troy was dedicated in 1849. The dedicatory sermon was preached by Elder Elijah Dodson.

The following named persons, members of the church, have served as clerks: Wm. Reufro, Valentine Vanhooser, John Vanhooser,

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Gideon Flowers, Wm. M. Lindly, J. B. Edgar, Wm. H. Gouterman, T. W. B. Dawson, James Sezhah, and Dea. W. A. Wilson.

Before the church removed to Troy, a few brethren engaged in Sabbath school operations; but it was some time after the church removed ere it had its own Sabbath school. For some years the teachers governed the school, and elected the officers. But now the Sabbath school is under the management of the church.

The following brethren have acted as deacons:
Wm. Skinner, Isaac Reufro, Abraham Vanhooser, George Brashaw, Caleb Gouterman, Andrew Waddle, Charles B. Street, Lyman Barber and Wm. A. Wilson.

From the organization of the church in 1833, with 15 members, most of whom are dead, and none of whom are now members, till 1870 this church has exerted a precious and lasting influence; and many of its once devoted members have departed to their final and eternal rest. At this time, 1870, the

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membership is 91. Deacons, three; Andrew Waddle, [The following is crossed out]Charles B. Street[End crossed out portion], Lyman Barber and Wm. A. Wilson.
Henry S. Deppe, Pastor.
T. W. B. Dawson, Church Clerk.

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Chapter VII. North district now Carrollton Association.

No. 1.

A. Bailey in 1838 reported that he had purchased a book and copied the Minutes up to that date in it as requested by the Asso. in 1937. For cost and labor he was allowed $5. A Com. to write a history of the Asso was appointed in 1857. Dr. Bulkley Chairman. Com. continued and B. B. Hamilton added in 1859.

Western Pioneer noticed in 1837.
Pioneer and Standard Bearer in 1836.
Against dropping in 1854.
Name changed to Carrollton in 1854.

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1835.
The North District Association, friends to Humanity met with the Indian Creek Church, at Princeton, Cass Co., Sep. 11, 1835. The meeting was opened with a sermon by Moses Lemen, from 2.Pet.1:5,6,7 "And besides this, giving all diligence, add to your faith virtue;" etc.

The statistics, or numerical returns from the churches have been cut out of the Minutes that I have and therefore I cannot give them.
Wm. Spencer, Moderator. J. C. Bergen, Clerk.

Having Circular Letters was discontinued. I find these resolutions in the minutes:
"Resolved, That although we do not consider an extensive education an indispensable qualification for a preacher of the Gospel, yet we believe it,

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when sanctified, to greatly promote his usefulness in the church, and in the world.

"Resolved, That we recommend Alton Seminary to the patronage and prayers of the churches of this Association.

"Resolved, That we express our thanks to the A. B. H. M. S. for the timely aid which they have afforded us the present season, and with the hope that we shall soon be able to do much more than heretofore for ourselves would still solicit a continuance of their assistance.

"Resolved, That this Association consider it the indispensable duty of all heads of family to worship God by prayer, and reading the Scriptures in their families."

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The worship of the Sabbath was attended with much interest.

"Resolved, That a protracted meeting be held with the Salt Creek Church, Macon Co., Coppenbargo's Settlement, on Friday before the first Saturday in June, and
that Bros. Moses Lemen, Kinner, and Bailey be appointed to attend."

"Resolved, That we recommend to the ministers of this Association to hold a protracted meeting in each church belonging to the Association within the year."

Collection on the Sabbath for State Missions of $14.70 was taken.

After this session the South and North District Associations ceased their united action and printed their minutes seperately, yet there is no allusion to it in the Minutes of either body.

1836.
The North District Association met with the Macoupin Church, Green Co. to hold its eighth annual meeting, Saturday, Sep. 10. The Session was opened with a sermon by A. Bailey from 1. Thess. 3:8, "For now we live, if ye stand fast in the Lord."

The churches were 15; from 3 there was no intelligence. Statistics: Baptisms 5; Rec'd. by Letter 14; Dismissed 21; Excluded 12; Died 4; Members 375.
Moses Lemen, Moderator. Amos Dodge, Clerk.

Letters from Corresponding Associations were read and delegates received. Manvaisterre
Church had changed its name to Mound Church.

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Lord's Day, Sep. 11.
H. Loomis preached from Mark 16:15,--"And he said unto them, Go ye into all the world, and preach the gospel to every creature", to a large and attentive congregation. He was followed by Moses Lemen who explained the character and objects of the Illinois Bap. Convention, and then a collection of $26.93, and a subscription of $48.75 were taken to aid the Convention. Other services closed the labors of the day.

Monday. Association resumed business. Delegates were appointed to attend the South District, Saline, Edwardsville, Blue River, and Salem Associations. These were the Associations favorable

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to Missionary and benevolent operations; and I suppose all them of the class in the state.

Resolutions favorable to most of the forms of Christian work were passed, and urging co-operation on the part of the churches and brethren. The Pioneer and Baptist Standard-bearer, which J. M. Peck was then editing and publishing, was earnestly recommended to the brotherhood as an ably conducted paper, and worthy of their patronage. The cause of temperance received hearty commendation. Delegates were appointed to attend the annual meeting of the Illinois Baptist Convention at the Bethel meeting-house, St. Clair Co. Beside H. Loomis Joseph and James Lemen preached after the opening of the session.

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1837.
The Island Grove Church, Sanga. Co. entertained the Association while holding its ninth annual meeting, commencing Friday, Sep. 8, with a sermon by
Wm. Spencer, from 2.Tim.2:15,--"Study to show thyself approved unto God, a work man that needeth not to be ashamed, rightly dividing the word of truth."

The Mount Taber Church, with 10 members, and Eli Barbre as pastor; and Rock Creek Church, in Wisconsin Territory, with 32 members were received. [The following is crossed out.]into the body.[End crossed out portion.] The churches were 17, but from Bear Creek, Mt. Pleasant, Henderson's Creek (now Whitehall), Cahokia, Lake Fork, Manchester and Mound Churches there was no intelligence. Statistics: Baptisms 77;

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Rec'd. by Letter 41; Dismissed 15; Excluded 16; Died 7; Members 508.
Moses Lemen, Moderator. T. J. Askew, Clerk.

"Worship on the camp ground at night." M. Lemen preached from Isa.55:1. "Ho every one that thirsteth come ye to the waters," etc. "J. M. Peck exhorted and invited Christian professors to renew covenant with one another and to pray unitedly for the presence of God during the meeting. Several persons requested prayers for themselves, their children and friends."

Saturday. There was a mistake in locating Rock Creek Church in Wisconsin Ter. It is said to be in Des Moines Co., which is in Iowa, while there is no such county in Wisconsin. The old associational custom was to receive delegates formally from corresponding associations

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and read the Corresponding Letters which the delegates bore. And custom also required the regular appointment of corresponding delegates to associations with a corresponding letter, at every session. Such was the custom with this Association. The Association also appointed a visiting committee, to each of the churches that failed to be represented, to encourage those languishing, and report the results of their visits at the next association.

The organization of the Am. and Foreign Bible Society was greatly approved, and the churches were solicited to contribute to its treasury.

The denominational Paper had undergone some changes within the year then closing. It was now the Western Pioneer, published under the

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care of a Committee, and edited by J. M. Peck, W. Leverett and E. Rodgers, and was recommended as worthy of queral patronage. Other recommendations of the previous year were reviewed. Delegates were appointed to attend the annual meeting of the Illinois Bap. Convention. Alvan Bailey was "instructed to procure a blank book and record the past and the present minutes, at the expense of the association."

I give place to the following:
"On petition of Indian Creek church, leave is granted to unite with other churches in forming a new association, and also to such other churches in our body, as may desire to unite in the same plan of operations, as we desire to extend our line of connection."

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Gratitude was expressed for the aid received from the Am. Bap. Home Mission Society by churches in the Association.

The following is from the minutes:
"Whereas, we regard the Spirit and practice of African Slavery to be a violation of the principles of liberty, of human rights, and of the gospel of Christ, which requires us to ‘do others as we would have them do to us,’ therefore,
Resolved, That it becomes Christians in their individual church and associational relations, to bear decided testimony against this evil, to sympathize with those who are in bonds, and on all suitable occasions to manifest their opposition to the oppression of their fellow men,

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and especially to make devout and fervent supplication for the interpostition of Almighty God for its removal from our country and the world."

The evening service was one of deep interest, and some professed to be converted.

There were three sermons on the Lord's day besides exhortations and prayers, and the exercises were of deep religious interest.

The ministers of the Association were Moses Lemen, William Hill, Alvan Bailey, Sears Crane, John McRae, Wm¨ J. Pritchett, John H. Daniels and Eli Barber. Licentiates C. S. Scandrett and Richard Rhea.

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1838.
The Carrollton Church entertained the Association during the tenth annual meeting, which was commenced, Friday, Sep. 7, with a sermon by Moses Lemen, from Gen. 13:8,--"And Abraham said unto Lot, let there be no strife, I pray thee, between me and thee, and between my herdsmen and thy herdsmen; for we are brethren."

Bluffsdale Church with 27 members, and Taylor's Creek church with 38 members were received. Salt Creek, Island Grove and Indian Creek churches had gine into the organization of the Springfield Association, Lake Fork and Mound Churches had become

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extinct, and Manchester Church had united with the Blue River Association. The remaining churches were Macoupin, Carrollton, Salem, *Apple Creek, *Bear Creek, *Mount Pleasant, White Hall (formerly Henderson's Creek), Bethel, *Cahokia, Rock Creek, Iowa Ter'y, Bluffdale and Taylor's Creek; being 12. And from 4 of these there was no intelligence, which are marked with a star. Statistics: Baptisms 114; Rec'd. by Letter 28; Restored 3; Dismissed 14; Excluded 2; Died 5; Members 511. Salem Church had received 54 by baptism, Carrollton 36, Rock Creek 11, and Bluffdale 13.
Alvin Bailey, Moderator. J. C. Graves, Clerk.

Corresoonding delegates and visiting brethren were elders starkweather, John Padon, D. Greenleaf,

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and Brn. Edward G. Miner and James Osgood.

The associational correspondence was duly arranged. Delegates were appointed to the Ill. Bap. Convention, to meet at Jacksonville.

Bro. Bailey reported that he had procured a book, and transcribed the minutes into it. He was allowed $5 for expenses and services.

The death of Elder Wm. J. Prithchett was alluded to in a resolution of the association, which leads to the conclusion that he had died during the year of closing. No account of him was given. The Bible, Foreign and Home Mission organizations were heartily approved, and the brotherhood was solicited to aid them by contributions.

The Session closed on Saturday evening.

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1839.
The Association met with the Salem Church, Greene Co. to hold its eleventh annual meeting, on Friday, Sep. 6. The Session was opened with a sermon by A. Bailey, from Acts 20:20, "And how I kept back nothing that was profitable unto you."

The churches were 9, but from Bluffdale there was no intelligence. Statistics: Baptisms 55; Rec'd. by Letter 16; Restored 2; Dismissed 18; Excluded 5; Died 6; Members 520. The members received by baptism had been to Macoupin church 15, Carrollton 6, Salem 18, Apple Creek 15, and Taylor's Creek 1.
Moses Lemen, Moderator. A. Bailey, Clerk.

To associational correspondence due attention was given. The delegation from the Edwardsville Associa was large, numbering eight.

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The following resolutions were passed:
"Resolved, That we consider the performance of Family prayer of vast importance to the advancement of piety, and would therefore urge its devout performance on all heads of families.

"Resolved, That we perceive with regret the lax manner in which the Sabbath is observed by some members of our churches, and we would therefore exhort all to observe it with strictness, as a day of religious devotion and improvement, not speaking their own words nor doing their own business, nor finding their own pleasures on that sacred day.

"Resolved, That it is indispensable to the best interest of the churches that ministers devote themselves entirely to the duties if their calling; we

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therefore, recommend, that they relieve their ministers, as far as possible from the necessity of attending to secular avocations as a means of livelihood.

"In view of the great good which had resulted from protracted meetings, we recommend to the churches to hold at least one protracted meeting annually.

"Whereas, we have heretofore declared our belief in the sinfulness of Slavery, and recommended our brethren by resolution to remember the oppressed at the throne of grace; and
"Whereas, We have reason to fear that many of our brethren are yet indifferent to the cry of suffering humanity; Therefore,
"Resolved, That our ministers be requested to

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preach, on all suitable occasions upon this subject.

"2. That, as it has been long neglected, we would recommend our brethren to remember particularly the enslaved at the monthly concert of prayer."

The committee in Shirtleff College made their report as follows:
"Your Committee on Shirtleff College would respectfully report; That they learn with pleasure that the Trustees of that Institution have resolved to erect as a college edifice, 120 feet long by 44 feet wide, and four storied high, This building is put under contract, and already commenced. It is the design of the Trustees to have the edifice up and enclosed by October 1840. This will incur an expense

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of $10,000.

"As soon as circumstances will permit after this building shall be enclosed, the Trustees design to finish it, which will incur an additional expense of ten of fifteen thousand dollars. The building when completed, will contain 56 rooms, and will conveniently accommodate one hundred students. To meet the expenses of this building they have now about $9,000; and for the remainder they make an appeal to the churches, and to the friends of education generally.

"On inquiry into the present condition of the Institution your committee are happy to say, that it has never at any former period been in so interesting and prosperous a state. The teachers

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who are employed are experienced in their business, and every way qualified to give satisfaction to those who may wish to obtain an education, of those who may wish to secure an education for their sons,--Therefore,
"Resolved, That Shirtleff College recommends itself to the confidence and patronage of an enlightened community, and should be remembered in our prayers."
A. Bailey, Chairman.

On Lord's day religious services began at 9 o'clock, A. M. Preaching at 11, followed by an appeal in behalf of the Ill. Bap. Convention, and a collection of $38.15 taken for it, Also a subscription of 435.25. Another sermon followed and the session closed.

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The custom of issuing a Circular Letter to the churches of the Association was received, and the minutes of this session contained one written by Eld. A. Bailey. Subject, The importance of union and brotherly love.

1840.
The Association met with the church in White Hall, Greene Co. to hold its twelfth annual meeting, Friday, Sep. 11. The session was opened with a sermon by Sears Crane, from Micah 6:8,--"He hath showed thee, Oman, what is good; and what doth the Lord require of thee, but to do justly, and to love mercy, and to walk humbly with thy God."

The Apple Creek church at its request was dismissed from the association. The remaining

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churches were 8. They were Macoupin, Carrollton, Salem, White Hall, Bethel, Rock Creek, Taylor's Creek and Bluffdale. From Taylor's Creek there was no intelligence. Statistics: Baptisms 57; Rec'd. by Letter 21; Dismissed 21; Excluded 24; Died 3; Members 477.
Alvin Bailey, Moderator. David Pierson, Clerk.

Committees thought necessary were appointed.

Correspondents received and appointed. The ordained ministers were 5, with one licentiate. There was nothing in the proceedings of the session having especial historic importance.

1841.
The thirteenth annual meeting of the Association was held with the Bluffdale church commencing, Friday, Sep. For some reason there

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were no minutes printed.

1842.
The Macoupin church (now Kane) entertained the Association while holding its fourteenth annual meeting which began, Friday, Sep. 9, in the Meeting House in Kane village, Greene Co. with a sermon by Wm. Hill, from 1.Cor.2:16,--"But we have the mind of Christ."

Mount Gilead Church with 113 members, and Delaware Church with 16 members were received. Bluffdale Church disappears from the table of churches for some reason. The session of 1841 with that church was one of considerable excitement on the Slavery question, and may have caused dissatisfaction. The churches were 9; but Salem was not represented. Statistics: Baptisms 167; Rec'd. by Letter 19; Restored 9; Dismissed 28; Excluded 11;

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Died 2; Members 501. The members received into the Churches by baptism were Macoupin 22, Carrollton 18, Whitehall 11, Bethel 30, Taylor's Creek 4, Mt. Gilead, 82.
M. Lemen, Moderator J. O. Graves, Clerk.

The usual line of business was followed.

The Rock Creek Church in Iowa ter. at its request was dismissed from the body. A Female Seminary under the management of Mrs. Mary P. Lemen at Salem, Marion Co. was advertised and commended a permanent establishment. The preachers after the opening sermon were Jos. Lemen, E. J. Palmer, R. Kimball, G. B. Perry, James Lemen. The interest was such at the close on Sabbath evening that the meeting was protracted some days after the Association closed. There was a collection of $10 on Sab. moving for Shurtleff College.

663

1843.
The Association met with the Bethel Church, in Hawkin's Prairie, Jersey Co., for its fifteenth annual meeting, Friday, Sep. 8, and the Session was opened with a sermon by Josh Terry, from 1.Cor.3:9, "For we are laborers together with God."

Jerseyville Church was received with 76 members. The churches were 9, the name of the Salem church having been removed from the minutes. The Macoupin Church had changed its name to Kane, and Bluffdale reappeared in the table. Statistics: Baptisms 60; Rec'd. by Letter 24; Restored 2; Dismissed 17; Excluded 14; Died 7; Members 569. Bethel Church had received 15 by baptism, and Jerseyville 33.
Moses Lemen, Moderator. Jas. O. Graves, Clerk.

664

The business of correspondence was duly performed.

The Home Mission Society, the Bible Society, the Publication, Foreign Missions and Shirtleff College all received commendable notice, and addresses advocating each were made.

The teachers of the Kane and Whitehall Sab. schools were commended for keeping up a "constant school," supposed to mean through the year and the example was commended to the teachers of other schools for imitation.

The Association resolved to attempt the support of an itinerant preacher within its bounds the ensuing year. A committee was appointed to carry out the purpose.

It was the rule of the Asso. to correspond with all associations in the State "friendly to

665

benevolent operations of the day" by sending minutes. Preaching during the session by E. Dodson, E. J. Palmer, and W. H. Briggs, and on the Lord's day by A. Sherwood and B. F. Brabrook. The session was one of deep interest.

1844.

The Mount Gilead Church, in Greene Co. entertained the Association while holding its seventeenth annual, meeting, the session of which began, Friday, Sep. 6, at Woodville, with a sermon by W. H. Briggs, from Heb.12:2,--"Who for the joy that was set before him, endured the cross despising the shame," etc.

In the minutes this is called the "seventeenth" annual meeting, while the one of the year before, 1843, was called the "fifteenth". I find no

666

explanation of this discrepancy, and therefore I attempt none. The churches were 9, but Taylor's Creek, and Bluffdale were not represented. Statistics: Baptisms 34; Rec'd. by Letter 6; Restored 2; Dismissed 27; Excluded 20; Died 9; Members 557. Kane Church had received 19 by baptism, and Jerseyville 9.
M. Lemen, Moderator. J. O. Graves, Clerk.

The usual courtesy was extended to visiting brethren. Committees were duly appointed, and made timely reports. Correspondents received, and in return appointed. The following resolution was passed:
"Resolved, That a Committee of three be appointed to attend the next session of the Apple Creek Association, requesting that body to appoint a committee to confer with a similar committee, from this Association, as to the points of

667

difference existing between us, and whether or not a correspondence may not be opened between us."

Elder Terry and brethren Hawkins and Graves were appointed the committee.

Delegates were annually appointed to attend the anniversaries of the Illinois Bap. Convention.

These resolution were passed:
"Resolved, In view of the pressing wants of Zion at home, as well as the distressing cry of the heathen for living teachers, we believe the young men of our churches are called upon to render their bodies and minds a living sacrifice to Christ in publishing his gospel, and that it is the duty of our fathers in the church to look out young brethren of suitable gifts, and urge then forward.

"Resolved, That we earnestly recommend the

668

churches to assist the young brethren whom they approve, and who by the operations of God's Spirit are persuaded to engage in the ministry, in obtaining such an education as will greatly them for extensive usefulness: And that Shirtleff College is every way worthy of the confidence and patronage of the churches."

The Psalmist as a Hymn Book was recommended.

1845.
For its eighteenth annual meeting the Association met with the Jerseyville Church, on Friday, Sep. 12. The brethren appointed to preach because of sickness were not present, so there was no opening sermon. The churches were as the year before nine, and all represented. Statistics: Baptisms

669

4; Rec'd. by Letter 30; Dismissed 44; Excluded 21; Died 6; Members 492.
M. Lemen, Moderator. J. O. Graves, Clerk.

The proceedings of the Association were as usual. The Western Star, published by A. Bailey at Jacksonville, was recommended to the patronage of the brethren. A committee reported a Constitution, Articles of Faith, and Rules of Decorum for the Association, which were adopted.

The General Association had been organized, and Elders M. Lemen, and Wm. Hill were appointed to attend its first meeting at Fremont, Ill.

The preachers were A. Sherwood, E. Rodgers, P. Clay, T. Powell and A. Bailey.

The Clerk was directed to have 400 copies of the minutes printed.

670

1846.
The Carrollton church entertained the Association during its nineteenth annual meeting commencing, Friday, Sep. 11, with a sermon by Wm. Hill, from Heb. 11:16, "But now they desire a better country, that is, a heavenly:" etc.

The Church at Lofton's Prairie was received with 29 members. The churches were 10, but Whitehall church was not represented. Statistics: Baptisms 4; Rec'd. by Letter 14; Restored 1; Dismissed 54; Excluded 49; Died 8; Members 389. Excluded by Carrollton Church 22; by Mt. Gilead 10.
Porter Clay, Moderator. J. O. Graves, Clerk.

The stereotyped order of business was followed.

Committees were appointed and reports made.

The Committee on the State of Religion in the Association

671

thus reported:
"There are three resident ministers as pastors of churches; three other churches are supplied with monthly preachers; four churches remain unsupplied, and are in points, as to location, favorable to the preaching of the word. Connected with this Association are four ministers, one of whom is laid aside from disease and affliction, and one other, will probably not continue to preach within it. Thus five churches will, and so remain destitute of the preaching of the gospel. These churches are on the decline, and without some aid they must expire.

"Therefore, Resolved, That we earnestly recommend to our churches the importance of regular Sabbath meetings, and to seek for, and sustain pastors.
"Resolved, That in view of the destitution of the gospel

672

ministry, we recommend the appointment of a traveling missionary within the bounds of the association."

A subscription of $100 was immediately obtained toward sustaining an itinerant preacher within its bounds, and a committee appointed to secure the missionary, and to solicit $100 from the Home Mission Society to sustain the itinerant for one year.

The Presbyterian Church received a vote of thanks for the use of their house of worship. At the services on the Lord's day a collection of $16 was taken for Home Missions.

1847.
The Association met with the Kane Church while holding its twentieth annual meeting, beginning Friday, Sep. 10. The sermon was by J. C. Harvey,

673

from Nehemiah 3:28,--"From above the horse gate repaired the priests, every one over against his own house."

The churches were 10, but Bluffdale, and Taylor's Creek were not represented. Statistics: Baptisms 39; Rec'd. by Letter 34; Restored 7; Dismissed 33; Excluded 15; Died 12; Members 408.
Joel Terry, Moderator. J. O. Graves, Clerk.

Committees were appointed and made reports. Correspondents received and appointed. The several branches of Christian benevolence were cordially recommended. After the opening sermon the preachers were J. W. Denison, W. D. H. Johnson, J. N. Tolman, I. D. Newell.

The committee on ministerial destitution said:
"Your committee are sensible of the great deficiency of ministerial labor in this Association; there being only

674

two settled pastors in ten churches. Eight of these contain two hundred and forty-seven communicants. There are two other places within the bounds of this Association where churches ought to be planted. Now to meet the demands we would suggest to the Association the ancient Apostolic example: ‘Pray ye the Lord of the harvest to send forth laborers into his harvest.’

"We would also urge a due regard to Christ's words ‘The workman is worthy of his hire’.

"Your committee are of the opinion that if these two Bible rules be observed with a proper use of the ministers you have, i.e. keep them employed and hold up their hands, God will verify his promise ‘Whatsoever ye shall ask in my name I will do it.’"

"As the best and only efficient means of meeting the immediate wants of this Association we urge

675

a continuance of an itinerant missionary.

We would further urge the destitute churches to hold a weekly prayer meeting."

There were four collections taken amounting to $34.66.

1848.
The twenty-first annual meeting of the Association was with the Whitehall Church, opening on Friday, Sep. 8, with a sermon by J. N. Tolmas, from Isa.52:1, "Awake, awake; put on thy strength, O Zion." Churches 10. Bluffdale and Taylor's Creek Churches were not represented. Statistics: Baptisms 3; Rec'd. by Letter 23; Restored 2; Dismissed 18; Excluded 21; Died 2; Members 390.
W. F. Boyakin, Moderator. J. N. Tolman, Clerk.

In general the old order of business was reviewed.

Volunteer committees agreed to visit the delinquent churches--Bluffdale and Taylor's Creek, to counsel and encourage them.

676

1849.
The Association met with the Carrollton church while holding its twenty-second annual meeting, which commenced, Friday, Sep. 7, with a sermon by W. F. boyakin, from Mark 9:37, 38,--"Whosoever shall receive one of such children in my name, receiveth me;" etc.

Churches 10. Taylor's Creek and Whitehall were not represented. Statistics: Baptisms 18; Rec'd. by Letter 17; Restored 1; Dismissed 31; Excluded 1; Died 9; Members 368.
W. F. Boyakin, Moderator. J. N. Tolman, Clerk.

No change in the order of business. There was nothing in the minutes which claimed a transfer to these pages. Kane Church received the 18 by baptism. No other church received any.

1850.
Jerseyville Church had the satisfaction of entertaining

677

their brethren while attending the twenty-third annual meeting of the Association. The session was opened, Friday, Sep. 6, with a sermon by Joel Terry, of Kane, from Psalm 126:5, "Thy that sow in tears shall reap in joy."

The churches remain the same 10. Bluffdale, Taylor's Creek, and Whitehall were not represented. Statistics: Baptisms 51; Rec'd. by Letter 35; Restored 3; Dismissed 14; Excluded 13; Died 5; Members 433.
J. E. Cooper, Moderator. J. N. Tolman, Clerk.

Jerseyville Church, J. Bulkley, Pastor received by baptism 41. The order of business was not materially changed. A circular calling for a Convention of Baptists to be held in the following October, at Bethel Church, St. Clair Co. was read, and referred to a committee

678

which made the following report, which was adopted:
"Resolved, That Joel Terry, Wm. Roberts, Wm. Hill, J. Bulkley and David Pierson, be appointed delegates to the missionary mass meeting, to be held at Bethel, St. Clair Co. Oct. 25, 1850, and that they be instructed to participate in no scheme having in view the formation of an organization independent of the General Association of Baptists in this State."

The committee on the destitution of ministerial labor in the Association give the text of their report in its first sentence. They say, "Few Associations with which we are acquainted in the State present a field so wofully destitute of the living ministry as the North District Association."

679

But to copy more of the report:
"Three churches only, are supplied every Sabbath with preaching; others have partial supplies. The effect of this destitution is every where visible; churches once flourishing, are now extinct.

"Feeble bands of worthy brethren and sisters, are now struggling against well organized and powerful opposition, and are hardly able to retain their visible organization. Vast multitudes of the impenitent are perishing within our own borders. At Whitehall, one of the best meeting-houses in the Association is entirely unoccupied by Baptists; and many other points of importance have no Baptist preaching. The Association has diminished within a few years, from ten churches, to seven ; and in the

680

number of its members, it has diminished about one-third.

This diminution has taken place while a population vastly more dense, has settled on the broad bosom of our western prairies."

681

1851.
The Association met with the Union Church at Lofton's Prairie, Friday, Sep. 12 to hold its twenty-fourth annual meeting. The Session was opened by prayer, the sermon being deferred until evening. The Greenfield Church was received with 16 members. The Lofton's Prairie takes the name of the Union Church. The churches were Bethel, carrollton, Delaware, Jerseyville, Kane, Union, Bluffdale, Whitehall, and Greenfield; being 9. Statistics: Baptisms 53; Rec'd. by Letter 32; Restored 6; Dismissed 40; Excluded 13; Died 8; Members 453.
W. F. Boyakin, Moderator. J. Buckley, Clerk.

H. T. Chilton, had been employed as an itinerant preacher, and read his report of labor during the year. In the evening J. Bulkley preached from Phil.1:27,

682

"Only let your conversation be as it becometh the gospel of Christ."

The time was largely occupied in hearing reports and speeches on them.

In the report on the House Mission Society it was said that the Society had through its missionaries "organized 739 churches, and ordained 379 ministers." I am well aware that for many years its Secretary was accustomed to use this mode of expressing these two points in his report. But I have always regarded it as not strictly true, and in part an assumption. If a missionary of the Society reported his attendance at a council for organizing a church or ordaining a minister, it could not be said in truth that

683

he organized the church or ordained the minister. He was simply one with others to perform these services. It would be very absurd for every member of the council to say that he had done the one thing or the other. It was a joint work in which he participated with others.

At this meeting there was much discussion on the Bible organizations. There were earnest friends of the Am. and Foreign Bible Society, and also earnest friends of the Am. Bible Union. These brethren could not see alike on the course taken by the A. and F. Bible Society, toward the Bible Union, and their differences were the subject of a long debate. Committees had reported on both organizations. The report on the A. and F. Bible Society was slightly amended and adopted,

684

and that on the Bible Union was not received.

The report on Domestic Missions contained these statements: "The field embraced by this body is wofully destitute. It extends over the counties of Greene and Jersey, embracing a population of 21,000 souls. In the midst of this vast population, we have only seven feeble churches, with 453 members; one member in fifty of the population. In 1840, we had a population of 16,519, and we had seven churches, with four hundred and fifty-nine members. Thus in eleven years the number of churches has not increased, and the number of members remains about the same, while the increase of population has been about 5,000. These facts speak volumes, and call loudly upon

685

the ‘host of God's elect’ to gird themselves for the battle. Entire settlements have no Baptist preaching; feeble churches are on the point of disorganizing and scattering to the four winds of heaven. The forces of irreligion and infidelity, are well organized and powerful, and the Macedonian cry is heard on every hand, ‘Come over and help us.’"

The report continued to urge the employment of earnest work in itinerating ministries, affirming that the brethren of the Association had both the men and the means to cultivate the whole field. Shall they be consecrated?

The reports generally were very long. A Digest of Church letters was in the minutes of this year. It is the first that has been published. The minutes had 20 pages.

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1852.
Kane Church [The following is crossed out]had the pleasure[End crossed out portion] entertained the Association in its twenty-fifth annual meeting, which began on Friday, Sep. 10. The session was opened with devotional exercises.

Martin's Prairie Church was received, formerly in the Springfield Association, with 105 members. The churches were 10 and all represented. Statistics: Baptisms 140; Rec'd. by Letter 50; Restored and Recommended 28; Dismissed 40; Excluded 11; Died 11; Members 743. Jerseyville church received 27 by baptism, Carrollton 49, Kane 35; Union 15, Mt. Gilead 13.
W. F. Bayakin, Moderator. J. Bulkley, Clerk.

Thirteen committees were immediately appointed.

687

The annual sermon was preached in the p.m. by W. F. Bayakin, from Acts 15:2, 3, 4. "When therefore Paul and Baruabus had no small dissention and disputation with them," etc.

There had been two itinerant preachers employed through the year--Brn. Chilton and Terry. The one at a salary of $300, and the other at one of $200. The statistics of their labors united were as follows: Sermons preached 248--exhortations delivered 148, prayer meetings attended 27, families visited 280, miles traveled 2841, Baptism 60, received by Letter 14, by experience 8.

The preachers were after the annual sermon B. B. Hamilton, A. J. Bingham, J. N. Tolman, C. B. Phillips and John Teasdale.

688

1853.
For its twenty-sixth annual meeting the Association enjoyed the hospitalities of the Greenfield church. The session commenced on Thursday, Sep. 8, with devotional exercises.

Winchester Church, dismissed from the Springfield Association, [The following is crossed out]being regularly dismissed from it[End crossed out portion] was received into this Association and so also was Fidelity Church. The one with 210 members, and the other with 9. The churches were 12 and all represented. Statistics: Baptisms 122; Rec'd. by Letter 54; By Experience 2; Recommendation 1; Restored 3; Dismissed 60; Excluded 15; Died 8; Members 998. Martin's Prairie Church had received by baptism 10 members, Mt. Gilead 16, Whitehall 33, Jerseyville 27, and Winchester 33.

689

A. Bailey, Moderator. J. Bulkley, Clerk.

The business if the sessions has become very uniformed and stereotyped. Largely under the influence of J. Bulkley the Association had been led into an efficient prosecution of itinerant missionary work. The Executive Committee had employed H. T. Chilton through the year, Joel Terry for 8 months, and Ezekiel Dodson, 22 weeks. They had paid them respectively $300, $166.67 and $88. The items of their reports united gave the following figures: miles traveled 3,821. Sermons preached 335, Exhortations given 98, Families visited 392, Protracted meetings labored in 9, Persons baptized 71. Beside the annual sermon, these were sermons by H. H. Stockton, A. J. Bingham, J. N. Tolman, A. Bailey, J. Bulkley, 3 by J. D. Cole and 2 by J. Teasdale.

690

The Treasurer reported having received $1149.53.

1854.
The Association met with the Winchester Church while holding its twenty-seventh annual meeting. The session was opened, Thursday Sep. 7. With a sermon by A. Bailey, of Carrollton, from 1.Cor.:11:2, "Now I praise you, brethren, that ye remember me in all things, and keep the ordinances, as I delivered them to you."

The Manchester and Big Spring Churches dismissed from the Springfield Association, were received into this body. The one with 61 members, and the other with 98. The churches were 14 and all represented. Statistics: Baptisms 129; Rec'd. by Letter 38; By Recommendation 9; Restored 1; Dismissed 76; Excluded 38;

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Died 19; Members 1148. Martin's PrairieChurch received 9 members by baptism, Whitehall church 10, Carrollton 28, Delaware 36, Winchestter 24, Fidelity 8, and Manchester 17, and four others received less numbers.
A. Bailey, Moderator. B. B. Hamilton, Clerk.

The name of the Association was changed to Carrollton Association. The Executive Committee reported that they had employed H. T. Chilton for the year, J. Terry for 3 months, and Ezekiel Dodson for 6 months. Their joint reports foot up as follows: miles traveled 2980, Sermons preached 289, Exhortations given 149, Families religiously visited 294, Persons baptized 115, Prayer meetings attended 21.

"Resolved, That in most cases where names are reported as ‘dropped’ in the letters from the churches

692

it would, in our opinion, be better to exclude the offending parties."

There was a good Circular Letter in the minutes of this year, on Church Discipline, written by A. Bailey, by appointment of the body, and also the subject was assigned him. [The following is crossed out.]Besid the annual sermon there were others preached, by B. B. Hamilton, W. H. Briggs, L. Church. G. W. Bell and 2 cast by J. Bulkley and D. P. French.[End crossed out portion.] The treasurer reported having received $984.20.

1855.

Carrolton Church [The following is crossed out]were favored with the privilege of[End crossed out portion] entertained the Association in its twenty-eighth annual meeting, which commenced, Thursday, Sep. 6, with a sermon by

693

D. P. French, of Jerseyville, from Judges 7:2, "And the Lord said unto Gideon, The people that are with thee are too many for me to give the Midianites into their hands, lest Israel vaunt themselves against me, saying, My own hand hath saved me."

Virden, Otter Creek and Girard Churches were received, having respectively 22, 34, and 13 members. The churches were 17, and all represented. Statistics: Baptisms 184; Rec'd. by Letter 70; By Recommendation 17; Restored 2; Dismissed 63; Excluded 24; Died 27; Members 1315. Kane church received by baptism and experience 24, Mt. Gilead 9, Jerseyville 58; Whitehall 18, Winchester 10, Big Spring 31, Greenfield 7, Martin's Prairie 8, Otter Creek 12, and other churches a less number.

694

D. P. French, Moderator. B. B. Hamilton, Clerk.

The business took the ordinary course.

H. T. Chilton and Ezekiel Dodson were reappointed itinerant preachers, and other ministers have been employed for short periods.

The Summary of Labor stands thus: miles traveled 4,078, Sermons preached 341, Exhortations given 97, Families visited 409, Persons baptized 65. Cost $695. After opening sermon, there were 14 others preached in connection with the Association, as, on the Lord's day, the Presbyterian, Methidist, Baptist and Campbellite houses were occupied by our brethren. A collection for Foreign Missions was taken amounting $110.89; one for the Education Society

695

of $14.55; and one for Association Missions of $38.43. The Treasurer reported having received $1038.08.

1856.
The Association met with the Virden Church to hold its twenty-ninth annual meeting, Thursday, Sep. 11 and was opened with a sermon by J. Bulkley, of Carrollton, from John 15:4, 5, "Abide in me, and I in you. As the branch cannot bear fruit of itself, except it abide in the vine; no more can ye, except ye abide in me. I am the vine," etc.

Carlinville and Bluffdale churches were received, with 61, and 8 members. The churches were 19, and all represented. Statistics: Baptisms 160, Rec'd. by Letter and Recommendation 89; Restored 12; Dismissed 97; Excluded 50; Died 15; Members 1460.

696

Kane church had received 38 members by baptism, Union church 23, Fidelity 11, Carrollton 33, Winchester 10, Bethel 7, Carlinville 25, and other churches received smaller numbers by the same rite.

The ordained ministers were 14, Licentiates 1.
D. P. French, Moderator. B. B. Hamilton, Clerk.

The business Committee made these recommendations; which were accepted:
"The committee would recommend a change, if possible, in the manner of conducting the business of the Association; and that a large proportion of its time be devoted to preaching and devotional exercises. And also recommend that the morning sermon on Saturday be specially devoted to the consideration of the report

697

of the Executive Board, and the condition of our own Association."

The Association had a devotional meeting of great interest.

The first Monday in January, 1857, the churches were requested to observe as a day of humiliation, fasting and prayer to Almighty God for the outpouring of the Holy Spirit and a revival of His work.

"A communication from Rev. Dr. Peck, Scribe, was received, read and ordered on file.

"Appointed Bros. Bulkley, Bower, Jackson, Hill, Chilton, French, Hamilton, Brown, Eastham, Love and Miner, to attend the mass meeting therein named in Upper Alton, October 29."

Executive Committee reported:

698

The employment for the year of H. T. Chilton, and of R. C. Keele for 10 months, and J. C. Maple for 31 weeks.

Summary of labors: miles traveled 4859, Sermons preached 380, Exhortations given 98, Religious visits made 652, Persons baptized 59. Itinerant Keele acted also as a colporter, sold 383 volumes of religious books, distributed 24 volumes and 1752 pages of religious tracts to the destitute.

Paid Bro. Chilton $350, Bro. Keele $247.92, and Bro. Maple $186. Total $783.92.

J. B. Jackson had acted as Associational Agent for the Missionary Union and reported the collection of $239.38.

[The following is crossed out.]Beside the opening sermon, there were others by J. B. Olcott, S. H. Bundy, R. R. Coon, J. A. Smith

699

A. B. Harris, P. Burnett[End crossed out portion.] Preaching on the Sabbath at the Bap. House N. W. Miner, ______ High and D. P. French; at Methodist House J. E. Moore, H. T. Chilton and B. B. Hamilton.

There was a good Circular Letter in the Minutes, by B. B. Hamilton, on Christian Perfection.

The Treasurer's report acknowledged the receipt of $1,406.54.

1857.
[The following is crossed out.]It was the privilege of[End crossed out portion] The Summerville Church (formerly Delaware) Macoupin Co. entertained the Association while holding its thirtieth annual meetign, which commenced, Friday, Sep. 11, with a semon by J. B. Jackson of Virden, from Eph. 5:18, "Be filled with the Spirit."

Bear Creek Church with 29 members, Sugar Creek

700

with 24, Apple Creek with 66, and Woodburn with 55 were received. The churches were 23, with fifteen ordained ministers, and 2 licentiates. The churches were all represented. Statistics:Baptisms 103; Rec'd. by Letter 107; By Experience and recommendation 14; Restored 2; Dismissed 97; Excluded 58; Died 13; Members 1690. The Summerville church had received by baptism 8 members, Verden 24, Kane 9, Jerseyville 14, Girard 19, and ten others had received smaller numbers by the same rite.
J. Bulkley, Moderator. J. B. Jackson, Clerk.

There was no material change in the order of business. The Executive Board made therir report. They had employed D. S. Miller, R. G.

701

Keele, Charles Lefevre, J. Terry and G. R. Guild. Their reports gave when united the following figures: miles traveled 6,361, Sermons preached 520, Exhortations given 54, Religious family visits 1078, Prayer meetings attended 156, Persons baptized 11. In addition, Brn. Keele and Lefevre did colporter work. Compensations given. D. S. Miller $200, C. Lefevre $158.35, R. C. Keele $400, J. Terry $500, G. P. Guild $333.33. The expenditure $1141.68.

Brn. Bulkley, Terry and Wm. Hill were appointed a committee to prepare a History of this Association.

The ministers were H. T. Chilton, Summerville; Geo. P. Guild and H. Newberry, Union; J. B. Jackson, W. Hill, J. C. Harvey, Virden; J. Terry and Eze. Dodson, Kane; D. P. French,

702

Jerseyville; J. Bulkley and R. G. Keele, Carrollton; P. Bennett and J. Bower, Winchester; M. V. Kitz Miller, Girand; R. S. Cole, Bluffdale. Licentiates: S. V. Keller, Summerville; C¨ Lefevre, Jerseyville.

[The following is crossed out.]The preachers called out during the session W. W. Freeman, S. H. Bundy, Elijah Dodson.[End crossed out portion.] On the Sabbath J. Bulkley, A. B. Harris, S. H. Bundy preached. There was preaching also at Spring Cove and Mt. Pleasant. Treasurer's receipts $2459.34.

1858.
The Association convened with the Church in Jerseyville to hold its thirty-first annual meeting, Thursday, Sep. 9, and was opened with a sermon by J. Bulkley, of Carrollton, from 1.Samuel 15:22, "And Samuel

703

said, Hath the Lord as great delight in burnt offerings and sacrifices, as in obeying the voice of the Lord?" etc.

The Berean and New Hope Churches were received; [The following is crossed out]into the Association[End crossed out portion] the one with 59 members, and the other with 9. The churches were 25, with 18 ordained ministers and two licentiates. All the churches made reports but Bear Creek. Statistics: Baptisms 195; Rec'd. by Letter 120; By Experience 11; Restored 18; Dismissed 56; Excluded 59; Died 16; Members 1,901. Apple Creek Church had received by baptism 11 members, Berean 12, Carrollton 11, Fidelity 14, Girard 9, Jerseyville 27, Mt. Gilead 12, Otter Creek 17, Virden 59. Eight other churches had received in the same way less number of members.
J. Bulkley, Moderator. J. B. Jackson, Clerk.

The business was in the common order.

704

I copy the following:
"Resolved, That we greatly regret our inability to open a correspondence with the Apple Creek Association during the past years, and sincerely hope that the time will soon come when we shall not only be able to have fraternal and Christian correspondence with that body, but be one people in our efforts to do the work which God requires, as we are one in hope, one in interest and one in destiny."

I copy the following as having historic value:
"Ordered, That the forenoon of tomorrow be devoted to Domestic Missions.
"Took up special order of business."
"Committee on Domestic Missions reported as follows:
Your Committee think it advisable that the Executive

705

Board consist of eight members, that one half of them be appointed for one year and the other half for two years, and that hereafter one half of the members be appointed every year to hold office for two years.

We think the Association should, through its Executive Board, and to the extent of its ability, and according to their necessities, those feeble churches that are making reasonable efforts to help themselves. We think it should also, as far as possible, occupy those fields of interest which are frequently opening around us and calling for aid. Your committee are also of the opinion that the Association should require of those churches asking assistance, that they make their request at the first meeting of the new Board, and that said request be accompanied with a statement, as near as possible, of how much they will be able to do for themselves.

"Your Committee would further suggest to the Association the propriety of making some arrangement by which our feeble churches shall be aided in erecting suitable houses of worship. To this end we would submit the following resolution:
"Resolved, That the Executive

706

Board be authorized to act as a Church Etension committee, and to adopt such measures as they may deem desirable for erecting houses of worship within the Association."

No. 2 follows this:
North District,
Now
Carrollton Association.
No. 2.

707

From No. 1.
North District continued No. 2.

The Executive Committee reported: That they had employed during the year, entire or in part, the following itinerants, H. T. Chilton, J. M. Wells, R. C. Keele, Ezek. Dodson, George P. Guild, J. C. Harvey, and T. L. Lowe. The first two the entire year, Keele 46 weeks, Dodson 33 weeks, Gould 26 weeks, Lowe 14 weeks and Harvey 25 weeks; making 4 years and 40 weeks of labor.

Their reports united give these results: miles traveled 9,402, Sermons preached 842, Exhortations given 155, Religious visits made 1054, Prayer meetings attended 72, Persons baptized 72. Cost of labor $1846.87. Sermons during the session were preached by W. W. Freeman, B. B. Hamilton, G. P. Guild, D. Lewis, P. Burnett. Also on the Lord's day at

708

the Presbyterian, Methodist and Baptist Meeting-houses by P. Burnett, H. T. Chilton, J. B. Jackson, J. M. Wells, and J. Bulkley.

The Circular Letter was written by P. Burnett on "The bearing which the administration of the financial affairs of a Church has upon its prosperity."

1859. 32nd Anniversary.
The Church in Carrollton entertained the Association while holding its [The following is crossed out]twenty-second[End crossed out portion] annual meeting, which was opened, Thursday, Sep. 8, with a sermon by B. B. Hamilton, from 2.Tim.4:2, "Preach the word ." The churches were 25, all except Bear Creek were represented. [The following is crossed out.]Statistics:[End crossed out portion] Baptisms

709

184; Rec'd. by Letter 93; By Experience 13; Restored 9; Dismissed 83; Excluded 45; Died 13; Members 2063. Additions to the churches by baptism: Apple Creek 11; Big Spring 8, Bethel 26, Carlinsville 16, Manchester 23, Summerville 23, Winchester 43, and other churches less numbers.
J. Bulkley, Moderator. B. B. Hamilton, Clerk.

Committees were appointed and visiting brethren received. From the Executive Committee's report I talk the following:
"Persons employed the entire year or only a part of it: H. T. Chilton, J. M. Wells, Geo. P. Guild, B. B. Hamilton, H. W. Manning and H. Gallagher.

"Points supplied wholly or in part: Summerville, Mt. Gilead, Union, Otter Creek, Big Spring, Martin's

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Prairie, Apple Creek, Woodburn, Fidelity, Miles Station, Greenfield, New Hope, Sander's Point and Delhi.

"The summary of labor: miles traveled 6716, Sermons preached 772, Religious visits made 742, Persons baptized 77, Addresses and exhortations made 27. Salaries paid $1587."

The resolutions were adopted:
"Resolved, That we deeply sorrow, in view of the death of our beloved brethren, Moses Lemen, Joel Sweet and Elijah Dodson, who, since our last meeting, have been called home, and who, in earlier days, labored with such evident marks of Divine approbation in this Association.

711

2. "Resolved, That we hold their self-sacrificing devotion and labors of love in grateful and affectionate rememberance, and that God, in his providence, calls upon us to renew our consecration to Him, and be ready at any moment to hear the Master say: Come up higher!"

The Committee appointed to write the History of the Association was continued, and B. B. Hamilton added to it.

There were, beside the opening sermon, five before the Sabbath, and there was preaching in four meeting houses on the Lord's day. A very practical Circular Letter was in the minutes written by Eld. D. P. French.

712

1860. 33rd Anniversary.
The Association met with the church in Winchester while holding its annual meeting, Thursday, Sep. 6, and was opened with a sermon by George Silver, from 1.. Cor. 13:13,--"And now abideth, Faith, Hope, Charity."

The churches were 25. Bear Creek church was dropped and Mount Zion located at Grafton with 75 members was received. There was no report from Union church; Baptisms 85; Rec. by Letter 58; By experience 6; Restored 4; Dismissed 77; Excluded 52; Died 17; Members 2004.

The ordained ministers were 17, and the licentiates were five.

