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Wilson, Douglas L., ed.; Davis, Rodney O., ed.; Whitney, Henry C. 'Henry C. Whitney to William H. Herndon' in 'Herndon's Informants: Letters, Interviews, and Statements About Abraham Lincoln' . Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 1998. [format: book], [genre: letter]. Permission: University of Illinois Press
Persistent link to this document: http://lincoln.lib.niu.edu/file.php?file=herndon627.html


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with a two pound flat lead weight in his hand concealed: he seized a time when the drunkards head was turned away & threw the weight with such force that his own coat tail flew over his head & the weight hit him just back of his ear & penetrated the scull & the victim fell at once & when picked up the weight (whose edge struck first) was imbedded in the scull so that it stayed in as he was lifted up. Lincoln Swett & myself were employed by Pattersons wifes relations (who were rich Quakers) to defend we each got $200.# & each took & kept it: Patterson was indicted for manslaughter (through an influence) and the next term we tried him: Ficklin did not help Lamon but Jno. C. Moses did: and they insisted that the real crime was murder (as it was): Swett made a first rate speech: & Lincoln who closed our case a very poor one for us: and he got 3 years: & Lincoln got Wood to pardon him out after one year so you can see how little reliable biography is. Turn to your books in Spring of 1858. You will find that L. got $200.# for Patterson's case. [25]

Lamons life. P. 331. "Lincoln v. I.C.R.R." — L. claimed $5000.# and took judgement by default: but Jno: M. Douglass solr went to Bloomington after the default and asked L. to set it aside which L. did: then Douglass had a talk with me & Davis (I was Atty for the Company in our county) and we concluded that it was very poor policy to make an enemy of Lincoln so Douglas settled it for the full amt. as I remember: there was no contested trial. [26] It was not Douglass our Solicitor, but Jas. F. Joy advisory counsel who treated Lincoln rudely. (P. 332.) Reaping machine case. Lincoln formed a poor opinion of Judge Mc Lean [27] at that time: thought him an old Granny & with no discrimination.
P. 358. Lincoln told me the reason he didnt speak any more with Douglas in 1854. was that D. claimed to be sick & unable to speak but that he also didnt want L. to speak to which he agreed. [28]
P. 359. On Oct. 24, 1854. L. made the Springfield speech at Urbana. I heard it myself: he was then at court. P. 421. Lincoln got the inspiration for his lecture from a lecture by Bancroft in Nov. '54. [29] This I read to him in 1855. as we were going to Danville court: it was on the wonderful progress of man: Lincoln then told us — Swett, Mrs. Swett & I, that he had thought much of the subject & believed he would write a lecture on Man and his progress. Afterward I read in a paper that he had come to either Bloomington or Clinton to lecture & no one turned out. [30] the paper added "that don't look much like his being President". I joked him about it: he said good naturedly "don't: that plagues me".

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Wilson, Douglas L., ed.; Davis, Rodney O., ed.; Whitney, Henry C. 'Henry C. Whitney to William H. Herndon' in 'Herndon's Informants: Letters, Interviews, and Statements About Abraham Lincoln' . Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 1998. [format: book], [genre: letter]. Permission: University of Illinois Press
Persistent link to this document: http://lincoln.lib.niu.edu/file.php?file=herndon627.html
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