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Wilson, Douglas L., ed.; Davis, Rodney O., ed.; Pinkerton, Allan. 'Allan Pinkerton Agency (Report Furnished to William H. Herndon)' in 'Herndon's Informants: Letters, Interviews, and Statements About Abraham Lincoln' . Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 1998. [format: book], [genre: report]. Permission: University of Illinois Press
Persistent link to this document: http://lincoln.lib.niu.edu/file.php?file=herndon267.html


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Mr. Lincoln also said that upon his telling Mrs. Lincoln of the step he was about to take that she insisted upon Mr. Lamon accompanying him, and that he (Lincoln) found it impossible to get away from the crowd without the aid of Governor Curtin and Col. Sumner, [42] whom he was finally obliged to inform of this movement to secure their co-operation in order to cover his absence; that all approved of the step he had taken, but the Military men were anxious to accompany him, expressing doubt but that I might be leading him into a trap and selling him (Lincoln) to the Secessionists — to all of which Mr. Lincoln said that he knew me, and had confidence in me and would trust himself and his life in my hands.

Mr. Lincoln said that from the great interest I had manifested in this matter he had every confidence in me.

Mr. Lamon offered Mr. Lincoln a Revolver and Bowie Knife and I at once protested saying that I would not for the world have it said that Mr. Lincoln had to enter the National Capitol Armed; that I anticipated no trouble; that if we went through at all we must do so by stratagem, but that if fighting had to be done, it must be done by others than Mr. Lincoln. Mr. Lincoln said that he wanted no arms; that he had no fears and that he felt satisfied that all my plans would work right. [43]

Mr. Lincoln was cool, calm, and self possessed — firm and determined in his bearing. He evinced no sign of fear or distrust, and throughout the entire night was quite self possessed.

On arriving at the vicinity of the Depot we left the carriage and I walked round the corner to the Depot. Mr. Lincoln, and Mr. Lamon followed. I met Mr. Dunn in the Depot who showed me to the sleeping car. I entered by the rear followed by Mr. Lincoln — no one appeared to notice us. I found M. B — and got into our Berths. Mr. Dunn soon left us and in about three minutes from the time we got aboard the train started.

I received from M. B — the reports written and verbal brought by Mr. Dunn. Mr. Lincoln soon laid down in his Berth, and when the Conductor came around for his Tickets, I handed him the Tickets for Mr. Lincoln. He did not look in the Berths at all — left and did not return again during the trip.

None of our party appeared to be sleepy, but we all lay quiet and nothing of importance transpired.

Friday 22d. February 1861 —

M. B — Reports.

At about 3.00. a.m. A. P— came to my room, sick, and tired out, and told me that he would not leave the city until evening. Mr. P— then went to his room and I went to bed tired out.

I got up at 6.00. a.m. and saw Lincoln raise a Flag on the State House. The
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Wilson, Douglas L., ed.; Davis, Rodney O., ed.; Pinkerton, Allan. 'Allan Pinkerton Agency (Report Furnished to William H. Herndon)' in 'Herndon's Informants: Letters, Interviews, and Statements About Abraham Lincoln' . Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 1998. [format: book], [genre: report]. Permission: University of Illinois Press
Persistent link to this document: http://lincoln.lib.niu.edu/file.php?file=herndon267.html
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