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Wilson, Douglas L., ed.; Davis, Rodney O., ed.; Stuart, John T. 'John T. Stuart (William H. Herndon interview)' in 'Herndon's Informants: Letters, Interviews, and Statements About Abraham Lincoln' . Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 1998. [format: book], [genre: interview]. Permission: University of Illinois Press
Persistent link to this document: http://lincoln.lib.niu.edu/file.php?file=herndon077a.html


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60. John T. Stuart (William H. Herndon interview).

July 21st 1865

The first time Stuart talked was about 5 days before this — SEE Little Book [1]

Stuart further says that in 1834 & 6 Mr Lincoln was a Whig — supported Whig measures — Lincoln a mystery — Stuart was a candidate for Congress in '38 & took his seat '39 — Lincoln had no good — accute critical judgement or organizing power — had no idea of human nature — generally no will — when he put his foot down it was down. Stuart says he has been at L's house a hundred times, never was asked to dinner. In Washington L never asked about to any body — Says Judge Davis [2] says so too — never asked Davis to dine — never asked Davis how the People were about Bloomington — When I was a candidate in 1838 went to Chicago — spoke there — the people applauded — hissed — this never pleased me — had never seen the like — heard the like — . The Yankees at that time didn't like Stump Speaking or Stump orators — they have changed now —

The Convention System was adopted in all America about 1836 it was a Van Buren Democratic measure. The Republicans adopted it in 1856 — so did the Democracy. In old times there was no such thing — Evry man became a candidate who wanted to — run on his own hook — spoke for himself &c — All met and discussed questions together — dys at it — People Came 30 — 40 mi to hear it &c — acted like People at church. — The real questions at issue in 1860 — to 65 — was really Federalism and State Sovreignty — Lincolns thinking was Federalism &c Johnson's [3] is different.

Library of Congress: Herndon-Weik Collection. Manuscript Division. Library of Congress. Washington, D.C. 2240 — 41; Huntington Library: LN2408, 2:194 — 96

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Wilson, Douglas L., ed.; Davis, Rodney O., ed.; Stuart, John T. 'John T. Stuart (William H. Herndon interview)' in 'Herndon's Informants: Letters, Interviews, and Statements About Abraham Lincoln' . Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 1998. [format: book], [genre: interview]. Permission: University of Illinois Press
Persistent link to this document: http://lincoln.lib.niu.edu/file.php?file=herndon077a.html
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