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Wilson, Douglas L., ed.; Davis, Rodney O., ed.; Lincoln, Mary Todd. 'Mary Todd Lincoln (William H. Herndon Interview)' in 'Herndon's Informants: Letters, Interviews, and Statements About Abraham Lincoln' . Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 1998. [format: book], [genre: interview]. Permission: University of Illinois Press
Persistent link to this document: http://lincoln.lib.niu.edu/file.php?file=herndon359.html


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-- 360 --

Our expenses at the White House were about [two] thousand dollars per month — breakfasted at [9] o'clock am — lunched at 2 o'cl PM — dined [at] 6 o'cl PM. Mr Lincoln got up irregularly — Saw the people — attended to the Hospital &c. [Woul]d turn Seward out when peace was declared — hated Andrew Johnson. Once Andy Johnson followed Mr Lincoln when he said — "Why is this man following me."

A Letter got out in the army from Mr Lincoln to me. Mr L was tender. I deny [D]inners Cost $500. for friends and diplomatic [corps &c] — twenty four Todd Connexion at frequently [illegible] table. Bakers wife [3] — bad Conduct

Mr Linc[oln] had a Kind of Poetry in his Nature: he was [a terribly] firm man when he set his foot down — none of us — no man nor woman Could rule him after he had made up his mind. I told him about Sewards intention to rule him — : he said — "I shall rule myself — shall obey my own Conscience and follow God in it. Mr Lincoln had no hope & no faith in the usual acceptation of those words: he never joined a Church: he was a religious man always, as I think: he first thought — to say think — about this subject was when Willie died — never before. he felt religious More than Ever about the time he went to Gettysburg: he was not a technical Christian: he read the bible a good deal about 1864

Mr Sumner & Mr Lincoln were great chums [after] they became acquainted with one and other: [they] watched Each other closely. Down at City Point once Johnson followed us — was drunk — Mr Lincoln said — "For God's Sake dont ask Johnson to dine with us" — "No do not" said Sumner [and] I did not ask Johnson.

I often said that [God] would not let any harm Come to my husband. We had passed through 5 long years — terrible — bloody years unscathed that I thought so — so did Mr Lincoln: he was happy over that idea: he was cheerful — almost joyous as he got gradually to see the End of the war.

I used to read News paper c[harges — ] News paper attacks on him — He said ["Don't do] that for I have Enough to bear — yet I [care] nothing for them. If I am right I'll live & if wrong I'll die anyhow — so let them [pass by] unnoticed."I would playfully say "That's the way to learn — read both sides"

Mr [Lincoln's] maxim & philosophy were — "What is to be [will be] and no Cares (prayers) of ours Can [arrest] the decree [4] I could tell when Mr Lincoln had decided anything: he was cheerful at first then he pressed or compressed his lips together — firmly When these things showed
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Wilson, Douglas L., ed.; Davis, Rodney O., ed.; Lincoln, Mary Todd. 'Mary Todd Lincoln (William H. Herndon Interview)' in 'Herndon's Informants: Letters, Interviews, and Statements About Abraham Lincoln' . Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 1998. [format: book], [genre: interview]. Permission: University of Illinois Press
Persistent link to this document: http://lincoln.lib.niu.edu/file.php?file=herndon359.html
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