B.B. Hamilton, Moderator. J. Bulkley, Clerk.

Visiting brethren and corresponding delegates

713

were invited to seats.

There was a great decline in Associational mission work this year. Only one itinerant was employed who was Geo. P. Guild, and the funds raised were not sufficient to pay this missionary and also pay arrearages due the last year.

The committee on the History of the Association reported progress, were continued and authorized to print the History when prepared. During the session these brethren preached Carpenter, Cole, Bulkley, Rafferty, Wells and Kitzmiller. And the Association supplied the preachers for the pulpits of four meeting houses in Winchester on the Sabbath. The circular Letter was written by M. V. Kitzmiller on "The

714

importance of holy living in order to the World's Regeneration."

1861. 34th Anniversary
The annual meeting of the Association was hold with the Girard Church, beginning on, Saturday, Sep. 7, with a sermon by D.P. French of Jerseyville, from 1. John 3:3, "And every man that hath this hope in him, purefieth himself, even as he is pure."

The churches were 25. From Whitehall and Union churches there was no report. Ordained ministers 21; Licentiates 3. Baptisms 102; Rec. by Letter 38; By Experience 16; Restored 1; Dismissed 39; Excluded 50; Died 28; Members 2034.
B.B. Hamilton, Moderator. J. Bulkley, Clerk.

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In the previous December, Elders Joel Terry and Theophilus Sweet died, and C. B. Read and J. Bulkley were appointed to prepare obituary notices of them. These life sketches were printed in the minutes, and will be found in the biographical part of this work

A Circular Letter was written by J. Bulkley, and adopted by the Association, but formant of room was not inserted in the minutes. A Digest of the Letters from the churches was ordered by the Association, but like the Letter failed of a place in the minutes. The Associational mission had wonderfully declined. The funds sent in were not sufficient to support one itinerant. The Civil War was bewailed, but the Association was loyal and

716

true to the government. E.P. Scott, under appointment as a Foreign Missionary, preached, and took a collection and pledges for the Missionary Union amounting to $43.

On the Lord's day there were six sermons in Girard and two in Virdin.

1862. 35th Anniversary.
The Kane church entertained the Association while holding its annual meeting, which was opened on Saturday, Sep. 13, with a sermon by L. C. Carr, of Jerseyville, from James 3:17. "First pure, then peacable".

From Bluffdale church there was no intelligence.

Twenty-four churches reported. Baptisms

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65; Rec. by Letter 39; By Experience 3; Restored 2; Dismissed 53; Excluded 58; died 32; Members 1984.
L.C. Carr, Modertor. J. Bulkley, Clerk.

In Associational Mission work nothing was done. The Committee on Resolutions presented the following on the state of the country.

"Whereas, we as a nation are now engaged in a civil war, set on foot by evil and designing men, which if continued, will destroy our civil and religious liberties; therefore; Resolved, That we are taught to be subject unto the higher powers, it is now the duty of all true Christians and Patriots, to defend their Country against all enemies at home and abroad.

"Resolved, that in the hour of our country's peril,

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it becomes us, as a body to humble ourselves before God and pray Him to give our rulers Wisdom, that the fear of God may be continually before them and us; and that they and we, in all these things may acknowledge Him, that the unholy rebellion now waged against our government may soon be crushed out, and that the authority of the Constitution and the Laws may be respected and obeyed, by all who have hitherto enjoyed its benign blessings."

The Circular Letter was on "The importance of Church discipline," and was written by C. B. Read of Winchester. The general course of the Association in business, worship and preaching was carried out.

719

The Treasurer's report made his receipts for all purposed $935.10.

1863. 36 Anniversary.
The Association met with the Carrollton Church while holding its annual meeting, which commenced, Saturday, Sep. 12, with a sermon by H.T. Chilton from Numbers 14:24, "But my servant Caleb, because he had another spirit with him," etc.

Bluffdale church was reported as disbanded, and from the following churches there was no intelligence; Bethel, Fidelity, Mt. Zion, Whitehall, Otter Creek and Union, from the remaining 18 churches reports were received. Baptisms 33; Rec. by Letter 21; By Experience 4; Restored 2; Dismissed 50; Excluded 33; Died 29;

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Members 1884.
L.C. Carr, Moderator. J. Bulkley, Clerk.

The Circular Letter was written by L.C. Carr, and by order of the body was printed in the minutes. "The present declining state of religious interest," was the subject considered in it. In it the writer says: "Of the twenty-five churches in our association, six or seven, have but a nominal visibility. We have but five pastors devoting their whole time, to the work of the ministry within our bounds. Our reported membership is annually diminishing , while the real, living membership is far less. Some of our churches have had no regular preaching for two or three

721

years." The causes of the decline are thus named: "1st our religion has been too fitful, spasmodic, unreal in its nature. 2dly, A want of entire consecration to God. 3rdly, A neglect of the appointments of the church. 4thly, The divided, distracted and alarming condition of our beloved country."

The Executive Committee gave to two minutes seventy-five dollars each for their services one half the time, assigning to each a church. The decline in the missionary work of the body has been remarkable, and can be only accounted for because of the want of truly godly zeal, and because of impatience under the cost of earnest mission work.

The religious services of the session were much

722

as formerly. The receipts of the Treasurer for all purposes were $1110.78. The ordained ministers were 14, and four were in the Army.

1864. 36 Anniversary.
[The following is crossed out.]The privilege was given to[End crossed out portion] The Virden Church of entertained the Association during its annual meeting. The session was opened, Saturday, Sep. 10, with a sermon by J. M. Wells, from Isa. 42:1-4. "Behold my servant, whom I uphold; my elect, in whom my soul delighteth;" etc.

The churches were 23. Bluffdale had been disbanded and Mt. Zion dropped. Also Bereau and Woodburn were at this session dismisssed to the Springfield Association. From Bethel, Fidelity, Manchester, New Hope and Otter Creek Churches there was no intelligence.

723

Baptisms 114; Rec'd. by Letter 56; By Experience 7; Restored 7; Dismissed 44; Excluded 32; Died 17; Members 1,904.
L. C. Carr, Moderator. M. V. Kitzmiller, Clerk.

The Circular Letter was by J. M. Wells, he taking for his subject "Christian Steadfastness".

While rejoicing over the Sabbath School as an institution, and over the good it has accomplished, the Committee in their report, "beg leave, however, to suggest some evils in our Sabbath School system which should be immediately corrected:
"First. We fail to secure the regular attendance of adults; and thus we encourage the older youth of both sexes to abandon the school. Parents ought to set the example, by a regular attendance when Providence will

724

permit.

"Secondly, It is almost impossible to obtain a sufficient corps of earnest, devoted, pious, competent, teachers.

"Third, We suffer, beyond measure, for the want of sanctified literature, in the shape of books, and periodicals, adapted to all classes, children as well as adults.

"Finally, We suffer beyond measure, and, we fear beyond remedy, by permitting the Sabbath School to usurp the place of parental instruction, and the hallowed and sanctifying influences of the more public worship of God in the Sanctuary.

"Our children are permitted to attend school on Sabbath morning, retire from the house

725

of God, spend the Sabbath in idleness, in improper reading, or in frivolous and wicked amusements. They thus contract habits averse to the public worship of God, leading them in early life to forsake entirely the house of God.

"These evils can be corrected; and they ought to be corrected, or the Sabbath School abandoned. We would renew the recommendation of last year to hold a Sabbath School in convention in connection with the Association next year, and that some brother be appointed to preach a sermon on the subject of Sabbath Schools."

The Executive Committee employed two missionaries, one for the year at $200 for half

726

his time with two churches, and the other one fourth of his time for six months. The amount expended by the committee was $250.80. They recommended uniting their missionary work with the General Association. Whereupon the following resolution was passed:
"Resolved, That this Association will henceforth conduct its domestic missions through the Baptist General Association of this State."

There were more baptisms than for some years previous. Carrollton church received by baptism 44; Greenfield 16; Jerseyville 19; Sugar Creek 16; Winchester 10.

This resolution was passed:
"Resolved, That the preaching of the Gospel by

727

the living ministry is second to no agency or instrumentality employed by the Spirit of God in the diffusion of truth and the actual salvation of man."

1865. 38 Anniversary.
The Association held its annual meeting with the Carlinville church, and opened its session, Saturday, Sep. 9, with a sermon by Niles Kinne, of Carrollton, from Gal. 6:14, "But God forbid that I should glory, save in the cross of our Lord Jesus Christ," etc.

The churches were 21, six of which were not represented. Baptisms 70; Rec'd. by Letter 39; By Experience 16; Dismissed 51; Excluded 37; Died 29; Members 1,399.

728

N. Kinne, Moderator. T. W. Greene, Clerk.

There was nothing in the proceedings of the Association claiming historic notice.

The religious services were attended to in the usual manner.

The Treasurer's report gave the following footings $836, for all objects.

1866. 39 Anniversary.
The Association held its annual meeting with the Jerseyville Church. The opening sermon was by A. C. Rafferty, of Carlinsville, Saturday, Sep.8 from Heb. 1:2. "Hath in these last days spoken unto us by his son," etc.

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The churches the same as the year before 21. Seven were not represented. Baptisms 148; Rec'd by Letter 77; By Experience 10; Dismissed 68; Excluded 32; Died 17; Members 1,400.
A. C. Rafferty, Moderator. T. W. Greene, Clerk.

The largest number of members received by baptism were in the following churches: Carlinville 24; Virden 41; Sugar Creek 15; Winchester 49; Union 11.

Collections in money and pledges were taken during the meeting amounting to $300. There was the usual course of business, and the ordinary religious services carried out in the meeting. The Treasurer's report amounted for all purposes in receipts to $538.

730

1867. 40 Anniversary.
The annual meeting of the Association met with the Winchester Church, Saturday, Sep. 7. The session was opened with a sermon by J. Bulkley, from Heb. 13:8,--"Jesus Christ the same yesterday, and today, and forever."

The churches were 21. From Apple Creek, Fidelity, Mt. Gilead, Otter Creek and Summerville there were no reports. Baptisms 122; Rec'd. by Letter 51; Restored 11; Dismissed 43; Excluded 13; Died 7; Members 1,633.

Bethel Church received by baptism 20 members, Carlinville 10, Manchester 17, Whitehall 43, New Hope 22. The ordained ministers reported in the letters were: A. C. Rafferty, I. N. Hill, J. M. Coley, G. W. Stephens, W. G. F. Hempstead, B. B. Hamilton, F. W. Greene, J. M. Wells and D. Wise.

731

B. B. Hamilton, Moderator. D. Wise, Clerk

The proceedings throughout were of the usual character. Winchester Church was constituted in 1825; Carrollton in April 28, 1827, with six members; White Hall in Oct. 1826; Jerseyville in 1841; Martin's Prairie in 1843; Virden in 1854. There was no treasurer's report.

1868. 41 Anniversary.
Whitehall Church entertained the Association while holding its annual meeting. The session opened, Thursday, Sep. 11, with a sermon by I. N. Hill, from Psa. 81:10,--"I am the Lord thy God, which brought thee out of the land of Egypt:" etc. The Antioch Church, Jersey Co. was received. The Auburn Church is supposed to be the Sugar Creek Church under a new name. The churches

732

recognized as members of the body at this session were 18. The Apple Creek, Greenfield, New Hope, and Otter Creek Churches do not appear in the minutes of this session, yet there is not, any mention in the proceedings of their being dropped, or by any act of the Association of their being removed from membership. Baptisms 91; Rec'd. by Letter 46; By Experience 19; Dismissed 77; Excluded 51; Died 11; Members 1,596.
I. N. Hill, Moderator. D. Wise, Clerk.

The churches blessed with the largest increase of members by baptism were: Auburn or Sugar Creek, which received 26; Girard 13; Jerseyville 10; and Winchester 25.

I find the following in the report of the Committee on Resolutions; and adopted by the body:
"Whereas, There is a tendency among Baptists in

733

the bounds of this Association to organize small churches in communities adjacent to other churches, and too weak to sustain the stated preaching of the Word, therefore,
"Resolved, That it is the duty of our stronger churches, through their pastors and such lay brethren as may be able to speak for Jesus, to go out and preach the Gospel in destitute places around them, which will in a great measure obviate both the necessity and the tendency to form these distinct organizations."

The premature organization of small churches where there is little prospect of their growth, and of their being able to maintain the preaching of the gospel has been, and now is, a great evil among us, and especially in the Southern

734

half of our state. With many of our people there is a desire to have a church in their neighborhood, even where there is not the material for an efficient organization, nor the prospect of growth. All that can be reasonably expected at the commencement is a struggle for life for a few years, and then death.

735

1869. 42 Anniversary
The Association met with the Girard Church while holding its annual meeting, which was commenced, on Thursday, Sep. 9, with a sermon by W.D. Clark, of Carrollton, from 2. Cor. 5:14,15, "For the love of Christ constraineth us; because we thus judge, that if one died for all, then were all dead;" etc.

Apple Creek church was dismissed to Macoupin Association. The churches recognized as in the body were 20. Greenfield, Manchester, Mt. Gilead, Summerville and Union were not represented. Baptisms 160; Rec. by Letter 40; Experience 19; Restored 7; Dismissed 62; Excluded 14; Died 15; Members 1498.

736

W.D. Clark, Moderator. D. Wise, Clerk.

As this Association and the Apple Creek and Macoupin Associations occupy to a considerable extent the same territory, because of slight differences in their accustomed methods of Church and Associational life and work, but which differences should at once give way to earnest Christian fraternity, I copy the following as showing the desire of this Association that an earnest brotherly union may speedily take the place of all little differences and bring the respective churches and brethren into entire harmony:

"Resolved, That in the judgment of this body, the time has come when all evangelical Baptists embraced within our territory should labor

737

to become one in sympathy, in love, in organization and in effort, as we are already one in faith and practice. We therefore desire to place on record, our high appreciation of the evangelical piety, the zeal and energy, the correctness in doctrine and practice of the Apple Creek and Macoupin Associations of United Baptists; and we wish to express our most earnest desire that the kindest feelings should be cultivated and exhibited by all our membership, looking to and praying for the time, we hope not far distant, when we shall all be in one harmonious and efficient body, presenting an unbroken front to all errorrists and enemies of the Truth, as it is in Jesus."

738

1870. 43 Anniversary
The annual meeting of the Association was held with the Carrolton Church, commencing, Thursday, Sep 8, with a sermon by B.B. Hamilton, from Deut. 4:9, "Only take heed of thyself, and keep thy soul diligently, lest thou forget the things which they eyes have seen," etc.

The churches were 19, and all represented. Baptisms 77; Rec. by Letter 62; By Experience 11; Restored 1; Dismissed 93; Excluded 27; Died 28; Members 1651
B.B. Hamilton, Moderator. J.M. Terry; Clerk.

Thirteen of the churches had received members by baptism. This year a Sabbath School convention was organized in connection with the Association. Owing to the arelessnes of incompetence of

739

the Clerk the ministers in the body are in no way distinguished from the delegates from the churches. A stranger, therefore, could not learn from the minutes that the churches had any ministers.

There were five sermons distributed through the session, beside seasons for social worship.

1871. 44 Anniversary.
The Association met with the Virden church while holding its annual meeting. The session was opened, Thursday, Sep. 7, with a sermon by R.F. Parshall, of Carrollton, from Psa. 50:2 "Out of Zion, the perfection of beauty, God hath shined."

The churches were 18, but there was no report from the Bethel, Manchester

740

and Mt. Gilead churches. Baptisms 242; Rec. by Letter 47; By Experience 17; Restored 4; Dismissed 47; Excluded 30; Died 13; Members 1863.
B.B. Hamilton, Moderator. J.M. Terry, Clerk.

The following resolution offered by D. Bulkley was discussed and adopted:
"Resolved, That a committee of five be appointed to visit Apple Creek, Macoupin, and other Associations embraced within the territory of the Carrollton Association, and endeavor to effect a union of all these Associations into one."

The churches largely blessed by additions to their members by baptism were Big Spring which received 10, Carrollton 51, Fidelity

741

22; Jerseyville 80; Sugar Creek 27; Virden 15; Whitehall 13.

There was the usual course in the business of the body. Beside the opening sermon there were five others preached, and seasons for prayer enjoyed.

1872. 45 Anniversary.
The Otter Creek Church welcomed the Association to its hospitalities while holding its annual meeting, which commenced, Thursday, Sep. 5, The opening Sermon was by H.M. Carr, of Virden, from 2. Kings 4:6. "And it came to pass, when the vessels were full, that she said unto her son, Bring me yet a vesel. And he said unto her,

742

there is not a vessel more. And the oil stayed."

The Liberty church with 29 members, and the Buena Vista church with 21 members were received. The churches were 20. Carrollton, Greenfield and Mt. Gilead churches were not represented. Baptisms 188; Rec. by Letter 40; by Experience 13; Restored 2; Dismissed 52; Excluded 17; Died 13; Members 1973.
B.B. Hamilton, Moderator. A.H. Scott, Clerk.

Baptisms in Antioch church 31, in Liberty 14, in Verden 83, in Manchester 35.

After the opening Sermon there were six others before the Sabbath, and two on that day. There were also times devoted to prayer.

Our benevolent organizations were represented and their claims presented before the Association.

743

1873. 46 Anniversary.
The Association met with the Kane Church to hold its forty sixth annual meeting, Thursday Sep. 11. The meeting was opened by P.Perry from John 14:6. "I am the truth."

The churches were 20. From Buena Vista, Greenfield and Mt. Gilead churches there were no reports. Baptisms 41; Rec. by Letter 32; By experience 6; Restored 1; Dismissed 75; Excluded 37; Died 30; Members 1872.
H.A. Guild, Moderator. B.F. Humphrey, Clerk.

There was nothing of special historical interest in the minutes.

The ordained ministers were: H.M. Carr, Virdin; H.T. Chilton, Medora;

744

Jos. Claridge, Otter Creek; Aaron Dodson, Otter Creek; D. Matlock, Otter Creek; H.A. Guild, Carrollton; W.B. Hill, Carrollton; B.F. Humphrey, Girard; M.V. Kitzmiller, Girard; W.C. Roach, Girard; A.H. Scott, Auburn; P.Perry, Jerseyville; D.S. Star, Whitehall; D.Wise, Whitehall; B.B. Hamilton, Whitehall; Wm. Hill, Virden; W.W. Freeman, Carlinville.

Licentiate: S.C. Ryan, Girard.

Below I give the Post offices of Churches, where the office is not of the same name with the church.

Antioch, Otter Creek; Bethel, Jerseyville; Big Spring, Glasgow; Martin's Prairie, Manchester;

745

Sugar Creek, Auburn; Buena Vista, Jerseyville.

1874. 17 Anniversary.
The Association met with the church in Manchester, Scott Co., for its yearly meeting, Sep. 10. After a prayer meeting, J.C. Baker preached, from John 15:5, "I am the vine, ye are the branches," etc.

The churches were 21, but no report came from 3. Baptisms 125; Rec. by Letter 38; Experience 17; Restored 10; Dismissed 24; Excluded 86; Died 77; Members 1922.
B.B. Hamilton, Mod. B.F. Humphrey, Clerk.

The course of business was very much

746

as usual, blended with devotional exercises. Following an address of Dr. Hobart pledges were made for Home Missions amounting to $104.90 with a small collection.

The Committee on Resolutions grouped in one resolution its favorable and commendatory notice of Home and Foreign Missions, the Publication Society, the Bible Union and the General Asso. of this State, and closed by saying; "All these Denominational enterprises demand the hearty support of our entire membership."

They also presented one approving heartily the contemplated centennial movement in the interests of education.

747

And another, urging aid to young men studying for the ministry, precuniarily and also in brotherly confidence and sympathy.

One too, urging the preservation of the Christian Sabbath by a strict example, and also in all methods of appropriate labor and influence from desecration.

Others were in the advocacy of Temperence; and of Bible benevolence.

The session holding over the Sabbath that sacred day was improved by the ministry of the word in the several places of worship in the town and also by Sabbath School and devotional meetings and services.

The Sunday School convention held its Anniversary in connection with the Association.

748

1875. 48 Anniversary
Auburn, Sanga. Co. Ill. Sep. 9, 1875.
For its annual meeting the Association met with the Sugar Creek Church, at Auburn, Thursday, Sep. 9. The session was opened with a sermon by M.C. Clark of Waverly, from John 1:42, "And he brought him to Jesus."

The churches were 21, 11 made no report; Baptisms 153; Rec. by Letter 35; By Experience 14; Restored 6; Dismissed 43; Excluded 15; Died 12; Members 1877.
B.B. Hamilton, Moderator. W.W. Freeman, Clerk.

Measures were introduced to establish missionary work in the destitute sections

749

of the field embraced by the body. A series of seven resolutions were presented by Dr. J. Bulkley, having reference to the proposed centennial work of raising funds for our [The following is crossed out]literary[End crossed out portion] educational institutions.

They were adopted.

Mrs. Mary P. Lemen presented claims of Alwira College.

Dr. Bulkley also urged the claims of the Illinois Bap. Educational Society. Beside the opening sermon others were preached by Drs. Johnson and Bulkley, and by Brn. I. W. Icenburger, C. R. Lathrop and B. B. Hamilton. Big Spring Church received by baptism 32; Carlinville 14; Fidelity 22; Jerseyville 59;

750

Kane 6; Sugar Creek 5; and Gerard 12.

The Sabbath School Convention held its annual meeting with much interest. The Ordained Ministers were 18 and Licentiates 1. The churches of Carrollton and Virden reported over 200 members, and Jerseyville over 300, while Fidelity, Sugar Creek and Winchester each returned over 100.

1876. 49 Anniversary.
Fidelity, Jersey Co., Sep. 7.
The Association met with the Church in Fidelity, Thursday, Sep. 7, 1876, for its annual meeting. After devotional services, the sermon was by E. E. Bayliss, from Mat. 10:29, 30, 31--"Are not

751

two sparrows sold for a farthing?" Etc.

The churches were 21, and 4 made no report. Baptisms 101; Rec'd. by Letter 40; By Experience 7; Restored 3; Dismissed 57; Excluded 20; Died 19; Members 1,929.
B. B. Hamilton, Moderator. W. W. Freeman, Clerk.

The course of Associational work was very much as usual.

Friday was wholly given to the Sunday school Convention.

There were representatives for most of our benevolent organizations present. The following Resolutions were adopted and given the character of By-Laws.

Resolved, That hereafter the subjects of Foreign Missions, Home Missions, Bible and Publication Society and Education be considered on Saturday afternoon.

752

Resolved, That hereafter no collection shall be allowed outside the legitimate work of the Association.

As the session of the Association in 1877 would be the fiftieth anniversary of the body, Rev. B. B. Hamilton was requested to prepare an historical discourse for delivery there.

The death of a minister long a member of the Association, Bro. H. t. Chilton, being reported, Elders B. B. Hamilton and W. W. Freeman were appointed to prepare an obituary notice of him.

Preambles and a series of resolutions adopted aiming at the prosecution of Associational mission work. To use the

753

language employed, presents the necessity for this work: "There is within the bounds of this Association appalling destitution of the Gospel."

Some of the largest additions to churches I will here give. Big Spring received by baptism 11 members; Jerseyville 12; Martin's Prairie 35; Virden 18; Winchester 13.

Ordained ministers belonging to the body were 15,--Licentiates were 4.

The Sunday School Convention held its annual meeting on Friday.

754

Chapter VIII. Edwardsville Association.

No. 1.

In 1841 and 1842 a severe condemnation of dropping members.

755

An historical sketch of the Edwardsville Association.
This Association was the first in the State which was organized wholly on the principle of an active and earnest co-operation with all branches of Benevolent Christian work. It was committed to the cause of Missions, Home and Foreign, and all kindred enterprises at its beginning. It was organized during a meeting of Baptists in Edwardsville commencing Oct. 16, 1830.

757

An historic sketch of the Edwardsville Association.
The Edwardsville Association was organized at a meeting for conference on mutual religious interests, of a company of Ministers and brethren, in Edwardsville. Oct. 16, 1830. Delegates from the three churches of Edwardsville, Rock Spring and Upper Alton, organized the Association. It was formed wholly on the principle of an active and earnest cooperation with all branches of benevolent Christian work. It was, therefore, committed to the cause of Missions, Home and Foreign, and all kindred enterprises at its beginning. It was the first Association in the State that took on entirely a missionary

758

character at its birth, and in this respect is entitled to pre-eminence, as most of the Associations in the State then were openly and avowedly hostile to missions, and to all kindred Christian labors; while the "Friends of Humanity" Associations, the South and North Districts, were in Spirit favorable to missions, yet needed to be led into active cooperation with them, by the example of a neighboring Association, in which the Spirit of Missions became immediately active, and developed itself in Christian plans for labor, and benevolent contributions to aid in executing these plans, and also to aid the older missionary organizations of the Denomination in their work. By its example this Association has been largely successful undoubtedly

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in its influence over the Associations already named, between which territorially it was located, and also in encouraging the organization of other Missionary Associations.

It is a matter of regret that the Minutes of the Annual meetings have not been obtained earlier than that of the session of 1834. The position of this body in the Southern half of the State, leading off from its inception, in the advocacy and defence of Missions, and the Christian activities of the age, amid surrounding opposition, exceedingly censorious and bitter, from those claiming denominational relationship, who ought to have been "fellow helpers to the truth" which they opposed; entitles it to greater historic prominence than most other Associations. It is proposed, therefore, to sketch

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its history.

1834. 5th Anniversary.
This session of the Association was held in Upper Alton, commencing, Friday, July 25, 1834.

The meeting was opened by Hubbel Loomis with a sermon, from 2. Tim.4:2. "Preach the worg."

Six churches were represented by 17 delegates, of whom there were ministers. Only one person had been baptized. The membership reported was 167. The churches were Edwardsville, having 54 members:--Rock Spring, 23;--Upper Alton, 28; --Lower Alton, 22; --Bluffdale, 29; --Piasan, 11. The last named church united at this session.

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Considering the time and the circumstances, the following claims a place here.

"Resolved, That this Association feel much gratification in the steady and rapid progress of the Sabbath School cause; that a school is in operation within the bounds of each church composing this body; and also would affectionately urge upon all the members of the churches, the study and weekly recitation of the Scriptures in Bible
Classes."

Resolutions were passed in favor of Foreign and Home Missions,--the Alton Seminary; --the circulation of tracts;--the encouragement of reliogious periodicals. Miller's Hymn Book was recommended

762

for circulation, as a cheap Baptist Book, well suited to the country.

I insert the following as worthy of universal observance.

"Resolved, That it be urged as a duty upon churches destitute of a constant ministry, to meet every Lord's day for social worship, according to the example and order of the Apostles."

The Lord's Day.
Prayer meeting at sunrise. Preaching at 11 o'clock by Eld. Elijah Dodson,--At 3 p.m. by Eld. George B. Davis; after which a collection of $14 was taken, and the Lord's Supper was administered.

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1835. 6th Anniversary.
The Anniversary was held with the church in Bluffdale, commencing Friday, May 22, 1835. The introductory sermon was by Alvin Bailey, from Habak. 3:2. "O Lord revive thy work."

Seven churches were repressented by 13 delegates, 4 of whom were ministers. The baptisms reported were 12;--whole membership 210. The Carlinville Church was received. Five of the churches reported no minister.

Visiting ministers were G. Bartlett, A. Bailey, Joseph Taylor, Alexander Evans and William Spencer.

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Delegates were present from the Salem; Blue River and North District as corresponding Associations. These were all the Associations in the State in favor of Missions, except the South District and the Saline.

Resolutions were passed in favor of all the general benevolent interests in which Baptists were engages.

The following resolution if here inserted because of its importance.

"Resolved, That we consider the duty of family prayer of vast importance, and rejoice in the belief that it is practised by most of the heads of families in this Association."

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A committee was appointed in each church, to solicit aid for poor ministerial students in Alton Seminary.

On Lord's day, there was a prayer meeting at 9 o' clock; preaching at 11, a second sermon following the first, at this session, a collection of 420 was taken for Foreign Missions, followed by the administration of the Lord's Supper. Another session was held at 4 p.m., and after a confernce followed of great interest, continuing until 8 p.m. whwn the brethren separated. "Thus closed a meeting that will dwell with sweet remembrance in the minds of those who had the happiness to be there." So the record ended.

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1836. 7th Anniversary.
The sixth annual meeting was with the Piasan Church, beginning, Friday, May 20, 1836. E. Roders opened the session with a Sermon from John 17, 15.
"I pray not that thou shouldest take them out of the world," etc.

Twenty delegates took their seats, representing 9 churches, of whom 7 were ordained ministers, and one was a licentiate. Baptisms 13; Rec'd. by Letter 49; Dismissed 20; Excluded 7; Died 2; Members 228.

Woodburn and Shoal Creek Churches were received.
E. Rodgers, Moderator. J. M. Peck, Clerk.

The several objects of Christian Benevolence were considered, approved and recommended to the cooperation of the

767

churches. The Lord's day services were as usual. Prayer meeting,--two sermons,--a collection for the Bureau Mission, for circulating the scriptures, of $29.30 was taken, followed by the observance of the Lord's Supper. At 5 p.m. there was another season of worship and a sermon. The Session of the Association, throughout was one of deep interest, gladdening the hearts of God's people.

1837. 8th Anniversary.
The Association convened with the Edwardsville Church, on Friday, May 26, 1837.

The Session was opened with a sermon,

768

by Elisha Starkweather, from Mat.7.21. "Not every one that saith unto me, Lord, Lord, shall enter into the kingdom of heaven," etc.

Twelve churches were represented by 28 delegates including 7 ordained ministers and one licentiate. Baptisms 12; Rec'd. by Letter 87; Dismissed 49; Excluded 4; Died 5; Members 305.

There were in the churches 13 Ordained ministers, and 4 licentiates. Of these the Clerk in a note said; "One is entirely disabled from infirmity of body; two others are in advanced age, though still doing some good service; two are Bible agents for Illinois and Missouri, to supply the destitute with the scriptures; two are instructors in the College and Seminary; one is a circuit missionary; two are devoted to pastoral charges; two are students in the College; and the others preach and perform much useful labor."
E. Rodgers, Moderator. J. M. Peck, Clerk.

Elders James Lemen, Ezra Fisher and Joel Sweet took seats as visitors brethren. Three new churches were received;--Greenville, Bond Co., Forks of Wood-River and Paddock's Prairie.

The Corresponding Associations were North District, Blue River and Salem. And correspondence with two new Associations was solicited in the Northern part of the State, the Fox River, and the Illinois River.

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The report on Sabbath Schools and Bible Classes thus closed;--"But while we earnestly recommend the Sabbath Schools to the young, we would urge on all the churches the importance of resolving themselves into a Bible class, for their mutual improvement in a knowledge of the Bible."

"Your Committee deeply deplore the time spent on the Lord's day, by many of our churches members in conversation on common place, and every day topics. Instead of the mutual advancement of each other in Biblical knowledge. And especially would we urge you in view of the destitution of

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our churches. How many Sabbaths do the churches spend without any ministers to go before them, and break the bread of life? Now how shall this time be spent? Ot os holy time. Shall it be spent in idleness or visiting? Or, shall it be spent as Christ directs? Jo. 5.39. ‘Search the scriptures, for in them ye think ye have eternal life, and they are they which testify of me.’"
Elijah Dodson, Chairman.

This surely was wise counsel, and especially suited to the then condition of the Churches.

The American and Foreign Bible Society had recently been formed in Philadelphia, and the consideration of its claims occupied the attention of the Association much of its time

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developing a lively interest in its prosperity.

On the Lord's day Sermons were preached by Elders Ebenezer Rodgers and James Lemen, and "a collection of $28 was received for the translation and publishing of the Scriptures in foreign languages."

The Ordained ministers were;--Zadoch Darrow, and J. M. Peck at Rock Spring; Eben. Rodgers, Pastor at Upper Alton, also Hubbel Loomis, President, and W. Leaverett and Lewis Colby, Professors in Shurtleff College, and R. Kimball; Dwight Ives, Pastor at Lower Alton; Amos Dodge, at Piasan; Elisha Starkweather, Elijah Dodson, and Geo. B. Davis, at Woodburn; and Joseph Taylor, at Shoal Creek. Elders Kimball and Davis were agents of the Bible Society.

Licentiates were G. Markland, Caleb Blood and

773

Wm. H. Briggs students at Shurtleff College; and Joshua C. Harvey at Bluffdale.

1838. 9th Anniversary.
The Association met with the Church at Shoal Creek, Clinton Co., May 25, 1838, and the session was opened by a sermon from J. M. Peck, on Gen. 14:24,--"See that ye fall out by the way." Twelve churches were represented. The delegates were 29, of whom 9 were ordained ministers. Baptisms 193; Rec'd. by Letter 126; Restored 4; Dismissed 59; Excluded 6; Died 11; Members 548.
E. Rodgers, Mod. J. M. Peck, Clerk.

Edwardville, Upper Alton, Alton City, Bluffdale, Carlinville and Woodburn Churches had received large additions by baptism. All the churches had thus

774

been increased. The average candidates to a church had been 16, while the highest number in any one church had been 50.

After a Committee's report and several addresses a collection and subscription of $66.75 was taken for the Education Society.

Being requested by the Rock Spring Church, the Association made an expression of its views regarding slavery in the following resolution.

"Whereas we regard the spirit and practice of involuntary and hereditary slavery, as a violation of the principles of liberty, of human rights, and of the Gospel of

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Christ, which requires us to "do unto others as we would have them do unto us;"
Therefore, Resolved, That in our individual and associated capacity, we bear decided testimony against this evil, pray for those who are in bonds, and for those brethren who hold slaves, that they may be directed in the way of their duty, according to the will of God and the principles of humanity; and especially pray that God will devise appropriate means and direct to their application, for the removal of Slavery and all kinds of oppression from our country and the world."

Rev. Thomas W. Haynes, an ordained minister, formerly a Cumberland Presbyterian,

776

and then recently baptized into the Baptist Church at Warsaw, Hancock Co., connected with the Salem Association, having been recommended by the pastor and the brethren of that church, to the opinion and advice of the ministers, and brethren in this Association, whether re-ordination, or what form of recognition is necessary as a Baptist minister. The Association directed the following services of recognition.

On Sabbath morning the recognition of brother Haynes as a Baptist minister took place; With prayer by Elder James Lemen; and an appropriate charge and an expression of fellowship by Eld. J. M. Peck. This was virtually

777

a re-ordination as it should have been. Following this service, on the Lord's day, were two sermons and a subscription and collection for Home Missions of $23.55. Then after a recess two sermons more, and the religious services were ended.

At this session correspondence was opened with the South District, the Saline and the Springfield Associations, constituting, with those in correspondence before, all the Missionary Associations in the State.

1839. 10th Anniversary.
The Rock Spring Church entertained the Association during the meeting of 1839, commencing May 24, 1839, with a sermon by Elijah Dodson, from Mat. 9

778

36-38. "But when he saw the multitude, he was moved with compassion," etc.

Eleven churches were represented. Baptisms 23; Rec'd. by Letter 31; Restored 1; Dismissed 45; Excluded 8; Died 9; Members 518.

Thirteen ordained ministers were also reported, and 6 licensed preachers. Of these, the Clerk, J. M. Peck, thus speaks:
"Of the Ordained Ministers 2 are superannuated, and unable to preach except very occasionally; 2 are engaged as instructors; 3 are agents; one a missionary of the Association; and one superintends the College boarding house. Of the licentiates, one is a teacher; one is a student; one is Sunday School Agent; one is devoted to preaching; and two follow secular businesses and preach frequently." Eight of the churches were without pastors.
E. Rodgers, Moderator. J. M. Peck, Clerk.

779

In the Report on Home Missions it was said;--"There are now more than 100 villages and settlements within the reach of the influence and bounds of this Association, that are destitute of preaching by Baptists, and many of them are seldom visited by other denominations." The plan of uniting the "Western Pioneer" (the Illinois and Missouri paper) with the "Baptist" of Tennessee was approved and commended. By this arrangement the able editorial services of Rev. Messrs. Waller, Howell, and Peck would be had. Resolutions strongly urging in Christians, and especially those of the Association, to wholly consecrate the Lord's day to the service of God, and the promotion of holiness of heart; and also the daily reading in the family the scriptures and the offering of morning and evening prayer were

780

passed. The general subjects of benevolence and Christian action received the earnest consideration of the Association, and also its commendation. The whole session was harmonious, and brought out a deep interest in the subjects which were discussed. The Sabbath was improved in a prayer meeting and four sermons, with a collection of $30.25 for Home Missions. The Church followed the meeting of the Association with a protracted period of worship, in which a revival was enjoyed and meny persons were hopefully converted.

1840. 11th Anniversary.
The Carlinville Church entertained the Association during its Anniversray, commencing May 22, 1840,

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with a sermon from Joseph Taylor, on Luke 22.69."Hereafter shall the Son of Man sit on the right hand of the power of God."

The Church in Hillsboro, Montgomery Co., was received. The churches were 12, two were not represented. Baptisms 109; Rec'd. by Letter 49; Dismissed 23; Excluded 8; Died 15; Members 590.

J. Merriam had become a pastor at Upper Alton, and R. Kellam was at Hillborough,
E. Rodgers, Moderator. J. M. Peck, Clerk.

The ordinary course of business was pursued. The Methodist and Presbyterian houses of worship were kindly tendered to the Association and occupied for preaching. The Rock Spring Church

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reported 22 persons baptized; Upper Alton, 40; Woodburn, 17; and Hillsboro, 13. The Association was now in correspondence with the following Associations; Clear Creek, Saline, South District, North District, Blue River, Springfield, Salem, United, Illinois River, Bloomfield, McLean, Northern, and Colored. These were all the Missionary Associations in the State.

1841. 12th Anniversary.
With the Hillsboro Church the Association met during the Anniversary of 1841, May 21. Amos Dodge preached the Introductory sermon from Nehemiah 6.3 "I am doing a great work." The Bunker Hill Church was received. It was formed in Jan. 1841.

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The churches were 13, Ordained Ministers 14, licentiates five. Baptisms 94; Rec'd. by Letter 41; Restored 2; Dismissed 77; Excluded 20; Died 15; Members 601.
E. Rodgers, Mod. J. M. Peck, Clerk.

Committees were appointed as usual. [The following is crossed out]on the following subjects.[End crossed out portion.] On the Collegge and Ministerial Education--On Foreign and Home Missions, and American and Foreign Bible Society--On Baptist Publications and Periodicals--To arrange, digest and prepare the remaining business. The following is from the Minutes:
"Resolved, To afford opportunity for brethren present to make verbal statements of the state and progress of religion within their respective fields of action. Brethren Rodgers, Peck, Newman, Perry Dodge, Trabue, Davis, Knapp, Liscum,

784

Kellam, Briggs, Dutton, and Chase Spoke.

A Preamble and Resolution were introduced, proposing to corresponding Associations to unite in printing their minutes, together with the Proceedings of our Convention, in one pamphlet, to be distributed in all our Associations and Churches in correspondence in the State."

This subject which is now being agitated in several states, it is seen from the above extract, was under consideration by the brethren of this Association more than thirty years ago. And after its reference to a committee, and then discussed, was unanimously adopted. And yet, as a "plan" seeming so desirable, and after being adopted so unanimously, it has failed of accomplishment for some reason. It has never been brought into operation.[End crossed out portion.]

785

Committees on the various branches of Christian work made their reports. The Educational work at Shurtleff College, has always been prominent in this Association. The following resolution was passed by the Association.

"Resolved, That J. M. Peck be appointed to preach a discourse at the Court house, to morrow at 2 o'clock, P. M., in which the prominent principles of the Baptist denomination and their view of the scriptural organization of churches and of measures for the advancement of the kingdom of Christ be given, with such historical facts as the preacher may deem expedient to sustain his position."

Also this just view of an unwarrantable practice, that has become an alarming innovation, was put on record by the Association.

786

"Resolved,That the practice of "dropping" members of churches is contrary to gospel church discipline, and ought not to be practiced by Baptist churches."

The new pastors were G. B. Perry, Alton City; Geo. B. Davis, Woodburn; and E. J. Palmer, Paddock's Prairie.

On the Lord's day there was preaching in the Lutheran House of Worship:--in the morning by Rev. G. B. Perry; and in the evening by Rev. E. Rodgers. In the afternoon also in the Court-house by Rev. J. M. Peck. A collection of $20 was taken for the Illinois Convention. And $110 subscribed to sustain a Theological Profess. or in Shurtleff College.

1842. 13th Anniversary.
The Association was held with the Church in Alton City opening May 20, 1842, with a sermon by Rev. Zenas B. Newman,

787

from Prov. 11:25. "The liberal soul shall be made fat; and he that watereth shall be watered also himself."

The churches were 13. Baptisms 73; Rec'd. by Letter 31; Restored 2; Dismissed 37; Excluded 22; Died 13; Members 613.

The new pastors were Jos. Lemen, Rock Spring; Adiel Sherwood, Upper Alton; Elijah Dodson, Woodburn; Mt. Gilead, formerly Woodriver, Aaron Trabue; Bunker Hill, W. H. Briggs.
E. Rodgers, Moderator. W. Leverett, Clerk.

The following resolution was adopted:
"Resolved, That this Association are of the opinion that according to the word of God, there are only three ways in which persons can go out of the church on earth, namely, by dismission, by exclusion, and by death, and they consider the "withdrawing",

788

"dropping" a violation of the Gospel rule." New Associations in fellowship and in correspondence were Vandalia, Western, Rock River and Palestine.

Sermons beside the introductory, were preached by I. T. Hilton, of St. Loius; Joel Sweet, G. B. Perry, A. Sherwood, and A. Bailey.

Rev. J. M. Peck, who had been a leading minister in the Association from its formation was removed to Philadephia, by his election to the Secretaryship of the Publication Society.

1843. 14th Anniversary.
The Association convened with the church at Edwardsville, May 26, 1843, and the session was

789

opened with a sermon by G. B. Perry, from Psa. 31:23. "O love the Lord, all ye his saints."

The Providence Church, near Choteau's Island, was received. The churches were 14. Baptisms 83; Rec'd. by Letter 30; Restored 3; Dismissed 61; Excluded 19; Died 4; Members 648.
E. Rodgers, Mod. Wash. Leverett, Clerk.

The ordinary course of business was pursued. It had been customary for the Association to devote an hour on Saturday morning to a prayer meeting. A Minister's and Deacons Quarterly meeting was instituted in the Association, and the first meeting appointed in the Church at Carlinville on Friday before

790

the 5th, Sabbath in the following July. Three sermons were delivered during the Session beside the introductory.

The reports were generally, on benevolent work, long and very much alike year after year. Resolutions are passed that seem to have little effect in securing any increased activity in the duty they recommend, or the cause they are intended to promote.

791

Edwardsville Association.
No. 2.

In 1860 D. W. D. Johnson was appointed to write a history of the Asso.

In 1856 the Asso. condemned the dropping of members.

1844. 15th Anniversary.
The Association met with the church in Woodburn, the session opening May 24, 1844 with a sermon by Prof. Wash. Leverett, from Eph. 6:10,--"Finally, my brethren, be strong in the Lord, and in the power of his might."

The churches were 15, Spanish Needle Prairie Church having been received, 11 were represented. The baptisms were 15; Rec'd. by Letter 33; Dismissed 90; Excluded 20; Restored 1; Died 9; Members 627. The Foreign Mission agent, B. F. Brabrook, and the agent of the Pub. Society, A. B. Harris, were present. The Association appropriately noticed the death of Rev. Amos Dodge, former pastor of Brighton Church. The sympathy of the body was expressed for the bereaved widow and fatherless son. "His humility, piety and usefulness were known through all our churches."

792

The usual committees were appointed. The first Digest of Church letters was in the Minutes this year. Rock Spring Church reported a time of refreshing. Woodburn had finished their house of worship. The Spanish Needle Prairie church was formed from the church in Carliinville in March 1844. The general condition of the churches was not encouraging. Near the closing services W. D. H. Johnson was ordained by the ministers of the meeting.
A. Sherwood, Mod. W. and W. Leverett, Clerks.

793

1845. 16th Anniversary.
The Upper Alton Church entertained the Association in 1845, which commenced its session May 23, and Warren Leverett preached from Jude 3, "Ye should earnestly content for the faith which was once delivered to the Saints." Only 9 churches were represented. Baptisms 4; Rec'd. by Letter 17; By Letter 1; Dismissed 43; Excluded 8; Died 18; Members 424.

The number of deaths was very large, nearly equaling the additions.
E. Rodgers, Mod. W. Leverett, Clerk.

The committee to visit the Hillsboro Church, reported the church in a feeble state, yet hoping for greater prosperity, and wishing to be retained in the Association. The Shoal Creek church has joined the Vandalia Association.

794

This year the General Association of Illinois came into existence, and delegates were appointed to it. Rev. Moses Lemen was appointed a missionary of this Association and the North District jointly, at a salary of $250. The Upper Alton church sent in to the Association the following Query, "If an ordained minister in the Protestant Methodist Church should be received as a member into a regular Baptist Church, would he, by virtue of his former ordination, be recognized as an ordained Minister, in and by the Baptist denomination?"

A committee answered thus. "That in our opinion, under such circumstances as appear in the present case, the candidate should be examined according to the

795

usual custom, and if approved, be publicly acknowledged as a minister of the gospel."

The organization of the General Association was cordially approved by the Association; and also "The Western Star", a paper issued by Rev. Alvan Bailey of Jacksonville; was warmly recommended to the patronage of the denomination and its friends. It was published by request of the General Association. The following is found in the minutes of this year;
"Whereas, It hath pleased the great Head of the church to call from our midst the late amiable and excellent brother, Zenas B. Newman, from his arduous and pious labors on earth to a mansion in heaven--whilst we humbly submit to the dispensations of that God, who is too wise to err, and too good to be unkind; yet we as an Association, are called upon

796

to mourn, in view of the great loss sustained by Shurtleff College, in the removal of one of its Professors; by our churches, in losing one of their faithful and most useful ministers; and by our community, in losing one of its most virtuous, philanthropic and amiable members: Therefore,
Resolved, That we deeply humble ourselves before God in view of our own departure, and that we affectionately regard and sympathize with his bereaved companion and fatherless children."

There were several sermons heard during the session and three on the Lord's day.

The several departments of our Christian work were warmly commended to the liberality of our brethren.

797

1846. 17th Anniversary.
The Association met with the Brighton Church, May 22, 1846. Adial Sherwood opened the session with a sermon from Isa. 55:8, 9, "For my thoughts are not as your thoughts."

Only 9 churches were represented. Baptisms 10; Rec'd. by Letter 10; Dismissed 29; Excluded 5; Died 17; Members 386.
E. Rodgers, Moderator. Wash. Leverett, Clerk.

The Committee appointed to inquire into the condition of churches which had not been represented in the Association for several session made the following report; --

798

"1. Carlinville Church has a brick house in an unfinished condition and is in debt, with no minister to attend them, or a casual supply. There are some five or six male and as many female members, but no church or prayer meetings are kept up. The Spanish Needle Prairie Church, is six miles south, and prospects are favorable towards building up this interest, provided regular preaching shall be had. The Committee recommend that those members about Carlinville join the Spanish Needle Prairie church, and that an effort be made to have preaching in Carlinville, and to sustain prayer meetings as a branch of that church.

"2. Hillsboro, This is an important position and should be provided with preaching. There are several

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members in and around the place, and prospects are favorable toward building up a church.

"3. Greenville, Your committee have less information about the condition of this church. There are several members living in and around Greenville, and means should be provided to aid them by preaching, and to resusitate the church.

"4. Paddock's Prairie church, by deaths and removals has become extinct. Some of its members have joined the church in Edwardsville. The committee see no prospect at present of reviving this church, and recommend, if there are any members left in the settlement, that they be invited to join the most convenient church in this body.

"5. Mount Gilead, on Wood River, from deaths, removals and defections, is extinct as a church. A few

800

scattered sheep may be found, and should be encouraged to join the Upper Alton or Woodburn churches.

