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Wilson, Douglas L., ed.; Davis, Rodney O., ed.; Pinkerton, Allan. 'Allan Pinkerton Agency (Report Furnished to William H. Herndon)' in 'Herndon's Informants: Letters, Interviews, and Statements About Abraham Lincoln' . Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 1998. [format: book], [genre: report]. Permission: University of Illinois Press
Persistent link to this document: http://lincoln.lib.niu.edu/file.php?file=herndon267.html


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-- 279 --

— The boy soon returned, and said that Judd had been left in Albany, but would be in New York on the first train, and so soon as he arrived would get the Note.

It was now about 6.30. p.m., so I went down and had supper — from the supper table I went direct to my room, and had no more that got in, when Mr. Judd called. I gave him a letter from A. P—, which he sat down to read, first asking me if he could light his cigar.

After reading the letter, Mr. Judd asked me a great many questions, which I did not answer, I told him that I could not talk on the business, but if he had any message for A. P— I would take it. He asked me when I would leave for Baltimore — I told him I should leave early in the morning. He said he was much alarmed and would like to show the letter I had given him to some of the party, and also consult the New York Police about it. I advised him to do no such thing, but keep cool, and see Mr. P—. Judd asked me what he should do. I told him would go direct to Baltimore, and have Mr. P— advise him by letter, and by Telegraph. Judd said that he wanted to see A. P— and asked me if I did not think he would come to New York if he Telegraphed for him. I said I knew it would be impossible for him (A. P—) to leave in time to see him (Judd) in New York. Judd did not know what to do; said that he would see me again so soon as possible, and that he must consult with one of his party.

Just at this moment — E. S. Sanford came in, and I introduced him to N. B. Judd. Mr. Sanford then handed Mr. Judd a note, from Mr Pinkerton. Mr. Judd read it, and said it was all right, and that he was glad to meet Mr. Sanford. Mr. Sanford replied that anything he could do for him (Judd) would be done with pleasure. Mr Judd then left promising to see me again during the evening. After Mr. Judd had gone, Mr. Sanford excused himself for not coming directly to see me on receipt of my Notes: said the fact of the matter was he was keeping out of sight for a few days, and did not want to be seen by any one, for all supposed him to be in Philadelphia, and said "Now what is the trouble?" I replied that I had come to deliver letters to him and Mr. Judd, and was ready to take any message back to A. P—; that I would leave early in the morning, and that was all I had to say on business. Mr. Sanford said there was something more, and I could tell him, for Allan always told him anything and everything. I replied that that was no reason why I should tell him all I knew, and that I had no more to say. Mr. Sanford rejoined "Barley, there is something more, and if you will only tell me how you are situated, and what you are doing at Baltimore I can better judge how to act." I said again "Mr Sanford, I have nothing more to say." He appeared quite dissatisfied, and said he supposed I had "roped" so many, I thought I could not be "roped" myself. I replied that it was as easy to "rope" me as, any one else, but that just now I really had nothing to say, Mr. Sanford laughed at this, and said that I was a strange woman. He seemed good natured again, and asked my advice about writing a Dispatch to A. P—, and sending Burn's to Baltimore.

He (Sanford) then wrote a Dispatch, and read it to me, after which he went down to send it, but before going asked me if he could bring Mr. Henry Sanford [25]
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Wilson, Douglas L., ed.; Davis, Rodney O., ed.; Pinkerton, Allan. 'Allan Pinkerton Agency (Report Furnished to William H. Herndon)' in 'Herndon's Informants: Letters, Interviews, and Statements About Abraham Lincoln' . Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 1998. [format: book], [genre: report]. Permission: University of Illinois Press
Persistent link to this document: http://lincoln.lib.niu.edu/file.php?file=herndon267.html
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