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Wilson, Douglas L., ed.; Davis, Rodney O., ed.; Weber, John B. 'John B. Weber (William H. Herndon Interview)' in 'Herndon's Informants: Letters, Interviews, and Statements About Abraham Lincoln' . Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 1998. [format: book], [genre: interview]. Permission: University of Illinois Press
Persistent link to this document: http://lincoln.lib.niu.edu/file.php?file=herndon388.html


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-- 389 --

for the Negro $250 in the NY Convention of 1820: he was charge with this: there was a speech on this very question in the old Market house in 1840, but forget the names of the parties [2] — . These discussions frequently took place.

I rember the discussion — Bakers speech in the old Court House in the Hoffman row of buildings. This was in 1840 — or 1844. [3] Baker Said this — "Wherever there is a land office there is a paper to defend the Corruptions of office." This was a personal attack on my Bro Geo Webber.: I was in the Court House and in my anger I cried "Pull him down" — . I regret this now. — have always advocate free speech — & press — I do not recollect Lincoln being there that night but I do Know that some one made some soothing — Kind remarks and the difficulty Ended and Baker permitted to End his Speech. [4] This was done under great anger and as I thought at that time it was a personal attack on my bro. He as well as other of my friends interfered — held me till the Excitement ceased — : so it Soon Ended in quiet & peace. Baker and I was personal friends at that time: we belonged to the Military Company.

The temperance question in the Washintonian reformation. I remember Lincolns temperance Speeches well: he & I used to go to the Country together in his buggy: he had a horse & buggy & I had none: he and I were neighbors then — I lived across the street and a little South of me. I could see him better in this position than if I had been coser. The temperance question lasted some years. I can't say how long Mr Lincoln Continued the speeches. I went to California in 1849. Lincoln & I Continued the discussions — Speeches &c. from 1841 to 1849, according to my recollections. Remember I was a severe democrat during all these years. [5]

Let me give you an incident in Mr Lincoln's life. He was frequently away from home for a week or so at a time attending Court & on political discussions. One night he Came home late at night. I heard an axe: it rang out at Lincoln's — got up — Saw Mr Lincoln in his Shirt Sleeves Cutting wood — I suppose to cook his supper with: it was a cold night — the moon was up — and I looked at my clock — it was between 12 & 1 o'cl. This I remember well — used to tell it on the stump and in Conversation — told him so — when he was a candidate for Presdt — did so in the presence of several gentlemen — one from N.Y.. Mr L did not say aye or nay — yet he took it as intended — Complimentary.

Once I heard a scream of — Mr Webber — Mr Webber — it was the voice of apparent distress — I looked back — saw Mrs Lincoln — "She said — Keep this little dog from biting me". The dog was a little thing & was doing nothing — too small and good natured to do anything. — Again — one day I heard the scream — "Murder" — "Murder". "Murder" — turned round — Saw Mrs Lincoln up
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Wilson, Douglas L., ed.; Davis, Rodney O., ed.; Weber, John B. 'John B. Weber (William H. Herndon Interview)' in 'Herndon's Informants: Letters, Interviews, and Statements About Abraham Lincoln' . Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 1998. [format: book], [genre: interview]. Permission: University of Illinois Press
Persistent link to this document: http://lincoln.lib.niu.edu/file.php?file=herndon388.html
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