"6. Providence church, in the American Bottom and on Chouteau's Island, was dispersed and broken up by the great flood of 1844. A number of members have returned and repaired their farm. In the same vicinity is a church belonging to the Apple Creek Association, who have a good meeting-house, the use of which had been offered for preaching to one of the brethren of this Association.

"To provide for these and other destitute places it is deemed indispensable for the Association to have an itinerant Missionary constantly devoted to the work. Aid can be obtained through the Board of the General

801

Association from the Am. Bap. Home Mission Society, provided the churches and brethren here will contribute their proportion. Your committee recommend the appointment of a standing committee on Missions, to consist of five persons, with instructions to act in the recess of the Association in raising funds, employing a Missionary, and conducting the necessary correspondence. The following resolutions are submitted:
"1. Resolved, that Elder B. Rodgers, A. Sherwood, Mark Pierson, John Clark, and Isaac Long, be a committee on Missions in this body, to obtain funds from the churches and the people, provide a Missionary, supervise his labors, conduct the correspondence, and report their doings to the General Association, and to this body at its next session.

"2. Resolved, That in view of the low State of religion

802

in most of the churches, the diminution of members in the churches, and the destitution of ministers, the churches be invited and urged to observe the first Saturday in September next, as a day of fasting humiliation, and prayer, that God would heal our backslidings, build up the waste places of Zion, and revive his work in the churches.
All which is submitted. J. M. Peck, Chairman."

This long report is given as an historical item, which presents an aspect of religious affairs in the Association very necessary to the obtainment of a correct knowledge of the times and the causes of slow growth in the body. The general course of business was pursued. The Spanish Needle Prairie Church in their letter desired the Association to ordain Luke Dillard, which was done in the usual manner on

803

the Lord's day.

In the afternoon, Rev. J. M. Peck preached, a collection was taken for Home Missions of $11-- and the Lord's supper was celebrated. The Corresponding Letter contained these sentences. "Our present session has furnished very little to encourage us-- Only ten have been baptized during the year, and five of six of the churches are nearly or quite extinct! Most of the others are in a state of apathy and lukewarmness; which might warrant the expectation of God's displeasure. But one minister in our bounds is sustained by the churches so as to illustrate the inspired direction.

They that preach the Gospel should live of the gospel.

804

This state of things calls for humiliation, prayer and repentance."

1847.
The Eighteenth Session of the Association was held with the Rock Spring church, beginning with a sermon by Rev. E. Rodgers, May 21, 1847., from John 17:1. "Father, the hour is come." Ten churches were represented, reporting Baptisms 6; Rec'd. by Letter 18; Dismissed 18; Restored 1; Excluded 14; Died 6; Members 384.
E. Rogers, Moderator. Wash. Leverett, Clerk.

The Missionary Committee appointed to obtain a missionary to labor among the destitute has failed to do so.

805

Another Committee was appointed for the same purpose.

The churches were requested to observe the last day of the next December as a day of fasting, humiliation and prayer for a revival of religion. The Carlinville church, not having reported its condition to the Association for several years until now, was re-admitted to the body. The usual course of business was pursued.

Including the Sabbath there were 9 sermons preached during the meeting.

[The following is crossed out.]The following will give an idea of the scarcity of minsterial labors. "During the past year two churches have enjoyed the constant and undivided labors of a pastor; four, one half of the time; one a quarter of the tiem; and two were destitute."[End crossed out portion.] Rev. A. J. Joslyn from the

806

Northern Section of the State was at this Anniversary.

1848. 19th Anniversary.
With the Bunker Hill church the meeting of 1848 was held. The session was opened, May 26, by J. M. Peck, with a sermon from Acts 15:22, "Then pleased it the Apostles and Elders, with the whole church, to send chosen men," etc.

The Greenville church was received. The churches were 11, and 10 were represented. Baptisms 13; Rec'd. by Letter 47; Dismissed 22; Dropped 12; Excluded 4; Died 5; Members 420.
E. Rodgers, Mod. Warren Leverett, Clerk.

807

Three churches had pastors, and six were supplied by Jas. Lemen, A. Sherwood, E. Rodgers and M. Lemen.

Rev. G. C. Moore, of Tubbermore, Ireland was present, and after preaching, by request gave a brief narrative of the sufferings of the people in Ireland, which was followed by a collection for their relief.

Rev. M. Lemen had been employed as a Missionary of the body nine months at a salary of $250, per annum.

The common course of Committee and their reports was the order of this Anniversary.

808

In this Association for some years there has been great destitution of ministerial labors, which has been frequently considered at the sessions. Some extracts from the Report of the Committee on Destitute Churches will here be given; which may be explanatory of the subject to some extent:
"Of the eleven Churches composing this Association, your committee learn that only one enjoys the constant and undivided labors of a Pastor. Three or four others enjoy the labors of a Pastor half the time; and three have preaching once a month. Two or three Churches are without any regular supply. Many neighborhoods, also, are destitute of preaching.

"Your Committee have inquired--Whence so great destitution of ministerial labor in this Association? It cannot be from a lack of members in our ministerial ranks. We count fifteen

809

ministers in the Association. Nor do we think it is from a lack of ministerial talent. But, is there not a fearful lack of devotioness in both the ministers and Churches? Perhaps the ministers are too fearful in regard to sustaining those who would, were it otherwise, devote themselves to promote their spiritual interests.

"Your committee would present the following recommendations:
"That in view of this subject, both ministers and Churches duly examine and humble themselves before the Lord.

"That the Association, as soon as practicable, employ the suitable Missionary to labor

810

in destitute neighborhoods.

"That the ministers enter into some arrangements to perform gratuitous labor, as they have opportunity, among the destitute Churches and settlements.

"That Quarterly Conferences of the Ministers and other brethren, be held in different sections of the Associational field; on which occasions arrangements may be made for performing such gratuitous labor.
R. Kimball, Ch'man."

Quarterly meetings were agreed upon at the following places, and in the order named: Brighton, Edwardsville, Spanish Needle Prairie and Carlinsville.

811

Besides the three sermons on the Sabbath, there were three others during the session. There were two collections taken during the meeting. One of $11--and the other of $10.65.

At the Anniversary the year before Rev. S. C. James was appointed to write a Circular Letter for this Session. It was received and printed in the Minutes. As it lets in some light upon the condition of the body, which may in some measure explain the improsperous condition of the churches for several years now passed, extracts will be given.

Circular Letter

"Our object in this Circular is to print out some evils which we believe exist in the churches, and to offer a few suggestions by which they may be removed.

812

"The design of Jesus Christ, in forming the Christian Church, was that it should be distinguished from all other communities by its spiritual character. Like the Jewish nation, His church was intended to be a people distinct from the world in principle, in Spirit, and in conduct.

"If this be the design of Christ, how are we fulfilling it, if we confess conform to the world, and have but a name to live? If, instead of firmness and decision, zeal and love, the whole head is sick, and the whole heart is faint, there is reason to fear that there is something seriously wrong. And while we know that many among us, are not chargable with the things which we are about to mention, we also know that they apply so extensively as to man the beauty, and spot the honor, of our

813

beloved Zion.

"1. There is among us an unchristian familiarity with wordly persons--participating in jokes and merriment--conniving at their sins--and avoiding the subject of religion before them.

"2. The indulgence of improper motives in the transaction of business--self-interest regarded to the disadvantage, if not inquiry of others--a reluctance in paying our debts--a concealed, but rooted covetousness.

"3. A distate of Christian duties; such as secret prayer, family worship, reading the scriptures, self-inspection, Christian conversation. How light and unprofitable is our conversation in social circles.

"4. Carelessness of a Christian temper and language. It is a matter of great importance that we manifest the spirit of Christian courtesy and love. To meet a brother

814

who discovers an unkind, distant, and unlovely spirit, sheets up Christian friendship at once; but when we see humility and love combined with sincerity and circumspection, who does not feel the attraction the attraction and the evidence of his piety? It is of such importance that God is glorified for His grace: it renders us a blessing to others, and we derive our full measure of the benefit.

"5. The want of brotherly esteem. If our religion is in a low state it will affect our actions. If we do wrong, we cannot be esteemed, and if not esteemed, not loved. A brother cannot be esteemed who is either indolent, or officious, trifling, overbearing or imprudent. Do churches complain of a want of brotherly love? Do they lament their low condition? Is not this the very cause? But we must not think to effect so

815

great an attainment as that of brotherly love, by a few efforts of unusual devotion or generosity. It is the result of uniform proofs of Christian character--of conduct which convinces, and finds for him a place in the sanctuary of the Christian's love.

"6. Indifference respecting doctrinal truth. The glory of God and our own welfare as churches are concerned in the truths of revelation. But while many have departed from the faith, and have yielded to the doctrines of men, the churches have measurably ceased to feel a solicitude on account of it. Without specifying to what errors we particularly allude, we ask our brethren to awake to inquiry--to search the scripture--to ask for the old paths. Be not contented with any attainment--suffer not yourselves to be defrauded of the rich and vital doctrines of God's word, and let the truth, the

816

whole truth, as it is in Jesus, yield you the strength and consolation it was designed to afford. How can churches grow on food that Apostles would have loathed? Brethren, is not the cause of Christ too dear to let it lie under the reproach of formality and lukewarmness? Let us arise and shake ourselves from the dust. We are aware that no resolutions which we might pass and recommend to the churches, will effect this object. It is a matter which concerns individuals. It is not done in the mass, but in the several parts of the whole--not in periodical revivals, or fits of occasional effort, but in the consistent, uniform, progressive habit of personal piety extending through the membership the firm, unbending purpose of living to God--not suffering ourselves to sink down into death like insensibility, or forgetful stupor, but to be awake

817

to righteousness, and putting on the beautiful garments of salvation.

As churches we need firmness in discipline. We should suffer no consideration to tempt us to retain worldly or unchristian persons in membership. If the approbation of God, and the presence of Jesus Christ are to be enjoyed in our churches, the duty of discipline must be performed."

1849. 20th Anniversary.
The Association convened with the Church in Alton City, on May 25, 1849. Wash. Leverett opened the session with a sermon from John 12:24. "Verily, verily I say unto you, except a corn of wheat fall into the ground and die, it abideth alone; but if it die, it bringeth forth much fruit." The Church at

818

Rattau's Prairie was received.

The churches represented were 9. Baptism 35; Rec'd. by Letter 25; By Experience 6; Dismissed 19; Dropped 2; Excluded 11; Died 3; Members 452.

Providence Church was dropped.
Washington Leverett, Mod. War. Leverett, Clerk.

There were several new pastors, and about the usual number of sermons were preaches before the close of the meeting.

The new plan of Domestic Mission Work, adopted by the General Association at its Anniversary in 1848, was highly approved by this Association, and commended

819

to the churches. A committee reported in favor of some well arranged measures to promote Religious Instruction among the German population of the State.

1850. 21st Anniversary.
The Association was held with the Woodburn Church, commencing, May 24, 1850, with a sermon from Wash. Leverett, from Prov. 4:23 "Keep thy heart with all diligencel; for out of it are the issues of life." Nine churches were represented, Baptism 61; Rec'd. by Letter 9; By Experience 1; Dismissed 20; Excluded 6; Died 4; Members 407.

Rock Spring Church had disbanded.
Washington Leverett, Mod. Elias Hibbard, Clerk.

The very uniform course of business was taken, developing little of special interest. A

820

digest of the Letters from the churches was printed in the Minutes.

From long continued bodily affliction Rev. J. F. Tolman, had resigned as pastor of Upper Alton church, which was then without a pastor. The Digest represents the churches, as a whole, in a low state religiously.

1851. 22nd Anniversary.
The Spanish Needle Prairie Church entertained the Association in 1851. The session commenced May 23, 1851, with a sermon by R. T. Ellis from 2. Cor. 5:1. "For we know that if our earthly house of this tabernacle were dissolved," etc.

The Churches of New Hope and Bethlehem were received;

821

Ten churches were represented. Baptisms 57; Rec. by Letter 38; By experience 9; Restored 4; Dismissed 47; Dropped 1; Excluded 7; Died 7; Members 502
A. Sherwood, Mod. War. Leverett, Clerk.

The course of business had become very uniform. It now followed the general order. The digest from the church letters gives rather a sad view. Edwardsville, Upper Alton, Brighton and Woodburn churches were without pastors. Alton City was the only church having constant ministerial services. Bunker Hill, Spanish Needle Prairie, Greenville, New Hope and Bethlehem churches had preaching a part of the time.

1852. 23rd Anniversary.
The Association met with the Greenville

822

church, May 21, 1852, and its session opened with a sermon by E. Rodgers, from 1. Cor. 1:22-24. "For the Jews require a sign, and the Greeks seek after wisdom; but we preach Christ crucified," etc. Nine churches were represented. Baptisms 15; Rec. by Letter 59; By experience 1; Dismissed 35; Dropped 1; Excluded 5; Died 14; Members 490.
Warren Leverett, Mod. J.H. Hibbard, Clerk.

The American Bible Union was added to the organizations to be yearly under review. Rev. J. N. Tolman had become pastor of Upper Alton church. The letters from the churches were more hopeful in tone.

1853. 24th Anniversary.
The Association convened with the Bunker Hill

823

church, Sep. 23, 1853. The session was opened with a sermon by E. Dodson from Psa. 86:8-10. "Among the gods" etc. The Stannton church, Macoupin Co., and Union Church, Bond Co., were received. Twelve Churches were represented, Baptisms 177; Rec'd. by Letter 93; By Experience 10; By Recommendation 14; Restored 6; Dismissed 58; Dropped 4; Excluded 13; Died 14; Members 737.

The number of baptisms this year was very large. The number reported in the 9 previous years was only 171, being 6 less than in this year. In 1846, the Brighton Church reported 10, which was all that year. The lowest number returned in any year was 4 in 1845.
E. Dodson, Moderator. War. Leverett, Clerk.

824

Rev. J. V. Hopper had been employed as an itinerating Missionary for nine months of the year, whose labors had been very successful. He baptized 87 persons; and witnessed about 130 hopeful conversions, and preached 178 Sermons. His compensations was $25 per month.

A new Missionary Committee of one from each church was appointed, into whose hands the direction or management of the work was committed. The Cause of Christ has been advanced the last year in this body, and the letters from the Churches are of an encouraging character. The delegates were more numerous, and the Session the pleasantest for many years.

825

1854. 25th Anniversary.
The New Hope Church entertained the Association during this session, which opened Sep. 22, 1854, with a sermon by E. Dodson, from Mat. 9.37, 38. "Then saith he unto his disciples, the harvest truly is great," etc. The New Salem Church was received. Thirteen churches were represented. Baptisms 77; Rec'd. by Letter 42; By Experience 4; Restored 3; Dismissed 46; Excluded 34; Dropped 3; Died 16; Members 775.
Elijah Dodson, Mod. War. Leverett, Clerk.

826

A Committee on Obituaries reported the death of three ministers in the Association,--Brn. Ebenezer Rodgers, and Robert F. Ellis and Henry Hensberger. See biographical part of this work.

Rev. J. V. Hopper labored as itinerating missionary four months of the year with good success.

Rev. J. A. Smith, Rev. J. E. Moore and Rev. H. T. Chilton preached on the Sabbath. Two collections were taken amounting to $32.50.

1855. 26th Anniversary.
The Association met with the Brighton Church, Macoupin Co., in 1855, the session beginning Sep. 21. The opening Sermon was by Justus Bulkley, from 1.Thess. 3.8. "For now we live, if ye stand fast in the Lord." There were fourteen

827

churches in the Association, twelve of which were represented. Baptisms 92; Rec'd. by Letter 28; By Experience 7; Restored 2; Dismissed 50; Dropped 9; Excluded 24; Died 11; Members 827.
E. Dodson, Mod. War. Leverett, Clerk.

The Association protested against the plan of operations adopted by the General Association the year before, in locating its Board at Chicago; and also urged that its Board meetings should be held in different parts of the State, rather than fixed at one point. It also declined cooperation with it under the then existing arrangements. Rev. J. V. Hopper had been employed, six months, as the itinerant Missionary of the Association, at $30 per month. Sermons preached 114; hopeful conversions 55; had baptized 33; received into the churches 48; Visited 97 families; and traveled 685 miles.

828

The formation of a Ministerial Quarterly meeting was recommended by the Association. At the close of the session such an organization was formed by the ministers. Similar organizations had existed several times before, but were soon allowed to become extinct. The Digest from the Church letters presented them as in an encouraging condition.

1856. 27th Anniversary.
The Association convened with the Church in Woodburn, Sep. 25, 1856. John M. Peck

829

preached from Gal. 6:9. "And let us not be weary in well doing and for in due season we shall reap is we faint not." The Church in Litchfield, Montgomery Co., was received. The church at Edwardsville had become extinct. That and the Rock Spring Church were two of the three that organized the Association in 1830, and both had ceased to exist. Fourteen churches made reports. Baptisms 59; Rec'd. by Letter 86; By Experience 2; Dismissed 66; Dropped 13; Excluded 15; Died 11; Members 868.
R. R. Coon, Mod. J. E. Moore, Clerk.

Nearly all the churches had pastors. The Association had ceased to appoint committees on nearly every organization among us for Christian work, and had substituted a Committee on the Business of the Session. The Carlinville

830

Church was dismissed, on its request, to join the Carrollton Association.

The Committee on the Business of this Session, reported among others, this Resolution which was adopted:
"Resolved, That this Association do not approve the course pursued by some of the churches of dropping members; and would earnestly recommend that members removing from the vicinity of one church to that of another, take letters of dismission and recommendation, and place themselves under the watch-care of the brethren with whom they live." Isaac Woodburry was the new Pastor at Upper Alton. A new movement--an Executive Board on Itinerant Missions was appointed of one or more from each Church.

831

1857. 28th Anniversary.
The Association was held with the Bethlehem Church, at Coop's Creek, Macoupin Co., commencing, September 25, 1857, by a sermon from Rev. W. D. H. Johnson, on 1.Cor. 3:23. "Ye are Christ's, and Christ is God's." The Marine Prairie Church, Madison Co., and Walnut Grove Church, Bond Co., were received. Fifteen churches were represented, Baptisms 21; Rec'd. by Letter 56; By Experience 8; Restored 1; Dismissed 78; Excluded 20; Died 18; Members 821.
J. V. Hopper, Mod. W. D. H. Johnson, Clerk.

The Board of Missions had failed to do anything. A new Committee of seven was appointed.

832

Woodburn Church was dismissed on its request to join the Carrollton Association. There was nothing of special interest in the Digest of Letters. Rev. D. Read had become pastor at Upper Alton.

1858. 29th Anniversary.
With the Litchfield Church the Association convened, Sep. 24, 1858. The Sermon was preached by Rev. R. R. Coon from 2. Cor. 5:13. "For whether we be beside ourselves, it is to God, or whether we be sober, it is for your cause." The Church at Nokonn's, Montgomery Co., was received. Fourteen churches were represented, Baptisms 122; Rec'd. by Letter 55; by Experience 12; Restored 4; Dismissed 32; Excluded 12; Died 15; Members 823.
Dan. Reed, Mod. W. W. Freeman, Clerk.

Every Church had preaching the whole or a part of the time.

833

The Session was one of ordinary interest, enjoying about the usual amount of preaching.

1859. 30th Anniversary.
The Association was held with the church in Greenville, Band Co. beginning, Sep. 23, 1859, with a sermon by J. V. Hopper, from 14:7, 8. "For none of us liveth to himself," etc. The Butler church, Montgomery Co., was received. Thirteen churches were represented, Baptisms 87; Rec. by Letter 50; By Experience 9; Restored 3; Dismissed 92; Excluded 17; Died 11; Members 855.
D. Reed, Mod. T.S. Lowe, Clerk.

The Bethlehem church letter reported the death of Eld. E. Dodson, where upon the Association paused to hear the remarks of brethren and to join in prayer, led by Rev. N.N. Wood for the God of grace to sanctify the afflictive dispensation to all

834

with whom he had been so long associated in labors, and to his bereaved family. Afterward Dr. Wood presented the following, which was passed;

"Whereas, during the year, God has, in his inscrutable providence, removed by death, in the vigor of his manhood, and in the full measure of his usefulness, The Rev. Elijah Dodson, late Pastor of the Baptist church in Belleville, and more recently of the Bethel Baptist church; therefore--
"Resolved, That in this said dispensation of Divine Providence, we recognize the chastening hand of Sovereign Father, and bow with humble submission to the doings of his inscrutable wisdom, cherishing the desire that the solemn lessons that this providence brings

835

may quicken us in duty and activity in the Master's service.

"Resolved, That we are deeply sensible of the great loss this Association and the cause of Christ throughout this region, has suffered in the death of Bro. Dodson; and that we cherish a grateful sense of his active and useful labors, commencing with an early period of our religious movements, and extending over a considerable portion of the State, and contributing largely to the present prosperity of our churches and religious enterprises in Illinois.

"Resoved,That while we deeply mourn our own loss, we tender our earnest sympathies to the afflicted family and friends of the deceased, praying that God's grace may minister abundant

836

comfort to the sorrows of their present bereavement."

Mr. Dodson was a very devoted, efficient laborious and useful minister; and though converted under the ministry of the excentric and grossly heretical, Daniel Parker, in Crawford Co., and baptized by him into the church which he served in 1822 or 3; yet he rose superior to Parker's influence, rejecting both his malignant opposition to missions, and also his absurd and God dishonoring "two seed doctrine".

Rev. Mr. Foulon, Pastor of a French Baptist church, at Sugar Creek, was present, and after addressing the Association the following resolution was passed;

"Resolved, that Bro. Foulon, as a representative

837

of the French Baptist church, at Sugar Creek, be encouraged by this Association to visit throughout this region and solicit subscriptions, for the erection of their chapel."

Rev. H. Samson had been employed a part of the year as an itinerating missionary. The ministers present occupied the pulpits of the Baptist, Methodist and the Presbyterian churches on the Sabbath. Rev. N.N. Wood was Pastor at Alton City; and Rev T.S. Lowe at Brighton. Some of the churches had enjoyed revivals.

1860. 31st Anniversary.
The New Hope church at Lamb's Point, Madison Co., entertained the Association in its meeting of 1860,

838

commencing Sep. 21, with a sermon by Rev. William B. Smith from Eph. 3:10 "The whole family in heaven and earth." Twelve churches were represented, Baptisms 58; Rec. by Letter 37; by Experience 8; restored 3; Dismissed 36; Excluded 26; Died 10; Members 865. New Salem church was disbanded.
W.D.H. Johnson, Mod. War. Leverett, Clerk.

Upper Alton church reported its benevolent contributions to have been $1,318.20--the Greenville church its to have been $116.00--And New Hope church its as having been $200.00.

The first Monday in January was recommended to the churches to be observed as a day of fasting and prayer for the outpouring of the

839

Holy Spirit upon the churches. Also to observe the last Thursday in February as a day of prayer for Colleges and other seminaries of learning.

The House of worship of the Alton City church had been burned in the previous March.
D.W.H. Johnson was appointed to prepare as soon as practicable a history of this Association.

840

1861. 32nd Anniversary.
The Association was held with the Upper Alton church, beginning with a sermon, Sep. 20, 1861, by Rev. Melvin Jameson, from 2. Cor. 11:3 "But I fear, lest by any means," etc.

Eleven churches were represented. Baptism 26; Rec. by Letter 43; Dismissed 44; Excluded 11; Death 14; Members 841.
D. Read, Mod. Warren Leverett, Clerk

The following query was in the letter of the Bethlehem church "Query--When a member removes out of the knowledge of the church, and previous to that act no unchristian conduct can be charged against him, what course ought the church

841

to pursue with him?"

To this the Association replied;
"Resolved, That we recommend to the churches of this Association to adopt a rule requiring members who remove from their bounds, to take letters, and unite themselves with other Baptist churches, if possible; and if not, to report themselves by letter to their churches within one year; and declaring that a failure to comply with this rule shall be deemed a violation of Covenant obligations, and shall subject such persons to discipline."

The following resolution in regard to the great Slavery Rebellion then seeking the overthrow of the government was adopted by the Association.

842

"Resolved, That in the present distressed condition of our beloved country, we see reason for deep humiliation; that although believing to the fullest extent in the justice of our cause, and rallying to the support of our National Government, we yet cannot feel ourselves sinless in the sight of God, nor expect to succeed without His continued assistance; and therefore that we recommend to all the churches of this Association a most reverent observance of the day appointed as a National Fast. ‘Let man and beast be covered with Sackcloth, and cry mightily unto God; yea, let them turn every one from his evil way, and from the violence that is in his hands.’"

843

A Circular Letter was printed in the Minutes on "The duty of sustaining Zion's interests, in Troublous Times." It was written by Rev. W. B. Smith of Upper Alton.

844

Edwardsville Association
No. 3

845

1862. 33rd Anniversary
This session was held with the Marine Prairie church, opening Sep. 26, 1862, with devotional services. The preachers being absent who were appointed to preach, the sermon was dispensed with ten churches were represented. The Butler Church was dropped. Baptisms 41; Rec. by Letter 20; By Experience 3; Dismissed 28; Excluded 10; died 12; Members 738.
Wash. Leverett, Mod. B.M. Mills, Clerk.

The letter from the Upper Alton church contained a request that the Association would organize as a council and examine A.J. Delano and Adison L. Cole, and if it is thought advisable ordain them as ministers of Christ.

846

The Association as requested aided the church by organizing as a special council. The candidates were examined on Saturday, and giving satisfaction to the council a to their fitness for the ministry, were ordained on the following Lord's day.

[The following is crossed out.]Resolved, That we now resolve ourselves into a council for that purpose."

Rev. M. Jameson was elected Moderator, and B.H. Mills, Clerk. After the examination as usual, the Council by a unanimous vote expressed themselves satisfied, and decided that the Ordination services should be on the following Sabbath.[End crossed out portion.]

Rev. J.V. Hopper had been employed only a small part of the year as an

847

itinerant missionary. Destitute churches were advised to maintain stated meetings, and also as far as possible the ordinances of the Sanctuary. The importance of sustaining a Baptist church at Edwardsville was urged, as it was the Country Seat of Madison Co.; and that each minister in the Association should spend at least one Lord's day gratuitously with the church there during the coming Associational year. In regard to the great rebellion then existing the following was adopted:
"Resolved, That we regard the maintenance of our National Government an object of so much importance, as to justify the measures already adopted, and even more vigorous, if they be necessary, to complete the overthrow of the present

848

rebellion; and that to this end we earnestly recommend, that special prayer be offered for the President of the U.S. and his Cabinet, that they may be enabled to meet the fearful responsibilities now resting upon them; for our officers and men upon the field, that they may be shielded in the hour of battle, and particularly for our own brethren of this Association, that they may be soon restored to their homes and churches."

849

On the Lord's day there was in the morning, an interesting Sabbath School meeting, the ordination services in the forenoon, and in the evening a sermon.

The digest of Letters furnished the following facts. Upper Alton church finding themselves unable to support a Pastor, Mr. Smith resigned. One-eighth of their resident members were in the army. About sixty of their members, including twelve volunteers, were absent. Rev. W.W. Freeman of the Spanish Needle church, and several of the most efficient members of the Litchfield church were in the Army. Edwardsville church had been re-organized. The members numbered only ten, and were poor in worldly goods.

850

1863. 34th Anniversary.
With the Litchfield church the Association met, Sep. 25, 1863, the session was opened with a sermon by D.P. French, form Heb. 10:23 "Let us hold fast the profession of our faith without wavering."

Ten churches were represented. Baptisms 22; Rec. by Letter 15; By Experience 6; Dismissed 28; Excluded 16; Died 14; Members 719.
J. V. Hopper, Moderator. B. H. Mills, Clerk.

Where names do not indicate post offices, they will be given New Hope church, Lamb's Point P.O.; Bethlehem church, Bunker Hill, P.O.; Spanish Needle, Carlinville, P.O.; Marine Prairie, Marine P.O.; Union, New Douglas P.O. A brief but good Circular Letter, by Rev. M. Jameson

851

was in the minutes on the evils of ministers being obliged to entangle themselves with the things of this world. Rev. John Mize, pastor at Troy, was employed as a missionary to preach one sermon each Lord's day at Edwardsville. Correspondence with the Rangoon Burmese Baptist Association opened. Rev. S. M. Osgood presented a copy of the minutes of that body, and requested that a correspondence with it should be opened. It consisted of five churches, with a membership of 294, and 97 were added by baptism during the year. The minutes presented were those of the Third Anniversary.

The destitute churches were urged to maintain regular meetings of some kind, upon every Lord's day, without an entire dependence upon the services of ordained ministers.

852

Among others, the following resolutions were passed.
"Resolved, That in common with our sister churches, we mourn the distracted condition of our beloved country, and the consequent absence of many loved brethren from our annual gatherings; that we sympathize with these brethren in their privations and distresses; that our purpose is unwavering to support the government; that we earnestly desire the suppression of the slave-holder's rebellion, and the removal of its evident cause; and that we will pray for, and support all proper means having this object in view."

"Resolved, That we recommend to the churches having members in the Army, frequent correspondence with them, giving them items of information in regard to

853

to the church at home, and words of Christian counsel and encouragement; urging them in return to give a sketch of their religions experience and such items of intelligence in religions affairs, as they think will be of interest to their friends at home; and further, we recommend that religious periodicals be sent frequently to such absent members."

"On motion the Association spent a season in prayer led by Bro. Read, for our country, and our members in the army."

The following also was passed;
"Whereas; The result of the present war, waged to suppress an unholy rebellion, in the providence of God will probably give freedom to four millions of our fellow men, long held in cruel bondage, and

854

"Whereas; our denomination in the loyal Sates, is now enjoying unexampled pecuniary prosperity; relieving churches and individuals from heavy embarrassments, and placing them in a position to do large things for God; Therefore,
"Resolved; That among the freedmen of the South, is opening a most promising field for Christian effort, and presents strong claims on all lovers of the Redeemer's kingdom."

1864. 35th Anniversary.
The Association convened with the Alton church, for the session of 1864, Sep. 23, and was opened with a sermon by Dr. D. Read, from 1. Tim. 4:7 "But refuse profane and old wives' fables, and exercise thyself rather unto godliness."

The Bunker Hill and Woodburn churches

855

returned to this Association from the Carrollton.

Ten churches were represented. Baptisms 100; Rec. by Letter 49; By Experience 1; Excluded 14; Dismissed 29; died 8; members 781. Four of the churches, Litchfield, Stannton, Bunker Hill, and Marine Prairie had paid the indebtedness on their houses of worship.
J. Bulkley, Moderator. B.H. Mills, Clerk.

The minutes had a searching Circular Letter on self examination, and proving each himself to be in the faith, written by Rev. D. P. French. Eleven of the churches were having regular Pastors, and preaching all the time, or preaching a part of the time. Arrangements were made for more than a usual number of sermons.

1865. 36th Anniversary.
Bunker Hill church entertained the Association which concerned with them

856

Sep. 22, 1865. J. Bulkley opened the session with a sermon from Psa. 137:5,6. "If I forget thee, O Jerusalem, let my right hand forget her cunning." etc.

Thirteen churches were present by delegates. Baptisms 55; Rec. by Letter 52; By Experience 9; Dismissed 45; Excluded 5; Died 18; Members 841. The Edwardsville church was received; and the Union church had ceased to exist.

To Sabbath Schools was given the first evening of the Association.

Among others the following resolution

857

was passed.

"Resolved, That we rejoice in the restoration of a righteous peace to our preservation; and that we accept the responsibilities of our new situation, especially with reference to the utter eradication of slavery and the elevation of the freedmen, with a firm purpose to discharge those responsibilities in the fear of God."

1866. 37th Anniversary.
The Association was held with the Bunker Hill church, beginning Oct. 13, 1866, with a

858

sermon by M. Jameson, from John 4:12-14. "Art thou greater than our father Jacob?" etc. The Nilwood church was received. Twelve churches were represented. Baptisms 94; Rec. by Letter 67; By Experience 4; Restored 3; Dismissed 51; Excluded 13; Died 17; Members 921.
Wash. Leverett, Moderator. B. H. Mills, Clerk.

Rev. E. P. Scott, Missionary to Assam was present. The Association took its usual course in business.

At its previous session it was arranged to have historical sketches of the churches in the Association take the place of Circular Letters, beginning with the oldest church. That of Upper Alton was presented and read, when the Association directed that it be printed in the minutes. On Lord's day morning at 9 o'clock there was a Sabbath School meeting,

859

which was addressed by the missionary Rev. R.P. Scott, and others. In the afternoon he addressed the people, holding their fixed attention for nearly two hours, which giving an inside view of Missionary life and labor, and all left the house with a clearer view of the great work, and self-sacrificing devotion of our Missionaries. A collection was taken for Foreign Missions of $63.00. The Nilwood church was organized in Oct. 1865 with twelve members. It is Macoupin Co.

1867. 38th Anniversary.
The Brighton church in Macoupin Co., welcomed the Association to their hospitalities during the session of 1867 which with a prayer meeting, followed by a sermon by Prof. E. C. Mitchell, from 2. Tim. 2:3. "Thou therefore endure

860

hardness, as a good soldier of Jesus Christ." The church at Shipman Macoupin Co., was received. Thirteen churches were represented. Baptisms 71; Rec. by Letter 89; By Experience 8; Dismissed 101; Excluded 14; Died; Members 945.
E.C. Mitchell, Moderator. M. Jameson, Clerk.

Benevolent contributions reported were $1764.29 they were mostly from the Upper Alton and Alton churches.

Resolutions were passed favoring the several forms of Christian work. The clerk have a synopsis of the church letters, which answered the purpose of a Digest. There were some things encouraging, but as a whole nothing of marked interest. Except the Upper Alton, and the Alton churches, there were no churches having 100 members. Two had over 90; two over 60; One 50; and the remainder all below 40. The following resolution was passed,

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the sentiments of which, demand the serious consideration of the members of the Association.
"Resolved, That the cultivation of the field within our own bounds belongs peculiarly to us as an Association, and that, in view of the great destitution, increased efforts should be made to supply houses of worship, and the preaching of the word."

The minutes say, "In considering the resolution upon Sabbath Schools, much stress was laid upon the importance of not allowing attendance at the school to excuse children from the regular services of the sanctuary. Parents were charged not to be negligent in this particular. Some arrangement should also be made to secure the attendance of children whose parents are not church members."

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In the consideration of the resolution on the cultivation of the field within the bounds of the Association, and a care for the feeble churches the minutes say, "It was thought that with so many ordained ministers and licentiates among us--perhaps more than in any other association in the State we ought to be able to supply all the accessable churches with preaching, until they become strong enough to support pastors."

A history of the church at Alton was directed to be printed in the minutes.

The following are the names of ordained ministers with their P.O. address.
O.L. Barlow, Up. Alton; Luke Dillard, Dorchester; J. Bulkley, D.D. Up. Alton; C.T. Floyd, Up. Alton; H. Daniels, Up. Alton; Robert Gibson, Up. Alton; A.J. Delano, Bunker Hill; T.W. Greene, Litchfield;

863

R.G. Hall, Greenville; W.M. Leggett, Up. Alton; H.C. Hazen, Up. Alton; Wash. Leverett, Up. Alton; Fred. Hill, Up. Alton; Hubbel Loomis, Up. Alton; J. V. Hopper, Bunker Hill; J. Merriam, Greenville; Chas. Howard, Up. Alton; E. C. Mitchell, Up. Alton; T. M. Ind, Litchfield; J.E. Moore, Woodburn; John E. Ingham, Up. Alton; R. E. Pattison, D.D. Up. Alton; Melvin Jameson, Alton; A.C. Rafferty, Carlinville; W.D.H. Johnson, Greenville; D. Read, L. L. D. Up. Alton; Edward Jones, Litchfield; W. J. Roseberry, Edwardsville; A. Knapp, Brighton; George Silver Bunker Hill; J.B. White, Greenville.

To these may be added four licentiates. Several of the ordained ministers were students; and several others professors in the College and Theological Seminary.

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1868. 39th Anniversary.
The Associational assemblage for 1868 was with the Greenville church, Bond Co., Oct. 9. Rev. A.J. Delano preached the introductory sermon from John 18:36, "My kingdom is not of this world." Eleven churches were represented. Baptisms 126; Rec. by Letter 74; Experience 22; Dismissed 64; Excluded 14; Died 12; Members 1007.
J.V. Hopper, Moderator. T.W. Greene, Clerk.

Rev. M. Jameson in behalf of the Committee appointed last year, reported an order of business, which assigned to several subjects definite and specified time, extending through the session. Rev. M. Jameson, Pastor at Alton, now a foreign Missionary, was clearly entitled to the

865

honor of being the greatest personal worker, as a pastor, in the Association. He had visited during the year five of the feeble churches of the body and arranged to visit another, the New Hope Church, when he learned that it had become extinct. And he also visited two other places in the bounds of the organization, but where there were no churches belonging to it. In this work eleven meetings were held and nine sermons preached and about five hundred miles traveled.

A resolution was passed requesting the ministers of the body, to engage in similar labors to those performed by Pastor Jameson, in the churches nearest to them. The History of the Greenville church was presented, read, and ordered to be printed in the minutes. The ministers present

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occupied the pulpits of four houses of worship on the Lord's day.

1869. 40th Anniversary.
The Litchfield Church entertained the Association during the session, which began Oct., 8, 1869. A prayer meeting was followed by a sermon, from J. Bulkley, D. D. on Solomon's Song 1:7, 8. "Tell me, O thou whom my soul loveth," etc.

The Milton Church in Madison was received. Fifteen churches were represented. Baptisms 95; Rec'd. by Letter 72; By Experience 2; Dismissed 76; Excluded 14; Died 16; Members 1117.
J. V. Hopper, Moderator. J. M. Stifler, Clerk.

The churches most favored additions by baptism were Stanton, Spanish Needle, Litchfield and Alton. The Shipman church had a meeting-house approaching

867

completion, when it was destroyed by a tornado, May 28, 1869. Though left in debt, they made arrangements to rebuild. Friday evening was devoted to the interests of the Sabbath schools. The History of the Litchfield Church was read and assigned a place in the minutes. The order of business was much in the same form as in the session the previous year. A committee to mature some plan for the Association to more effectually aid feeble churches in building meeting houses was appointed. And in due time made the following Report:
"Resolved, That this Association, to aid in feeble churches in erecting houses of worship, attempt the raising of a church building fund equal to the sum of one dollar for each resident member of our churches annually.

868

"Resolved, That a Church Extension Committee of six be appointed, three of whom shall be a quorum, and all of whom shall be members in good standing in our churches, to be distributed into three classes, one of which classes shall be elected each year.

"Resolved, That this Committee shall have power to collect and distribute the Fund; and shall report to this Body annually on the following principles:
"1. The sum granted to any church shall be loaned without interest for not over five years, to be then refunded, unless this Association shall otherwise direct.
"2. The sum granted to any church shall

869

not exceed 50 per cent of the amount actually expended by said church in erecting their house of worship, and shall not be paid until said house is enclosed.
"3. No money shall be loaned to any church not belonging to this Association.
"5. The deeds of churches aided shall be drawn in such a manner as to perpetuate the property to the denomination." The report was adopted and a Board elected.

Beginning with the session a year ago, the Association has had before it in its order of business certain questions which relate to church growth, and also to general Christian work, on which discussions have been usefully employed.

The Association voted to have the sermon of Dr. Bulkley, at the opening of the session printed,

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and appointed a committee to carry out their purpose. The death of Rev. Wm. J. Roseberry, pastor at Edwardsville was thus noticed:
"Voted, The Bro. Hopper be appointed to prepare a notice of Bro. Roseberry's death, to be printed in the Minutes." The following was inserted:
"Whereas, Our Heavenly Father in the mysterious dispensation of his Divine Providence has removed from our midst by death our brother and fellow laborer in the Gospel, Rev. Wm. J. Roseberry, therefore,
"Resolved, That we humbly bow to the will of our God and Father in this bereavement, fully believing that out loss is Bro. Roseberry's gain. By his death we are admonished to be ready at all times for the summons which may

871

call us hence."

A sketch of this brother will be found in this column among the Obituaries.

1870. 41st Anniversary.
The Association was held with the Nilwood Church, in Macoupin Co., opening Oct. 7, 1870, with a sermon by Rev. N. M. Wood, D. D. from John 8:3, "And the scribes and Pharisees brought unto him a woman," etc.

The churches represented were thirteen. Baptism 133; Rec'd. by Letter 61; By Experience 9; Dismissed 99; Excluded 35; Died 14; Members 1113.
J. Bulkley, Moderator. J. M. Stifler, Clerk.

Several of the churches have had refreshing revivals. They were Alton, Upper Alton, Brighton, Bunker Hill, Greenville and Nilwood. The History of the Woodburn church was read, and accepted for printing. An interesting letter,

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addressed to the Association, from Rev. M. Jameson was read by Rev. N. Butler. Mr. Jameson, was ten years the pastor at Alton, and was then a missionary in Bassieu, Burmah. The Church Edifice Committee, organized at the last session made their report. $425.80 had been raised, and $261.30 had been loaned to the church in Nokomis, on the terms established a year before. Some changes were made in the plan. A Sabbath School Convention was formed to be held in connection with the Association. Dr. Bulkley was requested to prepare an article on Systematic Benevolence to be inserted in the Minutes. The letters from the churches were generally of an encouraging and hopeful character.

The following is the article prepared by

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Dr. Bulkley by request of the Association.

"Our gifts to the cause of Christ.
To reach the Bible Standard, should be:
1. Cheerful. Exod. 25:2. "Of every man that giveth it willingly, with his heart, shall ye take my offering." See also, 1. Chron. 29:6, 9, 14, 17. 2. Cor. 9:7.
2. Beautiful. Deut. 15:7,8,9, and 10. Also 36:5, 6. 2. Cor. 8:7 and 9:6.
3. Systematic. Under the Mosaic Dispensation thithes were enjoined. Three are mentioned--See Num. 18:21, 24. Deut. 14:22, 23, 24. Deut. 14:28, 29. The Apostle urged system, 1. Cor. 16:1, 2.
4. Accompanied with prayer--Acts 10:2,4,5.
5. Of the best. Num. 18:29, 30. Prov. 3:9, 10. Mat. 1:8.
6. Should recognize the cause of God first.

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Exod. 23:19. 1. Kings 17:13. Mat. 6:33.
7. Should reach the point of self-denial--Mat. 16:24,25. Mark 12:41,44. 2. Cor. 8:2,3,4.

The practice of alms-giving is urged.
1. By the example of Christ--See 2. Cor. 8:9.
2. By the displeasure of God towards the covetous--See history Achau, Josh. 7th Chapter; history of Gehazi, 2. Kings, 5 Chap.; of Avanius and Saphira, Acts 5.
See also Hosea 2:8, 9; and Haggai 1.; Mat. 10:37; Eph. 5:5; and 1st John 3:17.
3. By promises of special blessings--Psa. 41:1,2,3,; Isa. 58:10, Luke 6:38 and 11:41, and 12:33; Deut. 15:20; Prov. 11:24, 25; Isa. 58:11, 12.

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1871. 42nd Anniversary.
Nokomis, Ill. Friday, Oct. 6, 1871.
The Association met with the Nokomis Church, and the session was opened, Oct. 6., with a sermon by N. Butler of Alton, from 1 Peter 4:12. "Beloved, think it not strange concerning the fiery trial which is to try you," etc. The churches were 12. Rec'd. by Baptism 32; By Letter 38; By Experience 9; Dismissed 71; Excluded 17; Died 13; Members 1058.

For several years the Clerk has given an abstract of the letters instead of a Digest, as one of the first items in the Minutes.

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H. C. Hazen, Moderator. J. M. Stifler, Clerk.

The church at Morrisville was received. Spanish Needle church dropped.

Committees were appointed, and the business of the body took its customary course.

The Sunday School Association presented no business and seemed to have been given up.

The Associational Mission work having failed, a Committee was appointed to report a plan to revive this work, as there was great destitution religiously, prevailing, as was confessed by all. But no plan will amount to anything without being thoroughly worked out.

There were four sermons preached during the session, beside the one at the opening.

On the Lord's day there was preaching in the

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Baptist, Lutheran, and Presbyterian Churches by Ministers of the Association. Sermons on the Sabbath were six. There was more than usual time given to devotional exercises.

1872. 43rd Anniversary.
Upper Alton, Ill. Oct. 11, 1872.
The Upper Alton Church entertained the Association during its session, which was opened, Friday, Oct. 11, with a sermon by J. M. Stifler, from John 16:13, "How be it when he, the Spirit of truth is come, he shall guide you into all truth:" etc.

The Pleasant Grove Church, Christian Co., was received. The churches reporting were 12;--The Milton Church was dropped, but without any notice of the fact in the minutes. Each church reported having a pastor. Ordained Ministers in the Association 22. A. H. Petty serves two churches as pastor, leaving in the body eleven ministers not pastors.

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Rec'd. by Baptism 84; By Letter 46; By Experience 25; Dismissed 60; Excluded 8; Dropped 51; Died 2; Members 1088.
H. C. Hazen, Moderator. J. M. Stifler, Clerk.

Benevolent contributions reported by the churches 41,251.13. Collection at the Association $21. Contributions reported from the Sabbath Schools $411.32.

A Committee was appointed to confer with a similar committee from the Carrolton and Macoupin Associations in reference to the adjustment of Associational bounds.

Forty-one days of missionary work was reported by the Executive Committee.

The church edifice enterprise as an Association work was abandoned.

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The following was unanimously adopted:
"Resolved, That in the judgement of this body, the time has come when all evangelical Baptists embraced within our territory, should labor to become one in sympathy, I love, in organization and in effort, as we are already one in faith and practice. We therefore desire to place on record, our high appreciation of the evangelical piety, the zeal and energy, the correctness in doctrine and practice of the Apple Creek and Macoupin Associations of United Baptists, and we wish to express our most earnest desire that the kindest feeling should be cultivated and exhibited, by all our membership, looking to and praying for the time, we hope not far distant, when we shall all be in one harmonious and efficient body, presenting an unbroken front to all errorists and enemies of the truth in Jesus."

880

1873. 44th Anniversary.
The Association met with the Church in Alton Oct. 10, 1873, and the session was commenced with a sermon by M. D. Brevan, of Greenville, from Mat.17:8, "Jesus only."

The churches were 18, but 6 were not represented. Baptisms 44; Rec'd. by Letter 54; By Experience 17; Dismissed 63; Excluded 16; Died 17; Members 1133.
H. C. Hazen, Moderator. J. M. Stifler, Clerk.

An interesting letter, addressed to the Association from Rev. M. Jameson, for several years a successful pastor in Alton, but then a missionary in Basseiu, Burmah was read, and ordered printed in the Minutes.

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The Committee appointed the year before to confer with similar committees from the Carrollton and Macoupin Associations, in reference to the adjustment of Associational bounds reported, that they had failed, after repeated efforts to accomplish the desired effect.

Voted, That the following summary of their work be printed in the minutes:
Your committee appointed to confer with similar committees from the Apple Creek, Macoupin and Carrolton Associations, to provide for re-districting out territories, would present the following reports:
These committees have held two meetings,

882

one at Alton and one at Brighton.

At the meeting in Brighton, with perfect unanimity we agreed upon a basis of re-districting, which we were willing to urge the Associations to adopt.

In reaching our conclusion, we took great pleasure in bearing testimony to the uniform kindness, Christian courtesy and fellowship exhibited and experienced by all the representatives of these several Associations. All expressed the desire, and the hope, that the time was at hand when all the Baptists in these several Associations would be a unit.

It has come to the knowledge of your committee, however, that the Apple Creek Association, at its last Annual meeting,

883

did not deem it wise, at present, to consent to the plan recommended.

Hence, for the present, in the judgement of your committee, nothing can be done except to cultivate the most fraternal intercourse between the Associations, and then prepare the way for the complete unification and more thorough efficiency of these bodies in the early future.
Respectfully submitted,
J. Bulkley.

There were only eight pastors. Four or five of the churches had not been represented for several years. This resolution was passed;
Resolved, That a meeting of the pastors, ministers and deacons of the Edwardsville Association

884

be held on the first Wednesday each of November, February, May and August to confer and arrange for missionary work within the Association."

