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Wilson, Douglas L., ed.; Davis, Rodney O., ed.; Pinkerton, Allan. 'Allan Pinkerton Agency (Report Furnished to William H. Herndon)' in 'Herndon's Informants: Letters, Interviews, and Statements About Abraham Lincoln' . Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 1998. [format: book], [genre: report]. Permission: University of Illinois Press
Persistent link to this document: http://lincoln.lib.niu.edu/file.php?file=herndon267.html


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-- 289 --

"Geo. H. Burn's
Harrisburg.
Where is Nuts. [40]
I. H. Hutcheson."

At 9.15. p.m. I received the following Dispatch.

Harrisburg Feb'y 22d' — 1861

"I. H. Hutcheson
St Louis Hotel Philadelphia.
"Nuts left at six — Everything as you directed — all is right — (signed) Geo. H. Burns",

I then procured a carriage for M. B — and went with here to the corner of Tenth and Chesnut Streets, where I got out and she went on to the Depot.

I then hired a carriage near the Girard House and drove with it to West Philadelphia. I stood with the carriage a few rods west of the stairs leading from the Street to Mr. Franciscus Office, and was soon joined by Mr. Kinsey. About three minutes past ten, Mr. Lincoln accompanied by W. H. Lamon, Superintendant Lewis, and assistant Superintendant Franciscus arrived. I met them on the steps. Mr. Lincoln wore a brown Kossuth Hat, and an overcoat thrown loosely over his shoulders. The evening was chilly but not cold. We immediately proceeded to the carriage and Mesrs Lewis and Franciscus parted from Mr. Lincoln. Mr Lincoln thanked them for their kindness &c — , and I promised to Telegraph them in the Morning. As the train on the Philadelphia, Wilmington and Baltimore Rail Road did not start until 11.50. p.m. I suggested to Mr. Kinsey to get on the box with the Driver and consume the time by driving Northward in search of some imaginary person, so that we should not arrive at the Depot, until about 11.00. p.m.

Mr. Lincoln, W. H. Lamon and myself took seats in the carriage. Mr. Lincoln said that after I had left him last night at the Continental, and he had gone to bed, that a son of Governor Sewards [41] had called him up, and delivered him letters from his Father (Governor Seward) and General Scott, Stating substantially the same as I had, but much stronger: that about Fifteen Thousand men were organized to prevent his passage through Baltimore, and that arrangements were made by these parties to blow up the Rail Road track, fire the Train &c — , and urging upon him (Lincoln) to change his route. Mr. Lincoln said that he had received the letters, but merely told young Mr. Seward that he would give him an answer at Harrisburg; that he (Mr. Lincoln) had in the morning after leaving Philadelphia told Mr. Judd about this, and on Mr. Judd's advice he had finally told young Seward that "He would change his route;" that after pledging himself to me to secrecy he did not think he had the right to speak to any one on the subject, nor would not until Mr. Judd told him he (Judd) would take the responsibility of his (Lincoln's) telling Seward and make it all right with me.

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Wilson, Douglas L., ed.; Davis, Rodney O., ed.; Pinkerton, Allan. 'Allan Pinkerton Agency (Report Furnished to William H. Herndon)' in 'Herndon's Informants: Letters, Interviews, and Statements About Abraham Lincoln' . Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 1998. [format: book], [genre: report]. Permission: University of Illinois Press
Persistent link to this document: http://lincoln.lib.niu.edu/file.php?file=herndon267.html
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