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Wilson, Douglas L., ed.; Davis, Rodney O., ed.; Pinkerton, Allan. 'Allan Pinkerton Agency (Report Furnished to William H. Herndon)' in 'Herndon's Informants: Letters, Interviews, and Statements About Abraham Lincoln' . Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 1998. [format: book], [genre: report]. Permission: University of Illinois Press
Persistent link to this document: http://lincoln.lib.niu.edu/file.php?file=herndon267.html


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to my room, and introduce him to me. I said that if it was necessary I should see Henry Sanford in regard to any business matter, I would do so, but not otherwise.

Mr. Sanford sent the Dispatch, and saw Mr. Judd, when he returned to my room, and talked to me about sending Burn's to Baltimore: said that it would be a great assistance to Mr. P— for he would give Burn's the full controll of the Telegraph wires from Baltimore to any point A. P— would wish, and that Burns could help A. P— very much in case he needed him. Mr. Sanford then said that he thought we were frightened (meaning Mr. P—, and myself). I suppose he thought now that I would go on and tell him all I knew, but I said nothing, only that we were not frightened and what was more I had never known A. P— to be frightened.

We now conversed on different subjects, and Mr. Sanford told me that he was keeping out of sight, to keep from having some old papers served on him: that it was an old California matter of the Adams Express Company's, for a Hundred and Forty Thousand Dollars; that himself, Dinsmore, and Shoemaker had to keep out of sight until Friday next. He laughed about it, and said I should tell A. P— that the Officers were after him (Sanford). He was very friendly and staid until after 10. oclock, when he bade me good night and left.

Mr. Sanford had not gone long when I received a Dispatch from Mr. P—, saying "Tell Judd I meant all I said, and that to-day they offer Ten for one, and Twenty for two." I immediately sent for Judd, who came at once to my room. I gave the Dispatch, and he (Judd) wanted to show it to Vice President Hamlin, and also that I should have an interview with Hamlin. I said that it would never do: that I could not say anything more to Hamlin than I had said to him (Judd), and that in the morning I should return to Baltimore.

Mr Judd urged me to have Mr. P— come on to Philadelphia and meet them there, so as to advise what to do. I promised Mr. Judd I would tell Mr. P— all he had said, and would do what I could to get him (A.P.) to meet them at Philadelphia. Mr Judd then told me about having been left in Albany, and said that he never felt so mortified in all his life. I could not but laugh to see how bad he felt. He also spoke of Mrs. Lincoln and said that she was tickled to death with all she had seen since leaving home. Mr. Judd left my room at 11.30. p.m. I then sent word to be wakened in time to take the early train for Baltimore in the morning — I went to bed tired.

Tuesday 17th. February 1861 —

T. W — [26] Reports.

****

Captain Keen [27] and some four or five others then came in, and got up a game of Ten-pins. we played until 1.45. p.m., when Springer, Taylor, and I went in to
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Wilson, Douglas L., ed.; Davis, Rodney O., ed.; Pinkerton, Allan. 'Allan Pinkerton Agency (Report Furnished to William H. Herndon)' in 'Herndon's Informants: Letters, Interviews, and Statements About Abraham Lincoln' . Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 1998. [format: book], [genre: report]. Permission: University of Illinois Press
Persistent link to this document: http://lincoln.lib.niu.edu/file.php?file=herndon267.html
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