On the Lord's day Bro. Thomas G. Field, was ordained as a pastor of the Alton Church.

The contributions reported for Home and For. Missions, Publication Society, Bible Cause and Ministerial Education were $1643.85. Of this sum, Foreign Missions, the Alton Church contributed $849.53. For Shurtleff College $1361 had been contributed. The Sab. School statistics were very imperfectly reported. The schools were 11.

1874. 45th Anniversary.
The meeting was with the Bunker Hill Church, beginning Oct. 9, with a sermon by J. H. Mize from Eph. 4:28, "Let him that stole steal no

885

more."

The churches represented were 14, and 5 were not. Baptisms 284; Rec'd. by Letter 51; By Experience 14; Dismissed 58; Excluded 14; Dropped 12; Died 10; Members 1404.
J. H. Mize, Moderator. J. M. Stifler, Clerk.

Eight of the churches reported pastors. The ministers holding membership in the churches were 21. One, Melvin Jameson, being a missionary in Bassieu, Burmah. The largest contributing church was the Alton, and uniformly giving to most of the objects patronized by the denomination. The next largest was Upper Alton Church. Only 3 churches reported contributions to House or State Missions; three to Foreign Missions and 3 to the Publication Society. The German Church at Fosterburg was received, and the New Hope Church had joined another Association.

The number of Baptisms reported was large. Upper

886

Alton Church received 65 by this ordinance; Alton Church 56; Bunker Hill 32; Greenville 32; Nilwood 32; Litchfield 23; Edwardsville 17; and two other churches less numbers.

A committee for mission work in the Association was appointed. Resolutions were passed urging increased interest in Foreign Missions. Also the Association expressed by resolutions its constant and earnest sympathy with all efforts to promote the cause of Temperance.

The Sunday School work of the Association was brought under earnest consideration, and able addresses were made by several brethren.

887

The letters from the churches were generally very cheering to the Association, expressing hopefulness as to their future. A large number of them had enjoyed revivals. One reported a good house of worship finished free of debt, and another that the debt on theirs had been cancelled.

Time was given to earnest addressed on the question; "How shall we best secure efficiency as an Association?". In these addresses several brethren participated.

The several pulpits of Bunker Hill were occupied on the Lord's day by ministers attending the Association. The afternoon was given to a mass Sabbath School meeting in the Bap. House of worship. Several addresses were made. And after a service in the evening "an earnest and tender Conference meeting" closed the session.

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1875.
Litchfield, Oct. 1, 1875.
The Association met with the Litchfield Church, Oct. 1, 1875. After devotional services the sermon was by Thos. G. Field from 2. Cor. 8:11, "Now therefore perform the doing of it."

The churches were 12. Baptisms 24; Rec'd. by Letter 31; By Experience 1; Dismissed 56; Excluded 6; Died 27; Members 1262.
J. H. Mize, Moderator. H. L. Field, Clerk.

There was some missionary work done in the Association.

The strictly benevolent contributions reported were $1924.75. There was not much in the proceedings of the Association that would enrich

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history. The minutes contained a History of the Edwardsville Church. Six of the churches in the body reported that they had no pastor. The benevolent contributions were almost wholly from the Upper Alton and the Alton Churches.

1876. 47th Anniversary.
The Association met with the Edwardsville Church, Sep. 29, 1876, and the Session was opened with a sermon by J. P. Howard, of Bunker Hill, from Prov. 14:4, "Where no oxen are the crib is clean."

The church in Hillsboro was received. There were 15 in the Association. The Greenville church had retired from their body and went into the organization of the Greenville Association

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Baptisms 83; Rec'd. By Letter 57; By Experience 9; Restored 1; Dismissed 58; Excluded 9; Erased 6; Died 11; Members 1277.
J. V. Hopper, Moderator. H. L. Field, Clerk.

The letters from the churches were as a whole encouraging. Jointly this and the Greenville Association had the missionary services of T. W. Jones for four and a half months, at $16.66 per month. The following I transfer:
"A Resolution from the Macoupin Association, protesting against certain proceedings, in which this Association is concerned, and asking the Association to take some action thereon, was read by the Clerk:
"Whereas, Churches holding membership with sister Associations, with which we correspond,

893

have received as members individuals who have been properly disciplined and expelled by our churches, therefore,
"Resolved, That we request sister Associations to discipline their churches, that the order of fellowship may be maintained.

Macoupin Association.
The following is the report of the Committee on Communication from the Macoupin Association, which was adopted:
Whereas, The peace and fellowship of our churches is liable to be disturbed by the two hasty and unwise action of one church, in receiving to membership persons excluded by another church;
Therefore, We recommend that our churches recognize the disciplinary acts of sister churches, and

894

move with great caution in all such applications for membership; and such persons should not be received without due investigation and correspondence, if possible, with the excluding, as the circumstances may seem to demand. And if no satisfactory result can be reached, then we recommend that the two churches unite in calling an advisory council, whose decision shall be final."

The following was adopted:
"Whereas, We have had a history of individual churches in our Association, prepared for publicaiton in our Minutes from year to year; and
"Whereas, It is desirable to have a history of our Association, before all its founders pass away. Therefore,
"Resolved, That the Moderator, appoint a

895

a committee to prepare such a history for publication in our Minutes of next year."

"Prof. Washington Leverett and Dr. Bulkley were appointed the committee."

Resolutions of the ordinary character were adopted.

On the Sabbath the pulpits of the place were supplied by our ministers present. And in the afternoon the several churches united in a Sabbath School Mass meeting.

Date of Church organizations: Edwardsville, 1828, and 1862; Upper Alton, April 25, 1830; Alton, Mch. 10, 1833; Brighton, 1833; Bunker Hill, Dec. 1840; Litchfield, 1856; Marine Prairie, 1856; Nokomis, May 1856; Nilwood, Oct. 1865; Fosterburg, 1857; Stanton, (reorganized) 1876; Hillsboro, 1876.

Contributions reported for For. Miss., Home Miss.,

896

Pub. Society and Min. Education $1087.53. Of the $490.78, the Alton and Upper Alton Churches contributed $467.03. For Shurtleff College Upper Alton Church was credited $3,871.00 and Alton Church $3,161.50.

Ordained Ministers
and P. O. Address.

Alton, Thos. G. Field, G. J. Johnson, D. D., Robert Gibson.
Upper Alton, A. A. Kendrick, D.D., J. Bulkley, D.D., Washington Leverett, J. C. C. Clark, O. L. Barlow, H. L. Field.
Bassein Burmah, Melvin Jameson.
Dorchester, Luke Dillarrd.
Edwardsville, Wm. J. Chapin.
Nokomis, John H. Mize.
Bunker Hill, J. V. Hopper, J. F. Howard, George Silver.

The end.

897

Chapter IX. Clear Creek Association.

Clear Creek Association.

Ministers who died in the Association.

Job C. Grey, Jno. L. Settlemore, and Auslem McNeeley, Thos. H. Williams, Granville Mize, John R. Williams, A. S. Edmonds, G. W. Otrich, E. J. Synder, Reuben A. Morris, J. W. Watkins, David Everhardt, L. Penrod, J. Clifford, J. J. Gay, E. R. Gordon, Moses Carlock, J. W. Atherton, Thos. A. Morton, W. W. Williams, Wm. H. Bruce, Wiley Hooker and R. B. Keith.

Organized in 1831. I want the minutes of the 1st 13 sessions. I have 1844, 1853, 1860, 1863 and then onward.

Sketch of Clear Creek Association.
This Association was formed in the year 1831. I have been unable to get the early minutes. The earliest copy I have is that of 1844, the 13 anniversary. I shall use what I have in this sketch, as the prospect of getting more is very uncertain.

1844. 13th Anniversary.
Saturday, Aug. 10, 1844.
The meeting was held with the Cedar Creek Church, Jackson Co., Ill. The session was opened with a sermon by Eld. Thomas Howard from Ezekiel 21:27, "I will overturn, overturn, overturn it,"etc.

898

Nine Mile and Bethel Churches were received. The churches were Shiloh, Ridge, Drury's Creek, Mississippi, Sexton's Creek, Sandy Creek, Cedar Creek, Limestone, Mouth of Clear Creek, Pleasant Hill, Lake Hill, Kincade, Nine Mile, and Bethel, being fourteen. Twelve were represented.

Rec'd. by Baptism 32; By Letter 24; Dismissed 35; Excluded 18; Died 4; Members 522. Ordained Ministers were 7; Licentiates 6; Contributions for missions in the Association $105.00.
J. Brown, Moderator. R. G. Davis, Clerk.

A prayer meeting on Sabbath was appointed, and another on Monday evening, for the revival of God's work.

899

R. G. Davis, Peter Hagler, and T. Howard preached at the stand on the Lord's day.

Arrangements were made for three quarterly meetings. Elder Thomas Howard was appointed the missionary of the Association. A letter was prepared and delegates were appointed to bear it to the Illinois State Convention. The following note was appointed by the clerk. "The utmost harmony prevailed during the session. The churches were well represented, and a general peace pervades our Association. The increase has been slow but gradual. We have been attended by a number of visiting brethren, and thereby have been enabled, during the session to keep the stand occupied; and we trust, that the word preached, in a degree, had the desired effect."

900

I have no minutes between the thirteenth and the twenty-fifth anniversary.

1855. 25th Anniversary.
Friday, Aug. 10, 1855.
The Association met with the Big Creek Church, Union Co., Aug. 10. The meeting opened with a sermon by H. H. Richardson, from Isa. 4:1; "And in that day seven women shall take hold of one man," etc.

Cypress and Caledonia Churches were received. The churches were; Shiloh, Sandy Creek, Lake Milligan, Sexton's Creek, Mount Tabor, Clear Creek, Bethany, Dutch Ridge, Sharon, Big Creek, Limestone, Cypress, and Caledonia. Being thirteen and all represented. Rec'd. by Baptism

901

54; By Letter 15; Restored 3; Dismissed 16; Excluded 24; Died 22; Members 746. Ordained Ministers were 12, Licentiates 4. Drury's Creek church not reporting is not counted. Churches contributed $24.15.
Samuel Hemsacker, Mod. Jas. E. McCrite, Clerk.

Committees were appointed on benevolent organizations, and Bap. Convention of Southern Illinois.

The preachers on the Lord's day were Wm. Ferrill, H. H. Richardson and M. B. Kelly. A prayer meeting of one hour was held before preaching commenced. A collection was taken up for the General Association and Home Mission

902

Society of $17.40.

The committee on Sabbath Schools in their report said, "They are pained that so little attention is given to the support of Sab. Schools. There are only two or three in all our churches, while there should be a school in every church." "The Sabbath is alos very much neglected, and many are too remiss I keeping holy the Christian Sabbath." They closed the report with this resolution.

"Resolved, That our churches urgently requested to organize Sabbath Schools (at least) in every church, and preserve inviolate the Sabbath day."

903

1860. 30th Anniversary.
Friday, Aug. 19, 1860.
Mt. Zion Church, Johnson Co., entertained the Association. The session began Aug. 10, with a sermon by M. B. Kelly, from Deut. 32:31, "For their rock is not as our Rock, even our enemies themselves being judges."

Gemspring and New Hope Churches were received. Since the session of 1855, and before this meeting, the following churches had been received. Salem, Caney, Mt. Zion, Pleasant Ridge, Bethlehem, Friendship, Anna, Pleasant Bluff, Macedonia, Mt. Pleasant. The number of churches was 24. Rec'd. by Baptism 232; By Letter 58; By Experience 12; Restored 24; Dismissed 85; Excluded 38;

904

Died 26; Members 1197. Ordained ministers 12, Licentiates 7. Contributions reported $34.20.
M. B. Kelly, Moderator. J. E. McCrite, Clerk.

The committee on Resolutions presented the work of benevolence in the several departments, in resolutions.

A Domestic Mission Board made a report. They had employed Alonzo Durham as an Associational Missionary for ten months at a salary of $16.66 per month. The missionary made the following report of his labors: "Preached 235 sermons, witnessed 132 conversions, baptized 44 persons, attended 95 prayer meetings, religiously visited 292 families, delivered 64 exhortations, traveled 2074 miles."

905

The preachers on the Lord's day were M. W. Holland, E. Parmly, and M. B. Kelly. A collection and subscription for Domestic Missions, amounting to $32.55 was taken.

Of another subscription the minutes thus speak: "A subscription was then taken up for the benefit of the Domestic Mission Board, amounting to $72.50. The brethren in the ministry then subscribed $130, to be paid in ministerial labor, at $1 per day.

From the number baptized it is quite certain that there had been enjoyed revivals among the churches. Shiloh Church received by baptism 17, Sandy Creek 11, Sexton's Creek 26, Clear Creek 24, Salem 11, Mt. Zion 25, Bethlehem 13, Anna 15, Macedonia 38, New Hope 14.

906

1863. 33rd Anniversary.
Friday, Aug. 9, 1863.
The Friendship Church, Union Co., entertained the Association during this session, which commenced Aug. 9, with a sermon by David Butler, from Heb. 10:14-23, "For by one offering he hath perfected for ever them that are sanctified." etc.

Stone Fort Church was received. The churches were 36, but five were not represented. Rec'd. by Baptism 122; By Letter 44; By Experience 32; Restored 4; Dismissed 51; Excluded 44; Died 67; Members 1972. Ordained Ministers 22, Licentiates 11.

Churches added since the session of 1860, were Pleasant Grove, White Oak, Hurricane Spring, South Pass, Running Lake,

907

Pleasant Hill, Hamburgh, Hickory Grove, New Prospect, Cooper's Creek, Metropolis Union, and Stone Fort.
H. H. Richardson, Moderator. J. L. Settlemoir, Clerk.

"On motion, Resolved, That some brother be appointed to visit each Church composing this body, and lay the subject of Evangelical labor within our bounds before them, and give each church at least one month's previous notice of his visit, and the said agent shall receive one dollar per day for the time spent, and shall make due monthly reports to the Secretary and Treasurer of our Home Mission Society."

Elder David Butler was chosen to act as the agent. I copy this also,
"On motion, Resolved, That it is made the duty of each member of the General Board of Domestic Missions, to take up at least one collection in their

908

respective churches this year, and send the amount obtained to the Secretary and Treasurer of our Home Mission Society, and that he co-operate with the Financial agent."

The preachers for the Lord's day were John A. Williams, Peter Hagler, and H. H. Richardson.

The following was presented by the committee on Resolutions and adopted:
"In as much as our beloved country is engaged in a heart-rending and bitter war, and fearing that we as Christians, have not humbled ourselves under the mighty hand of God, therefore,
"Resolved, That we again recommend Churches and individuals, most earnestly to plead with God for the restoration of peace, and the supremacy of the Constitution and Union upon the basis of the same."

909

A collection was taken on Lord's day for the Associational mission, amounting in cash to $39.50 and in pledges to $37.

Elder S. M. Osgood, Agent of Missionary Union, and Elder J. B. Olcott, Agent of the Home Miss. Society, were present and addressed the Association.

1864. 34th Anniversary.
Saturday, Aug. 13, 1864.
The Association met with the Mount Tabor Church, Union Co., Aug. 13, and was opened with a sermon by Wm. B. Pearce, from Mat. 5:14, "Ye are the light of the world," etc.

Mount Pisgah, Corinth, Antioch and Mt. Pleasant Churches were received. Of the 40 churches

910

9 were not represented. Rec'd. by Baptism 216; Letter 99; Experience 45; Restored 12; Dismissed 79; Excluded 34; Died 71; Members 1922. Ordained ministers 20, Licentiates 12.
H. H. Richardson, Moderator. J. E. McCrite, Clerk.

The preachers on the Lord's day were David Butler, G. T. Bailey, and J. A. Williams.

The committee presented a very similar report on the State of the Country to the one last year, which was adopted. "This resolution was passed,
Resolved, That we recommend to the churches of our Body, to keep up weekly prayer meetings, and to our brethren, to observe the duty of family prayer.

"The Committee on the State of the Churches, reported as follows:

911

"The Churches of this Association, are generally in a healthy condition; but while this is true of the churches in the aggregate, we have to lament the condition of some of them. A few are in a disorganized condition; some are in a cold and indifferent state, but the majority are alive and are doing, as humble instruments in the hands of God, a good work, as is evinced by their letters and our personal knowledge of them. And further, that the churches which have taken the most active part in the Missionary movements adopted by our last Association, and have contributed most for Missionary purposes according to their several abilities, have enjoyed the greatest displays of Divine favor; and we would recommend the continuance of the agency

912

adopted last year."

Members received by baptism in the churches: Shiloh 8, Clear Creek 8, Mt. Tabor 9, Dutch Ridge 9; Sharon 34, Mt. Zion 24, Pleasant Ridge 19, Friendship 12, Pleasant Bluff, 8.

1865.
Saturday, Aug, 12, 1865.
The Association met with the Shiloh Church, Pulaski Co., for its thirty-fifth annual session, commencing, Aug. 12, with a sermon by F. W. Carothers, from 1.Cor. 12:27, "Now we are the body of Christ and members in particular."

Palestine, Richwoods, New Harmony, Ebenezer, and Union Point Churches were received.

913

Of the 41 churches, three were not represented. From the catalogue of last year 5 were removed without notice.

Three of the 41 were not represented. Rec'd. by Baptism 387; By Letter 193; By Experience 118; Restored 29; Dismissed 128; Excluded 93; Died 51; Members 2572. Ordained Ministers 27, Licentiates 15. Contributions reported by the churches $51.90.
H. H. Richardson, Moderator. F. M. Aguew, Clerk.

The preachers for the Lord's day were L. C. Carr, H. Daniels, and M. W. Holland. Eld. Carr was to preach a Home Mission Sermon, and a collection to be taken for Associational Missions.

The following Obituary report was

914

presented and adopted,
"Whereas, Our Heavenly Father has seen fit, in his infinite wisdom to remove from us by death our beloved brethren, Elds. Job C. Grey, Jno. L. Settlemore, and Auslem McNeely, therefore,
Resolved, That in their death the Association has lost three of its most worthy members, the churches three of their most useful ministers, their families a kind father and protector, and society three of its valued members."

Three ministers made reports of Missionary service for the Association. The Baptisms reported by churches were very numerous, but only those receiving the largest numbers will

915

be here given. Judging by accessions in this form, it is natural to suppose that with some of them there was much prosperity. Mt. Tabor 33; Dutch Ridge 21; Sharon 17; Big Creek 32; Mt. Zion 19, Pleasant Ridge 8; South Pass 32, Pleasant Hill 27, Hickory Grove 10, New Prospect 12, Stone Fort 20, Corinth 22, Antioch 9, Richwoods 14, New Harmony 29, Ebenezer 10.

1866. 36th Anniversary.
Saturday, Aug. 11, 1866.
Anna Church, Union County entertained the Association during this session, which was opened Aug. 11, with

916

a sermon by H. H. Richardson from 2.Cor. 4:1, 2, "Therefore,seeing we have this ministry, as we have received mercy we faint not;" etc.

New Hope, (Williamson Co.), Cedar Grove, Dougola, Antioch, Mississippi Valley and Carbondale Churches were received. The churches were 46. From eight there was no intelligence. Rec'd. by Baptism 151; By Letter 110; By Experience 62; Restored 11; Dismissed 189; Excluded 143; Died 88; Members 2408. Ordained ministers 25, Licentiates 13.
H. H. Richardson, Moderator. F. M. Agnew, Clerk.

On Lord's day G. S. Bailey, Jacob Bower and Peter Hagler preached at Anna; and C. F. Tolman,

917

W. W. Holland, and P. W. Jones preached in clear Creek. By appointment Brn. Bailey and Tolman were requested to preach missionary sermons, to be followed by collections for the Associational Missions. The united collections were $53.50, and pledges were $42.50. A revival in Anna followed the meeting.

The Committee on Obituaries made a report on the death of Elder Thos. H. Williams, as follows:
"During the past year God, in his inscrutable wisdom, has removed from our midst the Pastor of Sharon Church, Elder Thos. H. Williams. Bro. Williams was born in Montgomery Co., Tenn., in May, 1821. At the age of 16 he was converted and united with the Methodists.

918

he became dissatisfied on the subject of baptism, and after reading and mature reflection, at the age of 21 he was baptized and united with the Baptist Church, and in 1844, he was licensed to preach by the Big Rock Church. In 1856, he removed and settled in Jackson Co., where he united with the Limestone Church, and was ordained in 1859. He labored with great success with the Sharon Church, which was reorganized, a large number added to it, and a good meeting house was built. He was Pastor of the Sharon and Carbondale Churches at the time of his death, which occurred,

919

Feb. 14, 1866. By those who knew him best, Bro. Williams was regarded as a devoted Christian. At the time of his death he was preparing to devote himself entirely to his Master's service in the ministry of the Gospel. Bro. Williams passed through many severe trials and afflictions, but our Heavenly Father sanctified them to his good; they brought him to the foot of the cross where he found strength and comfort. He left a wife and eight children, together with a large circle of friends to mourn his loss."
Respectfully submitted,
C. G. Flaugh
G. F. Fain, Committee

The missionary work in the Association was feebly sustained. I find in the Minutes this entry: "The names of the churches

920

composing the Association were called, and those that were in disorganized position were dropped from the minutes."

This action doubtless explains the removal of the names of churches from the minutes previous to this time, when the act was not mentioned in them.

The following is the report of the Committee on a Ministers' Institute.
"Your committee of inquiry in relation to the Ministers' Institute beg leave to report:
That we have consulted some of the brethren concerning this Institute; they would like to have it hold out of its sessions among us, but that we know of no place in our bounds where it would be well sustained;

921

but we would be glad for them to hold a meeting somewhere in Southern Illinois, so that any of us who might desire to attend could conveniently do so."

The report was adopted.

The names and residences of thirty-seven ordained ministers were given in the minutes, as within the Association.

1867. 37th Anniversary.
Saturday, Aug. 10, 1867.
The Church in Dougola entertained the Association in this session, which commenced Aug. 10, with a sermon by H. H. Richardson, from Eph. 4:5, "One Lord, one faith, one baptism."

Cypress Hill Church was received.

922

Of the 45 churches 3 were not represented. Rec'd. by Baptism 229; By Letter 137; Restored 22; Dismissed 164; Excluded 72; Died 35; Members 2455. Ordained Ministers reported 36; Licentiates 18.
H. H. Richardson, Moderator. F. M. Agnew, Clerk.

The preachers on Lord's day were J. R. Graves, Memphis, Tenn., and Robert Williams. A revival followed the meeting. An Associational Missionary collection was taken amounting to $34.

The death of five ministers was mentioned in the report of the Committee on Obituaries, but little was given for sketches.

923

I found the following in the Minutes.
"The following churches were granted a letter of dismission to assist in the organization of a new Association: Cana, Pleasant Bluff, Macedonia, New Hope, White Oak, Metropolis Union, Mt. Pleasant (Union Co.,) New Harmony and Ebenezer."

924

1868. 38th Anniversary.
Saturday, Aug. 8, 1868.
The Association met with Mount Zion Church, Johnson Co., and was opened, Aug. 8, with a sermon by Frank M. Agnew, from 1. Cor. 9:11, "Even so hath the Lord ordained that they which preach the gospel shall live of the gospel."

The Providence, Concord, Unity and Ridge churches were received. The churches were 37, four of which were not represented. Rec'd. by Baptism 232; By Letter 136; restored 26; dismissed 263; Excluded 86; Died 41; Members 2102; Contributions reported $58.65. Ordained ministers 29, Licentiates 17.
H. H. Richardson, Moderator. F. M. Agnew, Clerk.

925

The preachers on the Lord's day, W. F. Troughton, and D. C. Young. Missionary Collection $20.

Business took its common course. All the churches but eleven reported the reception of new members by Baptism. The churches receiving ten and upward I give here; Lake Milligan 18, Sandy Creek 10, Clear Creek 15; Friendship 18, Pleasant Hill 21, Richwoods 19; Cypress Hill 29; Unity 20. The introductory sermon of the previous year, and also of this, the Association published in the minutes.

1869. 39th Anniversary.
Saturday, Aug. 7, 1868.
The Association met with the Sharon Church, Jackson Co., for this session, which was commenced, Aug. 7, with a sermon

926

by David Culp, of Mt. Zion Church, from Eph. 2:1, "And you hath he quickened who were dead in trespasses and in sins."

Antioch, Union and Murphy's boro Churches were received. The churches were 42, but 8 were not represented. Rec'd. by Baptism 334; By Letter 194; Restored 37; Dismissed 194; Excluded 146; Died 35; Members 2380. Ordained ministers 28, Licentiates 19.
H. H. Richardson, Moderator. F. M. Agnew, Clerk.

Preachers on the Lord's day Robert Williams, C. F. Tolman, and H. M. Carr. Associational Collection $38.20. D. F. Carnahan represented the Gen. Association of Illinois.

The Committee on Obituaries presented the name of Elder Granville Wise,

927

Pastor of Bethlehem Church, as having died, but were unable to more than give the name.

Ten churches received from 10 to 56 members by baptism, which would indicate with them prosperity. But the number of exclusions was remarkably large also, on a membership of 2380, being 146. The Hurricane Spring Church was dismissed.

1870. 40th Anniversary.
The Association was held with the New Hope Church, Williamson Co., opening Aug. 13, with a sermon by Moses Carlock, from Rom. 8:9, "Now if any man have not the Spirit of Christ he is none of his."

Elk Prairie Church was received. The churches were 36, all but one represented.

928

Rec'd. by Baptism 113; By Letter 108; Restored 11; Dismissed 142; Excluded 108; Died 50; Members 2115. Ordained Ministers 29, Licentiates 14.
H. H. Richardson, Mod. F. M. Agnew, Clerk.

Mt. Zion Church was dismissed. The Gen. Association of Ills. was represented by I. S. Mahan. The Sabbath School Association of Ills. by D. M. Morgan, and E. S. Graham represented the Publication Society. There was preaching in three Baptist churches on Saturday evening. Lord's day preaching as usual.

It was agreed to meet the next year on Friday, the day before the Association, to organize a Sabbath School Convention.

The committee on obituaries made the following report:

929

"Your Committee on Obituaries beg leave to report, that it is with profound sorrow we learn of the death of Elders John R. Williams, A. J. Edmunds, G. W. Otrich and E. J. Snyder, who were faithfully ministers and members of this Association, and who have fallen asleep in Jesus. While we mourn with a large circle of friends and relatives, and especially with their distressed families, we feel assured that our loss is their eternal gain. Therefore, we bow in humble submission to the will of our Father in heaven. Many of our brethren have been called from their earthly labors, to reap their reward; yet, as God has spared our lives, let us try to improve them by His grace to the honor of His name, the advancement of his cause, and to glorify Him in our bodies and our Spirits which are His."

930

Among other resolutions passed were these:
"Resolved, That the preaching of the Gospel by the living ministry is second to no agency of instrumentality, employed by the Spirit of God in the diffusion truth and the actual salvation of men."

"Resolved, That we advise the churches to hold religious meetings every Sabbath; that they have preaching as often as they can, and for this purpose that they more efficiently sustain their ministers, and earnestly pray the Lord of the harvest to send forth laborers into his harvest."

"Resolved, That in view of the necessities of the fields now white unto the harvest, the churches are earnestly requested to seek out

931

and encourage all young men among them who give evidence of piety and such other gifts and graces as justify the belief that God has called them unto the Ministry, and give them the means of acquiring, in some of the Bap. institutions for this purpose, such an education as will prepare them for the responsible work to which God has called them."

1871. 41st Anniversary.
Saturday, Aug. 12, 1871.
Mt. Pleasant Church, Pulaski Co., entertained the Association, the session of which was opened Aug. 12, with a sermon by Simeon L. Wisner, of Big Creek Church, from Mat. 16:18, 19, "And I also

932

say unto thee, That thou art Peter, and upon this rock I will build my church," etc.

The churches of Walnut Grove, Union Co., and Mt. Orbin, Pulaski Co., and South Star of Cairo were received.

The churches were 38. Rec'd. by Baptism 213; By Letter 96; Restored 34; Dismissed 108; Excluded 94; Died 41; Members 2153. Ordained ministers 27, Licentiates 11.
David Culp, Moderator. F. M. Agnew, Clerk.

Preaching was arranged for Saturday evening and the Sabbath.

G. J. Johnson took a collection for the Publication Society of $27.20; and pledges for $190. And I. N.

933

Hobart took one for the Gen. Association with special reference to Cairo, of $65.50.

After the resolutions on foreign Missions were read, Rev. C. F. Tolman addressed the Association and took a collection, of $19.35 cash, and Pledges of $41.

Elder Wm. Geidenhager addressed the Association for the First Colored Bap. Church, in Cairo, and took a collection, of cash and Pledges, of $8.88, to aid them.

A collection of $50.75 was taken to pay Eld. A. Durham for past services as missionary. There was a prayer meeting for an hour on the Lord's day morning, before preaching. The business was of the ordinary character. The obituary Committee reported the death of Elder Reuben A. Morris. The brief sketch of his life is in the Biographical Department.

934

1872. 42nd Anniversary.
Saturday, Aug. 10, 1872.
The Limestone Church, Union Co., entertained the Association during its session, which commenced Saturday, Aug. 10, with a sermon by John A. Williams, of Stone Fort Church, from Acts 2:47, "And the Lord added to the Church daily such as should be saved."

The Union Church of Thebes was received. The churches were 38 and from three there was no report. Rec'd. by Baptism 66; By Letter 62; Restored 8; Dismissed 97; Excluded 39; Died 42; Members 1961.
David Culp, Moderator. F. M. Agnew, Clerk.

The Nine Mile, Union, Big, Saline and South District Associations, in Ill., as corresponding

935

bodies were represented. There was a large representation of Agents in attendance. The usual Committees were appointed.

The preachers on Saturday evening were L. C. Carr, and E. L. Schofield.

Lord's day. There was a Sabbath School Mass Meeting. Several speeches were made. The leading one by J. C. Baker, State Sab. School Missionary. Then commencing at 10 o' clock, A. M. W. S. Post, D.D., C. F. Tolman and J. C. Baker preached in succession. And in the evening W. S. Gee, followed by E. Parmly. A day of crowded services. The plan of dividing the Association was

936

indefinitely postponed.

The Committee on the State of the Churches, in their report, thanked God for the peace, harmony, and tranquility that existed among them generally. But said, "Your committee are pained to learn that many of our churches have neither Sabbath Schools, nor prayer meetings, and the lack of prosperity in these churches we attribute to this cause. We would therefore recommend that each church that has a Sabbath School, to sustain it; Those who have none, to organize one, and for all the churches to organize weekly prayer meetings, as we deem them indispensable to the cause."

The Committee on Resolutions, duly noticed

937

the several branches of Christian work.

The Committee on Obituaries appropriately noticed the death of Deacons John F. Walker, a member of the Clear Creek Church, he was faithful as a Christian. And also of Dea. Jacob Pieler, who was a member of the Bethany Church, Union Co., and served the church in a three-fold capacity--Deacon, Church Clerk and Sab. School Superintendent, and was faithful until death. He bequeathed his entire estate to the Clear Creek Baptist Association for Missionary purposes, except $20.00 a year to Bethany Church, toward the support of a pastor. The amount of the estate was $8,745.09.

938

1873. 43rd Anniversary.
Saturday, Aug. 9, 1873.
The Association met with the Friendship church, Union Co., 4 miles, N.E. from Dougola, on Illinois Central Prairie Rail Road. The session was opened, Aug. 9, with a sermon by J. W. Hunsaker, of Anna, from Nehemiah 6:3, "And I sent messengers unto them, saying, I am doing a great work, so that I cannot come down:" etc.

The churches were 38, but six of them were not represented. Rec'd. by Baptism 33; By Letter 54; restored 11; Dismissed 61; Excluded 67; Died 46; Members 1835. Ordained ministers 23. Licentiates 9. The requisite Committees were appointed.
H. H. Richardson, Moderator. F. M. Agnew, Clerk.

939

Saturday evening at 8 o'clock there was preaching at friendship, Cypress creek, Bethany and Walnut Grove Churches. This indicates their nearness to each other, which is a prevailing evil in Southern Illinois.

Lord's day at Friendship J. C. Baker conducted a practical Sunday School, and all were delighted. Four preachers were called into service during the day--D. P. French, G. J. Johnson, S. P. Ives, and J. M. Wood.

The Committees reported, and the reports were received.

The Committee on Obituaries, reported the death of six ministers since the meeting the year before. They were John W. Watkins, David Everhardt, Levi Penrod, John Clifford, J. J. Gay and E. R. Gordon.

940

Nothing more than their names were given by the Committee.

1874. 44th Anniversary.
The Pleasant Hill Church, Williamson Co., welcomed the Association to their hospitalities. The session was commenced, Aug. 8, with s sermon by David R. Sanders, from 1. Cor. 11:23-26. "For I have received of the Lord that which also I delivered unto you," etc.

Of the 38 churches 7 made no reports. Rec'd. by Baptism 102; By Letter 51; Restored 24; Dismissed 40; Excluded 87; Died 30; Members 1801. Ordained ministers

941

22, Licentiates 10.
H. H. Richardson, Moderator. F. M. Agnew, Clerk.

The usual committees were appointed. Correspondence with other Associations was duly attended to. Elder C. J. Kelly, advocated the claims of the Baptist Banner, published at Ewing, Franklin Co., Ill.

Preaching was arranged for Saturday night with Mt. Carmel, New Liberty, Pleasant Hill, and Stone Fort Churches. From this arrangement it is unfair to infer that the churches in Southern Illinois are very near each other; and this is doubtless one prominent reason why most of them have so few members, and are so weak in influence and pecuniary ability.

On the Lord's day there was first, a Sabbath

942

School service; then sermons by D. P. French, H. H. Richardson, and W. S. Post; and then an address on Foreign Missions by Mrs. A. K. Scott, a returned missionary, detailing her experience, and explaining the Woman's Missionary Organization. Collections were taken for Domestic Missions of $23 and Woman's Foreign Missions, $28.16.

J. C. Parker preached in the evening. Committees reported, reports were received.

The Association became a Body Corporate to legally receive and manage the bequest of Jacob Peeler to it, to be used for missionary purposes. The bequest was $8,745.09.

The work of Missions by the Association within

943

its own bounds was not vigorously sustained.

The Committee on Obituaries reported the death of Elder Moses Carlock and John W. Atherton during the year then closed. See obituary Department of this work.

944

1875. 45th Anniversary.
Anna, Ill. Saturday, Aug. 7, 1875.
The Association met with the Big Creek Church, Union Co., four miles south-east of Anna. The session commenced Aug. 7 with a sermon by David Culp, from 2 Tim. 4:2, "Preach the Word."

The churches were 34. Five were not represented. Caledonia, South Pass, Cypress Hill and Union of Thebes Churches were dropped without record. Recd. by Baptism 239; By Letter 76; Restored 34; Dismissed 59; Excluded 50; Died 29; Members 1896. Ordained ministers 21, Licentiates 8.
H.H. Richardson, Moderator. F.M. Agnew, Clerk.

945

Business took the usual course.

Arrangements were made for the usual preaching services of Saturday evening and the Lords day. The person occupying the Stand on the Lord's day were E.G.O. Groat, D.P. French, John A. Rodman, S.P. Bingham, F.M. Agnew and D.R. Sanders.

"Lake Milligan Church requested that in as much as Elder H.H. Richardson had because, in a sense, superannuated, and unable to fill the active duties of the Pastorate, that the Association should see to it that his temporal wants were all supplied, and that his declining year should be made pleasant and happy, by the consciousness that his labors now, and of former years were appreciated by his brethren."

This subject was taken up and considered, but no reliable plan of aid was adopted. A collection of

946

of $13.90 was taken for the aged minister.

The followings I copy:
"Whereas, There are about 10,000 of the colored population within the bounds of this association, and
"Whereas, No effort has been made on the part of this Association to reach that class of people with the truths of the Gospel: therefore,
"Resolved, That the Trustees of this Association authorize their missionary, and that the Ministers of this Association be, and are here by requested and urged to preach and labor with the colored people as they may have opportunity, thereby fulfilling the command of our blessed Master--to preach the Gospel to every creature."

I also copy the following from the Report of the Committee on Resolutions:

947

"Resolved, That we recognize the preaching of the Gospel by the men called of God, and commissioned by the Church to this work as God's appointed means to save men.

"Resolved, That we believe God has ordained it to be the duty of his people, to minister a reasonable support in temporal things to those who in return minister to them in spiritual things.

Resolved, "That we believe it to be the teaching of Christ that, as we teach His ministers so we teach Christ; that if we neglect to feed His poor and His poverty-stricken ministers, and do not minister to their necessities, the same disposition he considers as shown to Himself, and that He will place such individuals on the left hand among the goats on the great day of accounts, with the assurance that He never knew them."

948

J.W. Heinsaker, the Missionary of the Association gave the following summary of his labors. "I have labored 286 days, preached 270 sermons, baptized 45 candidates, and traveled 2602 miles."

The following from the Treasurer's Report, through a reproach to the guilty, deserves record:
"Dear Brethren, I have received but few responses from the churches, though we have endeavored by all means to bring the remembrance of the fact that they each have a member of the Domestic Mission Board, who is requested to take up a collection quarterly; but, we are sorry to say, that the calling the name and making the appointment is the last we hear of most of them. However, there are some brethren who have done their duty, as the following amounts collected show." Then follow contributions from four

949

churches and a few individuals amounting to nearly $74. Churches receiving over ten by baptism. Sandy Creek 15; Big Creek 62; Pleasant Ridge 12; Anna 40; Corinth 12; New Hope 10; Mississippi Valley 22.

1876. 46th Anniversary.
Western Saratoga, Ill. Sat. Aug. 12, 1876.
The Association was held with the Pleasant Ridge Church, Union Co., opening Aug. 12, with a sermon by F.M. Agnew, of Makanda, from Rev. 2:4,5. "Nevertheless I have somewhat against thee, because thou hast left thy first love." etc.

Cobden and Cache Creek churches were received. The churches were 34. Six made no report. The Sharon and Walnut Grove churches were dropped, without record. Rec. by Baptism 140; By letters 103; Restored 14; Dismissed 66; Excluded 49; Died 55;

950

Members 1890. Ordained ministers 24, Licentiates 9.
H.H. Richardson, Moderator. F.M. Agnew, Clerk.

Committees were appointed, repented and were discharged. There was preaching on Saturday evening. The Sabbath services were mostly broken up by a very severe rain.

The missionary work of the Association proved an entire failure. There is very little of the true missionary spirit in the body. As to their missionary work disaffection seems to rule, this caused six or eight churches to send in petitions for charges in the natures of conducting the work. The following resolution was finally offered;
"Resolved, That we invite candidates for the missionary work of the Association, to present their names and the account

951

of the salary they demand to the Clerk, to be announced to the Association; that from the numbers thus petitioning a selections by ballot be made; and that the minister thus selected be recommended to the Board of Trustees for appointment as missionary for the enduring year."

This entry in the minutes follows the Resolution. "This resolution brought out a full discussion of the whole subject of mission work, by the Association, in the historical, theoretical, and practical aspects, and also in its Anti-missionary, missionary, and Omissionary proclivities in the past and present, in which it was developed that the minutes of the Association of the Association were not used for the purpose of instruction to the members of

952

churches. The discussion was, participated in by many ministers and brethren, after which it was unanimously adopted."

The clerk announced the following candidates for missionary work:
Elder A.B. Brown, one year, $400 Salary
Elder A. Durham, one year, $500
Elder H. Kerr, one year, $545
Elder D. Culp, one year, $800

The ballot resulted in the choice of David Culp. There must have been some special reason for this, as his salary was the highest named. He must have been an abler or more trust worthy man than the others named. I had inferred that the $800 salary which had been paid by the Missionary Board, which must have been considered high in that section of the state, had been one of the main causes

953

of the prevailing dissatisfaction and the failure to respond to calls for funds.

The Friendship Church sent in this singular query. "What, and where, is the missionary ground in the bounds of Clear Creek Baptist Association?" To this a committee replied, which was endorsed by the Association:

"That the Entire Association is a Missionary Field, and that Cairo, Sandy Ridge, Unity, Thebes, Richwoods, Caledonia, America, Grand Chain, Mound City, Wetang, Toledo, the West side of Union Co., Murphysboro, Grand Tower, Burk's Island, Sand Ridge, Sharon, Big Hill, Jackson Co., and many other places require special cultivation."

The annual income from the Jacob Reeler

954

fund for Associational Mission was more than four times as large as all the Contributions from the churches.

Names of Ordained Ministers

Also their Post Offices
F.M. Agnew, Makanda
J.E. Anderson, Goose Island
D.M. Biggs, Cobden
Wm. Bracken, Thebes
A.B. Brown, Moscow
Thos. Bush, Carbondale
D.F. Clay, Makanda
John D. Chism, Goose Island
J.H. Corzine, Dougola
G.B. Corzine, Dougola
G.M. Crowder, Cottage Home
James F. Head, Dougola
S.P. Ives, Anna
T.J. Kella, DeSota
Henry Kerr, Dougola
Jacob Karraker, Dougola
John D. Lanier, Cobden
H.L. Nickens, Ullin
John Parmly, Cobden
H.H. Richardson, Anna
F.M. Richardson, Dougola
D.R. Sanders, Makanda

955

Alonzo Durham, Jonesboro
C.F. Fain, Frankfort
J.W. Heinsaker, Anna
John A. Williams, DuQuoin
S.L. Wesner, Anna

Names of Licentiates

Also their Post Offices
W.H. Aiken, Elkville
W.M. Brown, Anna
Marshall Culp, Makanda
W. R. Corzine, Dougola
A.B. Durham, Corinth
C.G. Flaugh, Jonesboro
H.R. Fowler, Sandusky
John H. Garnett, East Cape Girardeau
J.S. Hartman, Makanda
W.D. Jennings, Elkville
A.M. Lee, Pomona
David Nusbaum, Jonesboro

"A collection was made for Elder H.H. Richardson amounting to eight dollars and fifty cents, and the following churches pledged the amount set opposite their names: Anna, $10; Cobden, $5; Ridge, $10; Dutch Ridge, $5; Lake Milligan, $10." The end.

956

1877. Shiloh Church
Villa Ridge, Ill. Aug. 11,
The Association met with Shiloh Church to hold its forty-seventh annual meeting, and the session was opened, Saturday, Aug. 11, with a sermon by David Culp of Anna, from Eph. 2:20, "And one built upon the foundation of the apostles and prophets, Jesus Christ himself being the chief corner stone."

The churches were 37, but 5 were not represented. Baptisms 256; Received by letters 50; Restored 19; Dismissed 63; Excluded 57; Died 37; Members 2051.

The clerk, F.M. Agnew, says in the minutes of this session, that this Shiloh Church, with which the Association was in session, was the

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oldest church in the Association, and the oldest, but one, in the state of Illinois.

The churches known by the names Little Muddy, New Grand Chain, Hopewell and Union of Thebes were received.
David Culp, Moderator. F.M. Agnew, Clerk.

Most of the time of Saturday was consumed in preliminary business, together with sermons. Rev. H.H. Richardson, a venerable minister of the Association, and who has served it as its moderator in nineteen sessions, declined a re-election on account of "infirmities of age and other causes." He hopes therefore that his brethren would elect some other brother to fill the chair.

Elder David Culp had been the missionary

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of the Association during the year then closes and presented the following summary of his labors:
Miles traveled, 1208
Sermons preached, 226
Exhortations delivered, 196
Religious visits made, 324
Profession witnesses, 125
Converts baptized, 109
Days of service, 200
Salary per year at rate of $800
Amount due me for the above 260 days labor, 665.60
Collected from Clear Creek Church, 65.50
Balance due, $600.10

There was much Association business brought forward which consumed much of the time of the body.

The committee on obituaries made their report, mentioning the death of nine persons; two of whom were ministers, --

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Rev. William Braken and Rev. Thomas Bush. The committee had only the information necessary for a brief sketch of the life of the former, which I will transcribe in its proper place.

960

Apple Creek Association.
From 1846 I want 1848, 1853, 1856; and 1861
I want 1876 to be put in this side of the package.

961

I put this copy here because there was no vacancy at the other end of the package, and it is doubtful whether I ever get the early minutes. Dec. 7, 1877.

1875. 45th Anniversary
Paradise Church, Thursday, 26 Aug.
The Association met with the Paradise Church, Jersey Co., four miles west of Piasa, Aug. 26, 1875 which was commenced with a sermon by T.A. Marsh, from 1 Cor. 9:14, "Even so hath the Lord ordained that they which preach the gospel shall live of the gospel."

The churches were 36, but 6 were not represented. Baptisms 194; Received by Letter 56; Restored 3; Dismissed 51; Excluded 57; Died 24; Members 2202.

962

New Douglas and Little Vine Churches were received.
Levi Mitchell, Moderator. I.J. Johnson, Clerk.

In the minutes of 1874 a committee was appointed to visit and labor with and council the New Bethel Church, the church having called an unordained minister to the Pastorate, and allowed him to administer the ordinances. At this session the committee were called upon to report the result of their visit.

"The committee made a verbal report, which was received, and the committee discharged." A committee was then appointed to draft an expression of the sense of the body on the case of the New Bethel Church and unanimously reported the following resolution, which was adopted by the Association:
"Resolved, That the Association request the New Bethel Church to have those irregularly baptized

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persons, baptized by a regularly ordained minister, if they desire to retain their identity with us, as required by the Eleventh Article of Principles of Union."

The question of Associated mission work was taken up. The following plan was finally offered and adopted:
"In view of the importance of the House mission work, and in order that the Association be liberated from the work of superintending this matter:
"Resolved, That a committee of one from each church be appointed by the churches, to work up the Home Mission Cause, and that they be requested to forward the funds raised for this work to the Treasurer of the Association, to be paid out by him at the order of the Executive Committee of one, to be appointed by the moderator.

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"Resolved, That the moderator appoint a committee of one to be styled "The Executive Committee" whose duty it shall be to employ Home Missionaries to labor in the destitute churches and points in the bounds of the Association, provided the funds supplied by the churches will justify it; and draw his order on the Treasurer to pay the same."

The churches of Mount Nebo, Prairie Grove, Smith's Grove, New Douglas and New Hope in Madison Co., and Litchfield were given letters of dismission.

980

1846. 16th Anniversary
The Association met with the Providence Church, Greene Co., Sep. 18, 1846. S.B. Culp preached the opening sermon from 2 Tim. 2:19, "Nevertheless the foundation of God standeth sure, having this seal, the Lord knoweth them that are his." etc.

New Hope and Union churches were received, having 31 and 40 members. The churches were 15. The ordained ministers were 10; Licenses 7. Baptisms 56; Recd. By Recommendation 11; By Letter 19; Restored 1; Dismissed 79; Excluded 11; Died 15; Members 720.
John Brown, Moderator. E.L. Cooper, Clerk.

Preaching on the Sabbath by Elder Culp, Whiteside and Solomon. The minutes contain a good Circular Letter on the duty of ministerial support.

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Historical Sketch of the Apple Creek Association.
I am not possessed of any minutes of the Anniversaries of the Association earlier than 1847, which was the Seventeenth Annual meeting of the body.

Mr. Peck said it was "set off from the Sangamon Association in 1830, and organized in 1831." Allen's 1st Register, 1832. He further said it was "an anti-mission community," but speaks less positively of it as such in 1835. He then said "Most of the churches are rather opposed to missionary operations through other societies than the churches." Allen's Reg. of 1836. What there was, however, of the anti-mission leaven in that early

982

day has been gradually growing less, as it is now missionary in theory although the liberality of the churches is too limited to admit of its being actively missionary, except in a very limited degree. Something is done in missionary work within its own bounds, and also in Sabbath school labors.

I hope to obtain some of the minutes of earlier years, but at present must begin with

1847. 17th Anniversary.
The Association was held with Honey Creek Church, Macoupin Co., 4 m. N. West of Clyde, opening, Sep. 17, 1847 with a sermon by Eld. James Solomon, from Isa. 40:11,--"He shall feed his flock like a shepherd;"--etc.

