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Wilson, Douglas L., ed.; Davis, Rodney O., ed.; Whitney, Henry C. 'Henry C. Whitney to William H. Herndon' in 'Herndon's Informants: Letters, Interviews, and Statements About Abraham Lincoln' . Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 1998. [format: book], [genre: letter]. Permission: University of Illinois Press
Persistent link to this document: http://lincoln.lib.niu.edu/file.php?file=herndon616.html


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with Lincoln. You knew much more about him than any one else originally & then your great research made you a complete master of the subject. What do you say to a lecture tour yet? Have you any idea where the most fruitful field is to dissemanate ideas about Lincoln. I have recently imbibed a strong desire to get up an excellent lecture on Lincoln: but after reading your exhausting analysis, I am rather in dispair: yet a miscellaneous audience might be attracted by a generality: my memory is good and I recollect a great many incidents while we were on the circuit together which I found greatly in demand in the 2 or 3 times I either lectures or entertained a crowd in an informal way. Of course I have not 1/100 the advantage you would have as a lecturer & that is what discourages me. I found that a man having the capital you have could make an overwhelming success: but whether one with a little rush light like myself could do anything satisfactory — Quaere? However I already have letters on that subject from Davis & some Senators: and I presume I could obtain some endorsements from Swett and yourself: If I get up a manuscript lecture I shall want to trespass on your kindness sufficiently to read it — make some corrections if desired and give me a letter — somewhat of endorsement. If I do anything in that line I shall do as you did in "Lamon's" book. [7] I shall not say anything discreditable of either Bob or the Madam. Contrawise, I should praise Bob if I had to say anything for his Fathers sake: and I should really like to see Bob president for his Fathers sake. I must this A.M. to Hesler [8] the photographer to get a picture of Uncle Abe He has one taken in Washington which makes him look very respectable — unlike any Lincoln: thus he has one taken by him in 1857, somewhat faded but like our Uncle Abe: then he has the one which he took in Springfield in 1860, and which was furnished to the Century Co. which he is going to print for me. By the bye: Who is going to print your book? and when do you expect to get it out. Do you know anything of Lamons vol. 2? [9] There was a report in the papers that he was going to have it published. I hope you will take time to read this long letter & note down answers to the various topics suggested as you go along. I feel that it is trespassing on your patience. Your Friend

H C Whitney

appropos of the suggestion in Lamons life and also in Dubois' letter [10] i.e. that Lincoln neglected his friends — let me give you this incident from real life which lies peculiarly in my own knowledge and from which you may draw inferences.

In the summer of 1861. — There came to Washington from Illinois the following persons — all desiring to be appointed Paymasters as U.S.A. Victor B. Bell — formerly member of Legislature from Wabash Co. Whig. Ninian W. Edwards — with his wife & [others?] they lived at White House [Dr Wariner?] [11] an utterly worthless nobody from Bloomington
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Wilson, Douglas L., ed.; Davis, Rodney O., ed.; Whitney, Henry C. 'Henry C. Whitney to William H. Herndon' in 'Herndon's Informants: Letters, Interviews, and Statements About Abraham Lincoln' . Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 1998. [format: book], [genre: letter]. Permission: University of Illinois Press
Persistent link to this document: http://lincoln.lib.niu.edu/file.php?file=herndon616.html
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