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Wilson, Douglas L., ed.; Davis, Rodney O., ed.; Whitney, Henry C. 'Henry C. Whitney to William H. Herndon' in 'Herndon's Informants: Letters, Interviews, and Statements About Abraham Lincoln' . Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 1998. [format: book], [genre: letter]. Permission: University of Illinois Press
Persistent link to this document: http://lincoln.lib.niu.edu/file.php?file=herndon627.html


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-- 632 --

he had quit because it made him cross." Black has no such statement on p. 475. [20] in 478. stated that he read "Childe Harold". In my office in 1854. he picked up "Byron" and read commencing "They mourned but smiled at length" &c. to "He who ascends to mountain heights shall find. &c. [21] out loud; as impressively as it ever was read in the world. D. Davis: Swett: Lamon Alex Harrison & myself were present. "The mossy marbles rest" [22] &c. was a great favorite: but his greatest favorite, Alas!, was "Mortal man with face of clay

"Here tomorrow: gone to day."

What Davis & Scott say on p. 479. is substantially my idea of his frivolity [23]
p. 481. I don't believe he "damned with faint praise" at all: this is not true at all. I do think however that the next sentence commencing "fully alive" is correct. in fact all the succeeding lot of short sentences is correct. [24]

I don't think he forgot the devotion of his warmest partizans (482.) that is a clear mistake: take Lamons case: or mine: or Judds. He was eccentric in this matter. His secretiveness we will all agree on alike. I never heard him mention religion at all.

P. 83. Jno. Hanks came to Washington in a new suit of blue jeans — wanted an Indian agency: Lincoln really wanted him to have it but he couldnt read or write. Lincoln talked with me about its propriety — said Hank's son could be his clerk &c. wanted to appoint him but did not.


about Henry Clay: Lincoln admired him greatly while I knew him: spoke of him in the warmest terms.
P. 312. "At the 1st opportunity he commissioned Davis" &c This is not true as I have shown.
p. 322. The "Patterson" case was thus: Tom Patterson was a worthless doggery keeper at Sadorus: an old good natured drunkard who had then got drunk & talked rambling drunken talk in the crowd & picked up a spade & spoke of hitting some one &c — He was too drunk to hold the spade steady: Tom was several feet away
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Wilson, Douglas L., ed.; Davis, Rodney O., ed.; Whitney, Henry C. 'Henry C. Whitney to William H. Herndon' in 'Herndon's Informants: Letters, Interviews, and Statements About Abraham Lincoln' . Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 1998. [format: book], [genre: letter]. Permission: University of Illinois Press
Persistent link to this document: http://lincoln.lib.niu.edu/file.php?file=herndon627.html
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