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Fourteen churches were represented. Baptisms 36; Recd. By Recomm. 14; By Letter 24; Restored 5; Dismissed 17; Excluded 19; Died 10; Members 689.
J. Brown, Mod. E.L. Cooper, Clerk.

There was a Circular Letter in the minutes advocating the doctrine of the Trinity.

The minutes of 1848 have not been obtained.

1849. 19th Anniversary.
The Association convened with the Mt. Gilead Church, Greene Co., Sep. 14, 1849. The opening sermon was by Eld. N.H. Witt, from Psa. 2:8, "Ask of me, and I shall give thee the heathen for thy inheritance,"--etc.

Bethlehem, Liberty, Pleasant Grove and Mt. Zion churches were received. Nineteen churches were represented.

984

Baptism 53; Recd. by Recom. 12; By Letter 13; Restored 3; Dismissed 56; Excluded 25; Died 19; Members 1148.
J. Brown, Mod. E.L. Cooper, Clerk.

The Circular Letter is on the Design and Mode of Baptism, by J.V. Rhoades.

1850. 20th Anniversary
Bethel Church, Macoupin Co., 3 mi east of Fayette entertained the Association which began, Sep. 20, 1850, with a Sermon by Eld. Samuel Culp from Psa. 2.

Unity, Sulpher Spring and Oakland churches were received. Twenty one churches were represented. Baptisms 190; Recd. by Recom. 40; By Letter 39; Restored 3; Dismissed 83; Excluded 58; Died 23; Members 1354.

John Brown, Mod. E.L. Cooper, Clerk.

The Circular Letter was on the atonement, and written by Edler Culp.

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1851. 21st Anniversary.
The Association met with the Mt. Pleasant Church, Macoupin Co., at Rhoades Point, beginning Sep. 19, 1851, Eld. John Brown preaching the customary sermon, from, 2 Tim. 4:2, "Preach the Word"

The Oak Hill, Mt. Olive and Shiloh Churches were received. Twenty-two churches were represented. Baptisms 318; Recd. by Recom. 33; By Letter 110; Restored 13; Dismissed 135; Excluded 29; Died 31; Members 1650.
John Brown, Mod. E.L. Cooper, Clerk.

The History and Origin of the United Baptists is in place of a Circular in the minutes.

All the churches, except those received at this session had received from one to 58 members by baptism.

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1852. 22nd Anniversary
The Association convened with the Bethlehem Church, Madison Co., 5 m. S.W. of Edwardsville, Sep. 17, 1852, which session was opened with a sermon by Eld. S.B. Culp, from Rom. 3:24. "Being justified freely by his grace through the redemption that is in Christ Jesus."

The Bethany and Paradise churches were received.

The churches represented were 24. Baptisms 133; Recd. by Recom. 20; By Letter 59; Restored 16; Dismissed 85; Excluded 41; Died 33; Members 1818.
John Brown, Mod. E.L. Cooper, Clerk.

Correspondence with the South District Association was refused. One of the churches has over two hundred members, and five others over one hundred.

The minutes of 1853, the twenty-third yearly meeting have not been obtained.

987

1854. 24th Anniversary.
The Lebanon Church, Jersey Co. welcomed the Association to their hospitalization this year. The session opened Sep. 1, 1854, Eld. S.B. Culp preached the sermon from Rom. 12:1, "I beseech you therefore, brethren,"--etc.

Liberty, Mt. Calvary, Mt. Zion and Red Bud churches were received. Twenty-nine churches were represented, return--
Baptisms 264; Recd. by Recom. 30; By Letter 50; Restored 14; Dismissed 141; Excluded 44; Died 30; Members 2099.

This year the Circular Letter was on the support of the gospel ministry. Good--and much needed.

Brown, Keele and Rhoades had been employed as the itinerants.

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1855. 25th Anniversary.
The Association met with the Mount Olive Church, Madison Co., 3 m. E. of Upper Alton, Sep. 13, 1855, and the session opened with a sermon, by Eld. R. C. Keele from 1. Cor.3:9. "For we are laborers together with God; ye are God's husbandry, ye are God's building."

The New Hope Church, St. Clair Co., and the Hickory Point Church were received.

Twenty-eight churches were represented. Baptisms 251; Rec'd. by Recom. 37; By Letter 61; Restored 11; Dismissed 137; Excluded 58; Died 37; Members 2105.

The Minutes of 1856 have not been obtained.

989

1857. 27th Anniversary.
The Association was held with the Shiloah Church, Macoupin Co., Sep. 18, 1857. The usual sermon was by Eld. John Brown, from 1. Cor. (Chap not given)

The Mt. Calvary and Shoal Creek churches were received. Twenty-six churches were represented. Baptisms 95; Rec'd by Recom. 19; By Letter 44; Restored 6; Dismissed 93; Excluded 77; Died 22; Members 2006.
J. Brown, Moderator. J. W. Farrow, Clerk.

Brethren from Carrollton, Franklin, Springfield and Edwardsville Associations were invited to seats as visitors. Delegates from some of them have been heretofore not received. Some things which an Association should not notice are sadly

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magnified and produce results which destroy harmony where it should ever exist.

The Circular Letter was in defence of the doctrine of the Trinity, Eld. J. W. Farrow being its author. From the minutes of this year it is evident that there had been some itinerating missionary service performed by Elders J. V. Rhoades and John Brown, but the Association decided to have none for the coming year. It also voted to adopt Brown's Hymne Book, the Author, or Compiler, was a member of the Association. The Association made the unusual request that each church clerk should keep an account of all funds for ministerial purposes raised during the year and report the amount at the next session of the body. The Association also recommended to each of its churches to have a protracted meeting

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before the session of 1858. The Association voted to pay $10 towards the expenses of its ministers delegated as correspondents to other Associations.

1858. 28th Anniversary.
For some reason, not explained, the Association did not meet this year with the Unity Church, St. Clair Co., as it voted to do, but it met with the Providence Church, in Greene Co., Sep. 17, 1858. The sermon was by Eld. A. C. Rafferty, from Mat. 11:29, "Take my yoke upon you, and learn of me, for I am meek and lowly in heart; and ye shall find rest unto your souls."

The church of Pleasant Hill, Jo Daviess Co., and the churches of Antioch and Pleasant Hill, Macoupin Co. were received. New Salem and Bethel churches were reported as dissolved. Twenty-six

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churches were represented. Baptisms 382; Rec'd. by Recom. 60; By Letter 49; Restored 21; Dismissed 111; Excluded 57; Died 26; Members 2289.
J. Brown, Moderator. A. Farrow, Clerk.

The Committee on religious Exercises asked Eld. J. Bulkley to fill the stand, which he did, the people then assembled. The Clerks reported the amount raised for the support of the ministry by the churches in the body at $856.58. Visiting brethren from neighboring Associations not corresponding delegates were invited to seats in the body. A very labored method was taken to learn whether the Association would correspond with the Carrollton and Edwardsville Associations; more acquaintance with those bodies seemed to be desired, although they were Associations the nearest to this body of any, and their churches were scattered over the same territory, inter-located, and sometimes near each other.

The Association recommended the Christian

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Times, the Christian Repository and the Western Watchman to the liberal support of the churches. It also recommended to all the churches to organize and keep up Sabbath Schools within their districts, and report yearly their progress. These last two items are the first of their kind which have appeared in the minutes of this body.

The following is a new institution in an association. "The Association recommend the Apple Creek Evangelic Alliance to the favorable regard and support of all our churches, as a suitable channel through which all their contributions for the spread of the gospel in the bounds of our Association may be made available."

The body ordered a Digest of the letters of the Churches to be made by the Moderator and

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Clerk, and to be inserted in the Minutes. It was the first ever appearing in them.

1859. 29th Anniversary.
The Association convened with the Oakland Church, Macoupin Co., in the town of Clyde. The session was opened, Sep. 15, 1859, with a sermon by Eld. A. Trabue, from Song of Solomon 6:10 "Who is she that looketh forth as the morning,"--etc.

Pilot Little Flock and Mt. Tabor churches were received. Bethel and New Hope churches had been dissolved, and from six there was no intelligence. Twenty-six churches were represented, returning Baptisms 113; Rec'd. by Recom.; 16; By Letter 25; Restored 13; Dismissed 71; Excluded 45; Died 31; Members 1963.
J. W. Farrow, Moderator. A. J. Johnson, Clerk.

Hickory Point, Shoal Creek, and Pleasant

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Hill churches were dismissed at their request.

The Honey Creek Church sent in the following query. "Are the following items a departure from the faith once delivered to the Saints?
To read sermons to congregations instead of preaching them.
To look to Colleges for preachers instead of looking to God.
To use instrumental music in the worship of God.
To employ a choir to sing for the churches instead of churches doing their own singing.
To use the title Reverend of Doctor of

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Divinity.
to believe that no one ought to preach but the learned."

After the points in the Query were quite fully discussed, the Association answered thus, "We consider that the practice of such things is contrary to the Spirit of the Gospel."

The general tone of the letters from the churches, as exhibited in the Digest indicated a low state of spirituality, and Christian life; though several of the churches had been much blessed.

1860. 30th Anniversary.
The Association met with the Salem

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Church, in Greene Co., Sep. 14, 1860, and the services were introduced by a sermon from Eld. A. Farrow, on Mat. 3:15, "Suffer it to be so now, for thus it becometh us to fulfill all righteousness."

East Fork, Hamburg, and Bethany Revived Churches were received. Bethany and Union churches were disolved, and from five others there was no intelligence. Twenty-four churches were represented, Baptisms 84; Rec'd. by Recom. 13; By Letter 42; Restored 4; Dismissed 62; Excluded 128; Died 18; Members 1902.
J. W. Farrow, Moderator. A. J. Johnson, Clerk.

A Committee was appointed to obtain a file of the Minutes of the Association and transcribe them in a book, and present their fee at

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the next annual meeting of the body. The Committee were J. W. Farrow, R. C. Keele and A. Farrow.

Shilow church was dismissed from the Association. New Bethel Church presented a letter, and asked admittance into the body, and was rejected for want of written Articles of Faith. The Letters showed that the state of religion was generally low in the churches.

The Minutes of 1861 have not been obtained.

1862. 32nd Anniversary.
The Meeting was with the Shaw's Point Church, Macoupin Co., opening with a sermon by Eld. Albert

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Farrow, from Heb. 4:9, "There remaineth therefore a rest for the people of God."

Bethalto and New Salem Churches were received. At the session a year ago, 1861, Liberty, Pilot, Little Rock, Mt. Tabor and East Fork churches were dismissed from this body, and formed the Rehoboth Association. New Hope and Mt. Zion churches were dropped, and from four other churches there was no intelligence.

Twenty churches were represented, Baptisms 115; Rec'd. by Recom. 12; By Letter 22; Restored 4; Dismissed 53; Excluded 50; Died 26; Members 1587.
A. Farrow, Moderator. A. J. Johnson, Clerk.

The Antioch Church was dismissed. The correspondence with the Union Association was dropped because of its denial of the Divinity of Jesus Christ, and of the Holy Spirit.

The Association passed the following resolution,

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at the request of the Mt. Olive church:
"Resolved, That in view of the afflicted state of our Country, this Association, in conjunction with the Macoupin Association, set apart the second Tuesday in each successive mouth, to be observed as a day of fasting, humiliation and prayer to Almighty God, that He would remember in mercy our bleeding country, and that He would protect, by His Providence, and keep by His grace the members of our churches, and the children of our brethren and sisters who are now in the army."

1863. 33rd Anniversary.
The Meeting was held with the Honey Creek Church, Macoupin Co., 4 m. north of Gillespie, and was opened Friday, Oct. 2, 1863, with a sermon

1001

by Eld. C. T. Bader from Col. 3:4, "When Christ who is our life shall appear then shall ye appear with him in glory."

Mt. Zion church was restored, and the Pacific Union was dropped having joined another Association. Sixteen churches were represented. Baptisms 73; Rec'd. by Recom. 4; By Letter 36; Restored 12; Dismissed 29; Excluded 30; Died 19; Members 1636.
A. Farrow, Moderator. A. J. Johnson, Clerk.

A Circular Letter was in the minutes of this year on Christian Union, written by Eld. C.T. Bader.

1864.
The Association met with the Goshen Church, Madison Co., near Long Lake Station, on the Alton and Terre Haute R.R., Sep. 30, 1864, opening with a sermon, by Eld. A. Farrow from Rev. 1:18, "I am he that liveth, and was dead; and, behold I am alive forever more, Amen; and have the keys of hell and of death."

1002

Thirteen churches were represented. Baptisms 96; Rec'd. by Recommendation 3; By Letter 14; Restored 5; Dismissed 44; Excluded 36; Died 16; Members 1655.
A. Farrow, Moderator. A. J. Johnson, Clerk.

The Committee to collect a file of the Minutes of the Association, reported, "That those of 1831 and 1832 were wanting to make the file complete, and that they had not obtained any information as to the first two sessions, except that the second session was held at the Apple Creek Church." The report was received, and the Committee discharged from further service, "and were requested to hand over what they had collected to M. Williams, James Sanders and A. Farrow to be printed and bound in a book form."

Eld. A. Farrow was appointed to write a Circular Letter, for the next anniversary, "on the subject of the great necessity of a oneness,

1003

union and love amongst the brethren composing this Association."

Mt. Calvary Church was granted a dismission from the body. Elders Brown and Wadley were appointed to prepare an Obituary notice of the death of Elder John P. Sinclair, to be printed in the Minutes.

1865. 35th Anniversary.
This Meeting was held with the Mt. Olive Church, Madison Co., 3 m. East of Upper Alton, and commenced, Aug. 25, 1865. The usual sermon was by Eld. John Brown from Heb. 13:1. "Let brotherly love continue."

Sixteen churches were represented. Baptisms 75; Rec'd. by Recom.12; By Letter 21; Restored 10; Dismissed 39; Excluded 24; Died 23; Members 1567.
A. Farrow, Moderator. A. J. Johnson, Clerk.

A. C. Rafferty, J. Brown, J. V. Rhoads and L. Michell were appointed to prepare an Obituary notice of

1004

Elder James Mitchell.

The Committee on printing the Minutes in book form, reported that they had not had the Minutes thus printed. The report was received and the committee discharged. The Clerk was then appointed to purchase a book, and transcribe the minutes of all previous sessions of the body, in said book, and report the cost of the book, and the number of days employed in transcribing, at the next session.

The Clerk of each church was requested to furnish the Association, at its next meeting, a correct sketch of the history of the church which he served; its organization and progress--who organized the church--what ministers have labored as its pastors, and everything of interest connected with it.

1005

"In view of the advanced age, and great labors of Elder J. V. Rhoads there was collection taken for him, amounting to $84.50."

The following statement is made in the minutes:
"The religious exercises during the session were conducted with ability and zeal, and a great degree of religious feeling and brotherly love were manifested."

The delegates formed a Convention, meeting after the meetings of the Association each day, to consider the subject of an associational mission, and arranged to have Elder F. M. Long employed to travel and preach to the destitute churches, and made provision for his compensation. It is somewhat singular that this should not have been attended to

1006

as a part of the work of the Association.

1866. 36th Anniversary.
The Hickory Grove Church, Greene Co., 4 miles east of the Berdan Station on the St. Louis and Jacksonville R.R., entertained the Association in its meeting, beginning, Aug. 24, 1866. Eld. F. M. Wadly opened the session with a sermon from Rev. 22:17, "And the Spirit and the bride say, Come,"--etc.

Mt. Calvary Church was received. Seventeen churches were represented, returning Baptisms 71; Rec'd. by Recom. 10; By Letter 36; Restored 10; Dismissed 76; Excluded 56; Died 24; Members 1504.
J. Brown, Moderator. A. J. Johnson, Clerk.

The Clerk appointed to transcribe the Minutes reported that he had completed the work up to the minutes of 1858, and was given

1007

time to finish it.

Head of Wood River Church was dropped for declaring non-fellowship with the body.

The Association recommended to each of its churches to have a sermon preached within that year, on the Origin, Faith and Practice of Baptist Churches, each church to select nay minister they desired, to deliver the discourse to them.

Delegates that had historical sketches of their churches were requested to file them with the Clerk, and churches which did not send theirs were again requested to do so at the next anniversary of the body. At the request of the Unity church, the Association recommended that each

1008

church send a contribution to each annual meeting, for the benefit of Eld. J. V. Rhoads in his declining age.

The Association appointed a committee to visit the Macoupin Association and propose a consolidation of the two bodies. The Missionary Convention of the Association, followed the meetings of the body the same as last year. The religious exercises of the session are said to have been especially marked with meekness, devotion and zeal.

1867. 37th Anniversary.
The Meeting was held with the Unity Church, St. Clair Co., 4. m. north of Belleville, commencing Aug. 23, 1867. Eld. J.V. Rhoads opened the session with a sermon from 2. Tim. 2:15, "Study to show thyself, approved unto God," etc.

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This note follows the notice of the sermon. "Elder Rhoads is now in his 74th year, and has faithfully attended every session of this body for 36 years, yet was enabled to deliver this discourse with ability and zeal."

Zanesville, Mt. Nebo, New Hope of Jersey Co., New Hope of Montg'y Co., and 1st Church of Bethalto were received, and 24 churches were represented. Baptisms 89; Rec'd. by Recom. 14; By Letter 45; Restored 8; Dismissed 121; Excluded 33; Died 15; Members 1534.
A. Farrow, Moderator. A.J. Johnson, Clerk.

The churches sent in $145.50 for Elder J. V. Rhoads. The Clerk reported that he had completed the transcribing of the Minutes of all the sessions of the body, except those of the first two not obtained, into the book ordered by the Association. He also reported, that the Book cost $7.20, and he had been twenty-two days in transcribing them. The report was received, and he was allowed the cost of the book and $2 per day for his labor, making the whole cost $51.20.

Providence and Harmony churches filed with

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the Clerk their historical sketches, and the churches which had not, including those received at this meeting, were again requested to send in theirs at the next session. The report of the Committee to confer with the Macoupin Association was that that body "deemed it inexpedient to consolidate the two Associations."

It was recommended to each the churches of the Association to have a discourse preached to them within the year on The Call to the Ministry.

The Minutes contain the following: "The Salem and Mount Pleasant Churches having each pledges the sum of $25 to support an itinerant, the Association to carry the same into effect, adopted the following resolutions:
"Resolved, That we adopt as an Association the following system of operation as a permanent

1011

principle of Home Mission:
"First, That each report every year, in advance the amount it may be willing to contribute to this purpose.
"Secondly, That a Missionary Board be appointed, every year, whose duty it shall be to receive and disburse funds contributed to this work, and report annually to this Association.
"Thirdly, That one or more traveling Missionaries shall be appointed by the Association, or through the Board, to travel within its bounds, and whose duty it shall be to make annual reports to this body."

A Board was then appointed, and pledges to the amount of $230 were given.

In direct religious exercises, there was two sermons on Friday afternoon, and two in the evening, and

1012

the same on Saturday afternoon and evening, and, on the Sabbath, two in the forenoon, two in the afternoon, and two in the evening.

1868.
The Association met with the Mount Pleasant Church, Macoupin Co., 10 miles north of Brighton, on the St. Louis and Chicago R.R., Aug. 21, 1868. Elder T. V. Greer opened the meeting with a sermon from Eph. 5:27, "That he might present it to Himself, a glorious church," etc.

Pleasant Grove, and the Head of Wood River Church were received. The Woodbury Church requested admission, but not having adopted written Articles of Faith, was an objection, which however was overcome by the churches' being received on the Articles of Faith of the Association. Twenty-one churches were represented,

1013

Baptisms 133; Rec'd. by Recom. 12; By Letter 39; Restored 13; Dismissed 55; Excluded 32; Died 20; Members 1721.
A. Farrow, Moderator. A. J. Johnson, Clerk.

The Missionary Board reported that not having been able to agree upon a missionary they had done nothing.

Mt. Nebo Church filed her historical sketch. The following query came form Shaw's Point Church; "Is it in accordance with scripture, and Baptist principles, for Apple Creek Association to retain in fellowship, churches which admit to their membership Materialists and Universalists."

The Association answered by saying, No.

Elders J. B. Varin and T. N. Marsh were appointed itinerant Missionaries, for one year, they agreeing to depend on the churches for their support. A committee was appointed to report on the Sabbath Schools, the first the Association ever had, and reported the following resolution which was adopted.
"Resolved, That this Association recommend to all

1014

its churches, the establishment, and support of Sabbath Schools, as an efficient means for the dissemination of a correct knowledge of the Holy Scriptures in the minds of the young, thereby laying a good foundation against the many errors which are afloat in the world."

The Constitution was so amended that no church can be received without adopting Written Articles of Faith. The churches were advised again to remember Elder J. V. Rhoads, by a yearly contribution for his benefit.

1869. 39th Anniversary.
The Association convened with the Mount Nebo Church, Bond Co., six miles west of Greenville, Aug. 27, 1869. The opening sermon was by Eld. A. Farrow from 2. Tim. 4:1. "I charge thee therefore before God, and the

1015

Lord Jesus Christ, who shall not judge the quick and the dead at his appearing and his kingdom; preach the Word."

Walnut Grove, West Prairie, O'Fallon, Shiloh Valley, Smith's Grove, Liberty, and New Douglass churches were received. Twenty-three churches were represented. Baptisms 123; Rec'd. by Recom. 15; By letter 28; Restored 5; Dismissed 89; Excluded 35; Died 14; Members 1818.
T. V. Greer, Moderator. A. J. Johnson, Clerk.

The ministers employed as missionaries in the Association for the year gave the following statistics in their reports. Elder Vann had traveled 600 miles; preached 165 sermons; 9 persons had united with the church; compensation received $365.00. Eld. Marsh had given 246 sermons and

1016

exhortations; had witnessed 147 conversions; delivered 6 Sabbath School lectures; baptized 19 persons; and had received as compensation $238.52.

The Circular Letter, written by the venerable Eld. J. V. Rhoads was read and directed to be inserted into the minutes. "After the reading, the brethren feeling impressed, that perhaps it was the last time they would ever be permitted to meet Elder Rhoads in an Association, united with Eld. A. Farrow in returning thanks to God for having raised up and protected father Rhoads, in preaching the gospel so faithfully and efficiently, for so many years, and in imploring the blessing of Heaven to be continued to him, and

1017

the churches, so many of which he has assisted in building up. The brethren joined in a beautiful song and extended to Eld. Rhoads their hands amidst the most solemn and effecting scene that ever occurred perhaps in the Association." Eld. Rhoads had attended every annual meeting of the Association for thirty nine years. That is from its organization.

Mt. Pleasant, Bethlehem, and New Hope, Montgomery Co. Churches filed their histories with the Clerk. The Committee on Sab. Schools and Bible Classes made the following report:
"While we look with pleasure on the interesting reports, coming form the Sabbath Schools connected with our churches, we are convinced that their reports might be made more favorable,

1018

if the numbers of our churches were more unanimously engaged in their support: Therefore,
"1st. Resolved, That in all cases church members alone should be teachers, and that it is the duty of Pastors and Deacons and other members, to be actively engaged in Sabbath Schools and Bible classes, and sustain by their presence, prayers, and labors, these efficient auxiliaries to the church of God.
"2nd. Resolved, That we request the churches to report in their letters next year the statistics of their Sabbath School or schools in the following form: Number of schools--No. of teachers--No. of scholars--No. of volumes in library--amount of money expended."

The Association advised the churches to be more punctual in remembering Eld. J. V. Rhoads by a yearly contribution to him. In connection

1019

with this subject the ministers present pledged themselves to contribute the first marriage fee they received to Eld. Rhoads. There was also a collection taken up for him amounting to $31.65. Elders J. Brown and G. P. Hanks were appointed to prepare an obituary notice of Eld. J. knowles, to be published in the minutes. This notice I have not found, and judge it was not published.

Elders T. N. Marsh and J. W. Swift were employed as itinerating missionaries within the body, for one year, they taking the pledges given in the letters, with those that may be given, with the liberality of the brethren for their support.

A verbal request having been sent from Walnut Grove Church, that the Association would ordain a Bro. S. M. Tennison to the work of the ministry; the

1020

meeting after duty considering the request decided that it had no power to resolve itself into a presbyter for ordaining ministries, and advised the church to call its own presbytery for that purpose.

The Circular Letter written by Eld. J. V. Rhoads is in the minutes of this year. The subject is that of "Good Works."

1870. 40th Anniversary.
The Shaw's Point Church entertained the Association while holding its Meeting which commenced, Aug. 26, 1870, with a sermon by Eld. T. N. Marsh, from 1. Tim. 6:20, "O, Timothy, keep that which is committed to thy trust," etc. Mount Zion and Little Flock Churches were received. There was sent in from the Churches for Eld. Rhoads $92.05. Twenty-five churches were repressented.

1021

Baptisms 113; Rec'd. by Recom. 25; By Letter 26; Restored 12; Dismissed 63; Excluded 51; Died 20; Members 1760.

Eld. Marsh, an Associational Missionary reported that he had traveled 3075 miles--Sermons and exhortations given 236; Conversions 86; Baptisms 23--Amount contributed for his support $255.35.

Eld. W. M. Roberts, for only a part of the year, reported:
Miles traveled, 640--Sermons 116, Exhortations, 81--S. S. Lectures, 6--Conversions, 103--Baptisms, 48--Churches organized, 2--Contributions received, $60.65.

Mt. Gilead Church was dismissed. O'Fallon and Pleasant Grove churches were dropped from the minutes for withdrawing without leave of the body.

The Queries from Shaw's Point and Unity Churches were taken up, which are in the following words, "Is the denomination known as Baptists, the only true Apostolic church, and have they received their constitution, doctrine

1022

ordination from the primitive church of Jesus Christ, established by Him and His Apostles, and if so, can immersion of the Lord's Supper administered by any other denomination valid?

These queries called out a long debate which was closed with the passage of the following resolution:
"Resolved, That the Association answer the queries, in the affirmative in regard to constitution, ordination and doctrine, and in the negative in regard to baptism, and other ecclesiastical acts."

The committee on Sabbath Schools reported the Constitution for a Sab. School Convention, and recommended the formation of one connected with the Association. The Report was adopted.

Eld. T. N. Marsh was employed as a missionary in the Association for the year to come, at $50 per

1023

month. It was agreed to take a public collection on the Lord's day for Bros. Marsh and Rhoads, to better remunerate them for their services last year. The following was passed:
"Resolved, That we recommend the "Baptist", published by J. R. Graves, at Memphis, Tenn., as a true exponent of Baptist principles, and earnestly solicit for it the patronage of this Association."

1871. 41st Anniversary.
This Meeting was held with the Bethlehem Church, Madison Co., three miles south of Bethalto, on the Alton and T. Haut R.R., and was commenced Aug. 24, 1871, with a sermon by Eld. A. Farrow, from 1. Tim. 4:1, 2, 3. "Now the spirit speaketh expressly, that in the latter times some shall depart from the faith," etc.

Brushy Grove, Blue Mound, and New Hope of Greene Co.,

1024

churches were received. Twenty-nine churches were represented. Baptisms 194; Rec'd. by Recom. 25; By Letter 52; Restored 9; Dismissed 94; Excluded 65; Died 14; Members 2055.
A. Farrow, Moderator. A. J. Johnson, Clerk.

Elder C. F. Tolman preached on the subject of Foreign Missions and took a collection of $44.83.

The Associational missionary, Eld. Marsh made his report for the year: Sermons and Exhortations delivered, 236; Conversions, 80; Baptisms, 25; Miles traveled, 2,753; months of labor, 10; Amount received, $500--

The following resolution was adopted:
"Resolved, That in view of the wants and demands of the heathen in foreign lands, the Apple Creek Association recommend the churches of the same to contribute to Foreign Missions annually."

The following was brought before the Meeting, and was considered:
"Will this Association hold in its fellowship any

1025

church or churches, that hold in their fellowship any minister or ministers who preach the doctrine of Materialism, commonly called Soul-Sleeping, or denying the immortality of the Soul?" Answered, No.

This would come very near intimating that there were such ministers in the Association. And this follows:
"Resolved, That as the report has gone forth that Mt. Pleasant Church holds in her communion members believing and teaching the doctrine of Materialism, that a committee of five ministers be appointed by this body to examine into the facts and report accordingly to this Association at its next session."

1026

1872. 42nd Anniversary.
The Association met with the Hickory Grove Church, Greene Co., at Sheffield Station, Aug. 22, 1872, opening with a sermon by Eld. G. P. Hanks, from Mat. 18:32, 33, "O, thou wicked servant, I forgave thee all that debt," etc.

The Oak Hill Church was received. Twenty-six churches were represented. Baptisms 97; Rec'd. by Recom. 6; By Letter 35; Restored 9; Dismissed 61; Excluded 37; Died 25; members 1737.
Levi Mitchell, Moderator. A. J. Johnson, Clerk.

The Committee appointed to visit Mt. Pleasant Church reported that from their inquiries they were assured that Materialism existed in the Church.

A committee was thereupon appointed to advise as to the best course to be taken toward that church. The committee made the following report, which was adopted:

1027

"Whereas, This Association in its session in 1871, decided that it will not hold in its fellowship, any Church that holds in its fellowship, any Ministers or Ministers who preach the doctrine of Materialism, commonly called Soul-Sleeping, or denying the Immortality of the Soul. And, Whereas, By the report of your Committee, it appears that Mt. Pleasant Church is holding in her communion Ministers who teach the doctrine of Materialism. And, Whereas, They have been admonished, and endeavored to justify themselves by a misapplication of Scriptures, and persist in the doctrine of Materialism. And as the Scripture requires us to reject a heretic after the first and second admonition, Therefore,
Resolved, That this Association withdraw its fellowship from the Mt. Pleasant Church, until it as

1028

a Church, renounces the doctrine of Materialism, and returns to the faith and doctrine held by this Association."

The queries from Mt. Nebo, and Smiths's Grove churches as to a division of the Association, were thus answered:
"Resolved, That we say in answer to the queries of said churches, that if any churches in our body wish to form a new Association, they should call for letters of dismission for that purpose."

"Whereas, a Committee of five was appointed by Carrolton Association to meet with Apple Creek and Macoupin Associations to endeavor to effect a union of all these Associations into one. A part of this Committee being present, wishes us to appoint a Committee to meet with them in

1029

council upon the matter, therefore,
Resolved, That we appoint a Committee for that purpose, consisting of Elders G. P. Hanks, T. N. Marsh, F. M. Long and J. D. Rhoads."

"The two following Articles were adopted, as additional to the Articles of Faith of the Association:
1. We believe that man is endowed with an Immaterial, Undying Spirit, which will exist in a disembodied state, either of conscious suffering of happiness from Death until the Resurrection.
2. We believe that disembodied Spirits are secure from the Disturbing Elements of this world, and are not permitted to return to earth to communicate with the living, but that they await the Resurrection's Morn, in expectancy of their final reward or doom."

1030

"The following resolution was adopted:
Resolved, That the Association appoint a Committee of five to inquire into the soundness of the Providence Church, touching the doctrine of Materialism, and if found to be unsound, counsel them, and report at the next meeting of this body.
Elders G. P. Hanks, S. B. Culp, W. P. Hart, John V. Rhoads and David Elliot were the Committee."

The Circular Letter of this year is on Man's two-fold nature--a spirit in a body; and was written by Eld. G. P. Hanks.

1873. 43rd Anniversary.
The Annual Meeting for 1873, was held with the New Hope Church, Montgomery Co., six miles north of Litchfield, beginning Aug. 22, 1873, with a sermon by Eld. T. N. Marsh, from Jude 3. "It was needful for me to write

1031

unto you, and exhort you that ye Saints should earnestly contend for the faith once delivered to the Saints."

Litchfield, and Prairie Grove Churches were received. Thirty-one churches were represented. Baptism 53; Rec'd by Recom. 13; By Letter 17; Restored 5; Dismissed 74; Excluded 31; Died 32; Members 1626.
Levu Mitchell, Moderator. A. J. Johnson, Clerk.

The report of the Committee on the Providence Church was submitted as follows:
"On the 22nd day of November last, your Committee visited the Providence Church, and after a good deal of fillibustering on the part of the assumed and assuming Pastor, we gained a hearing, and found about half of the membership very sound in the doctrine of Materialism. Your Committee counseled the church as best they could and left the event in the hands of God."

The following Minority Report was submitted:
"At a subsequently called meeting of that part of

1032

the original Providence Church who were unwilling to subscribe to Materialism, they, through the recommend of a council from Sister Churches, called together on that occasion, withdrew from the hand of church fellowship from the Materialist part of the Church, and your committee recommend that those members thus standing by the Old Articles of Faith be recognized by the Association as the United Baptist Church at Providence."

The report was adopted.

The Committee on consolidation of this Association with others reported: "That the council recommended that the Apple Creek, Carrollton, Macoupin, and Edwardsville Association consolidate, and then be divided into three specified districts."

The report was received, and the proposition was respectfully declined.

The action of the New Salem Church was endorsed

1033

in excluding a portion of its members for holding the doctrine of Materialism, and expressed satisfaction in the Church's firmness in the doctrines of the Bible.

Bethalto, Goshen, Woodbury, and Shiloh valley churches were dropped from the Minutes, they having lost their visibility.

The Circular Letter this year is on "The Unity of the Church of Christ", and was written by Eld. F. M. Long. The Sabbath School convention met yearly in connection with the Association.

1874. 44th Anniversary.
The Association met with the Honey Creek Church, Macoupin Co., 4 miles north of Gillespie, Aug. 20, 1874, and was opened by a sermon from Eld. F. M. Long, on John 19:30, "It is furnished."

1034

Barrow's Station, Bethalto, St. John's, New Hope, in Madison Co., and Mount Pleasant churches were received. Thirty churches were represented. Baptisms 307; Rec'd. by Recom. 56; By Letter 54; Restored 22; Dismissed 76; Excluded 52; Died 19; Members 2066.
Levi Mitchell, Moderator. A. J. Johnson, Clerk.

At the session of the Sabbath School Convention only five Schools made reports.

Having now sketched the history of this body to the present time, I will close with the names of the ministers belonging to it.

Ordained Ministers and their Post office address.

John Brown, Augusta, Kansas.
Trabue, Jerseyville.
S. J. Haycraft, Piasa.
T. N. Marsh, Piasa.
M. J. Badgley, Belleville.
R. S. Cole, Carrollton.

1035

F. M. Long, Albany, Oregon.
J. T. Yates, Gillespie.
Levi Mitchell, Gillespie.
Peter Long, Old Ripley.
Moore, Breese.
S. M. Tenison, Walshville.
H. Graves, Kane.
J. S. Deck, Bethalto.
J. R. Jones, Bunker Hill.
L. M. Whiting, Upper Alton.
T. F. Deck, Upper Alton.
G. P. Hanks, Litchfield.
T. W. Jones, Litchfield.
J. D. Rhoads, Plainview.
Wm. Dorman, Plainview.
D. P. Deadrick, Macoupin Station.
J. R. Barbec, Girard.

Licentiates and Post offices.

J. W. Bartlett, Jerseyville.
W. Beadle, Caseyville..
J. W. Deck, Upper Alton.
Long, New Douglas.
Hill, Fosterburg.
Wm. H. W. Kann, P.O. Unknown.
Thos. Reed, P.O. Unknown.
B. M. Tabor, P.O. Unknown.
Wm. Waite, Shole's Point.
John H. Slaten, Litchfield.

1036

1875. 45th Anniversary.
The Association convened with the Paradise Church, 4 miles west of Piasa, Aug. 26, 1875. The Session commenced with a sermon by T. N. Marsh from 1. Cor. 9:14. "Even so hath the Lord ordained that they which preach the gospel shall live of the gospel."

The churches were 36, 30 represented. Baptisms 194; Rec'd. by Recom. 16; By Letter 40; Restored 3; Dismissed 51; Excluded 57; Died 24; Members 2202.
Levi Mitchell, Moderator. A. J. Johnson, Clerk.

New Douglas and Little Vine Churches were received. The following were granted a dismission, Mt. Nebo, Prairie Grove, Smith's Grove, New Douglas, and New Hope, Mad. Co., and Litchfield.

"Resolved, That the Association request the New Bethel Church to have those irregularly baptised persons baptised by a regularly Ordained Minister, if they desire to retain their identity with us, as required by the 11th Article of Principles of Union."

1037

Chapter X. Quincy Association.

Quincy Association.

1038

against dropping members in 1844.
Sab School convention in 1844.

1039

Blue River Association.
The Blue River Association was formed at a meeting held with the Blue River Church, located eight miles east of Pittsfield, Pike Co., on June 8, 1833, by three churches, having 83 members. Mr. Peck says in Allen's Triennial Bap. Register, 1836, "Two of these churches seceded from the Morgan County Association on account of its opposition to Missions, and benevolent societies." One of these was the Pleasant Grove, now Manchester church, in Scott county, with Rev. Jacob Bower for Pastor, and P. N. Haycraft, also a minister. With the means now at hand, the other seceding

1040

church cannot be designated, unless it was Mount Gilead in Green co. And the third, which made the number at the organization must have been the one where the meeting to organize was held.

If there were other churches in Pike Co., than those connected with the Blue River Association they were undoubtedly anti-mission in character, and if associated, belonged to the Spoon river Association, or the Salem (Regular) Association. The Blue River Association was the second association, formed in the State on openly avowed missionary principles; the Edwardsville being the first, and also formed by three churches, in Oct. 1830. With

1041

this and the Blue River Association there existed the warmest sympathy. Yet, while those who believed in missions, by the Constitution, enjoyed their liberty in acting in their belief, there was no coercion. Those whose opinions were adverse to missions, and other forms of Christian effort, were equally at liberty to give, of not give, to missions--to favor or not favor benevolent work. But the law was that in this liberty there must be peace.

The location of this Association was mainly on the west side of the Illinois River, and in the County of Pike, which occupied in breadth the territory between the Mississippi and Illinois Rivers. There may have been

1042

an intention in its organization chiefly, to accommodate the Churches springing up in that section of the State, between the two rivers, with associational privileges. Yet, it was not designed to limit its bounds to churches west of the Illinois river. These were early times in that portion of Illinois,--pioneer days.

It is much regretted that the Minutes of the first three meetings of the Association cannot be obtained. In the sketch now proposed the beginning must be with the Third Anniversary,--That of

1836. 3rd Anniversary.
The Griggsville Church entertaining the Association in its session, commencing Aug. 26, 1836, on Friday,

1043

and Eld. Jonathan Sweet preached the introductory Sermon, from Mat. 24:14;--"And this gospel of the kingdom shall be preached in all the world, for a witness unto all nations, and then shall the end come."

The Churches were Pleasant Grove, Afterwards Manchester, in the South-East corner town in Scott Co., having 36 members; Mount Zion, having 47 members; Blue River, having 39 members; Salem, next town North of Pittsfield, having 14 members; Pleasant Vale, now Barry, having 34 members. Mt. Gilead, now in the Carrollton Association, having 22 members. Diamond Grove, now in the Springfield Association and located a few miles south of Jacksonville, having

1044

31 members. Bay creek, probably on a creek of that name in the South part of Pike Co., having 15 members. Griggsville, having 19 members.

The Ministers were:--Jacob Bower, Pleasant Grove or Manchester;--Mount Zion, Wm. Browning and Jesse Ellige;--Blue River, Lewis Allen;--Salem, Levi Kinman;--Pleasant Vale, or Barry, John Tyler;--Diamond Grove, Jonathan Sweet, and Joel Sweet, Joel being the son of Jonathan;--Griggsville, Calvin Greenleaf. Thus the Association in its third anniversary had nine churches, and nine ordained Ministers. Baptisms 15; Rec'd. by Letter 48; Dismissed 19; Excluded 4; Died 3; Members 257.
Joel Sweet, Moderator. Jesse Ellige, Clerk.

1045

As visiting ministers from other Associations, there were present, from the Edwardsville John M. Peck and Elijah Dodson;--and from the Salem Association, John Logan, John Clark and Norman Parks.

The American and Foreign Bible Society was cordially welcomed as a denominational organization, (Just then formed) and commended to the churches, as worthy of their contributions.

Sabbath Schools and Adult Bible Classes, had been recommended at previous sessions, and were now also.

The Illinois Baptist Education Society had been formed at the Meeting of the Ills. Bap. Convention in Springfield, in a special session, and Eld. Peck was requested to read its

1046

constitution and explain it, room was also given for others to speak who wished on the subject, After which the following resolution was passed:
"Resolved, That this Association approve of the organization of the Illinois Baptist Education Society, and recommend the churches and brethren to aid it, and they especially recommend the churches and brethren to aid it, and they especially recommend any young brethren of suitable gifts and graces, to avail themselves of its aid in obtaining an education."

As this anniversary is the commencement of the Historical Sketch of this association, it is proper that a more particular of the doings of the body should be made than will be consistent here after.

1047

Hence the following is taken from the Minutes to give a clearer view of the spirit animating the members.

"Resolved, That the "Western Pioneer and Baptist Standard-bearer" published at Upper Alton, weekly, be recommended to the brethren and public as an organ of the denomination in this State, and well deserving of their patronage.

"In view of the low state of religion, as expressed in most of the letters of the churches, the Association urgently recommended to all the churches to observe the last day of the year for fasting, confession and prayer to God for a revival of religion

1048

in the churches, and the conversion of sinners.

"Resolved, That it is desirable to have the tracts and other publications of the Baptist General Tract Society, more extensively circulated, especially the Baptist Manuel, and it is recommended to the churches and brethren to obtain supplies of Baptist
tracts, and furnish the traveling preachers for distribution among the people.

Note.--These publications can be obtained from Eld. John Logan, of McDonough county, from the Pioneer office, Upper Alton, and from J. M. Peck, Rock Spring.

1049

The discussions, especially on the Bible question and ministerial education, were peculiarly interesting and impressive. Brethren felt their hearts greatly animated, and the utmost harmony prevailed.

Lord's day,--A large assembly met and repaired to a grove, where Elders Dodson and Peck preached. The latter, by appointment, explained and enforced the principles of Home missionary operations, from 2. Cor. 8. Chap. A collection of $11.70, and a subscription of sixty dollars were taken for the Convention. Joel Sweet preached at 4 o'clock.

The session of the Association was harmonious, and the meetings for business and preaching were well attended.

1050

1837. 4th Anniversary.
The Meeting of the Association was held with the Pleasant Vale Church, (now Barry) commencing, Friday, Aug. 25, 1837. Rev. Calvin Greenleaf preached from Isa. 43:10--"Ye are my witnesses saith the Lord." The Sandy Creek, now Winchester Church, in Scott Co., and the Liberty Church in Adanis Co., were received. Eleven churches were represented by 33 Delegates, of whom 7 were ordained ministers. Baptisms 60; Rec'd. by Letter 24; Dismissed 35; Excluded 6; Died 3; Members 345.
Joel Sweet, Moderator. Jesse Ellige, Clerk.

The corresponding Associations were Edwardsville, Salem, Ill., and Salt River, Mo.

The Diamond Grove Church asked to be dismissed from

1051

the Association for the purpose of entering into the formation of another Association, more convenient for them. The request was granted, and the Church was one of the several churches which formed the Springfield Association, Oct. 7, 1837.

The Lord's day services were deeply impressive and solemn. It is said, The word was preached with intense anxiety for the conversion of sinners. And God was pleased to own the labors of his servants, and many were pricked to the heart, whose groans and cries and tears pierced the hearts of Christians, upon which, the meeting was protracted more than a week, and many precious souls

1052

will praise the Lord in eternity for the happy results of that meeting. There being no meeting house, the meetings were held under an extensive arbor, previously prepared, and well seated in the midst of surrounding camps. This church (Barry) reported the next year 28 baptisms, and 5 ordained additions by letter. One of the converts of this meeting was Prof. J. Bulkley, D.D. of Shurtleff College.

1838. 5th Anniversary.
The Sandy Creek, or Winchester Church, then in Morgan county, entertained the Association in its Anniversary, beginning on

1053

Friday, Aug. 24, 1838, with a sermon by Rev. Jesse Ellige, from Psalms 72:19--"And let the whole earth be filled with his glory. Amen and Amen." The Perry, and the Hadley's Creek Churches were received. Eleven churches were present by Delegates numbering 34. Baptisms 101; Rec'd. by Letter 57; Dismissed 31; Excluded 7; Died 1; Members 450.
J. Bower, Moderator. Jesse Ellege, Clerk.

In these days when the friends of Christian Missions and work were few, amid the surrounding many, professing the same faith, though severely opposed to them because they were "workers together with God" in the labors of his kingdom, Christian sympathy, in Christian work was highly prized; and for

1054

this reason the correspondence between Associations who were in fellowship in Christ's labors was greatly valued. A correspondence by the visits of brethren. At this session there were from Edwardsville,--Delegates with letter and Minutes--J. M. Peck and Z. B. Newman; Salem--M. Shuey, letter and Minutes; North District, Elder Wm. Spencer with minutes.

Springfield,--Elder Joel Sweet and minutes. Minutes from the Illinois River, and Northern Associations, with letters desiring correspondence.

Elder Peck read a Circular, addressed

1055

to the Associations, and explained a plan of general correspondence between sound Baptist Associations in the State, who are in favor of union and mutual cooperation. Whereupon it was,
Resolved, That a correspondence be open by letter and minutes with the foregoing Associations, and as far as possible by delegates.

Saturday morning, after a season of prayer, Elder Peck preached a sermon on the Institution and obligations of the Christian sabbath, from Isa. 58:13, 14; and Acts 20:7.

Resolutions were passed, favoring the work of the Am. and Foreign Bible Society; Sabbath

1056

Schools and Bible Classes; Illinois Bap. Convention; Ministerial Education; Western Pioneer; Temperance; and Ministerial Support.

As something peculiarly characteristic of the times the following is inserted:
Time of the Monthly meeting and supply of each church.
Manchester, 3rd Sabbath, Elder J. Bower
Mount Zion, 2nd Sabbath, Elder J. Ellege
Blue River, 3rd Sabbath, Elder Wm. Foreman
Salem, 1st Sabbath, Elder David Hubbard
Pleasant Vale, 1st Sabbath, Elder J. Ellege
Mount Gilead, 2nd Sabbath, Elder J. Bower
Bay Creek, 4th Sabbath, Elder J. Ellege
Griggsville, 1st Sabbath, Elder Wm. Ford--Licentiate
Sandy Creek, 1st Sabbath, Elder J. Bower
Liberty, 1st Sabbath, Elder John Tyler
Perry, 4th Sabbath, Elder Calvin Greenleaf
Hadley's Creek, 4th Sabbath, Elder John Tyler

1057

Prayer meeting were at Sun-rise, and other times, and also several sermons were preached at intervals of business.

On Lord's day, there were five sermons, a Sabbath School Meeting, the ordination of a Deacon, and the administration of the Lord's Supper. A member of anxious persons came forward for prayer. It is probable that the meeting was continued longer with interest, as the church reported at the next session 16 received by baptism.

1839. 6th Anniversary.
The Association convened with the Salem Church, Pike Co., Friday, Aug. 23, 1839, and Rev. J. Bower preached the

1058

opening sermon from Mat. 16:18.--"And I say also unto thee, that thou art Peter, and upon this rock I will build my church;" etc.

The Hartford and Pleasant Vale Church was not the one heretofore bearing that name. That had changed its name to Barry. This was a new church in the south part of Pike Co. Twelve churches were represented. Baptisms 67; Rec'd. by Letter 42; Restored 1; Dismissed 39; Excluded 14; Died 5; Members 525.
Jacob Bower, Moderator. A. Bailey, Clerk.

The Manchester Church was dismissed to unite with the Springfield Association. This Query came from the Griggsville church.

"Is it good order to grant letters to members expressing a dissatisfaction, and say they

1059

will unite with no church?" Answer, No!

Lord's day:--A large congregation assembled at the Stand, and three sermons were preached, and thirteen came forward for prayers of Christians.

