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Wilson, Douglas L., ed.; Davis, Rodney O., ed.; Pinkerton, Allan. 'Allan Pinkerton Agency (Report Furnished to William H. Herndon)' in 'Herndon's Informants: Letters, Interviews, and Statements About Abraham Lincoln' . Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 1998. [format: book], [genre: report]. Permission: University of Illinois Press
Persistent link to this document: http://lincoln.lib.niu.edu/file.php?file=herndon267.html


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I also spoke of the Privateer spoken of by Captain Sherrington, and the Fire Balls or Hand Grenades spoken of by the Baltimore Secessionists, and to the disloyalty of the Baltimore Police who it was even doubtful if they would make a decent show to preserve order, and instanced the difficulty experienced by the Presidential Party in Buffalo where with a Loyal Police the pressure was great as to seriously injure Major Hunter [54] one of the Party. I said to Mr. Judd that the danger was from a small number of men in the crowd acting in concert, and asked what would be the consequences where the Presidential Party was hemmed in a crowd unable to move and a few men bent on taking life — armed, prepared and determined on doing so even if they had to give a life, for a life — and argued that situated as the country was this was no time to go into War, which would be the result if the President Elect was assassinated in Baltimore: that at present we had no Government and could have none before the Inaugeration of Lincoln: that as things stood now Mr. Lincoln had no power: that nameless and unknown as I was, I could stand a better chance for my life, than did Mr. Lincoln as I at least had some of my own men with me who would die in their boots before I should be injured. I said that the danger was not so much to the President whilst upon the Train as it was from the time he landed at the Northern Central Depot until he could pass in an open carriage about a mile and a quarter to the Depot of the Washington Branch Rail Road, and said to Mr. Judd that I did not believe it was possible he (Lincoln) or his personal friends could pass through Baltimore in that style alive.

I enquired of Mr. Judd if he knew if any arrangements had been made in Baltimore by any parties with view to the friendly or patriotic reception of the President elect, and he replied that he did not know of any such arrangements. I then enquired of Mr. Judd who Mr. Wood [55] was, who was acting as manager for the Presidential Party, and Mr. Judd said he did not know, nor could not tell who he was: that he had asked Mr. Lincoln himself this same questions and could not learn that Mr Lincoln knew any thing about him further than that he came from New York and had been recommended by Erastus Corning, and Gov. Seward.

Mr. Judd said that all this was a very important subject, and that after what he had heard he believed there was great danger to Mr. Lincoln to attempt to pass through Baltimore according to the Programe: that he had not mentioned this to Mr. Lincoln, as in my letters to him at Cincinnati and New York, I had exacted strict secresy and that he should now have to see Mr. Lincoln in regard to it, and enquired of Mr. Felton and myself what we thought best to be done. Mr. Felton advised that if it could possibly be done, Mr. Lincoln should quietly leave the Party to-night and with me take a passage in the Sleeping Car and go on to Washington arriving there to-morrow morning.

I assured Mr. Judd that I thought this could be done in safety, and that from what Mr. Felton had told me of General Scott, I believed that if once the President Elect was in Washington that he would there be safe, and further said that I
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Wilson, Douglas L., ed.; Davis, Rodney O., ed.; Pinkerton, Allan. 'Allan Pinkerton Agency (Report Furnished to William H. Herndon)' in 'Herndon's Informants: Letters, Interviews, and Statements About Abraham Lincoln' . Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 1998. [format: book], [genre: report]. Permission: University of Illinois Press
Persistent link to this document: http://lincoln.lib.niu.edu/file.php?file=herndon267.html
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