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Wilson, Douglas L., ed.; Davis, Rodney O., ed.; Pinkerton, Allan. 'Allan Pinkerton Agency (Report Furnished to William H. Herndon)' in 'Herndon's Informants: Letters, Interviews, and Statements About Abraham Lincoln' . Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 1998. [format: book], [genre: report]. Permission: University of Illinois Press
Persistent link to this document: http://lincoln.lib.niu.edu/file.php?file=herndon267.html


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-- 276 --

was fully conscious of all he was doing. He is a man well calculated for controlling and directing the ardent minded — he is an enthusiast, and believes that, to use his own words, "Murder of any kind is justifiable and right to save the rights of the Southern people". In all his views he was ably seconded by Captain Turner.

Captain Turner is an American, but although, very much of a gentleman and posessing warm Southern feelings, he is not by any means so dangerous a man as Ferrandina, as his ability for exciting others is less powerfull — but that he is a bold and proud man, there is no doubt, as also that he is entirely under the control of Ferrandina. In fact it could not be otherwise, for even I myself felt the influence of this mans strange power, and wrong though I knew him to be, I felt strangely unable to keep my mind balanced against him.

Ferrandina said that never, never shall Lincoln be President — His life (Ferrandina) was of no consequence — he was willing to give it for Lincoln's — he would sell it for that Abolitionists, and as Orissini [17] had given his life for Italy, so was he (Ferrandina) ready to die for his country, and the rights of the South, and, said Ferrandina, turning to Captain Turner "we shall all die together. We shall show the North that we fear them not — every Captain, said he, will on that day prove himself a hero — The first shot fired, the main Traitor (Lincoln) dead, and all Maryland will be with us, and the South shall be free, and the North must then be ours. "Mr Huchins," said Ferrandina, "If I alone must do it, I shall — Lincoln shall die in this City."

Whilst we were thus talking we (Mr. Luckett, Turner, Ferrandina and Myself ), were alone in one corner of the Bar Room, and while talking two strangers had got pretty near us. Mr Luckett called Ferrandina's attention to this, and intimated that they were listening, and we went up to the Bar — drinked again at my expense, and again retired to another part of the room, at Ferrandina's request to see if the strangers would again follow us — whether by accident or design, they again got near us, but of course we were not talking of any matter of consequence. Ferrandina said he suspected they were Spies, and suggested that he had to attend a secret meeting, and was apprehensive that the two strangers might follow him, and at Mr. Lucketts request I remained with him (Luckett) to watch the movements of the strangers. I assured Ferrandina that if they did attempt to follow him, that we would whip them.

Ferrandina and Turner, left to attend the meeting, and anxious as I was to follow them myself, I was oblige to remain with Mr. Luckett to watch the strangers — which we did for about fifteen minutes, when Mr. Luckett said that he should go to a friends to stay over night, and I left for my Hotel, arriving there about 9.00. p.m., and soon retired.

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Wilson, Douglas L., ed.; Davis, Rodney O., ed.; Pinkerton, Allan. 'Allan Pinkerton Agency (Report Furnished to William H. Herndon)' in 'Herndon's Informants: Letters, Interviews, and Statements About Abraham Lincoln' . Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 1998. [format: book], [genre: report]. Permission: University of Illinois Press
Persistent link to this document: http://lincoln.lib.niu.edu/file.php?file=herndon267.html
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