1840. 8th Anniversary.
The Perry Church entertained the Association during its Anniversary, which convened Aug. 21, 1840, and was opened with a sermon by Rev. Wm. Foreman, from Heb. 12:1,--"Wherefore, seeing we also are compassed about with so great a cloud of witnesses," etc. The Richfield and Pittsfield churches organized since the last anniversary, were received.

1060

Thirteen churches were represented.

Baptisms 76; Rec'd. by Letter 27; By relation 10; Dismissed 55; Excluded 7; Died 6; Members 513.
Jacob Bower, Moderator. A. Bailey, Clerk.

The 14 churches in the Association were all in Pike Co., excepting Mt. Gilead, Winchester, and Liberty, and two of these were on the east side of the Illinois River.

As the Association has not heretofore expressed its opinions on the points included in the following resolutions, they are inserted here that the views of the body might be known.

"Resolved, That we deeply deplore the desecration of the Lord's day, and urge upon all the churches and members composing this Association, to abstain

1061

from all unneccesary traveling, visiting, and such other things as are forbidden in the word of God, and tend not to promote holiness of heart; and to regard that day as wholly consecrated to the Lord"

"Resolved, That we regard the daily reading of the Scriptures, and the maintenance of morning and evening worship in their respective families, and the religious training of children and domestics to be the indispensable duty of heads of families."

The Lord's day services were largely attended, in both the Baptist and Methodist houses of worship. Six sermons were preached in them during the day.

1062

1841. 9th Anniversary.
With the Barry Church the Association convened to hold its session, on Friday, Aug. 20, 1841, which was opened with a sermon by Rev. Alvin Bailey, from Deut. 3:25. "I pray thee, let me go over and see the good land," etc. The churches of Chambersburg and Milton were received. Fifteen churches were represented by 57 delegates. Baptisms 69; Rec'd. by Letter 40; Dismissed 47; Excluded 7; Died 11; Members 586.
A. Bailey, Moderator. C. Greenleaf, Clerk.

A new Association, bearing the name, "Western" was present by delegates, desiring correspondence, which was granted. Rev. T. H. Ford was appointed to preach a Missionary

1063

Sermon at the next anniversary.

1842. 9th Anniversary.
The Anniversary of the Association was held with the Griggsville Church, beginning with a sermon, Aug. 26, 1842, by Rev. T. H. Ford, from 2. Cor. 3:11--"For if that which is done away was glorious, much more that which remaineth is glorious." Thirteen churches were represented. Baptisms 146; Rec'd. by Letter 35; By relation 2; Restored 5; Dismissed 22; Excluded 10; Died 8; Members 509.
C. Greenleaf, Moderator. Jesse Ellege, Clerk.

Gilead Church requested to be dismisssed, to join the North District association. The corresponding delegates to the Western Association

1064

were Elders Sherwood, Greenleaf, Coffee, and Elledge, and Brn. Brown and Jennings. The following resolution was passed:
"Resolved, that our delegates to the Western Association be, and they are hereby empowered to negotiate a union of the two Associations, provided a union can be effected satisfactorily to the contracting parties."

Also the following:
"Resolved, That we deem quarterly ministerial conferences, composed of preachers and deacons, important, in as much as they are calculated to extend acquaintance, and promote harmony both in sentiment and in action."

1065

The different branches of Christian work were noticed and recommended. Here ends the history of the Blue River Association.

A single copy of the minutes of the Third Annual Meeting of the Western Association is in my hands; but I learn from another source that the body was organized at a meeting of delegates convened with the Union Church, near Mendon, Adams Co., Ill. In 1840. The Churches uniting in the organization were Bethany, now Payson; 1st Quincy; Union; Mount Sterling; and Rushville. The ministers were Elders, N. Parks, Edwin C. Brown, John G. Seger, William Hobbs, H. P. Graves,

1066

and Henry Davis; and licentiates Jonathan Brown and Moses Winslow.

1842.
The Western Association held its Third Anniversary with the Rushville Church, Schuyler Co., commencing, Sep. 8, 1842. The Annual Sermon was preached by Eld. J. G. Seger, from Heb. 13, 17,--"For they watch for your souls, as they that must give account."

The churches represented were the six already named, which reported 19 persons baptized, and 302 members. The only change in the Ministry, from the names previously given was Eld. Calvin Greenleaf in the place of N. Parks.

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The minutes contain the following;
"A Committee consisting of brethren Grover, Hobbs, Seger, E. Davis, and E. P. Swan were appointed to confer with the delegation from Blue River Association relative to a union of that body with this."

The Committees appointed on different subjects, in their reports, give the assurance that the Association was thoroughly missionary in character. These reports were on Missions, (Foreign and House), Bible, Education, and Publication Societies, Sabbath Schools, and Temperance.

The following report was made on the observance of the Sabbath.

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"As the Sabbath was made for man, and intended for his moral and religious benefit, and as a strict observance f it is conducive to fervent personal godliness, therefore,
"Resolved, That it is the duty of everyone, especially every professor of religion, to abstain from work on that day, and to spend it in religious conversation, and to attend punctually at the house of God."
"Resolved, That the Association recommend to the churches a more strict observance of the Lord's day, or Christian Sabbath, by refusing to make it a day of visiting."

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Shurtleff College was urgently commended to the patronage of Churches and members. The number of Students in 1841, was 86, 11 of whom had the ministry on view. The expenses of education at it, per annum, were stated to be only from $85 to $100.

The committee appointed to confer with the delegates from the Blue River Association reported. It was then,
"Voted, That the Association accede to the request of the Blue River Association to unite.

Arrangements were them perfected for the union of the two bodies. The name agreed upon for the body was the "Union Association".

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An historical sketch of the Quincy Association
1843. 1st Anniversary.
The Quincy Association convened in its First Session with the Church in Quincy, Aug. 24, 1843, and was opened with a sermon by Rev. Charles Harrington, from Rom. 3:28,--"Therefore we conclude a man is justified by faith, without the deeds of the law."

From what has been preciously written it is known that this body was formed by the union of the Blue River and the Western Associations, and included the churches of those bodies. The Brooklyn Church was now received. The churches represented were 18, by 68 delegates. Baptisms 184; Received by Letter 61; By Experience 17; Restored 5; Dropped 2; Excluded 29; Died 9; Members 913.
C. Harrington, Moderator. E. C. Brown, Clerk.

There were 9 ordained ministers and 4 licentiates. Committees were appointed on the several departments of Christian work, and made their reports.

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Rev. Joel Sweet had been employed as a missionary of the Association. He reported nine and a half months labor, and had preached 254 sermons, had attended 206 prayer meetings, had visited 194 families, had baptized 20 persons, and had traveled 572 miles. He aided five churches in seasons of protracted worship, which churches now reported the baptism of 102 persons.

To promote Sabbath Schools the Association appointed seven of its members, not ministers, as Sabbath School lecturers, in the four counties, in which its churches were located. And it also recommended a meeting of the Superintendents and Teachers in each county, in the bounds of the Association, to consult on the best means of conducting Sabbath Schools.

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On Sabbath afternoon, the Superintendents, teachers and Friends of Sabbath Schools held a meeting and consulted together on the subject of a Sabbath School Convention, embracing the Schools in the bounds of Quincy Associations.

This shows that more than thirty years ago, among those who are old men now, there were those who were earnest workers in these schools. All the churches but three reported baptisms, and seven of them, a large number, the highest being 48. The Hadley Creek Church reported the early death of their pastor, Rev. M. W. Coffee, who had also several the Griggsville church as its pastor. At this session the name Union, given to the Association when the Blue River and Western were united, was changed to Quincy.

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1844. 2nd Anniversary.
The Annual Session of the Association was held with the Payson Church, commencing with business, by postponing the usual sermon. The Belmont Church was received. There were twenty churches; seventeen of them were represented by 72 messengers. Baptisms 61; Received by letter 553; By Experience 9; Dismissed 64; Dropped 4; Excluded 12; Died 10; Members 960. The ministers were 10 ordained and 5 licensed. Liberty Church had changed its name to Kingston.
C. Harrington, Moderator. R.G. Kay, Clerk.

The following was adopted by the body:
"Resolved, That this Association cannot recognize any mode of members dissolving their connection with churches, except by letters of dismission to churches of the same faith and order with themselves, or by exclusion."

In the evening the annual sermon was preached by Rev. A. Edison, from Rev. 3:2, "Be watchful, and strengthen the things which remain, etc..

The Centerville Church brought in a complaint against the Brooklyn Church, and C. Harrington, C. Greenleaf and R. G. Kay were appointed a committee, to investigate and reconcile differences if possible, and report at the next session.

The Sabbath School lecturers appointed last year failed to do anything in the way of lecturing. The following resolutions in reference to the Sabbath were passed:

"Resolved, That we regard the proper observance of the Sabbath as intimately

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connected with the perpetuity of the privileges of the gospel of Christ."

"Resolved, That we mean by the ‘proper observance’ of the Sabbath, rest from common labor; devout attendance on public and social divine worship; and spending the entire day in the moral and religious improvement of our selves or others."

The following on the death of Prof. Newman of Shurtleff College was passed:
"Resovled, That we have learned with deep sorrow, of the recent death of Professor Zenas B. Newman, of Shurtleff College, whose ripe scholarship and fervent piety gave so much promise of usefulness to the Baptist denomination in this State;

1076

and we hereby tender our sympathy to the Faculty of said college, and also to his bereaved family."

Committees were appointed to visit churches which had failed to represent themselves for one or more years, and report at the next session.

A Sabbath School Convention was organized in connection with the Association; the special object of which was to promote the interest of Sabbath Schools.

By a resolution the Association pledges itself to sustain, through our Foreign Mission Board, a Karen Native Assistant, with a salary of $100.

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1845. 3rd Anniversary.
The Mount Sterling Church entertained the Association while holding its Meeting, which was opened, Aug. 8, 1845, with a sermon by Rev. John Seger from Rom. 10:1, "Brethren, my heart's desire and prayer to God for Israel is that they might be saved."

Nineteen churches sent delegates, Baptisms 41; Received by Letter 59; By Experience 7; Dismissed 71; Excluded 31; Died 9; Members 964. The members of ministers the same as in 1844.
Charles Harrington, Moderator. James C. Bernard, Clerk.

Nearly all of our benevolent organizations were represented by agents, who were welcomed.

The Association recommended the

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observance of a certain day for fasting and prayer the revival of the Lord's work. The reports on the branching of Christian were generally very long.

1846. 4th Anniversary.
The Perry Church gladly entertained the Association this year. The session began Aug. 8, 1846, with a sermon by Rev. S.S. Parr from 2. Cor. 4:1, "Therefore seeing we have this ministry, as we have received mercy, we faint not."

Nineteen churches were represented. Baptisms 88; Received by Letter 54; By Experience 10; Restored 1; Dismissed 66; Excluded 28; Died 9; Members 995.
C. Harrington, Moderator. H. Carmen, Clerk.

The committee appointed two years before to examine into the difficulty the Centerville Church had with the Brooklyn Church, recommended that the churches submit

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their difficulty to a mutual council, and agree to abide their decision. The report was adopted. The Association thus expressed its opinion upon a practical point; perhaps the one having a connection with the trouble between these churches.

"Resolved, That in the judgement of this Association, it is incorrect in practice, and contrary to Baptist usage to receive into fellowship persons excluded from sister churches."

Business took its usual course. The committee on the state of religion in the churches reported, and the report was adopted. It opened with this sentence: "an inquiry into the religious condition of the Association exhibits a spiritual declension and apathy, lamentable and alarming."

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The Milton Church had changed its name to New Salome. The name of Rev. B.B. Carpenter, who was so long pastor at Griggsville, appeared as a delegate from that church this year, for the first time. "The Western Star" published by Rev. A. Bailey in Jacksonville was recommended to the patronage of the brethren.

I will here make another extract from the report on the state of religion: "Two churches only have enjoyed special manifestations of God's power in the conversion of sinners; while by far the greater part have not witnessed one trophey of God's all-conquering grace. We learn also that there is a great want of ministerial labor in many parts of the Association. Three churches only are supplied with the constant preaching of the Word;

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others enjoy preaching only a part of the time. And many important points have no Baptist preaching except casual supplies from visiting brethren. In many parts the rising generations are growing up under the influence of incorrect principles--the easy dupes of skepticism, Atheism or Infidelity. These things present to us an unequivocal call for humiliation, repentance, confession and consecration to God, and for immediate, energetic, and systematic measures on the part of the churches."

1847
The Association met this year with the Barry Church Aug. 7, 1847, and the session was opened with a sermon by Rev. B.B. Carpenter, from Jer. 8:22, "Is there no balm in Gilead; is there no physician there? Why then is not the health of the daughters of my people recovered?"

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The Green Plains Church, in Hancock Co. was received. Twenty churches were represented. Baptisms 26; Received by Letter 64; By Experience 7; Restored 2; Dismissed 95; Excluded 38; Died 19; Members 973.
Charles Harrington, Moderator. H. Carmen, Clerk.

There were twelve ordained and three licensed ministers. The venerable Rev. Archibald Macaly from New York, agent of the Am. and For. Bible Society was present. A day for fasting and prayer with consecration to God was again recommended to the churches. No business of more than usual interest was done.

1848. 6th Anniversary
The Griggsville Church provided for the meeting of the Association, which opened its session, Saturday Aug. 12, 1848, with a sermon by Rev. J.O. Metcalf from Acts 20:24, "But none of these things move me, neither count I my

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life dear unto myself," etc.

The churches were twenty; eighteen only were represented; Baptisms 59; Received by Letter 95; By Experience 5; Restored 1; Dismissed 67; Excluded 34; Died 11; Members 956. The ordained ministers were 12 and 1 licentiate.
Charles Harrington, Moderator. H. Carmen, Clerk.

At the session the year before this a Minister's and Deacon's Conference was originated, and at this meeting the Association recommended its ordinance.

At the anniversary of 1844 committees were appointed to visit the Salem, Chambersburg and Richfield Churches, which had failed to be represented. These committees never reported, neither have the churches been since represented. Doubtless they had become extinct. The course of business was very uniform and furnished but little that was historic.

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1849. 7th Anniversary.
The Association met with the Union Church in Mendon, Adams Co., and opened its session, Aug. 11, 1849, with a sermon by Rev. Aaron Jackson of Quincy, from Psalm 34:3,--"O magnify the Lord with me, and let us exalt his name together."

The churches were twenty; from five there was no intelligence. Baptisms 22; Received by Letter 56; By Experience 6; Restored 3; Dismissed 53; Excluded 16; Died 11; Members 846.
C. Harrington, Moderator. H. Carmen, Clerk.

The Association rejoiced over the action of the Brooklyn Church in which they removed the difficulty which they had occasioned with the Centerville Church. Committees reported on Digest of Letters from the Churches; on

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Education and Religious Publications; on Foreign Missions; on House Missions; on Am. and Foreign Bible Society; and on Indian Missions. Three churches only had received any additions by baptisms, which were Quincy 5, Payson 3, Green Plains 14. This surely was a painful record. These certainly existed abundant cause for earnest inquiry, and great searchings of heart with the members of al the churches, to ascertain if possible why the Lord withheld the outpourings of his Holy Spirit from them.

1850. 8th Anniversary.
The Association convened with the Quincy Church in this session which opened Saturday, Aug. 10,

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1850, with a sermon by Rev. Charles Harrington, from 1. John 3:2,--"Beloved, now are we the sons of God and it doth not yet appear what we shall be," etc.

Littleton Church, in Schuyler Co. and Warsaw Church, in Hancock, Co. were received. The Hadley Creek Church had disbanded, and the New Siloam Church disappears from the minutes without any record. The churches were twenty. Blue River and New Hartford Churches were not represented. Baptisms 137; Received by Letter 58; By Experience 12; Restored 10; Dismissed 55; Excluded 13; Died 15; Members 1028. Quincy Church received by baptism 21, Rushville 10, Kingston 24, Belmont 14, Green Plains 10, Littleton 46. The ordained ministers reported by the churches were 12; the licentiates were 2.
C. Harrington, Moderator. E.P. Burdett, Clerk.

Quincy, Payson, Griggsville and Warsaw Churches enjoyed the constant ministry of their pastors,--A. Jackson, J.O. Metcalf, B.B. Carpenter and R. Weston.

Pleasant Vale, Barry and Belmont churches each received the labors of Elder Jesse Ellege regularly on stated Lord's days; Kingston and Perry churches divided the labors of Elder Wm. Hobbs; Union and Green Plains churches received the ministry of Elder G. Seger, each one half of the time; Rushville, Littleton and Brooklyn churches divided the labors of Elder H. Davis; Pittsford and Bay Creek churches had the services of Elder Norman Parks; Centerville and Mount Sterling churches had no regular ministerial services.

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Arrangements were made for three preaching services on the Lord's day. Committees reported on the several organizations for promoting Christian work that usually receive attention in associational meetings.

The following resolution was passed with reference to destitute churches and places:
"Resolved, That the churches be requested to relinquish their claims upon their Pastor's, once in three months, for the purpose of carrying the ‘Bread of Life’ to destitute churches within the bounds of our Association."

The Hadley Creek church, located between Barry and Pittssfield churches, had

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disbanded and the members had united with churches in the vicinity of their residences.

The committee on Destitution said in their report:
"Within our Associational bounds there is great destitution of the preached Word. Many neighborhoods of considerable extent, rarely enjoy the privileges of Sabbath Worship, or of hearing the preacher of the Gospel. And in view of the smallness of our means, we would direct the attention of the Association, especially, to those churches connected with us which are entirely destitute, or seldom enjoy the ministrations of the ‘Word of Life.’ A number from whom we were want, on by-gone days to receive evidence of their Christian fellowship

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and fraternal love, by letter and messengers, have ceased to communicate with us, having been long with none to guide them or stir them up to diligence and active duty, have fallen away to an anti-working, or some others equally deleterious spirit, and no longer report themselves."

"We most cordially approve of the course taken by the Church at Hadley Creek, in disbanding and uniting with Churches in their vicinity; and earnestly hope other feeble Churches will follow their example."

The Committee closed their report with the following:
"Resolved, That the Association retain

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in its own hands the funds sent up for House Missions, and apply them to the maintenance of the Preached Word in our own bounds, especial reference being first had to the most important and promising points, and that a committee of three be appointed to carry out this resolution." Adopted.

1851. 9th Anniversary.
Payson Church ministered to the members of the Association, which began its session, Aug. 9, 1851, with a sermon by Rev. Jesse Ellege from Rom. 1:16, "For I am not ashamed of the gospel of Christ," etc.

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Eighteen churches were represented. Green Plains church took the name of Mt. Pleasant. From Pleasant Vale and Warsaw churches there was no intelligence. Baptisms 154; Received by Letter 91; By Experience 14; Restored 5; Dismissed 66; Excluded 29; Died 17; Members 1191. Judging from the members received by baptism, six of the churches enjoyed a revival.
C. Harrington, Moderator. H. Carmen, Clerk.

The Littleton Church sent in this Query: "What is the best course to pursue, in case a member, or members shall commune with other denominations, and persist in it?" The Committee replied: "That members communing with Pedo-Baptists and other Churches thereby acknowledge the validity of sprinkling, pouring and infant baptism, should be remonstrated with; and should they persist, be

1093

excluded for having abandoned Baptist principles."

The Bay Creek Church sent this request: "Will the Association define the relation of a member to a church, from which he has received a letter of dismission, while he holds the letter in his possession?" The Committee answer: "They regard a member holding a letter of dismission as a member of the Church from which he received the letter, in every sense, until he joins another church."

The Committee on Sabbath desecration presented the following:
"Resolved, That in view of the great desecration of the Sabbath, our church

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members be requested to discontinue Sabbath visiting, and also avoid political and worldly discussions on that Holy day." These several reports were approved.

Elder Charles Harrington had been usefully employed as a missionary of the Association by its Committee.

1852. 10th Anniversary.
The Association met with the Littleton Church, and was opened Oct. 2, 1852, with a sermon by Rev. Norman Parks, from Acts 28:9, 10,--"So when this was done, others also which had diseases in the island, came," etc.

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Pearl Creek church was received. The churches were 21 and 17 were represented. Baptisms 208; Received by Letter 100, By Experience 20; Restored 1; Dismissed 101; Excluded 34; Died 18; Members 1418. Some of the churches, as their reported baptisms indicated had been largely blessed with revivals. The baptisms in Griggsville church were 75, in Barry Church 52.
C. Harrington, Moderator. H. Carmen, Clerk.

The course of business was as usual.

1853. 11th Anniversary.
The Association met with the church in Perry, Oct. 1, 1853, and Rev. W.W. Keep preached the opening sermon from 2. Cor. 5:19,--"To wit, that God was in Christ reconciling the world unto himself," etc.
Seventeen churches were represented. Baptisms

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21; Received by Letter 85; By Experience 26; Restored 5; Dismissed 123; Excluded 23; Died 20; Members 1502. Ordained ministers 12. The churches largely increased by baptisms were Perry 33, Payson 59, Quincy 13; Mt. Pleasant 68, Kingston 11, Pearl Creek 18, and Pittsfield 7.
C. Harrington, Moderator. H. Carmen, Clerk.

The committee on destitution had employed Rev. Wm. Hobbs as an itinerating missionary, who had labored three quarters of the year, at an expense of 150 dollars.

He reported sermons preached, 139; and persons baptized 11; and in two quarters attended 27 pray and conference meetings; 97 families were converted with personally on the concerns of the soul, and 1250 miles were traveled.

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The committee closed this report by offering the following, which was adopted:
"Resolved, That this Association viewing with deep interest the necessity, of carrying the preached word into every destitute neighborhood within its bounds, would urge the necessity of raising from $400 to 500, to be used by your Committee for the purpose of carrying out this object the coming year."

Reports full of interest were made and adopted on the several branches of Christian benevolence and work. On the Lord's day, by request, there was preaching in four houses of worship by our brethren.

1854. 12th Anniversary.
The Association met with the Barry Church

1098

Sep. 30, 1854, the session was opened with a sermon by Rev. C. Greenleaf, from Isa. 5:1,2,--"Now will I sing to my well beloved a song of my beloved touching his vineyard. My well beloved hath a vineyard in a very fruitful hill: and he fenced it," etc.

The church in Baseo, Hancock Co., and the Good Hope church, in Schuyler Co. were received. All the churches were represented, in number nineteen. Baptisms 215; Received by Letter 111; By Experience 26; Restored 10; Dismissed 121; Excluded 50; Died 17; Members 1648.
C. Greenleaf, Moderator. H. Carmen, Clerk.

The churches blessed with large accessions by baptism were Barry 25, Quincy 82, Rushville 15, Kingston 13, Littleton 57; and Centerville 8.

The contributions received

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for benevolence were $336.57.

The Committee on Destitution had employed Rev. J. Elledge as associational missionary 4 1/4 months at $25 per month. In this service he preached 84 sermons; visited, for religious conversation, 130 families; witnessed the conversion of 40 or 50 souls; baptized 8 persons; and traveled 640 miles. Then after closing his services as a missionary he preached 40 sermons; baptized 10 persons; beside performing other labor at his own charges.

In view of the necessities of the case the Committee closed this report by recommending the adoption of the following

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resolutions:
"Resolved, That it is the opinion of this Association that each church is under moral obligation to raise a sum equivalent to 40 cents of each member to be paid quarterly.

"Resolved, That a committee of one member from each church be now appointed, whose duty it shall be to present the consideration of the above resolution to their respective churches, and report the result as early as possible, to the Chairman of the committee on Destitution."

The report was accepted and adopted.

1101

1855. 13th Anniversary.
The meeting of the Association was with the Griggsville Church, the session beginning Oct. 6, 1855, with a sermon by Rev. N. Hays, from Dan. 12:4 "But thou, O Daniel, shut up the words and seal the book, even to the time of the end; many shall run to and from, and knowledge shall be increased."

The church in Lima, Adams Co. was received. The churches were 20; 16 were represented. Baptisms 51; Received by Letter 96; By Experience 11; Dismissed 93; Excluded 47; Died 17; Members 1489.
C. Greenleaf, Moderator. H. Carmen, Clerk.

The Association from its origin in the Blue River Association has been decidedly in favor of missions and all Christian work. Missionary

1102

labor had been performed amounting in cost to $307.21. In this service 281 sermons had been preached, 411 families had been conversed with religiously, 50 prayer meetings had been attended, the conversion of 39 persons had been witnessed, 17 had been baptized, and nearly 3000 miles had been traveled.

The usual course of business had been pursued. Benevolent contributions were $400.25.

1856. 14th Anniversary.
The Association was held with the Quincy church opening Oct. 4, 1856, with a sermon by Rev. B.B. Carpenter, of Griggsville from Gen. 28:12,--"And he dreamed, and behold, a ladder set up on the earth, and the top of it reached to heaven: and behold, the angels ascending and descending on it."

The Vermont Street, and the German churches in Quincy were received. The Pearl Creek church changed its name to Mt. Vernon. The twenty churches were all represented. Baptisms 38; Received by Letter 56; By Experience 5; Restored 2; Dismissed 164; Excluded 86; Died 19; Members 1462.
Calvin Greenleaf, Moderator. J.O. Metcalf, Clerk.

There were 9 ordained ministers, and 2 licentiates.

To increase the interest in the home mission work of the association the Missionary Committee were instructed to hold quarterly sessions with different churches in the body and secure the attendance of ministers at

1104

the same, to facilitate, if possible, the prosecution of missionary work.

In the minutes of this year the first Circular Letter appears, written by Rev. B.B. Carpenter, under appointment of the Association. It is well written on the important Duty of Attending Public Worship. The excellent author is now laid aside from his loved work by Him who doeth all things well. A beloved brother and fellow laborer in earlier days. Benevolent contributions receive by the Treasurer, and others which do not pass through his hands were $1844.36.

1857. 15th Anniversary.
The Association met this year with the Payson Church

1105

The session was opened by a sermon from Rev. L. Osborn, of Mount Sterling, May 23, 1857, on Eph. 1:22,23. and Rom. 12:4,5, --"And hath put all things under his feet, and gave him to be head over all things to the church," etc.

"For as we have many members have not the same office," etc.

Churches received into the body were Big Neck and Hickory Grove. The churches were 22 and 19 were represented. Baptisms 66; Received by Letter 62; By Experience 23; Restored 2; Dismissed 58; Excluded 61; Died 12; Members 1403.
L. Osborn, Moderator. J.O. Metcalf, Clerk.

There were in the body fourteen ordained ministers and one licentiate. The contributions reported were $2,139.00.

1106

One of the churches requested the Association to ordain as a minister one of their members at their anniversary, to which request the following reply was given:
"Resolved, That this body deem it beyond their province to ordain any man." A good Circular Letter on Church Discipline, is in the minutes of this year, written by Rev. Niles Kinne.

1858. 16th Anniversary.
The Association was held with the church in Griggsville, which commenced May 22nd, 1858, with a sermon by Rev. N. Kinne, of Barry, from Eph. 1:11--" In whom also we gave obtained an inheritance."

1107

The La Prairie, Pleasant View, Columbus, and Warsaw churches were received. The churches were 24m and 23 were represented by delegates or letters. Baptisms 254; Received by Letter 117; By Experience 32; Restored 9; Dismissed 147; Excluded 52; Died 14; Members 1660.
L. Osborn, Moderator. J.O. Metcalf, Clerk.

Connected with the churches were 18 ordained ministers and 3 licentiates. The statistics indicated that many of the churches had been favored with revivals, and I give the number of persons baptized into them. Griggsville 46, Payson 19, 1st Quincy 15, Barry 44, Centerville 13, Kingston 44, Littleton 15, Vermont St. Quincy 12, Warsaw 10, All the others but five had received members by baptism.

The contributions were $2213.88. The Circular Letter was written by Rev. Wm. Stewart, Jr. On the Lord's Supper, as an ordinance of the church.

1108

1859. 17th Anniversary.
The Littleton Church welcomes the Association to its hospitalities this year May 21, 1859. The session was opened by Rev. J.R. Manton or Quincy, with a sermon from Rom. 14:17,--"For the kingdom of God is not meat and drink, but righteousness, and peace, and joy in the Holy Ghost."

Kinderhook, Hamilton, Browning, and Camp Point churches were received. Twenty churches were represented by messenger, four by letters, and two made no report. Baptisms 127; Received by Letter 100; By Experience 19; Restored 4; Dismissed 128; Excluded 71; Died 20; Members 1629.
L. Osborn, Moderator. J.O. Metcalf, Clerk.

The ordained ministers were 15 and licentiates were 2.

The time of the Annual Meeting was changed from May to September. The ordinary course of business

1109

was pursued. Contributions for direct Christian work reported were $1048.26. For colleges and meeting houses $1752.50. Only ten churches reported any contributions.

1860. 18th Anniversary.
The Association met with the church in Barry, Sep. 22, 1860. The Rev. J.V. Schofield of Quincy opened the session with a sermon from John 4:24, "God is a Spirit and they that worship him must worship him in Spirit and in truth."

The church at Tioga, Hancock Co., was received.

There were messengers from 23 churches, two reported by letter, and two made no report. Baptisms 280; Received by Letter 141; By Experience 66; Restored 9; Dismissed 144; Excluded 112; Died 29; Members 1886. The ministers were 17 ordained and two licentiates. Of the ordained several were new men.
Niles Kinne, Moderator. Wm. Stewart, Clerk.

The new men were

1110

Jonathan Brown, of Vermont Street, Quincy; Barrow, Belmont; J. Richardson, La Prairie; and Jirah D. Cole, Barry.

There was preaching in all the houses of worship in the Village on the Sabbath. The Circular Letter was a very good one, "On Missions," written by Rev. R. L. Colwell. There was no business of unusual interest transacted. The churches which received the largest numbers by baptism were First Quincy, Perry, Pittsfield, Vermont St. Quincy, Warsaw the largest numbers, 681 La Prairie, Kinderhook, Camp Point, Pleasant View, and Tioga.

1111

1861. 19th Anniversary.
The church in Perry gladly entertained the Association this year, which commenced Sep. 21, 1861, with a sermon by Rev. J. C. Baker of Rushville, from Gal. 6:2, "Bear ye one another's burden's and so fulfill the law of Christ."

The church at Pleasant View, Schuyler Co. was received. Messengers were present from 23 churches, and three reported by letter. Baptisms 139; Received by Letter 65; Restored 5; Dismissed 120; Excluded 70; Died 20; Members 1835. The Browning Church had become extinct. Ordained ministers were 17 and licentiates 3.
Niles Kinne, Moderator. Wm. Stewart, Clerk.

1112

The Committee on domestic missions made a long and able report, setting forth the necessity of the employment of a better policy in their management that is too often pursued. The usual subjects were considered and in the usual manner.

1862. 20th Anniversary.
The session of the Association was with the Vermont Street Church, Quincy. The introductory sermon was by Rev. Wm. Hawker, of Perry, from 1. Pet. 1:3-5. "Blessed be the God and father of our Lord Jesus Christ," etc.

Reports were presented from 24 churches, three failing to report.

1113

Baptisms 225; received by Letter 101; Restored 6; Dismissed 88; Excluded 72; Dead 20; Members 1945.
Wm. Hawker, Moderator. J. C. Baker, Clerk.

The Report on Domestic Mission presented at its close the following resolution.

"Resolved, That this body request the Churches composing it to adopt the Bible system of benevolence, as indicated in 1 Cor., 16:2; and that, so fast as it shall be adopted, it take the place of the present system of raising funds."

Resolutions of sympathy and cooperation with the government in its "efforts to suppress the causeless and ungodly rebellion against it were passed."

In view of the debt on the house of worship of the Perry Church, the brethren there

1114

were advised to send out their Pastor, among the churches of the Association, to solicit form them aid to pay that debt. Some Missionary work was done in the body.
Cooperation with the General Association, the Executive Committee were instructed to arrange if practicable.

1863. 21st Anniversary.
The Payson Church entertained the Association this Session, which began with a sermon by Rev. H. M. Gallaher, from Mat., 11:28. "Come unto me, all ye that labor and are heavy laden, etc."

Only 21 churches were recognized,

1115

as belonging to the body; Warsaw having been dissolved, and Camp Point, Hickory Grove, Hamilton and Columbus being dropped from the Minutes without any explanation. And Tioga and Mound Station made no communications.

Only 19 churches were represented, with eleven ordained ministers, and 1 Licentiate. Baptisms 39; Rec'd. by Letter 38; restored 7; Dismissed 52; Excluded 43; Died 23; Members 1708.
C. Greenleaf, Moderator. H. M. Gallaher, Clerk.

Business arrangements as usual. The Minutes of the Sunday School Convention were appended to the Minutes of the Association this year, it being their first appearance. The benevolent contributions were $783.38. To Shurtleff College $800.

1116

1864. 22nd Anniversary.
The Association met with the Griggsville Church Sep. 24, 1864. The introductory sermon was by Rev. C. E. Bristol, of Quincy, from John 14:9, "Jesus saith unto him, Have I been so long time with you and yet hast thou not known me Philip?" etc.

The Camp Point church was received. The churches were 22, and all but two were represented. Baptisms 72; Received by Letter 45; Restored 4; Dismissed 113; Excluded 57; Died 25; Members 1662. Ordained ministers 11 and 2 licentiates.
L. Osborn, Moderator. E. C. M. Burnham, Clerk.

1117

Cooperation was established with the General Association in State Mission work. The complete establishment of a Theological Department in Shurtleff College was this year recognized, and a full approval of the measure expressed, encouragement given, and co-operation pledged in completing the endowment, and in the erection of a new college edifice.

This year also the Constitution of the Association was so amended, as in appointing a brother to open the next Annual Session, with a sermon a subject should be assigned to him on which to preach.

Rev. B. B. Carpenter was appointed to preach the introductory sermon next year on "Fidelity to the Cause of Christ."

1118

Rev. Thomas Reed had been employed a missionary by the Executive Committee, and had performed very satisfactory service.

The Committee on resolutions reported some on the state of the country in which they regarded the Nation as then suffering the chastisement of God for national sins, especially the sin of Slavery. Also they recognized the mercifulness of God "in not adding Pestilence and Famine to the afflictions of the Sword." And expressed an abiding faith, that when the purpose of his providential punishment shall be accomplished, He will then "restore and perpetuate

1119

the integrity of our national Union; and make the people free, united and happy"; for which blessings they resolved devoutly to pray; and finally pledging to the Government their earnest sympathy and aid in suppressing the rebellion.

1865. 23rd Anniversary.
The Mount Sterling Church welcomed the Association to their hospitalities. The session commencing, Sep. 23, 1865, with a sermon by Rev. B. B. Carpenter of Griggsville, "On Fidelity to the Cause of Christ."

1120

The churches represented were 19. Baptisms 302; Rec'd. by Letter 72; By Experience 35; Restored 6; Dismissed 75; Excluded 36; Died 30; Members 1704.
L. Osborn, Moderator. G. C. Brown, Clerk.

There were large additions to some churches, indicating revivals. And the Association by a special season of prayer returned thanksgiving to God for these blessings.

The close of the great rebellion was recognized, and thanksgiving rendered to God by the Association for the success he gave to our armies, "and for the consequent crushing out of Slavery." And also, wisdom was implored from God to rest upon the President and Congress in reorganizing and reconstructing the rebellious states. By direction of the body the Corresponding Letter of the Rangoon Burmese Association

1121

to Corresponding Associations in America, was printed in the Minutes. This session was held at Thongzai, commencing, Feb. 9, 1865.

Rev. W. Hawker, and Rev. Thos. Reed had been employed as missionaries in the Association during the year. The Minutes of the Sabbath School Convention, held in Payson, May 30, 1865, were published in the Minutes of the Association.

1866. 24th Anniversary.
The Association convened with the Pleasant River church at Liberty, Adams Co. Sep. 22, 1866. Rev. P. P. Shirley opened the session with a sermon. (The text was not given.) Seventeen churches were represented.

1122

Baptisms 133; Rec'd. by Letter 81; By Experience 11; Restored 4; Dismisssed 104; Excluded 63; Died 10; Members 1561.
C. Greenleaf, Moderator. T. S. Lowe, Clerk.

There had been a very material falling off in the numbers of churches, and also of members in this Association within a little time. In the session of 1860, there were twenty-five churches which made their annual report, and two that did not, and 1886 members were returned. In six years the number of churches was ten less, and the membership 325 less. [The following is crossed out.] The Association ventured a new measure; the raising of "a meeting house fund, to aid and encourage weak churches within the bounds of the Association in building houses of worship." They resolved upon taking a collection at this session to initiate the work, and recommended

1123

that the churches raise funds yearly for this object. A committee was also appointed, made up of one member from each church to disburse the fund. There is reason to believe, that this measure will experience the fate of some others, that have been resolved upon by the Association, die as soon as born.[End crossed out portion.]

Rev. S. A. Taft was appointed to preach the introductory sermon next year. Subject:--"How near should Christians conform to the fashions of the world?" Rev. E. P. Scott, Missionary from Assam, who took in his wife, Miss. Kay, from the Payson Church was present at the meetings.

1867. 25th Anniversary.
The Anniversary of this year was with the church in Barry commencing, Sep. 21, with a sermon by Rev. S. A. Taft,

1124

of Quincy, from Col. 2:10. "Ye are complete in him." The brethren appointed to preach the opening sermon seem to disregard the subject assigned them, though to preach on it was a Constitutional requirement.
C. Greenleaf, Moderator. T. S. Lowe, Clerk.

The Colored Church of Quincy was received. There were 21 of the 22 churches represented, Baptisms 160; Rec'd. by Letter 79; Restored 12; Dismissed 97; Excluded 75; Died 20; Members 1908.

The letter from the Griggsville Church contained the announcement that Rev. B. B. Carpenter, the devoted and excellent pastor of that Church since 1846, and a

1125

long tried and reliable minister if the Association, had, in the mysterious providence of God, been striken down, and disabled from ministerial work, with little hope of his ever being able to resume it. After the reading of the Griggsville Letter, therefore, the Association paused, and was led in prayer by the Moderator, Rev. Calvin Greenleaf, long associated with the afflicted brother, that to all concerned, the dispensation so afflicted might be sanctified. The following resolution was passed:
"Resolved, That as a token of kind regard for, and an abiding interest in sister Scott, we designate her as a life member of the Missionary

1126

Union". [The following is crossed out.]The meeting house fund measure adopted last year by the Association was now rescinded.[End crossed out portion.]

The Association appointed a Committee of three to prepare its history and that of its churches to be presented at the next annual Session, consisting of Elders C. Greenleaf, C. Harrington, and G. P. Guild. Judging from action of this kind in other Associations there can be little hope that the work will be performed. Few committees have been willing to give the labor necessary to the performance of such a task. The benevolent contributions were $2830.98. For Shurtleff College and Chicago University $5135.50.

1127

1868. 26th Anniversary.
The Griggsville Church entertained the Association during this session, which was opened, Sep. 25, 1868, by a sermon from Rev. T. W. Goodspeed, of Quincy on Phil. 1:17; and Jude, v.3. "But the other of love knowing that I am set for the defence of the Gospel." "And exhort you that ye should earnestly contend" etc.

Of the 21 churches, 17 were represented. Baptisms 170; Rec'd. by Letter 50; restored 6; Dismissed 77; Excluded 37; Died 19; Members 1962.
L. C. Carr, Moderator. T. S. Lowe, Clerk.

1130

There were 14 pastors and 6 other ordained ministers and 3 licentiates. Rev. T. M. Goodspeed was appointed to write letters of correspondence to the Bassieu and Rangoon Associations in Burmah.

The Report of the Committee on the state of the Churches presented the following facts: "Ten of the churches had pastors residing with them and serving them regularly every Sabbath. Four had preaching twice a month. Three had no preaching and no regular meetings of any kind, so far as was known. Fourteen of the churches sustained regular prayer meetings, but some of them were carried on by the faithful

1131

few, while a majority of the church habitually neglected them. Seven of the churches had no prayer meetings, either being without pastors, or widely scattered, which reasons the Association did not consider a justification for such infidelity to the cause of Christ. Five or six of the churches were without Sabbath Schools. In most of them, however, Sabbath Schools were sustained with great interest. Four or five reported Mission Schools, reaching seven or eight in number." The following, as the close of this report is here inserted because of its historical character:
"During the past ten years the Association has been growing very slowly. The past

1132

year 223 have been added, the losses have been 145, the net increase, therefore, is 78, between 20 or 30 less than the average for ten year years. The churches, for the most part, report a lack of earnest prayer and work, and the need of a higher type of piety. The benevolent contributions for the past year are reported at about $13,000,--an increase over the preceding year of about $4,500--. The total annual contributions for all gospel purposes will average about $25,000--. And we cannot but feel that in a day when Great Head of the church, is opening before the denomination such wide and effectual doors at home and abroad, when the calls for more liberal giving are so numerous

1133

and imperative that we are able to do far more that we are doing,--that we are criminally unfaithful in this respect, and that we ought not to be satisfied without giving for all gospel purposes not less than $100,000 a year.

"Some feeble churches are becoming more vigorous. From most places reports are hope full, and while we have reason for repentance in view of our unfaithfulness, we are permitted to rejoice in progress, though it be slow, and to feel the assurance that this progress will continue." Adopted.

Contributins for benevolent purposes reported $1269.35. For Shurtleff College $10,100-- Chicago University $100--. The History plan was changed to having two churches present annually their histories in the order of their constitution.

1134

1869. 27th Anniversary.
The Association met with the first Church in Quincy, Sept. 24, which was opened with a sermon by Rev. L. C. Carr, of Griggsville, from Psa. 60:4. "Thou hast given a banner to them that fear thee, that it may be displayed because of truth."

The New Philadelphia church was received Twenty churches were present by delegates. Baptisms 176; Rec'd. by Experience 8; By Letter 78; Dismissed 70; Excluded 52; Died 19; Members 2043.
L. C. Carr, Moderator. T. W. Goodspeed, Clerk.

Thirteen churches reported pastors, and one a supply. Six ordained ministers were not pastors.

The following is from the report of the Committee on destitution:

1135

"The field we occupy, presents a vast scene of destitution, which calls for efficient action on the part of this body. Many churches which once existed in this field, have gone down, and others are languishing and need aid, without which they must perish, Your Committee recommend the means proposed last year, as best suited to meet this destitution."

The History of Payson Church, and also of the Griggsville Church were presented to the Association and read, and inserted in the Minutes. The Benevolent contribution reported were $1577.86. For Shurtleff College $3,830.

The usual order of business was observed.

1136

1870. 28th Anniversary.
The Payson Church entertained the Association during this session, which was opened with a sermon by Rev. Wm. Hawker, on September 23, 1870. (Text not given.)

The Churches were 21, and all represented. Baptisms 138; otherwise 88; Deaths 18; otherwise 133; Members 1908.
L. C. Carr, Moderator. E. L. Scofield, Clerk.

All but 6 churches reported pastors. Some of these pastors served two churches in that capacity. The pastors were: E. L. Scofield, Barry; Clayton, W. Hawker; Kinderhook, G. P. Guild; Kingston, J. C. Grosh; La Prairie, J. Keely; Littleton, J. Knowles; Mount Sterling, Wm. Hawker; Mount Vernon, J. H. Delano; New Philadelphia, G. W. Stewart; Payson, N. Kinne; Pleasant View, J. C. Grosh;

1137

Quincy, First, A. B. Mitler; Vermont Street, Quincy, T. W. Goodspeed; Rushville, J. Knowles; Star (formerly Tioga till 1864), J. H. Delano.

Ministers not pastors: C. Greenleaf, Kinderhook; C. Mason, Barry; C. Harrington, B. B. Carpenter and L. C. Carr, Griggsville; E. Veatch, Mound Station; J. Barrow, New Salem; J. Brown and H. Worden, Quincy. The Benevolent Contributions reported were $963.18. Shurtleff College $4100--.

Nothing claiming especial notice as historic is found in the proceedings of the body.

1871. 29th Anniversary.
The Association assembled with the Kinderhook Church for its meeting, Sep. 22. The session was opened with devotional

1138

exercises, followed by a sermon from J. C. Grosh. Text, Zech. 13:7, "Awake, O Sword, against my Shepherd, and against the man that is my fellow saith the Lord of hosts:" etc.

Delegates were present from 15 churches, and 6 were not represented, but 2 of them sent statistics. There were 13 pastors. Baptized 236; Received by Letter 80; By Experience 35; Restored 15; Dismissed 100; Excluded 29; Died 19; Members 1986.
A. B. Miller, Moderator. H. L. Stetson, Clerk.

The usual routine business of Committees and reports received due attention, and largely occupied the time of the Association.

The death of Geo. W. Stewart, a young colored minister, pastor of a colored church at New Philadelphia

1139

was duly noticed in the report of the Committee on Obituaries. He died with consumption in the 26th year of his age.

The benevolent contributions reported amounted to $4,135.55. To this sum I add, $3000 reported for Shurtleff College.

The Committee on the State of the Churches made the following report which was adopted:
"That, while we have reason for devout thankfulness to the Great Head of the Church for His blessings, so richly poured upon some of our churches the past year, in the conversion of many precious souls, there are other churches which are feeble and languishing and very much need our sympathy and aid; these, together with important fields that might be occupied, require of this body some efficient action. We would, therefore, recommend the employment of an

1140

efficient missionary, so soon as the suitable man can be found, to labor in this field under the direction of a Committee, appointed by the Association for this purpose."

There were special periods in the progress of the session, given to devotional exercises. There was also preaching at the Baptist and Methodist houses of worship on Friday and Saturday evenings, also on Sabbath morning and evening at the two houses named, and also during the day at two other stations.

For some years there has been a Sabbath School Convention connected with the Association, that had its separate session in connection with the meeting of the Association.

1141

1872. 30th Anniversary.
The Association met with the Littleton Church, the session beginning Sep. 3, 1872, with devotional exercises, followed with a sermon by R. Gibson, from Acts 20:19, 20. "Serving the Lord with all humility of mind," etc.
Wm. Hawker, Moderator. H. L. Stetson, Clerk.

The churches were 19, and from 3 there was no intelligence. Baptisms 93; Rec'd. by Letter 51; By Experience 8; Restored 1; Dismissed 86; Excluded 53; Died 28; Members 2002.

The business followed in the usual course.

J. M. Wells had been employed a part of the year as Associational Missionary, at a Salary of $1000 per annum.

The Sabbath School Committee had done

1142

nothing and had no report. The names of Big Neck and Star Churches were removed from the minutes. The Pastors reported were 13.

Reports were made on most of our forms of Christian work, followed generally by addresses.

Benevolent contributions were $1033.45. For colleges $330.

The Pittsfield Church had been for many, many years the recipient of Associational solicitude and sympathy, as well as missionary labor, and yet made the sad report, with a membership numbering 64, "Have no preaching, no prayer meetings, no Sabbath Schools."

1143

1873. 31st Anniversary.
Mount Sterling, Ill. Friday Sep. 5, 1873.
The Association convened with the Mount Sterling Church, Sep. 5, 1873, and the session was opened with a sermon by John Knowles of Littleton , from Mat. 5:8,--"Blessed are the pure in heart, for they shall see God."

The church of Newtown, Adams Co. was received. The churches were 20. From three there was no messengers.

1144

The representatives were 69. Baptisms 104; Rec'd. by Letter 40; By Experience 9; Restored 2; Dismissed 89; Excluded 33; Died 26; Members 1977. Churches 20, Pastors 10.
J. C. Bernard, Moderator. R. W. Gardner, Clerk.

Committees were appointed on Missions and Kindred Works and on associational affairs. P. P. Shirley was employed 7 months to preach and Lord's day morning for Clayton Church and the remainder of his services were to be given where they seemed most needed. The Clayton Church were to pay one half his salary at $1000 per year. The Committee recommended the continuance of his services. He reported his labors in the following items: miles traveled 2,620; Sermons preached 90; Visits made 226; Baptized 5; Books sold for Publication Society $71.33.La Prairie, Big Neck, Mendon and Camp Point were all without regular preaching.

