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Wilson, Douglas L., ed.; Davis, Rodney O., ed.; Miller, William. 'William Miller? (statement for William H. Herndon)' in 'Herndon's Informants: Letters, Interviews, and Statements About Abraham Lincoln' . Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 1998. [format: book], [genre: history]. Permission: University of Illinois Press
Persistent link to this document: http://lincoln.lib.niu.edu/file.php?file=herndon361.html


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-- 362 --

in so doing several was killed from this place we went to the Yellow Banks on the Mississippi River in what is now Henderson County we here remained one day and Night while at this place a considerable Body of Indians of the cherokee tribe came across the River from the Iowa side with the white flag Hoisted this was the first Indians we saw they was verry friendly and gave us a general war Dance we in return gave them a sucker Ho down all enjoyed the sport and It is safe to say no man enjoyed it better than Capt Lincoln from this point we went to dixons ferry on Rock River where the City of Dixon Now stands and Remained two days and Nights waiting for Provisions whitch was to come up the river to this point our supplies all came by water after two days waiting our supplies came and we drew a Bountiful supply of Beef and Beans with a small quantity of flour to mix with it. while we was here Stillman [2] passed us refusing for some reason to Join the Main army after he left taking the Direction of Rock isand Proceeded about twenty Miles that night found himself cut off by the Indians and Attacked he failed to hold his handful of men about 75 in number they fled in all directions about 12 oclock that Night they commenced coming into our camp, and kept coming in all the remainder of that Night and Next day untill about twenty came in some on foot and some on horse back Leaving the killed and Missing about Sixty in number on the second day after the Battle the army under Gen Whitesides was camped on the Battle ground gathering up the Dead and wounded the dead was all scalped some with the heads cut off Many with their throats cut and otherwise Barbourously Mutilated of the wounded we founded few in number and they hid in the Brush as well as they could among the wounded Joseph Young and Jessy Dickey I Rember that was Badly wounded and Recovered after caring for the wounded and Burying the Dead the main army Struck for a Bend or outlet in Rock river where Black Hawks vessels called Perogues was said to be This was thought to be a dangerous undertaking as we knew Indians was plenty and close at hand To provide as well as might be against danger one man was started at a time in the direction of the point when he would get a certain distance Keeping in sight a second would Start and so on until a String of men extending five miles from the main army was made each to Look out for Indians and give the sign to Right Left or front by hanging a hat on the Bayonet erect for the front and Right or Left for enemies as the case might be. to raise men to go ahead was with difficulty done and some tried hard to Drop Back But we got through safe and found the place deserted leaving plenty of Indian sign a Dead Dog and several Scalps taken in Stillmans Defeat as we supposed they Beng fresh taken finding no enemy to fight we returned to the Battle ground and remained one day & night and Started for Rock Island and then Joined the main army under Gen Atkins here we Drew Rations again from this point we was sent to the Mouth of Fox River at this place our time was up and we was Discharged from service after going to Peru and getting supplies for our men and horses which came up the River by Boat in Charge of Thomas Wilbourn of Beardstown During
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Wilson, Douglas L., ed.; Davis, Rodney O., ed.; Miller, William. 'William Miller? (statement for William H. Herndon)' in 'Herndon's Informants: Letters, Interviews, and Statements About Abraham Lincoln' . Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 1998. [format: book], [genre: history]. Permission: University of Illinois Press
Persistent link to this document: http://lincoln.lib.niu.edu/file.php?file=herndon361.html
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