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Wilson, Douglas L., ed.; Davis, Rodney O., ed.; Irwin, Benjamin F. 'Benjamin F. Irwin and Ira Emerson to William H. Herndon' in 'Herndon's Informants: Letters, Interviews, and Statements About Abraham Lincoln' . Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 1998. [format: book], [genre: letter]. Permission: University of Illinois Press
Persistent link to this document: http://lincoln.lib.niu.edu/file.php?file=herndon414.html


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man generally having to furnish his own team often going ten Miles to Mills ridng one horse carrying a Sack of Corn or wheat and leading a horse Both harnessed ready to hitch to the Mill and to get the turn at the Mill the time of starting was about 12 at Night as by day light there was generally a days grinding on hand whitch would be about 20 or 25 Bushels of corn or wheat and the Bolting of Flour [1] was done by hand thus Mills was generally Built By Posts put in the ground 8 feet high and a Log Mill house on top such a Mill put on exhibtion in 1860 would be a Better show than Barnums Museum or Dan rices circus at that time Meal was often made by grating the corn on an oval piece of tin punched full of holes with a common nail and tacked on a Board another Method of getting meal was Substituted by Burning a hole out of the end of a solid Log sawed off say 3 feet Long 18 Inches across Burn out the end untill it would hold ½ Bushel then get an Iron ring Put on the end of a Pole an drive in an Iron wedge to use as a Butt and in this Mortar pound the corn into Meal or hominy thus kind of a Mill hundreds used and Lived happy and fine on the Meal this substitute was called a Mortar after a few years Inclined wheels and water Power took the place of the single Band Mills [2] But a short time previous to these difficulties some of the first settlers of sangamon County actually went to Madison County to Mill Distances of 80 Miles to get Meal or flour and the trip had to be made by crossing without any Bridges what would now seem to be Impassable streams at this time it was no uncommon thing to see men with Coon skin caps on for a covering of the head such sights would now frighten a Beholder But fashion had then no votaries the wimen Made all the clothing old fashioned wheels cards [3] and yarn Cotton and wool could be found at every house the wimen made their own sunday ware of Clothing whitch was Checked Cotton or flannen Dresses the fashion was tight sleeve Dresses four widths of Cloth made a Large 3 widths Dress often these Dresses for a fine article was checked of various Colors made of grass walnut or oak Bark was used for Coloring also shoe make [4] Berries it was in these days a Common thing to see the trees Stripped of Bark as high up as a woman could reach and every man seeing a tree Barked new what it was done for, Mens Clothing was Generally plain white or But nut yellow [5] mad with walnut Bark either Cotton or wool goods the Children as a common thing from early in the Spring, until fall wore nothing But a Shirt and many never had a Shoe the year round in verry cold weather they sat in the house to keep Comfortable if a woman got a calico Dress of any kind she was Dressed so fine the whole Neighborhood would Know it and at this time it took at least 10 Miles square to constitute a Neighborhood and a woman would thnk nothing of picking up a child and walk 4 or 5 Miles to visit a Neighbor Calico was the finest article used for a Dress a sun bonnet made of Calico Blue or checked
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Wilson, Douglas L., ed.; Davis, Rodney O., ed.; Irwin, Benjamin F. 'Benjamin F. Irwin and Ira Emerson to William H. Herndon' in 'Herndon's Informants: Letters, Interviews, and Statements About Abraham Lincoln' . Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 1998. [format: book], [genre: letter]. Permission: University of Illinois Press
Persistent link to this document: http://lincoln.lib.niu.edu/file.php?file=herndon414.html
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