1145

There was preaching in the houses of worship of three different denominations on the Lord's day twice, besides the services at the Baptist house. Beside other names the Committee on Obituaries reported that of Rev. C. Harrington among those who had finished their course. This is said of him, "He was one of the constituent members of the Perry Church; was also Moderator of the Association when organized and for the following twelve years. He was one of our pioneer ministers, never relying upon preaching for a support, but as abundant in labor as any. Traveling and preaching in neighborhoods where opportunity offered, renders it impossible for the effects of his labors to be seen, as would have been the case had they been more concentrated. Never will it be known, till the day of judgment, how much good Bro. Harrington has done."

The above was adopted and also the following resolutions:

1146

"Resolved, That, in future, this Association will prosecute its missionary work in co-operation with the Baptist General Association of Illinois."
"Resolved, That the Constitution be so amended as to change the time of meeting to Wednesday instead of Friday, before the full moon in September."

This resolution was adopted:
"Resolved, That we recognize it to be the duty of Baptist Churches to contribute liberally to the support of missionary enterprises of our denomination, For. Missions, Home Missions, Bible and Publication Society, and Ministerial Education; and we recommend to our Churches the adoption of a system of giving, by which , at stated times, they shall contribute to these objects."

The contributions for definite Christian work outside the home church, expenses reported amounted $1423.66.

The Mt. Vernon Church was dismissed to the Salem Association.

1147

1874. 32nd Anniversary.
The Association met with the church at Griggsville, Sep. 23, 1874, and was opened with a sermon by F. D. Rickerson, from 1. Cor. 6:21 and 2. Cor. 8. Subject: "Systematic Beneficence."

The churches were 15, and Pastors 8. Baptisms 165; Rec'd. by Letter 48; By Experience 28; Restored 1; Dismissed 71; Excluded 45; Died 21; Members 1798.
J. C. Bernard, Moderator. J. Grafftey, Clerk.

The course of business was as usual.

The Sabbath School Convention was allowed a part of Thursday for its work. It was voted also to consider this work a part of the regular business of the Association, and the Convention was given up as an organization.

1148

The Associational Mission work has been a subject of constant perplexity. Plans and methods of carrying it on have been frequently changed without bringing the relief sought for. The great want has been the money to sustain a missionary. Whether this want can be charged to the lack of ability to give of to illiberality in the churches is not for me to say. It must be one or the other.

Miss Harriet A. Eastman, of the Griggsville Church, had gone to Burmah as a missionary under the Woman's Missionary organization.

There were eight ordained ministers reported as belonging to the churches of the body who were not pastors. And also there were two licentiates.

Benevolent contributions to objects outside of the Association, reported $961.95.

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1875. 33rd Anniversary.
Quincy, Ill. Wednesday, Sep. 15, 1875. The Association met with the Vermont Street Church, Quincy, Sep. 15, 1875. As many delegates has not arrived the usual opening sermon was deferred until 3 p.m. Opening with prayer the letter from the churches were read.

The church in Mendon, Adams Co. was received. Churches 16, Pastors 9. Only 14 were represented. Baptisms 100, Rec'd. by Letter 34; By Experience 27; Restored 4; Dismissed 68; Excluded and Erased 60; Died 25; Members 1828.
W. Greene, Moderator. James Grafftey, Clerk.

1150

Some of the churches are in a very feeble condition--nearly extinct. The usual committees were appointed.

In the afternoon the Annual Sermon was preached by C. Wisting, D.D., from Rom. 11:29,--"For the gifts are calling of God are without repentance."

The forenoon session of Thursday was almost wholly given to Sabbath School interests.

Addresses were made on the different departments of Christian work. The committee on obituaries reported giving the names of four aged ministers who had long been connected with the Association, who had died within the year then closed. They were Jesse Elledge, John Kelley, Jonathan Brown and Calvin Greenleaf. They were respectively aged 75, 64, 85, and 72 years. Elder Elledge died in Iowa, and Elder Greenleaf in Colorado. Life sketches will be found of them in another

1151

department of this work.

The sisters had a meeting to hear reports from Mission Circles within the bounds of the Association in the afternoon of Thursday. The number of Circles that made reports was five.

1876. 34th Anniversary.
Clayton, Ill. Friday Sept. 1876.
The Association met with the Church of Clayton, Sep. 1 1876, and the session began with a sermon by H.C. Yates, from Psa. 60:4.--"Thou hast given a banner to those that fear thee, that it may be displayed because of the truth."

The churches of Cooperstown, Fairmount, McGee Creek and Highland, and the Union (Colored) Church of Quincy were received into the Association.

These churches now received except the Quincy

1152

Colored church, came from the disbanded Cooperstown Association. The churches were 20, but 4 were not represented. Baptisms 153; Recd. by Letter 48; By Experience 32; Restored 4; Dismissed 44; Excluded 39; Died 20; Members 2070.
Wm. Green, Moderator. J. Grafftey, Clerk.

There was little difference between the proceedings of this Anniversary and that of the preceding year. The committees were appointed for about the same work, and reports were different in language mainly.

1153

Chapter XI. Salem Association.

No. 1. 1864-1862

Historical Sketch of the Salem Association
I have not been able to get the ministers of this body for many early sessions. In 1858, the Association took the following action.
"Resolved, That we appoint a committee to gather up, and write in a book, a condensed history of this Association, and that the labors of Eld. John Logan, the founder, under God, of the Association, be especially noticed therein."

"On motion, Brothers Coghill, Tucker, and Eld. Botts were appointed to write an abridged History of this Association, according to the above resolution."

This Committee were not able to obtain

1154

copies of the minutes of four sessions of the Association, even as early in the history of the body as the date of their appointment, in 1858. They finished, however, the work assigned them, and through the kindness and courtesy of the Association in loaning me the manuscript History, prepared by the committee, I am permitted to enter into their labors, and take these from what I may find suited to my purpose.

As to the origin of the Association the Committee say:
"It appears that the Spoon River Association--the only association at the time on the Military Track, was organized in the year 1830. Then at their session in 1833, they

1155

adopted a resolution declaring non-fellowship for a missionary operations and benevolent institutions--That a number of members were very soon thereafter, excluded from the various churches composing this Association, because they were in favor of these Institutions. About thirty members, including Elder John Logan, and his wife, were excluded from Crane's Creek Church (near Rushville). Eld. Logan was about this time receiving aid from the Am. Bap. Home Mission Society," and before the organization of that Society in 1832, had been aided some by the Massachusetts Missionary Society.

"Chiefly through the instrumentality of Eld. Logan, the members excluded from the various churches were gathered together and organized into

1156

several churches on Gospel principles, and uniting with some others newly organized churches, they formed this Association--then called "The Salem Association of United Baptists." But at this session in 1844, held with the Carthage Church, the name was changed to The Salem Baptist Association of Illinois.

The Minutes of the first, or organizing session of this body, your Committee could not procure.

From the best information that we could obtain, it seems that delegates from nine small churches, viz: Concord, Cedar Fork, (afterward Berwick), Centerville, Lebanon, McComb, Union, (Adams Co.), Knoxville, Bethany,

1157

and Duck Creek (afterward Canton), met with New Hope church, Friday before the fourth Lord's day in September 1834 and were organized as an Association as above stated. The membership of all the churches was only 181.

The Committee and Eld. J.M. Peck do not agree, as to the year in which this organization took place. The Committee, as above, say it was in 1834; Mr. Peck, in Allen's Register for 1836, says it was in 1833. There are very strong reasons for accepting the Committee's date as the true one.

1st. The Committee say, that the Spoon River Association as its session in 1833, which in Allen's Register, for 1832, was set down to commence on Oct. 4, 1833, passed a resolution of "non-fellowship for all missionary operations, and benevolent institutions." And soon after the close of this session the churches took their action, inspired by the passage of that resolution, and excluded those of their members who favored missions; and among them was

1158

the act of the Crane's Creek church excluding about thirty of its member, including Elder Logan and his wife. Now this all took place in the Association, and also in the churches too late in 1833 to have the organization of the Salem Association date in that year. As the excluded and scattered members of the churches were to be gathered and organized into new church, which would require both labor and time. Yet, accepting the Committee's date, allowed nearly a year's time to make these necessary arrangements.

2. Though the Committee were not able to obtain a copy of the minutes of the first session of the Association the organizing session, yet they did obtain those of the second session, and the minutes of that meeting bore the date of Sep. 4 and 5, 1835, which would assign to the previous yearly meeting the date of Sep. 1834.

1159

At a meeting to organize the Baptist State Convention of Illinois, held in Whitehall Oct. 9th and days following, in 1834, The Committee on the State of Religion in Illinois, of which Elders Bartlett and Logan were two of the three members composing it, and both delegates to the meeting from the Salem Association, say in their Report, that on the military Tract, five new churches, and one new Association with ten churches have been formed have been formed. This Association was the Salem Association, which they represented, it being the only one in that part of Illinois, favoring the cause which these were represented. In this statement of the Committee they referred to the religious changes which had taken place since the general meeting of the friends of missions the year previous. This examination

1160

shows the organization of this Association to have been in 1834, as its Committee reported it, and not in 1833, as Eld. J. M. Peck reported it.

There is a mistake, however of the Committee's which needs to be corrected. They say the Association was organized by "delegates from nine small churches," and give the names of the churches but do not include the New Hope Church, with which the meeting for organizing was held. It would have a strange and altogether an unusual thing for a meeting to organize an association, to be held with a church which did not itself go into the new body. And there the main agent in the formation of this new association,-- Eld. John Logan, was the pastor of the New Hope Church, and quite surely a member of it. And as the Committee name

1161

nine churches without including the New Hope church it is certain they did not give it a place in the new organization. But the number of churches cooperating in the movement was ten and not nine embracing the New Hope Church. And in Allen's Register for 1836, a statistical table is inserted giving the names of the churches, the ministers, the number of baptized, and the number of members in each church, taken from the minutes of the second session of the body held in 1835. The names of 13 churches are given and New Hope is the first in the table, and three received at this second session were the last; thus showing that the number which went into the organization was ten, as have said and not nine.

Having now settled points of importance that demanded attention, I proceed to continue the history of the Committee.

1162

"We do not know precisely what ministers of the Gospel were present, but suppose it probable that Elders Joel Sweet, John Clark, and Gardner Bartlett were with Elder Logan on that occasion.

The Constitution and Summary of Faith, as published in the minutes of 1840, we are satisfied, are precisely the same adopted at the organization of this body."

I will not insert the Constitution as a whole here, it being in the main so much like those of all our Associations. But will record the last part of it, that had special reference to the State of things then existing.

"Art 9. "This Association may recommend to the churches, such measured as may be thought proper for the increase

1163

of Christian piety, and the advancement of the Redeemers Kingdom in the world.

And that there may be a clear understanding of our views concerning Missionary, Sunday School, Temperance, and Bible Societies etc. we make this statement. Though a majority of the members of the churches of this Association are favorable to these things, when properly managed, yet me think all persons should be free to act or not to act;-- to give or not to give, to the support of any of these benevolent institutions, without a breach of fellowship either way; provided they are sound in faith, and orderly in practice; and on these terms we tender the hand of fellowship to all sound Baptist Associations, churches and individuals."

The Summary of Faith I will not copy as it is the same in fact with that adopted by very many of our churches in Illinois.

1164

1835. 1st Anniversary.
In its session of this year, the Association met with the Centerville Church, Schuyler Co. commencing Sep. 4, with a sermon by John Lark. The text is not given.

The following churches were received at this Session;-- Union, Fulton Co., Whitney's Grove, and Long Creek, (New Purchase,) That means Iowa.

Elder John Logan, Moderator, David Lenox, Clerk. Received by baptism 17; by letter 18; Restored 3; Dismissed 21; Excluded 9; Died 1; Total 217.

Ministers in the Association present, were J. Logan, John Clark, Gardener Bartlett, Ozias Hale, B.M. Parks, and N. Parks a licentiate.

Visiting brethren present, invited to seats were Eld. George B. Davis, Bible Agent; Eld. Alvin Bailey, agent for the Illinois State Convention, and House Mission Society; Eld. Jacob Bower,

1165

and Eld. Jesse Ellege of the Blue River Association; and Bro. David Fair, of Flat Rock Association in Indiana.

W.J. Davis was appointed Cor. Secretary of the Association Resolutions approving and recommending,-- The more faithful study of the Scriptures; Sabbath Schools and Bible classes; Family prayer, and weekly prayer meetings; the Illinois Bap. State Convention; Alton College; The Bap. Triennial Register for 1846; Bap. General Tract Society; The Pioneer published at Rock Spring, Ill.; The cross and Bap. Journal of Cincinnati O.; and the Am. Bap. Magazine were passed.

A resolution was passed recommending the 1st Monday in January, 1836, as a day of fasting and prayer;-- and one also expressing thanks to the House Mission Society for the aid received from it, and earnestly desiring still further aid.

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The following Resolution was passed:
"Resolved, That we wish the churches to keep in mind, that the Association has no power to adopt any system or resolution and compel any church or individual to adopt the same, without their own consent; but that every church is, and shall ever remain entirely independent and free, to adopt all, or any of the above resolutions, or not adopt them, as to them may seem duty, but we only act as an advisory council, and common bond of union."

Protracted meetings were appointed to be held with five churches during the enduring year, and ministers were appointed to attend the same.

There was preaching every day and evening during the session; and on Lord's day two sermons. A subscription of $42.25 was taken up for the Illinois Bap. State Convention.

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1836. 2nd Anniversary.
The Association convened with the Concord Church, Schuyler Co. Sep. 2, 1836 to hold its session, which opened with a sermon by John Logan, from 1 Tim. 4:16, "Take heed unto thyself and unto the doctrine, continue in them; for in doing this thou shalt both save thyself, and then hear thee."
John Logan, Moderator. David Lenox, Clerk.

Received by baptism 8; by letter 48; Dismissed 23; Excluded 5; Died 5; Members 256.

Two churches were received--Bethel, and 1st Quincy. Ministers in the Association present were J. Logan, R.M. Wilbur, J.M. Chapman, G. Bartlett, B.M. Parks and Ezra Fisher. From the Blue River Association Elders Jonathan and Joel Sweet, and Jacob Bower. Resolutions were passed commending several benevolent

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forms of Christian action. The last day in the year was recommended to the churches to be observed as a day of fasting and prayer for the revival of God's work, and the conversion of dinners.

The usual preaching services were enjoyed as in the previous session.

1837. 3rd Anniversary.
The session of the Association this year was held with the New Hope Church, beginning Friday, Sep. 1, 1837. With a sermon by B.M. Parks, from Eccles. 12:9 "And moreover, because the preacher was wise, he still taught the people knowledge."

Two new churches were received, Fall Creek, Henderson Co., and New Boston, Mercer Co.
Ezra Fisher, Moderator. J. Parks, Clerk.

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Received by baptism 28; By letter 75; Dismissed 13; Excluded 6; Died 2; Total 374.

Ministers in the Association present were J. Logan, J.D. Newell, Ezra Fisher, John Clark, Cullen B. Townsend, J. Bower, and B.M. Parks. The usual committees were appointed. Some of the many resolutions passed I will copy in substances.

Recommended to destitute churches to raise what funds they could to sustain ministers of the Gospel while laboring for them, and to procure all the preaching they could.

Recommended to churches having the stated ministry, to relinquish their claims on their ministers a part of the time, that they might visit destitute churches.

One resolution requested the churches to state in this letter at its next session, how much they contribute to sustain preaching

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at home, and how much for benevolent objects.

Recommended to each church to sustain a Sabbath School within its bounds.

Canton Church was dismissed, to join the Illinois River Association then recently organized.

On the Lord's day a collection of $37.08 was taken and divided equally between the Am. and For. Bible Society, and the Illinois State Convention.

1838. 4th Anniversary.
The Warsaw Church entertained the Association while holding its Session, opening Aug. 31, 1838, with a sermon by Eld. Ezra Fisher.

At the close of the sermon the following preamble

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and resolution were adopted:
"Whereas, God in his Providence has removed our brother Elder Cullen B. Townsend, from Zion's Walls by death since our last Anniversary, therefore,
Resolved, That public prayer be now offered, that this afflictive dispensation may be sanctified to this Association for our spiritual good.

Eld. John Logan then leading the Association in prayer.

Churches represented were the same as the year previous except Canton. Received by baptism 12; by Letter 49; Dismissed 56; Excluded 4; Died 3; total 314.
Eld. Fisher, Moderator. Sam. C. Thompson, Clerk.

Ministers in the Association present were Elders J. Logan, R.M. Wilbur, B.M. Parks, Ezra Fisher and J. Clark

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Elders Joseph Botts; A.J. Carter, N.Y.; J. Brown, Mo.; and J. Bower, from Blue River Association were visitors.

Several committees were appointed. Delegates were also appointed to attend the Illinois Bap. State Convention. Committees made usual reports which were adopted.

1839. 5th Anniversary.
This year the Association met with the Payson Church. The meeting commencing on Sep. 20, 1839 with a sermon by Eld. Norman Parks, from 1 Cor. 9:16. "For though I preach the Gospel, I have nothing to glory of: for necessity is laid upon me; yea, wo is unto me, if I preach not the Gospel."

The following churches were represented, Union, Adams Co.; Bethany, afterwards changed to Payson; Bethel, Quincy; Centerville; New Hope; New Boston. Fall Creek and Cedar Fork Churches sent letters only. McComb church had been dissolved; and there was no intelligence from the churches of Warsaw, Long Creek and Union, Fulton Co.

Received by Baptism 38; by Letter 45; Dismissed 18; Excluded 8; Died 3; Total 291.
E. Fisher, Moderator. R.G. Kay, Clerk.

Ministers in the Association present were J. Logan, E. Fisher, N. Parks and D.J. Lloyd.

T.H. Ford, J. Bower, R. Weston and John Sears, and brethren J. Hart and T. Jennings, also Eld. Greenleaf from North District Association were visitors.

The following without explanation, or any preliminary remarks the Committee have in

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their history.
"Voted, That the Association be divided by a line running between Adams and Hancock counties, and between Brown and Schuyler, and that the churches worth of said line retain the name of Salem Association."

The Committee say: "This division took off several churches from this Association, and blessed the territory about one half, and a larger portion of the remaining half still unsettled."

Then followed this resolution:
"Resolved, That immediate efforts be made to raise funds to sustain a preacher of the gospel to labor in the bounds of this Association; and that one brother in each church be appointed to solicit funds for that purpose. Whereupon, $122 were

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immediately contributed, and brethren appointed to secure services of an efficient minister as a missionary."

A resolution was passed condemning traveling on the Sabbath for the purpose of convenience or saving time, or expense. Other resolutions favoring the several benevolent organizations and branches of Christian work were adopted. Collections were taken. One for the circulation of the Bible in foreign lands of $11.56:-- and one for the Illinois State Convention of $14.25.

In the division of the Association recorded above, the churches in the South half, organized an Association in 1840 which they called the Western Association. The churches were Bethany, now Payson; 1st Quincy; Union; Mt. Sterling and Rushville. The ministers were N. Parks, Edwin C. Brown, John

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G. Segar, William Hobbs, H.P. Grover and Henry Davis; and licentiates, Jonathan Brown and Moses Winslow. And at the third session of this body, in 1842, it and the Blue River Association united, and the two Associations formed the Quincy Association.

1840. 6th Anniversary.
The Association met with the Cedar Fork (Berwick) Church in its session this year, which was opened with a sermon by Eld. Logan, Sep.26. Only seven churches were represented, which were Bethel, New

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Hope, New Boston, Cedar Fork, Warsaw, Oxford and St. Mary's. The last two churches were received at this session. Received by Baptism 22; by Letter 50; Dismissed 15; Excluded 2; Died 9; Total 187.

Ministers in the Association present were J. Logan, John Clark, R.M. Wilbur and Joseph Botts.
Eld. Logan, Moderator. James Tucker, Clerk.

Eld. John G. Segar and Martin Shuey were visitors from the Western Association.

Sep. 27. Spent one hour in prayer.

Appointed two union meetings, and three ministers to attend each. The usual course of business was pursued. After

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a sermon on Lord's Day, the ordinance of baptism was administered by Eld. Wilbur, a large assembly being present.

1841 and 1842.
The minutes of these two sessions the Historical Committee of the Association failed to obtain. I must therefore, as they did, pass over this period.

1843. 9th Anniversary.
The Cedar Fork, now Berwick, church entertained the Association while holding its session in this year, which began with a sermon by Eld. Thos. Holman, Sep. 22. Providence church because a member of the Association. Received by Baptism 39; by Letter 29; Restored 2; Dismissed 3; Excluded 2; Died 5; Total 377. There were 10 churches, 9 ordained ministers, and 3 licentiates.
J. Logan, Moderator, and B.C. Hord, Clerk.

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The ministers were Rodolphus Weston, Thos. Holman, John Logan, John Clark, James Hovey, R.M. Wilbur, Joseph Botts, Daniel Beaver and John Murphy.

Delegates from Quincy Assoc. J.G. Segar and Charles Poling, and from Illinois River Asso. Nathan West and Edmund Russel; Eld. L. Davis, from N.Y. were invited to seats.

The usual Committees were appointed, and resolutions passed. The Association resolved itself into a Domestic Missionary Society. An Executive Board of five members was appointed, three of whom were a quorum; also a solicitor in each church.

1844. 10th Anniversary.
The session of this year was held with the Carthage church, beginning Sep. 20, 1844 with a sermon by Eld. James Hovey. Received by Baptism 68; by Letter 30; Restored 3;

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Dismissed 16; Excluded 6; Died 6; Members 446. Ministers in the Asso. present R. Newton, J. Logan, James Hovey, R.M. Wilbur, Jos. Botts, John Murphy, C.E. Tucker, R. Weston and Thos. Holman.
James Hovey, Moderator, B.C. Coghill, Clerk.

The name of the body was changed to Salem Baptist Association of Illinois. The number of members from each church as messengers limited to three. The Board of Domestic Missions reported that five months of missionary labor had been performed, some previous souls hopefully converted,--one church organized.

The officers of the Board were appointed, and solicitors chosen. Union meetings were appointed in two churches, and ministers

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selected to attend them. The standing clerk of the Association was instructed to purchase a Book for the Records of the Association, but the measure was never carried out.

1845. 11th Anniversary.
The Oxford Church, Henry Co. entertained the Association at this session, commencing Aug. 22, 1845, with a sermon by Eld. Jos. Botts, from 2. Cor. 10:4,5. "For the weapons of our warfare are not carnal, but mighty through God to the pulling dorm of strong holds; casing down imaginations," etc.

Churches represented were Carthage, New Hope, New Boston, Fall Creek, Berwick, formerly Cedar Fork, Oxford, St. Mary's, Union, Lamoine, Providence, Pleasant Bluff, and Head of Grindstone. Received by Baptism 17; by Letter 29; Restored 1; Dismissed 34; Excluded 17; Died 4; Total 443.
J. Logan, Moderator, B.C. Coghill, Clerk.

Ministers of the body present; John Logan, R.M. Wilbur

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Jos. Botts, John Murphy and C.E. Tucker.

Delegates from Illinois River Asso. S.S. Martin, S. Ladd and E. Russel. The usual committees were appointed, and resolutions passed. Arrangements were made for holding four union meetings in different churches, and ministers were appointed to attend them.

The following resolution was passed:
"Resolved, That we deeply lament the loss of our beloved brother, Eld. Daniel Beaver, who was called on the 19th of April last, to give an account of his stewardship; and that we sympathize with his bereaved family, who mourn the loss of husband and father."

Members of the Domestic Mission Board were appointed. Little had been done in the year then passed, which was regretted by the association. The Executive Board made their Report, which included the

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following facts: There had been paid for missionary labor to Eld. Logan $57.19; which left $22.83 in the treasurer's hands. There had been ten hopeful conversions, nine had been baptized, and once church had been organized.

1846, 12th Anniversary.
This year the Association met with the Monmouth church; the session opening Friday, Aug. 22, 1846 with a sermon by R.M. Wilbur from Heb. 13:1, "Let brotherly love continue."

Oquawka Church was received, and the Oxford by request was dismissed.

Received by Baptism 22; by Letter 29; Restored 1; Excluded 6; Died 8; Members 489.
J. Hovey, Moderator. B.C. Hord, Clerk.

Associational ministers present--J. Hovey, R.M. Wilbur, C.E. Finker, J.G. Ward, J. Murphy, Asel Owen, J.M. Chapman and E. Miner.

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The Association was divided into three districts, and union meetings appointed as the year before. Member of the Domestic Mission Organization were appointed. The Treasurer reported $39.50 received, and the same amount paid our for missionary services. There was no report from the Board.

1847. 13th Anniversary.
The New Boston Church entertained the Association in the session of this year, opening Aug. 20, with a sermon by E. Miner. Churches represented were Carthage, New Hope, New Boston, Fall Creek, Berwick, St. Mary's, Union, Lamoine, Pleasant Bluff, Monmouth, Bethel and Oquawka. Independence Church was received.
E. Miner, Moderator. Thos. Holwan, Clerk.

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The ordinary course of business was pursued.

Ministers in the Association present: Thos. Holwan, J.G. Ward, Asel Owen, James Hovey, and E.S. Byron. A collection was taken up for Shurtleff College of $5.97; and one for Foreign Missions of $7.

The time of holding the annual meeting was changed to the 1st Saturday in Nov. Preaching as usual. Thanks were returned for the use of the Methodist house of worship.

1848. 14th Anniversary.
The meeting of the Association was with the Bethel Church McDonough Co., opening Saturday, Nov. 4, 1848 with a sermon by A. Gross. There were no reports from the churches of New Boston, Fall Creek, Providence or Pleasant Bluff; and only a letter from Monmouth Church.

Received by Baptism 45; by Letter 21; Restored 1;

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Dismissed 16; Excluded 6; Died 9; Members 554.
Joel Sweet, Moderator. James Tucker, Clerk.

Ministers in the Association present R. Weston, Joel Street and Joseph Botts. A Gross was agent of Am. and Foreign Bible Society; W.H. Briggs from Edwardsville Asso.; and J.L. Thompson from the Quincy Asso.

Preaching was heard three times on the Sabbath, and the Lord's supper was administered. Also a collection was taken up for the Am. and For. Bible Society amounting to $12.10.

The usual reported and resolutions received due attention. The following, found in the minutes, marked its own report.
"Resolved, That we deeply sympathize with the family of Eld. John Murphy, and also with the Union Church in the irreparable loss which they have sustained in his removal from them by death, confidently however, believing that their loss in his gain."

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1849. 15th Anniversary.
Berwick Church entertained the Association this year, commencing with a sermon Friday, Aug. 24, 1849, by R. Weston, from Mat. 3:12, "Whose fan is in his hand, and he will thoroughly purge his floor," etc. The following churches were represented; Carthage, New Boston, Fall Creek, Berwick, St. Mary's, Union, Lamoine, Pleasant Bluff; Monmouth, Bethel, Independence, New Hope, and Hillsboro. Hillsboro Church was received.

Received by Baptism 50; by Letter 35; Dismissed 6; Restored 8; Died 7; Members 593.
Joel Sweet, Moderator. James Tucker, Clerk.

Ministers in the Asso. present; R. Weston, James Hovey, John Logan, and J.L. Tower. The usual course of

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business was taken. The Association resolved itself into a Domestic Mission Society to supply the destitution of its own field; and a committee was appointed to prepare a constitution for a Society; and the churches were agreed to send contributions for this purpose to the Association.

The same course was taken--a constitution was drawn--a society organized for the same purpose in 1843. Will this work any better than that did? We shall see. The churches sent up $10.90 for Foreign Missions, $2.08 for Home Missions, and $2.35 for Am. and For. Bible Society.

With these words the record of the session closes. "A harmonious, pleasant and we trust profitable session. The Domestic Mission Society was regularly organized, and set in motion again."

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1850. 16th Anniversary.
The session of this year was held with the Fall Creek Church, the meeting being opened Aug. 23, with a sermon by Eld. J.L. Tower.

The North Prairie Church was received. Oquawka was represented again.

Received by Baptism 34; by Letter 56; Dismissed 29; Restored 2; Excluded 6; Died 5; Members 644.
Joseph Botts, Moderator. James Tucker, Clerk.

New Lancaster Church applied for admission into the Association. The case referred to a committee. The committee in a very long and

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thorough report closes with recommending to the Association the adoption of the following resolution:
"Resolved, That the application of the New Lancaster church for admission into this body be indefinitely prospered."

The report of the committee was received and almost unanimously adopted. The objection to the reception of the church grew out of on apparent looseness in doctrine manifested in presenting, when the council met for this recognition, the Articles of Faith which the Association had adopted, as though adopted by them, and then soon after renouncing all creeds and Articles, claiming to have the Bible only as their rule. In view of this case the following resolution was passed by the body.

1191

"Resolved, That hereafter all applications by churches for membership in this Association shall be referred to a Committee to report thereon."

And this resolution was prompted by the decision on the case of the applying church.

"Resolved, That we cherish the kindest feelings toward the brethren calling themselves the New Lancaster church, and that whenever, they give as evidence of this being sound Baptists, we will on application receive them into this body."

Resolutions were reported and adopted approving and recommending the several forms of Christian work.

The Board of Associational Missions reported about six month's labor

1192

with little apparent success, and recommended continued effort. A part of the labor was gratuitous. Mission elected.

1851. 17th Anniversary.
Aug. 22, The New Hope church, in McDonough Co., entertained the Association while holding the session for 1851, which was opened with a sermon by Wm. T. Bly. Fifteen churches were represented. Received by Baptism 49; by Letter 98; Dismissed 14; Restored 1; Excluded 8; Died 9; whole Members 710. Ministers present belonging to the Asso.: Wm. T. Bly, J. Hovey, Thos. Camp, Joseph Elliot, J. L. Tower, Jos. Botts, J. G. Ward and John Logan. The usual committees were appointed.

"Two letters were handed in at this session, purporting to come from Carthage church.

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They were referred to a special committee of five. This committee mad a lengthy report. This report showed that a difficulty had originated in that church about one Wm. Thompson, a native of Scotland, professedly a preacher of the gospel, and a very talented man:--that a part of the church was very much taken up with him; that the remainder 23 in number regarded him as a man of immoral life, giving specifications of many and grievous charges against his moral character, which the committee considered were fully sustained by ample proof.

Concluding that the course of the church was unscriptural and a departure from Baptist church policy, and that the course pursued by the 23 aggrieved brethren and sisters was irregular and informal, the committee recommended

1194

that neither letter should be received, and recommended also, that said Wm. Thompson's name should not be entered in the minutes as a delegate from Carthage church. The report was adopted and both letters were rejected."

The historical Committee say, "In consequence of these difficulties the church very soon went down and became extinct; and about the year 1858 a small church was again organized in Carthage."

The several committees made their reports about as usual, which were adopted. But little was done by the Asso. in missionary work on its own field this year.

1852. 18th Anniversary.
The Association met with the Union church in Warren Co.; Aug. 20, 1852, and commenced its

1195

session with a Sermon by Thos. Camp.
Joseph Elliot, Moderator. Wm. T. Bly, Clerk.

Three new churches were received; Lee, Roseville and Pleasant View. Received by Baptism 77; by Letter 38; Restored 1; Dismissed 48; Excluded 25; Died 10; Members 809.

Ministers in the Asso. present were: Wm. T. Bly; S. Brinhall, T. Comp, R. Newton, Jos. Elliot, J. L. Tower, Jos. Botts, J.G. Ward.

The course of business was the usual one. A special committee of five was appointed to consider certain inquiries from St. Mary's church, and report thereon. This committee made a lengthy report, from which it was apparent, that the Carthage church, with Wm. Thompson (noticed in the minutes of the session

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the year previous) held a kind of mock council, in the house of worship of the Hillsboro church; that said council proceeds to lay many and grievous charges against this Asso., in reference to its dealings with Carthage church and the said Wm. Thompson at its last session, and that they had the same published in the Watchman of the Prairies of Chicago, Ill. The report proceeded to refute charge in a masterly maneuver, and suggested that Carthage church in calling said Wm. Thompson to ordination, had given occasion of grief to sister churches, and dishonored the cause of Christ, and had violated gospel principles; and concluded by recommending to them that they withdraw the letter of recommendation from Wm. Thompson, as a gospel minister.

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The report was adopted.
Isaac Merriam
Joseph Mattison
Joel Sweet
B. C. Coghill
S. G. Miner, Committee.

Steps were taken to revive Domestic Mission work in the Association.

"A committee of able and devoted brethren was appointed to visit Carthage church, and endeavor to reconcile them and establish union and brotherly love."

Elders J. Merriam, R. Newton, S. G. Miner and Jos. Elliot preached on Lord's day. Benevolent collections taken up amounted to $37.90.

1198

1853. 19th Anniversary.
The Association met with the Lee church Aug. 26, 1853, and was opened with a sermon by Joseph Elliot, from Isa. 62:6, 7. "I have set watchman upon thy walls, O Jerusalem, which shall never hold their peace day nor night:" etc.
J. Elliot, Moderator. G. D. Simmons, Clerk.

The churches represented were Berwick, Bethel, Fall creek, Hillsboro, Independence, La Harp, Lee, Lamoine, Monmouth, New Hope, Oquawka, Pleasant Bluff, Pleasant View, Roseville, St. Mary's, Union, Salem and Harmony. The last two named were added this session. Baptized 68, Received by Letter 63, Restored 4, Dismissed 47, Excluded 15, Died 14, Members 807.

Ministers belonging to the association present were

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G. D. Simmons, Wm. Whitehead, W. T. Bly, James Hovey, Thos. Camp, E. O. Whitaker, Joseph Elliot, J. L. Trower, S. Brimhall, Joseph Botts and J. G. Ward.

Visiting ministers were Jirah D. Cole, agent of the Missionary Union; Thos. Powell, agent of the House Miss. Society; J. Teasdale, agent of Shurtleff College; N. Hays and ------- Hastings.

For unchristian conduct toward the Association Carthage church was dropped. Also the denomination was warned against Wm. Thompson, a professed preacher of the gospel, and author of disturbance in Carthage church, as an impostor.

A difficulty arose in the Hillsboro church, dividing it, and each party sent in to the Association letter proclaiming to be the church. The cause of

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trouble was this Wm. Thompson. Finally harmony was restored and the church became united and prosperous.

1854. 20th Anniversary.
The St. Mary's church entertained the Association in its session, commencing August 23, 1854, with a sermon by J. K. Barry, from John 4:14, "But whosoever drinketh of the water that I shall give him shall never thirst;" etc.

Th churches represented were the same as last year, excepting Oquawka, Pleasant Bluff, and La Harp; and Mount Pleasant, Greenbush Abington and Jubilee Churches were received.
R. Newton, Moderator. J. Tucker, Clerk.

Baptized 136; Received by Letter 53; Restored 7; Dismissed 88; Excluded 14; Died 9;

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Members 963.

Ministers present Hovey, Gregory, Newton, Botts, Whitehead, Ward, and Brimhall. Visiting ministers welcomed were J. K. Barry, ------- Gordon, N. Hays, J. Seger, ------- Osborn, and Bro. Shuey.

The Domestic Mission Board had employed Elder E. S. Freeman as missionary. There had been considerable missionary work done, and thanks were rendered to God for his blessing upon it. A new Board was appointed with other arrangements for work in the coming year.

1855. 21st Anniversary.
This year's session was held with the Mount Pleasant church, commencing Aug. 25, with a sermon by R. Newton, from 1. Tim. 3:15, "But if I tarry long, that thou mayest

1202

know how thou oughtest to behave thyself in the house of God," etc.
R. Newton, Moderator. B. C. Coghill, Clerk.

Three new churches were received. Oquawka, Oxford 2nd church, and Lindon. The former Oquawka church had become extinct. A new church had been organized.

Baptized 97; Received by Letter 130; Restored 1; Dismissed 73; Excluded 19; Died 6; Members 1123. Ministers of this body present were Barry, T. Gregory, Newton, Wm. Forest, W. Morse, Botts, Ward, Hovey, J. Ray, and A. Vandever. Visiting ministers present were I. Clark, agent of General Association of Ill.; J. D. Cole, agent of Miss. Union; H. C. Ransford, Col. Bap. Pub. So.; N. Hays.

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Our several benevolent institutions were commended in resolution to the churches.

The Board of Domestic Missions reported three months missionary work as having been performed, and the baptism of 37 persons.

The following resolution was adopted:
"Resolved, That this Association does not regard Erastus Miner, who is now preaching within our bounds, as of us, and therefore does not endorse his acts as a Baptist Minister."

Our denominational papers were requested to publish the resolution. The Committee in their History say, "The objection urged against said Miner was heterodoxy,--something worse probably that Campbelism."

The digest of letters showed that seven churches

1204

had preaching every Lord's day by their pastors, four had preaching two Sabbaths each month, two one each month, and six no stated preaching.

Preaching on the Lord's day, in the grove in the morning by J. K. Barry and J. D. Cole who took a collection for Foreign Missions for $46.38. In the afternoon Elder Benton preached, and in the evening Elder Morse.

1856. 22nd Anniversary.
The Association met with the 1st church in Monmouth for this years session, which opened August 23, 1856, with a sermon by W. F. Forest, from Eph. 2:18-22, "For through him we both have access by one Spirit unto the Father, etc."
W. F. Forest, Moderator. B. C. Coghill, Clerk.

The churches represented were 21.

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Baptized 105; Received by Letter 48; Restored 1; Dismissed 88; Excluded 12; Died 22; Members 1086. H. S. P. Warren, E. J. Lockwood, A. Tucker and B. C. Clay were new ministers in the body.

Avon, and 2nd Monmouth churches were

1206

received. Through the letter of the Union church there was a difficulty came into the Association between the 1st Monmouth church, Elder R. Newton, the Union church, and certain members whom the Monmouth church had excluded. All arose from differences of opinion, and no delinquency in moral character. Through the report of a large and able committee, appointed by the Association, which was accepted and adopted by al concerned, the parties were harmonized and the 2nd Monmouth church was received into the body.

After an address by J. B. Olcott on Chicago University, followed by others, the Association gave expression to its hearty interest in the University.

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The Domestic Mission Board had employed Elder E. S. Freeman as a missionary at a Salary of $550--; he had labored nine months and twenty days, preached 283 sermons, baptized 85 persons and received for baptism eleven more. The Board had paid him $398-- for his services, and had also renewed the engagement with him for another year. The Mission Board was reelected.

The letters from the churches gave the pleasing assurance that some of them had enjoyed refreshing visits from the Lord. Nearly all of them had enjoyed peace and love among their members; some had pastors who preached for them every Lord's day, some had preaching half the time, some one Lord's day each month,

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and some no stated preaching.

1857. 23rd Anniversary.
The Berwick church entertained the Association this year, the session of which, commenced Aug. 22, 1857, with a sermon by Anson Tucker from 2. Tim. 2:10. "Therefore I endure all things for the elect's sake," etc.
W. F. Forest, Moderator. B. C. Coghill, Clerk.

Churches represented were 21. Carthage, Plymouth and Salem were received. Baptized 46; Received by Letter 54; Restored 9; Dismissed 66; Excluded 12; Died 11; Members 980.

1209

A resolution of sympathy, was passed, in view of the death of Elder Thomas Camp, with his bereaved widow and the church with which he was connected.

On the Lord's day there were four preaching services at the Baptist house of worship, and two at the Methodist.

After much discussion a resolution was adopted recommending a division of the Association.

The Mission Board reported that Elder Freeman had labored under their appointment, at a salary of $600 per year, ten and a half months,

1210

had preached 230 sermons, had baptized 40 persons and had assisted in the organization of two churches. For these services they had paid him $525, and had on hand a balance of $36--.

The agitation of the division question caused no arrangements to be made for Associational mission work. Elder Jos. Elliot sent into the Association a deeply interesting letter from his sick bed, which was read to the body which elicited the following preamble and resolution:
"Whereas, Father Elliot is deprived of the privilege of coming up to this anniversary by ill health, and whereas we fear he has met with us for the last time, whose labors have been beneficial to this body and the kingdom

1211

of Christ, and who has personally addressed us by his own hand, in sending to this body a letter expressive of his feelings; Therefore,
Resolved, That his letter sent to this body, be printed in full, in the minutes as a memento of our beloved father Elliot."

A resolution was adopted, requesting each church to send up to the next anniversary a contribution for the benefit of superannuated ministers.

1858. 24th Anniversary.
The Association met with the Hillsboro Church to hold its annual session, Aug. 21, 1858, which was opened with a sermon by H. S. P. Warren, from Mat. 24:14,--"And this Gospel of the kingdom shall be preached in all the world

1212

for a witness unto all nations; and then shall the end come."
Wm. F. Forest, Moderator. B. C. Coghill, Clerk.

Churches represented were 21. Mt. Pleasant, (Hancock Co.) Colchester, Basco and Ellisville were received.

Baptized 113; Received by Letter 84; Restored 2; Dismissed 31; Excluded 18; died 9; Members 1151.

Ministers of the body present were Hovey, Lockwood, Forest, Botts, Ray, Trower, Ward, with new names, J. Winter, H. B. Johnson, S. P. Ives and John Jones.

Visiting ministers welcomed to seats were nine,

1213

Shurtleff College, The General Association and the Bible Union were represented.

The usual Committees were appointed. The churches of Berwick, Oxford, and 1st Monmouth having united with other churches in forming the Galesburg Association, were dropped from the minutes of this. There was much preaching at Hillsborough and vicinity during the session.

In the year just ending two ministers in the Association had died, and their deaths were reported in the letters to the body. They were Anson Tucker, Pastor of the 1st Monmouth churche, and Joseph Elliot. This fact led to the adoption of the following resolutions:
"Resolved, That in the death of our beloved brother, Elder Anson Tucker, in the meridian of his life and the zenith of his usefulness, the

1214

church has lost a bright and shining light--his family an affectionate father and husband; with them we most sincerely sympathize; but while we feel the loss, we bow submissively to the wise and righteous dispensation of the Divine Governor of his church, and rejoice at the clear and blessed evidence that he left behind, that our loss was his eternal gain."

"Resolved, That in the death of our venerable father, Joseph Elliot, God has been pleased to take to himself, one who has finished his work, who for fifty years was engaged in ministerial labor with diligence, fidelity and success, and who was gathered as a shock of corn fully ripe for the heavenly granary."

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"While we feel our loss at his removal from our earthy association, we rejoice in the anticipation of a reunion in a purer and more permanent association above; yet we deeply sympathize with the venerable widow, who for forty-nine years has been the partner of his joys; the sharer of his sorrows, and a helper in his various labors of love, as well as with his children, who we hope will cherish his memory and emulate his virtues."

Here comes in the Resolution on having a History of the Association.
"On motion, Resolved, That Brn. B. C. Coghill, James Tucker and Elder Joseph Botts be appointed a committee to write an abridged history of this Association, noticing especially the life and labors of Elder John Logan therein; and that the churches be requested to send up contributions to the next

1216

session to pay for the service."

A Domestic or Associational Mission Board was appointed, and arrangements made for prosecuting this work.

1859. 25th Anniversary.
The Fall Creek church entertained the Association at this session, commencing Aug. 27, with a sermon by S. P. Ives, from Job. 27:8. "For what is the hope of the hypocrite, though he hath gained, when God taketh away his soul?"
Wm. F. Forest, Mod. B. C. Coghill, Clerk.

The churches represented were 21. Prairie City church was received.

Baptized 78; Received by Letter 64; Restored 5; Dismissed 46; Excluded 28; Died 12; Members 1001.

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The ordained ministers were 12.

The usual committees were appointed.

The arrangements made at the session a year ago were productive of no mission work. The plan has too much machinery to be efficient: Yet the Association re adopted it.

The Fall Creek church had just finished a new house of worship, and preaching on Saturday P. M. and on Sabbath was in both houses--the new and old; And they were both crowded.

Committees reported. The Committee appointed to write a History of the Association; Reported, that the work was not yet completed.

1218

They, however, presented their biography of Elder John Logan, also their history of the organization and constitution of the Association, which were read. Whereupon, the report was accepted, and the Committee allowed another year to complete the work.

This note is attached to the record of the proceeding of this anniversary by the committee:
"The resolution recommending the division of the Association, which was passed in the session of 1857, though it resulted in nothing more than the withdrawal of some three churches, yet put a stop to the operations of our Domestic Missions, which with the blessing of God had accomplished so much during the preceding year."

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1860. 26th Anniversary.
For the session of this year the Association met with the Independence Church, and was opened with a sermon, Aug. 25, 1860, by H. S. P. Warren, from Mat. 16:18--. "And I say unto thee, That thou art Peter, and upon this rock I will build my Church."
D. W. Litchfield, Mod. E. Mitchell, Clerk.

The Macomb, Raritan and Tennessee churches were received.

Churches were 24. Baptized 70; Received by Letter 66;

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Restored 2; Dismissed 53; Excluded 21; Died 17; Members 1242.

The routine of Committees and their reports was carried out. Among other resolutions the following was adopted:
"Resolved, That we drop the word "Reverend" as used in connection with gospel ministers."
"The Committee appointed to write a condensed history of the Salem Association requested an extension of time. Request was granted."

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1861. 27th Anniversary.
The Association was held with the Plymouth church, Hancock Co., commencing Aug. 4, 1861, with a sermon by Wm. F. Forest, from Dan. 2:44, "And in the days of these kings shall the God of heaven set up a kingdom which shall never be destroyed:" etc.

Of the 24 churches, 21 were represented. Those not reporting were Bethel, Oquawka and Ellisville. Baptisms 104; Rec'd. by Letter 76; Restored 3; Dismissed 41; Excluded 45; Died 9; Members 1254.
W. F. Forest, Moderator. J. O. Metcalf.

The usual order of business was pursued.

The Committee on the History of the Association reported progress, and was continued. Whereupon it was:

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"Voted, That the Clerk of each Church be requested to forward to Bro. Coghill, by the first of Oct., the facts and incidents concerning their origin."

The following was adopted:
"Whereas, The prevailing use of Tobacco by church members--by its consumption of funds which might be better employed--by its narcotic effect on the hearers of the Word who use it--by its frequent defilement of our houses of worship--is opposed that precept of the gospel which requires temperance in all things, and to the command, "Be ye clean that bear the vessels of the Lord,"
"Therefore, Resolved, We advise our young members, and more especially our younger brethren in the ministry, to abstain from the use of Tobacco as a Christian duty."

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The letters from the churches were generally of a grateful and hopeful character. There was not much preaching.

1862. 28th Anniversary.
The Prairie City church entertained the Association during the Anniversary of 1862, which was opened Aug. 23, with a sermon by D. B. Gunn, of Carthage, from 1. Tim. 3:15,-- "But if I tarry long, that thou mayest know how thou oughtest to behave thyself in the house of God," etc.

The churches were 21, two failed to be represented. Baptisms 275; Rec'd. by Letter 67; Restored 9; Dismissed 39; Excluded 43; Died 14; Members 1524. The ordained ministers were 16.
J. O. Metcalf, Moderator. P. P. Shirley, Clerk.

The proceedings were of an ordinary associational character. Among the resolutions presented by

1224

the Committee is one on the State of the Country, patriotic and loyal to the Government.

The minutes contain a good Circular Letter "On the importance of preaching the gospel," by J. O. Metcalf.

There were special seasons for prayer and conference during the session; also much preaching, the Methodist and Presbyterian houses of worship were occupied as well as the Baptist.

The Committee on the Associational Mission reported that nothing had been done.

The Ordained Ministers names were, E. J. Lockwood, D. B. Gunn, H. H. Parks, J. Hovey, W. N. Whitaker, S. Brimhall, John Ray, C. King, W. F. Forest, R. L. Colwell, P. P. Shirley, Jos. Botts, J. L. Trower, J. G. Segur, J. O. Metcalf and W. R. Welch.

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Salem Association.
No. 2. (1863-1876)

1863. 29th Anniversary.
The Association met with the New Hope church at Blandensville, McDonough Co., Aug. 22, 1863, and W. R. Welch opened the session with a sermon, from 1st Peter 5:4,-- "And when the Chief Shepherd shall appear, ye shall receive a crown of glory that fadeth not away."

The Churches of Bushnell and Swan creek were received. Of the 24 churches, 22 were represented: Baptisms 44; Rec'd. by Letter 61; Restored 1; Dismissed 43; Excluded 38; Died 26; Members 1510.
J. O. Metcalf, Moderator. R. L. Colwell, Clerk.

The routine order was mainly pursued. The Committee of arrangements planned for the preaching of ten sermons during the session at different places

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and holding over the Sabbath. Also for seasons of social worship. The Association adopted the resolutions passed by the Missionary Union at its session in the spring of 1863 on the state of the Country. They were very long. The minutes contain a good Circular Letter on Christian Fidelity, by R. L. Colwell.

Seventeen ordained ministers were in fellowship with the churches. Benevolent contributions were reported from only five churches.

1864. 30th Anniversary.
The Association met with the Carthage Church, in 1864. The session was opened, Aug. 27, with a sermon by H. H.

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Parks, from Luke 12:32,--"Fear not, little lock; for it is your Father's good pleasure to give you the kingdom."

The Hamilton Church was received. The churches were 23. Baptisms 100; Rec'd. by Letter 49; Restored 3; Dismissed 69; Excluded 43; Died 29; Members 1515.
J. O. Metcalf, Moderator. J. Elliot, Clerk.

The common line of business was pursued.

"Voted, That this Association unite and co-operate with the General Association in the work of domestic missions."

The Committee on Resolutions gave their commendation to our several benevolent organizations in their report, which was adopted. Collections were taken as follows:
For Domestic Missions $149.75; for For. Missions $10.15; for the Publication Society $50.60; for the aid of ministers at Shurtleff

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College $23.05. The churches of the body were not distinguished for their liberality.

1865. 31st Anniversary.
Roseville Church entertained the Association during its meeting in 1865, which commenced, Aug. 26. J. O. Metcalf preaching the opening sermon from Luke 12:32, "Fear not, little flock; for it is your Father's good pleasure to give you the kingdom."

The churches were 22. Baptisms 114; Rec'd. by Letter 78; by Relation 16; Restored 1; Dismissed 45; Excluded 27; Died 24; Members 1592.
Norman Parks, Moderator. J. Elliot, Clerk.

Business took its usual course.

"On motion: Resolved, That we, the delegates of the

1229

Salem Association, hereby tender our affectionate thanks and sincere gratitude to our Bro. J. O. Metcalf for his just, impartial and wise administration, as Moderator of this Association for several years past."

The report of the Committee on Resolutions was long and comprehensive. Ten sermons were preached in several different places, also periods for prayer and conference were had during the session. The collections taken amounted to $120.15.

1866. 32nd Anniversary.
The Association met with the Fall Creek Church in 1866. The session opened, Aug. 18, with a sermon by H. H. Northrup, from Joshua 13:1, --"Now Joshua was old and striken in years; and the Lord said unto him, Thou art old and striken

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years, and then remaineth yet very much land to be possessed."

The churches of Cameron, Warren Co., and of Honey Creek, Henderson Co., were received. The churches were 23, but 20 only were represented. Baptisms 174; Rec'd. by Letter 46; By Relation 30; Restored 1; Dismissed 114; Excluded 47; Died 10; Members 1459.

There is a discrepancy in the number of members returned, when compared one year with another, for which I cannot account, as the minutes furnish no explanation. It, however, makes apparent one fact--that the statistics of the churches are not accurately kept. Also the number of churches in the Association vary from year to year without any explanation.

1231

W. R. Welch, Moderator. B. C. Coghill, Clerk.

The order of business was as heretofore. The report of the Committee on Resolutions caused a long and unpleasant discussion. The first resolution only was adopted, the other six were rejected. There are only 4 churches of the 23, whose number of members exceeds 100, and only 3 others that have more than 75 members. Four churches had received more than 25 members by baptism--one other had received 17, and another 11. The ordained ministers were 11. G. S. Bailey took a collection for the General Association of $123.90; and S. M. Osgood one of $61.25 for Foreign Missions.

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1867. 33rd Anniversary.
The Union Church, Warren Co., entertained the Association in the meeting of 1867, which was opened, Aug. 17, with a sermon by C. A. Hewitt from 2. Tim. 3:14,-- "But continue thou in the things which thou hast learned and hast been assured of, knowing of whom thou hast learned them."

The Bethel Church, McDonough Co. was received with 20 members. The churches were 24, the reporting 21. Baptisms 84; Rec'd. by Letter 54; By relation 19; Restored 3; Excluded 55; Dismissed 92; Died 19; Members 1452.
A. Jones, Moderator. J. E. Bosler, Clerk.

The routine course was carried out.

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There was much preaching on the Lord's day, extending to Berwick and Roseville. The Committee on Resolutions recommended and urged the claims of Christian benevolence on the church members. The highest number received by baptism by any church was 17. Seven of the churches had received none. The churches religiously were in a low State.

1868. 34th Anniversary.
The Association was held with the Church at St. Mary's, Hancock Co., opening, Aug. 15, 1868. L. Odborn, preaching the sermon from Rev. 2:10,-- "Fear none of those things which thou shalt suffer; behold, the devil shall cast some of you into prison, that ye may be tried; etc."

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The churches of Lemoin and Elm Grove were received. The churches were 26; three made no report. The pastors were E. Russ, Roseville; C. A. Hewitt, Prairie City; W. Hobbs, Hillsborough; A. W. Sutton, Independence; H. H. Parks, Mt. Pleasant, Warren Co.; P. Inskeep, Mt. Pleasant, Hancock Co.; L. Osborn, Plymouth; Jos. Botts, St. Mary's; H. H. Parks, Union; J. G. Seger, Basco; N. Parks, Raritan; C. W. Palmer, Macomb; R. W. Welch, Tennessee; John Warren, Oquawka; W. Hobbs, Swan Creek; J. W. Thompson, Honey Creek.

Baptisms 106; Rec'd. by Letter 76; By Relation 18; Dismissed 67; Excluded 36; Died 12; Members 1456.

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N. Parks, Moderator. J. E. Bosler, Clerk.

The Missionary Union was represented, by C. F. Tolman; Publication Society, C. R. Blackhall; Theological Union Chicago, W. M. Haigh; General Association, I. Clark.

The Committee on the State of Religion reported very encouragingly, presenting a hopeful view of the cause in the Association.

The Committee on Resolutions noticed commendingly the several branches of our benevolent work.

1869. 35th Anniversary.
The Association met with the Raritan Church, Henderson Co., Aug. 11, 1869. The session was opened with a sermon by I. L. Benedict of Macomb, from Rom. 3:24,-- "Being justified fully by his grace through the redemption that is in Christ Jesus."

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The churches were 24, but only 18 made reports. Baptisms 157; Rec'd. by Letter 41; By Relation 10; Restored 5; Dismissed 83; Excluded 30; Died 10; Members 1355. Four only of the churches have a membership reaching 100; and only 4 of the remainder have over 50 members. Six of the churches received members by baptism, ranging from 16 to 35. Six others had reported from 1 to 3 baptisms.
I. L. Benedict, Moderator. J. E. Bosler, Clerk.

The visiting brethren that reported themselves, were C. F. Tolman, G. S. Bailey and I. N. Hobart. They represented the Missionary Union, The Theological Union, and The General Association. The routine course in business was taken. The Collections amounted to $129.15, beside the pledges which were given.

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Arrangements were made to renew the mission work in the Association. There were also seasons for prayer and conference.

1870. 36th Anniversary.
The Association was held with the Church in Macomb, in 1870. The session was opened Sep. 14, with a sermon by L. Osborn, of Plymouth, from Heb. 12:28, 29,-- "Wherefore we receiving a kingdom which cannot be moved, let us have grace, whereby we may serve God acceptably with reverence and godly fear; For out God is a consuming fire."

Of the 24 churches, 21 were represented. Baptisms 168; Rec'd. by Letter 78; By Relation 62; Restored 7; Dismissed 86;

1238

Excluded 36; Died 17; Members 1578. Four of the churches had received 20 members and over by baptism; and 4 had received 12 members and over; and 9 had received numbers less than 12.
L. Osborn, Moderator. J. E. Bosler, Clerk.

The Sciota and Blandinville Churches were received; the one with 30 members, the other with 29.

The ordinary committees were appointed, and made their reports. Rev. S. Pickard had been employed as the missionary of the Association, and his labors had been successful. Committees were appointed to visit certain churches that had failed to be represented for years. The following I take from the minutes:
"In as much as this Association has learned of certain

1239

irregularities existing in the Basco Baptist Church, viz.: Practicing mixed communion, receiving an excluded member from another church into their fellowship, and in as much as the church is a member of this body,
"Resolved, That Bros. L. Osborn, S. Pickard and Wm. Hobbs be appointed a committee to investigate the said reports, and advise with the church, and report at our next meeting."

1871. 37th Anniversary.
The Association met with the Oquawka church during the session of 1871, which commenced, Sep. 16. The sermon was by E. Russ, of Roseville, from Mark 6:37,-- "He answered and said unto

1240

them, Give ye them to eat." etc.

Honey Creek Church had become extinct. The churches were 23. Two made no reports. Baptisms 73; Rec'd. by Letter 34; By Relation 15; Restored 3; Dismissed 76; Excluded 28; Died 13; Members 1428. There were 15 ordained ministers.
J. L. Benedict, Moderator. J. E. Bosler, Clerk.

The Associational work was as usual.

"The Committee appointed to visit Basco Church presented the following resolution and recommended its adoption, which was done:
"Resolved, That the report of loose practice in the

1241

Basco Church, in regard to the communion, having been inquired into by a committee, is believed to be groundless."

"The Committee in the State of Religion, within the bounds of this Association, reported
the following preamble and resolution, which were adopted:
"Whereas, There is much destitution within the bounds of our body, and much of said destitution lies close to al our Churches;
"Resolved, That each Church make a preserving effort to supply this destitution by Sabbath Schools and ministerial labor, thus developing the latent talent of our Churches in building up our Redeemer's Kingdom in our midst."

There were seasons for prayer and conference.

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I take the following from the Minutes:
"Whereas, Our beloved brother, Samuel Pickard, who for two years past has faithfully served us as our Associational Missionary, ahs changed his field of labor,
"Resolved, That we express our thanks to him for his faithful and self-denying labor, assuring him that as he labors in his present field, our prayers for God's blessing upon his labors shall ascend that he may have strength to labor, and that many may be turned to Christ through his instrumentality."

Sister Scott of the Assam Mission, after the death of her devoted husband seemed to be regarded by this Association with special interest.

I insert the following from the Minutes: "Father

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Hovey," (Eld. James, Hovey, a member of the Fall Creek Church) "an old soldier of the Cross, who is one of the oldest ministers in the Salem Association, being present, delivered the following farewell address, which is reported from memory:
"Thirty years ago I entered this Association, and ‘What hath God wrought?’ I see but few of those I then saw. Bro. Logan, who organized the "New Hope" Church, at Blandinsville, with others of the old pioneers, has gone home. Bro. Botts and myself are left, and we will soon go. I am glad to see so many here, but am sorry to see so many in a hurry to get away. I had expected to see a full delegation this morning to finish up the business of the Association, but a good many have gone. It did not use to be so; when we went to an Association we expected to stay until everything was done. Some

1244

have remained, I hope to do work for Jesus. Brethren, I bid you good bye; the old man's work is done; O shall soon go home; I never expect to meet with you in an Association again. I am poor in this world's goods, but I trust I am rich in Christ. Some of my brethren have blamed the old man wrongfully; they have blamed me because I did not take a salary. God knows they do not know what they are doing; if I had asked a salary the brethren would have said, ‘You can go, we do not want you.’ The brethren were poor, I took things as I found them, and did the best I could. But I have never suffered, the Lord has provided for me, and the brethren have not forgotten me. I have but a short time longer to live and then I shall be at rest; I can trust God for the rest of my life. Brethren

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in all your sermons preach Christ crucified. Good bye."

It is further said: "The address was listened to with a great deal of interest and emotion, and after the conclusion Father Hovey's hat was passed around and $20 deposited therein."

1872. 38th Anniversary.
The Blandinville Church entertained the Association in 1872. The session was opened, Sep. 14. The sermon was by Niles Kinne, of Carthage, from 1. Peter 2:5,-- "Ye also, as lively stones, are built up a spiritual house, a holy priesthood, to offer up spiritual sacrifices, acceptable to God by Jesus Christ."

The churches of Farmer's Township, Fulton Co.; of Bethel Township, and Cameron, in Warren Co., were

1246

received. The churches were 26, but two made no reports. Baptisms 204; Rec'd. by Letter 71; By Relation 28; Restored 4; Dismissed 65; Excluded 39; Died 11; Members 1755. Five churches received 20 persons and upwards by baptism; four received 12 and upwards; nine received a number below 12. Elm Grove Church is now Cedar Creek.
I. N. Hill, Moderator. J. E. Bosler, Clerk.

The course of business was as heretofore mainly.

I give the following a place here:
"Resolved, 1st, That we do most unhesitatingly and unqualifiedly protest against all forms of popular amusements that in any way tend to, or countenance gambling, such as match games; playing at base ball, prize contests, whether it be at cards

1247

or croquet.
"Resolved, 2d, That we do earnestly request all our people to discountenance and discourage every feature of popular amusements that cannot be used for the glory of God, and the salvation of precious souls."

"On the observance of the Sabbath:
"Resolved, 1st, That we look with regret and alarms on the increasing efforts of infidels, whether home born or foreign, who have fled to our shores from the oppression of Europe, to introduce legal enactments in contempt of God's law of the Sabbath, with the design to establish in this country the degraded standard of morals of their native homes.
"Resolved, 2d, That we look with regret on the united

1248

efforts of foreign infidels and the whiskey-ring, asking legal enactments for the repudiation of the Sabbath and all temperance laws.
"Resolved, 3rd, That the united power of Christians should at once be brought to bear, against this tide of evil, and that we earnestly recommend our people to withdraw their support from all political parties which ignore the Sabbath of God, or connive at its abrogation and the repeal of all temperance laws.
"Resolved, 4th, That it is our duty as Christian ministers, deacons, and members of Christ's Body, by positive and uncompromising action to oppose this growing evil."

The Committee on Obituaries thus reported:

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"Your Committee respectfully report that several beloved brethren and sisters have, during the year, entered, we trust, into the Rest that remaineth for the people of God. Among these we mention our much esteemed brother, Eld. Wm. F. Forrest. He died in Macomb, in December last. Eminently kind in Spirit, a lover of religion, and of the cardinal doctrine of salvation by grace, he was perceived to welcome many souls to a place in the church of Christ, hopefully converted under his ministry."

There was especial prayer and conference meetings; and much preaching in different houses of worship on the Lord's day.

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1873. 39th Anniversary.
The Association met with Bushnell Church in 1873. The session opened, Sep. 20, with a sermon by L. Osborn, of Plymouth, from 2. Tim. 3:5, "Having a form of godliness, but denying the power thereof: from such turn away."

The name of the Swan Creek Church has been changed to Youngstown. The churches were 26. The receptions by baptism in four of the churches had been 20 or more; and in three the number had been 11 or more. Baptisms 176; Rec'd. by Letter 77; By Relation 36; Restored 1; Dismissed 68; Excluded 43; Died 26; Members 1915.
Niles Kinne, Moderator. J. E. Bosler, Clerk.

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The minutes say: "The Sabbath was pleasantly and we trust profitably spent. The pulpits were all filled as previously appointed, and the congregations were good. The Missionary meeting at the Baptist Church was of special interest. The house was filled to its utmost capacity, and after some singing, prayer was offered. Brother Tolman made some remarks on Foreign Missions; after which sister Scott, who recently returned from her mission-field in Assam, came forward and gave a brief account of her own, and also of her deceased husband's labors among the heathen. Her remarks were listened to with a great deal of interest by the large congregation, and at the close a spontaneous contribution was taken for foreign missions

1252

in cash amounting to $83.11 and $17 in pledges. Mrs. Leach of Galesburg, followed, making a few very appropriate remarks in regard to Woman's work and Woman's duties on Foreign Missions."

The Committee on Obituaries made the announcement of the death of the venerable Elder James Hovey, aged 88 years. A sketch of his life is in the Biographical part of this History.

I give the following a place:
"Resolved, That we recommend the New Baptist Hymn and Tune Book for adoption in our Churches in preference to any others."

Father Joseph Botts, an old and faithful soldier of the Cross, desiring to retire in order to go home on the next train made the following

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remarks, "This has been my home for 35 years; have always enjoyed the meetings of my brethren on these occasions; shall soon close up my 84th year; in all probability this will be the last time I shall meet with you, but this parting will not be for always--we shall meet again to part no more. The prosperity of the Baptist cause has been my struggle. I can say that the Lord has often blessed me. Have often felt in my labors that the Lord was with me. When I first came to this country my labors extended 100 miles north and south, have assisted to organize 17 churches. On several occasions I rode on horseback till I was so tired that I could hardly get off my horse. I feel that my labors on earth are closed.

1254

I exhort the brethren to unity. Farewell."

There was preaching at four houses of worship on the Lord's day, and two sermons in each.

This resolution was passed by the Association:
"Resolved, That this Association realizing the importance of Woman's Work in Missions, earnestly recommends the early formation of a Mission Circle in each Church."

There was in the Minutes a Circular Letter of much worth on "Scripture guide to the cultivation of Benevolence." Written by Geo. P. Guild.

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1874. 40th Anniversary.
The Association held its session with the Church at Sciota, McDonough Co. The meeting opened on Saturday, Sep. 10, 1874, with a sermon by H. H. Parks, from Mat. 16:18,--"I say also unto thee, That thou art Peter, and upon this rock I will build my church;" etc.

The churches were 29, only 25 made reports. Littleton, Mt. Vernon and Harris churches were received. Baptisms 258; Rec'd. by Letter 68; By Relation 40; Restored 2; Dismissed 130; Excluded 39; Erased 31; Died 24; Members 2220.
J. M. Harrington, Moderator. J. H. Delano, Clerk.

The usual committees were appointed.

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The representatives of several of our Christian Societies were present. The usual committees were appointed. The Committee on Missions in the body had failed to accomplish anything. Collection on the Lord's day for State Missions, including the Association amounted in cash and pledges, to $500; also one for Foreign Missions--cash and pledges 4200. The manuscript history of the Association was obtained from Bro. Coghill, and a collection of $18.50 was taken to compensate him. Brn. Kinne, Hobbs, Botts and Parks were appointed to write up the history to the present time. The Clerk of the Association was instructed to preserve the Minutes of the body in book form. The thanks of the Association were given to Bro. Coghill for his labor. "The History of the

1257

Association was loaned to Bro. Cole for a time sufficient for his purpose in writing the general History of the Baptists of the State."

The Association again decided to do its mission work through the General Association. "In view of the fact that great dissatisfaction exists among many of our members, relative to many of our members and some of our ministers engaging in popular sinful amusements,
"Resolved, That we do heartily protest against this practice by our members."

The Churches if the Association were requested to liberate their pastors for a limited time to labor in destitute fields in the Association, under the direction of the Missionary Committee. The following Pastors volunteered to donate ten days the coming

1258

year to this work: J. R. Pennington, J. H. Delano, G. D. Kent, N. Kinne, T. S. Lowe, J. M. Harrington.

Benevolent contributions reported were for Foreign Missions $265.15; Home Missions $432.22.

The 13th Anniversary of the Sabbath School Convention preceded the session of the Association.

1875. 41st Anniversary.
Roseville church entertained the Association during this anniversary, which opened Sep. 18, 1875, with a sermon by I. N. Hobart, of Chicago, from Num. 23:23,--"What hath God wrought."

The churches were 27. Baptisms 231; Rec'd. by Letter 40; By Experience 26; Restored 11; Dismissed 66; Excluded 29; Erased 38; Died 17; Members 2376.
Alex. McLean, Moderator. J. H. Delano, Clerk.

Committees were duly appointed. Visitors present were

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courteously recognized. Dr. Bulkley requested a file of the Minutes for binding and to be deposited in Shurtleff College library. A collection for State Missions of $117.50 was taken. The minutes say, "The Sabbath was very pleasantly, and we trust profitably spent, in accordance with the report of the Committee on Religious exercises. The pulpits of the various churches were occupied by appointed ministers. A collection was taken for Foreign Missions, amounting to $102. Committees on Benevolence and in the Centennial made their reports which were adopted. Dr. Bulkley was requested to prepare a copy of his sermon of Saturday night, for publication and distribution as a centennial document.

Contributions reported were for For. Miss. $433.38; State Miss. $372.95; Pub. Society $248.85. The Sabbath School Convention was held, before the Association.

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1876. 42nd Anniversary.
The Association was held with the 1st Church of Macomb. The session opened Sep. 16, 1876, with a sermon by S. H. D. Vaughn, of Prairie City, from Rev. 22:9,--"Worship God."

The churches were 27, but two were not represented. Baptisms 242; Rec'd. by Letter 48; By Experience 32; Restored 2; Dismissed 73; Excluded 38; Erased 60; Died 20; Members 2489.
A. McLean, Moderator. G. D. Kent, Clerk.

The several churches of Macomb were supplied on the Lord's day by brethren attending the Association. There was much interest in the services.

The Woman's Mission society held a very interesting meeting in the M. E. house of worship. The time of the body was mainly consumed in the presentation of reports of Committees, and in addresses

1261

following. The Committee on Obituaries with other names of the departed, gave that of James Henry Kidd, a young minister whose life sketch will be found in the Biographical part of this work.

The Continuous History of the Association, supplementing Dea. Coghill's history, and bringing it down to the present time, by Rev. N. Kinne was received. The Benevolent contributions reported for For. Miss., State Miss., and Pub. Society only amounted $318.16.

The Minutes of the Sabbath School Convention are published in the Associations minutes.

The End.

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Chapter XII. Fox River Association.

No. 1. 1835-1844.

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History of the Fox River Association, when organized receiving the name of the Northern Association, which it retained until its session in 1847, and included up to that year, the Chicago Association also.

It may be well here to make a record of some preliminary occurrences which belong to our history, before proceeding directly to the history of the Association.

The first, and therefore pioneer Baptist ministers who came to Northern Illinois were Allen B. Freeman, Jeremy F. Tolman, Joshua E. Ambrose and Alfred B. Hubbard. The first three of these men, were under commission from the American Baptist Home Mission Society, as its missionaries to this then new country.

Rev. A. B. Freeman was the first to enter the field, which he did, in a few weeks after

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his graduation from the Theological Seminary, at Hamilton, N. Y.; arriving in Chicago in August, 1833. With this, then small village, as his center of operations, he went forth to his work of searching out and gathering together the scattered disciples of Christ, who had come to make their homes in this land of prairies and of promise. His was the work of preaching the gospel in the new settlements and of organizing churches, to become centers of spiritual influence, where the people might be drawn together for Christian instruction. On October 5, 1833 therefore, at one of his points of labor, he assisted in organizing the O' Plain church (now Hadley) a few miles east of Lockport. This was the first Baptist church organized in Northern Illinois. On the 19th of the same month, he completed the organization of the First Baptist Church of Chicago composed of

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15 members.

Soon after Mr. Freeman began his labors in Chicago, the erection of a meeting-house, by the few Baptists and their friends was commenced. Though an unpretending edifice, it answered well its intended use, and the needs of the times, being designed to serve the double purpose of a place of Christian worship and a schoolhouse. Its cost when finished was six hundred dollars, one hundred of which remained as a debt on the property. In April, 1834, Mr. Freeman administered the ordinance of Baptism to the first person who was ever "buried with Christ by baptism into death" on the Western shore of Lake Michigan.

On August 26, 1834, Mr. Freeman preached

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on the occasion of recognition of the church in Du Page, (the town north of Lockport); and in December of the same year he also preached at the recognition of the church at Long Grove (now Bristol); and baptized Brother (now Elder) David Matlock, which was undoubtedly the first administration of the Sacred ordinance in Fox River. The toil and fatigue of his return journey to Chicago, occasioned by the sickness of his horse, obliging him to finish it on foot, resulted in his sickness and death, December 15, 1834. This was a sad bereavement to our infant cause in Chicago and its vicinity.

Elder Alfred B. Hubbard settled in 1834, at Du Page; Elder J. F. Tolman at Long Grove; and Elder J. E. Ambrose at Plainfield; places until

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then not favored with Baptist preaching, but in each of which Baptist churches were soon favored.

Mr. Tolman in his history says, "Between the death of Elder Freeman in December 1834, and the formation of the Association, in September 1835, Elder Isaac T. Hinton had succeeded Brother Freeman in the pastorate of the church at Chicago. Elder J. G. Porter had become pastor of the church at O' Plain; (Hadley) Elder John Beaver had immigrated to Long Grove, and the writer had left the latter place to obtain medical aid in New York, and did not return to his field of labor till the following Spring."

Organization of the Association.
A Convention of delegates from the Small Churches was called to consider the propriety of organizing

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an Association, and convened with Du Page Church, September 15, 1865. (Tolman p. 16, "Sept. 15, 1835") (should not this be 1835? I. Bulkley)

Elder Wm. Southwood of Michigan City, opened the Convention with a sermon, from Titus 2:13, 14. "Looking for that blessed hope, and the glorious appearing of the great God and our Savior Jesus Christ;" etc.

Wm. Southwood was chosen Moderator, and Benj. H. Clift, Clerk.

The following churches were represented by their delegates:
O' Plain.--Eld. Jonathan G. Porter, Abraham Snapp, and Cyrus Cross.
Chicago.--Eld. Isaac T. Hinton, J. T. Temple, Samuel Lathrope, and Benj. H. Clift.
Du Page.--Eld. Alfred B. Hubbard, Abel E.

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Carpenter, Alfred Churchill, Hiram Warren and A. M. Lull.
Plainfield.--Eld. Joshua E. Ambrose.

The organization seems to have been decided at the outset, and Elders Hinton, Hubbard and Ambrose were appointed a committee to draft a Constitution.

The brethren from the Churches presented the following particulars respecting them:
O' Plain Church was constituted Oct. 5, 1833, with 12 members; 2 had been added by baptism, and 25 by letter. Five had been dismissed, 1 had died, and 1 had been excluded, members now 34.

Chicago Church was constituted Oct. 19, 1833 with 15 members; 5 had been added by baptism, and 34 by letter, 10 had been dismissed, 3 had died, 1 had

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been excluded, present members 41.

Du Page Church was constituted Aug. 26, 1834, with 6 members; 8 had been added by baptism, and 20 by letter, 1 had been dismissed, members then 33.

The church existed in two branches. One at Du Page, the other at Naper's, afterwards undoubtedly taking the name of Naperville.

Plainfield church was constituted Oct. 16, 1834, with 5 members; 4 had been added by baptism--5 by letter; 1 had been dismissed--1 excluded--members 12. This church was constituted on the principle of total abstinence from intoxicating liquors. These churches were then all in Cook county. The entire membership of the four churches was one hundred and twenty.

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The intervals of time were employed in devotional exercises and in preaching.

After the opening services of the second morning, the Committee on a Constitution reported one, and after careful consideration it was adopted unanimously. The title given to the Body was "The Northern Baptist Association of Illinois, Indiana and the Wisconsin Territory." From this name it appears that the Association was intended to embrace, at least temporarily, the Northwestern part of Indiana, and the section of the Wisconsin Territory bordering upon Illinois. It soon, however, became a State organization wholly.

It belongs properly to this history to record here, whatever was peculiar to this organization,

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and will present a view of the purposes, plans and methods of work of the pioneer Baptists of this region.

As to the Objects of the Association they thus speak, "To aid in promoting the Spread of the Gospel and the establishment of the Kingdom of Christ within its own limits, and throughout the world; by affording opportunity for, and encouragement to the exercise of Christian fellowship, mutual consultation, and concerted action, among the churches composing this Association."

And as to the Means they say:
"1. By promoting, in connection with the Baptist Home Mission Society, the support of itinerant preachers of the Gospel, where churches are not formed, or

1273

are too feeble to sustain a stated ministry.
2. By encouraging and aiding in the support of Sabbath Schools.
3. By ascertaining the need and facilitating the distribution of the Sacred Scriptures.
4. By promoting the circulation of suitable Periodicals, Books and Tracts.
5. By aiding in the support of Institutions for Ministerial Education.
6. By encouraging and keeping alive a missionary spirit; and by affording a channel or the transmission of contributions to the Treasury for Foreign Missions."

One of the provisions of the Constitution reads as follows: "In neighborhoods where churches are not yet formed. Members of Baptist churches in good standing to the number of five, are authorized and requested to elect a delegate to attend the meetings of this body;

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and any association of members of the Baptist denomination, contributing to the funds of this body, shall be entitled to send one delegate."

Another provision reads thus: "Any ordained Baptist minister in good standing, though not actually in charge of any church, residing within the limits of this association, and contributing to its funds, shall be considered a member of this body, and entitled to sit and vote at its meetings."

The Constitution made provision for an Executive Board, and prescribed its duties as follows:
"An Executive Board shall be chosen annually, consisting of nine members, three of

1275

whom shall form a quorum. It shall be the duty of the Board to admit new churches which may apply, to call special meetings if necessary, and to manage the affairs and conduct the correspondence of the Association during its recess. The Board shall elect a Chairman, Secretary and Treasurer; and shall meet quarterly on the third Wednesday in September, December, March and June. The meetings of the Board shall be open to all the pastors and delegated, who shall be entitled to advise and vote at the same. The Board shall report to the annual meeting their proceedings for confirmation."

In other respects the Constitution had nothing unusual in it. The Convention was considered dissolved by the adoption of the Constitution, and

1276

Elder Southwood took the Chair as Moderator of the Association.

The Association recommended several things to the churches, some of which it may be well here to notice:
To meet regularly on the first day of the week, for reading the scriptures, exhortation and prayer, when they had no minister.--
To maintain a Sabbath School for all who may be disposed to attend it.--
That in case any member should have been excluded by any Baptist church for attaching himself to any temperance, missionary or other society for promoting the kingdom of Christ, after ascertaining the fact by proper correspondence, with the

1277

church; such member be, on application, received, whether the church excluding him consent to it or not. The Association thus recorded its views of slavery.

"This Association regard the practice of holding men in slavery to be a violation of the natural rights of man, and contrary to the first principles of the gospel."

By authority of the Association an address was printed in the minutes setting forth important matters worthy of thought and attention by all its churches, and the unchurched Baptist of that day.

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1836.
The Association held its first anniversary with the church in Chicago, opening September 21, with a sermon by Prof. S. S. Whitman, from 1.Cor. 15:53. "For this corruptible must put on incorruption, and this mortal must put on immortality."
I. Wilson, Moderator. A. B. Hubbard, Clerk.

Committees were appointed, On the State of the Churches,--Home Missions,--Foreign Missions,--Ministerial Education,--A. and For. Bible Society,--Temperance,--Sabbath Schools,--Observance of the Sabbath.

Belvidere and Second Du Page Churches were received at this meeting. The Executive Board had received at the quarterly meetings these churches: Little Wood,

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Vermillionville, Long Grove, Jackson's Grove, and Big Woods. All but Long Grove had been formed within the year. The churches were 11, ordained ministers 10, one served two churches, and all had ministerial services except one. The statistical reports of the Churches aggregated thus: Baptized 23; Received by Letter 65; Dismissed 25; Excluded 1; Died 2; Members 288. At the organization of the Association the four churches entering into it had 120 members. The number of Sabbath Schools reported was 14; number of scholars 305. The benevolent contributions were $176.87.

The Committees all reported,--their reports were adopted and ordered to be printed. The following resolution was passed,

1280

"Resolved, That Elder Woodin of Hannibal, Oswego Co. N. Y. be invited to accept the appointment of Itinerant Agent in the bounds of this Association."

There is nothing more in the proceedings of the Association, unusual in character, and requiring notice here. The new Ministers of the Association were D. W. Elmore, Thomas Powell, S. S. Whitman and John S. King.

I will at this point insert a statement from J. F. Tolman's History of the Fox River Association, that will be as much in place here as anywhere, as it relates to the first year's quarterly meetings.

"The quarterly meetings were spent in devotional exercises, in receiving new churches into the Association, in the transaction of missionary business, in the

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free discussion of topics deemed important, in the pastors giving an account of their respective fields of labor, and in devising means to support destitute places with preaching."

The first quarterly meeting was held at O' Plain, (now Hadley) in December 1835; the second at Plainfield in March 1836. At this meeting the delegates from Long Grove, (Bristol Church) presented a Resolution, disapproving of "free or mixed communion," on the ground of it being unscriptural. The design of it was to snip that doctrine in the bud, and thereby prevent further dissemination of it by Elder Hinton, who advocated that practice. The Resolution was opposed and was opposed by Elder Hinton. He had adopted the peculiar views of Robert Hall on the subject of communion.

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He was an Englishman, possessing a well endowed and cultivated mind, was an acceptable preacher and successful pastor. After discussing the resolution, it was lost. The moderator, Elder Hubbard, gave the casting vote against its adoption; not, however, because he was favorable to free communion, but merely from motives of policy. Thus began a contention about communion, which issued in the withdrawal of Elder J. Beaver and several of his family connections, from both the church and the Association. They united together in forming a church at Little Rock, about ten miles distant from the one they left. The new church never received a formal fellowship from other churches; nor did it ever join an Association. It was supplied with

1283

the ministry of Bro. Beaver. Several persons were added to it by baptism. It has become extinct. Elder Beaver and some other of the members returned to the Bristol Church.

"For the sake of connecting what we have to say on this subject, dates are anticipated. At a quarterly meeting at Big Woods, (Batavia) in June 1837, after some debate on free communion, advocated by Brother Hinton, it was distinctly stated to him, that although there would be no direct interference with his pastoral relation with the church at Chicago; yet he himself could not remain a member of the Association, unless he entirely desisted from advocating such practice at the meetings of the body. Finding the brethren firm, and determined to maintain their position, he yielded, and

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gave assurance of silence on the subject at Associational meetings in the future. The writer never after heard him even allude to the subject in public and but once in private."

I will insert here some extracts from the Report of the Executive Board, as they will aid in obtaining a correct idea of the view and purposes of the early Baptist in this Association. Referring to the quarterly meetings the Report says, "These meetings have been highly interesting, and it is hoped beneficial: the fellowship of the churches is maintained--the communion is sweet--and the hearts of many, are strengthened. The Board deem this arrangement of holding the quarterly meetings with churches in turn, to be highly conducive to the prosperity and establishment

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of the kingdom of Christ among us, and trust they will be punctually maintained."

"The Board would remark with gratitude, that they are not aware that any church of our name exists within the bounds of the Association which maintains erroneous views, or refuses cooperation in the benevolent operations for which this era of the church has become so happily celebrated."

"Resolved, that no churches be received into this body but such as are connected with the regular Baptist denomination--and also, That each church applying for admission send a copy of its articles of faith and practice."

Of an important object, ever had in view--and are ever cherished by the Association, with the most

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lively interest, the Report thus speaks: "Your Board have been most anxious to secure the aid of a faithful minister, to itinerate among the numerous settlements, where members of our denomination are scattered abroad, that they may at least, be occasionally fed with the bread of life, and may, as soon as circumstances justify, be formed into churches; but they regret to state that although the Home Mission Society has, with a liberality for which we would be grateful, expressed a willingness to concur with your Association in sustaining such itinerant, that no minister has yet been found ready to undertake this most important work. The Board have reason to hope, however, that by the opening of next spring, a minister from the East, peculiarly suited, may be induced

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to undertake the mission, and would urge upon the churches the most liberal efforts to sustain him."

"Under the circumstances, you Board have felt it their duty to urge as earnestly as possible, the stated pastors of your body to take each of them a share in this arduous, but most important sphere of exertion; and they are happy to state that to some extent they have succeeded."

Elder Tolman says, "The Board did not obtain the minister they had in view. And it is worthy of special notice, that notwithstanding the most strenuous efforts were made, year after year, to obtain an itinerant minister, yet the object never was realized to any considerable extent."

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From the Report on the State of the Churches I make the following quotations:
"O' Plain Church is at present in a very interesting and hopeful condition. A state of comparative indifference among the hearers of the Gospel appears to have given way to an almost general anxiety on the subject of religion, and many are inquiring, ‘What shall we do to be saved?’"

"Chicago Church has been considerably blessed during the past year, and has manifested commendable zeal and liberality in sustaining the ministry of the Gospel and the benevolent institutions which exist for its dissemination in the world."

1st Du Page Church. The congregation is increasing--the church is in peace, and engaged in

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sustaining the benevolent operations of the day. It has dismissed sixteen of its members to constitute the 2nd Du Page Church.

"Plainfield Church has enjoyed a season of revival, which has been refreshing and strengthening to the church in both numbers and graces."

The following churches are the new ones, existing since the Association was organized:
Long Grove, (now Bristol) was organized Nov. 15, 1834, with six members--twenty-three were added by letter. Members twenty-nine. "The affliction of Elder Tolman has nearly deprived the church of his valuable services; but its peace and purity are still preserved, and its members have been increased by pleasing accessions from the East."

Little Woods, afterwards Charleston, but now

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St. Charles, was organized Oct. 16, 1835, with ten members--twelve have been added by letter--Members twenty-two. "It is now supplied by the ministerial labors of Elder D. W. Elmore. It has no less than five Sabbath-Schools in connection with it, and also a Temperance Society. It enjoys a state of peace, and its prospects are pleasing."

Vermillionville Church was organized in 1835, with fifteen members. Two have been baptized, and two dismissed. Members fifteen. "Although only twice visited by ministerial aid, has been preserved in peace--increased in numbers--a spirit of liberality maintained--and the prayers of its members heard in directing the steps of Elder Thos. Powell, who is about to take charge of them in the Lord."

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Jackson's Grove Church was formed in 1835, with five members. One has been baptized into it. Members six. "It is a feeble band, and is very desirous of receiving the occasional labors of the ministers of the Association."

Big Woods (now Batavia) was organized June 16, 1836, with thirteen members. One died. Members twelve. "It is supplied once a month by Elder Ambrose, but is desirous to maintain more constant ministrations."

Belvidere Church was organized July 31, 1836. Elder John S. King and thirteen brethren and sisters were duly enrolled as members. Two were added by letter. Members sixteen. It is now favored with the labors of Elders King and Whitman, and there is reason to hope

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that the cause of Christ, not only at Belvidere, but in the neighborhoods around, which is rapidly filling with settlers, will receive benefits of a character which will cause the hearts of many to rejoice.

2nd Du Page Church (now Warrenville) was organized in 1826 [1836], with twenty-two members. Congregations large and prospect encouraging. A spirit of liberality characterizes the members.

Mr. Tolman says, "At a quarterly meeting in June, 1837, Elder R. B. Ashley, recently from the State of New York, accepted an appointment to itinerate such portion of the time as could be spared from other engagements at one dollar per day. His labors were very acceptable wherever he went. They were especially

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blessed to the enlargement of the 2nd Du Page, now Warrenville church; and to the gathering of the church at Joliet. At each of these places he baptized several persons."

1837.
I am wholly dependant on the file of Minutes of this Association, which I loaned of Rev. C. F. Tolman, which his father gave him at his death, and upon the History of this Bosy which his father published, for the historic facts of the Organization through all its early years; can do no better, therefore, than to copy here what he says, in his History, of the Anniversary of 1837.

"We have failed to obtain the minutes of this session. The Association in 1836,

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voted, ‘That the next annual meeting be held at Plainfield, the first Wednesday in October, Elder Powell to preach--Elder Porter his substitute.’

"At this session, or at some of the quarterly meetings four new churches were received, all of which were organized in 1837; Upper O' Plain ten members; Joliet four members--two of whom had been baptized; Prophet's Town twelve members, and Rochester (Wisconsin) ten members. Elders R. B. Ashley and Joel Wheeler were added to the ministry. Bro. Wheeler was Clerk and Deacon Isaac Wilson Moderator."

Benevolent contributions reported $176.87.

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1838.
The third anniversary of the Association was held with the Church in Warrenville, opening Oct. 3, with a sermon by R. B. Ashley.
J. F. Tolman, Moderator. B. H. Clift, Clerk.

Rochester Church (Wisconsin) was dismissed at its request to join the Wisconsin Association.

The churches of Elgin, with thirteen members, J. E. Ambrose minister; McHenry, with twenty members, J. Wheeler minister; Dundee and Adams, now Dundee, with thirteen members, D. W. Elmore minister; and Lake Zurich, with fourteen members. There was one new minister, D. T. Graves.

The following churches were represented: Chicago, 1st Du Page, Plainfield, Little Woods,

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(now St. Charles) Long Grove, (now Bristol) Big Woods, (now Batavia) 2nd Du Page, Upper O' Plain.

Statistics--Baptisms 34; Received by Letter 60; Dismissed 34; Excluded 6; Died 5; Members 450. Benevolent contributions reported $176.75.

The only Baptist periodical in this State, and serves also for the State of Missouri, and it has struggled into existence for a number of years, under heavy discouragements, sustained by the extraordinary efforts and sacrifices of our esteemed and talented brother Peck; and whereas the paper is still laboring under considerable embarrassments, and requires the united exertions and patronage

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of the denomination to prevent its entire failure, and from the very able and satisfactory manner in which the same is now conducted, its loss would be depricated as a very serious denomination and public calamity:--Therefore it is resolved, that we earnestly recommend to every member of our churches able to spare $2.50 per annum for a newspaper, to devote the same as a matter of paramount duty and interest, to the purchase of the Pioneer."

The Executive Board elected for the year then beginning, were I. T. Hinton, A. B. Hubbard, J. E. Ambrose, Joel Wheeler, R. B. Ashley, Isaac Wilson, E. H. Mulford, Warren Smith, Abraham Snapp, Rice Fay and J. T. Wheeler.

The following resolution was passed: "Resolved,

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That it is recommended to each of the churches composing this Association to hold at least one special meeting in the year, to commence on Friday, and continue such length of time as may be deemed expedient; and that the ministers make such arrangements, as to have at least two ministering brethren present during the whole time of its continuance."

Also the following has place here:
"Resolved, That, whereas the inefficiency of Christians in contributing for the spread of the Gospel, is assignable greatly to the neglect of the Apostolic injunction, on the first day of the week let every one of you lay by him in store as God hath prospered him; it is recommended to the ministers of this Association to improve an early opportunity

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of bringing this subject effectually before the several churches over which they preside."

To put on permanent record the sentiments of our Christian brotherhood in regard to the former great curse of this land--slavery, I insert here the following:
"Report on the State of the colored population."
The moral power of the church of Christ is the instrumentality by which alone the civil and religious liberties of mankind can be permanently maintained, and the welfare of the human race be effectually promoted. The subject of the present report is therefore, one which falls directly within the sphere of the churches; and that their influence may be effective it is needful that the views of the members of the churches should be

1300

harmonized, clearly expressed and firmly maintained; and both individually and collectively acted upon. It will not be denied, by any honorable mind, that at a period when it is sought by the very basest means (the destruction of property and even of life itself,) to intimidate Christians from the expression of their views on this important subject, it is the peculiar duty of our churches to manifest that they are composed of men who fear not them that can ‘kill the body’, but Him who can ‘cast both body and soul into hell’.

The constant exposure of evils which exist is one of the methods adapted and ultimately, however gradually, yet efficiently to procure their removal; we therefore, feel constrained
Thus publickly to record our deep grief that any

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circumstances should exist in which our brethren who are fellow heirs of immortal glory should be debarred from the perusal of that volume which is the great charter of our salvation; that they should be degraded from that spiritual equality which is the expressed law of Christ should exist in his churches; that they should be deprived of the solemn recognition of the marriage relation which their God has appointed, and their Lord honored; and that their children should be refused the important blessing of Sabbath School instruction. These privileges are things which ‘are God's’ and are therefore to be ‘rendered’ to him in spite of all hindrances the short-sighted selfishness that human laws may oppose. The sole cause of so large a portion of our fellow men continuing subject to such

1302

enormous moral evils, is the existence of a system of slavery alike opposed to human rights, the principles and spirit of the Gospel, and the welfare of the nation; and it is the duty of all Christians by every proper experience both of the moral and political influence to bring such evils to a speedy termination.

This, therefore
Resolved, That while we would deprecate the employment of any intemperate language or imprudent measures, the members of the churches comprising this Association are recommended and earnestly urged,
1. To use every endeavor to procure an abrogation of all laws existing, in this state which tent to create an odious and degrading distinction between any classes of its inhabitants.

1303

2. To use every effort to procure the removal of the evil of slavery from such portions of the United States as are subject to the legislative action of the general government.

3. To make ever exertion to prevent the extension of the evils of slavery over other portions of this continent, under whatever pretence of worldly policy it may be urged.

4. To make the condition of the brethren in bounds the subject of frequent and fervent prayer to Him who is Head over all things to his Church."

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1839.
The Association met with the Elgin church, for holding its fourth annual meeting, and the session was opened with a sermon, Oct. 4 by Elder O. C. Comstock of Michigan.
R. B. Ashley, Mod. A. B. Hubbard, Clerk.

Fairfield church, with thirteen members, D. W. Elmore, minister; and Crystal Lake church with seventeen members, J. Wheeler, minister were added to the body. There were two new ministers, L. B. King, 1st DuPage, and A. W. Button, O'Plain. Prophet's Town church was dropped.

The Association had 18 churches, and from one there was no delegate, the others were represented.

1305

Statistics. Baptized 136; Received by Letter 147; Dismissed 58; Excluded 7; Died 11; Members 656. The net gain was 252.

The benevolent contributions reported were $294.17. The ministers were A. W. Button, I.T. Hinton, Lyman B. King, Riley B. Ashley, Joshua E. Ambrose, Jeremy F. Tolman, D.T. Graves, S.S. Whitman, A.B. Hubbard, John S. King, Joel Wheeler, D.W. Elmore.

Some of the churches had been largely increased in numbers, by the baptism of converts, and also the reception of individuals by letter. Chicago received 61 by baptism, and 13 by letter; Bristol 6 by baptism, and by letter 10; Belvidere 19 by baptism, and 76 by letter; Warrenville 22 by baptism, and 9 by letter; Joliet 8 by baptism, and 7 by letter; Elgin 14 by baptism, and 17 by letter; Plainfield 4 by baptism,

1306

and 6 by letter. This statement shows that God had blessed the churches with "times of refreshing from His presence," and thus cheered and comforted his ministers and people.

Among the visiting ministers were O.C. Comstock, from Michigan Convention; Alfred Bennett, agent for Foreign Mission; John M. Peck, from the Convention of Illinois and Edwardsville Association.

The usual committees were appointed and made their reports. The quarterly meetings for the ensuing year were appointed to be held with certain churches, and a minister named to preach at each.

1307

1840.
The meeting of the Association was with the Bristol church for its fifth anniversary, on Oct. 7, and was opened with a sermon by J. Wheeler, from Heb. 12:14, "Follow peace with all men, and holiness, without which no man shall see the Lord."
Solomon Knapp, Mod. L.D. Boone, Clerk.

The Belvidere church was dismissed having united in forming the Rock River Association. The Jackson's Grove church, having been dissolved was dropped from the minutes. The churches represented were Oplain, Chicago, Plainfield, St. Charles, Bristol, Batavia, 2nd DuPage, (Warrenville) Upper Plain, Joliet, Elgin, McHenry, Dundee, Lake Zurich,

1308

Fairfield and Crystal Lake.

Statistics. Baptized 71; Received by Letter 97; Dismissed 39; Excluded 8; Died 1; Members 632. Benevolent contributions reported $192.85.

S. Knapp at Joliet, and John Sears at Lake Zurich were new pastors in the body.

The following I find in the minutes:
"Ordered, That Br'n. Boone King and Knapp be a committee to take into consideration the propriety of forming a North-Western Convention."

Reports were made on the several branches of Christian work.

The committee reported on the subject of organizing a North Western Convention as follows:

1309

"That in view of the rapid extension of Settlements in the Northern part of out State, and in the Territories of Wisconsin and Iowa, and the increasing demand for organized and efficient action upon the part of our denomination, and the impracticability (from the great length of our State) of any thing like efficient cooperation with our esteemed brethren of the South, we recommend the adoption of the following resolution.

Resolved, That a Convention of brethren from Northern