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Wilson, Douglas L., ed.; Davis, Rodney O., ed.; Harrison, George M. 'George M. Harrison to William H. Herndon' in 'Herndon's Informants: Letters, Interviews, and Statements About Abraham Lincoln' . Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 1998. [format: book], [genre: letter]. Permission: University of Illinois Press
Persistent link to this document: http://lincoln.lib.niu.edu/file.php?file=herndon553.html


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— furnished by our selves — Our coffee we would parch in the frying pan, grind in a tin cup by placing the cup on the solid ground or a log and punching it with the end of a hatchet handle until it would do to boil in the coffee pot, and cool in our tin cups: and if a cup or cups should be pilfered or lost, we had to enter into partnership until another was procured. The noise throughout camp, early of a morning, made by this mode of grinding coffee, was striking in a high degree: the chuck, chuck, chuck, chuck; would make one think of a thousand wood chucks sitting all a round, on fences, on logs, on stumps, and on chunks, each one exerting himself to the utmost.

As to wet days, I have little to say, as there was but one rain during the whole time that I was out from home in the army; at that time there was also quite a storm of wind, and all of us passed the time trying to hold up the tents and keep off as much rain as posible; but in spite of our efforts we got a thorough drenching: this was at sycamore creek some 20 or 30 miles above Dicksons ferry; the very spot where stillman was encamped when the Indians attacked him and killed so many of his men, well known as Stillman's defeat. At this time our company was alone and overstayed the time, and our rations failed to hold out, and we hastened back to Dixon's [4] in a hurry: when we got there we found prepared for us, an abundant supply of boiled bacon and light bread of an excellent quality, cooked in vessels borrowed from Mr. Dixon, by the soldiers — Mrs Dixon also gave us Ten gallons of sweet fresh milk and several pounds of butter, with which to finish the repast. Several of our men ate so much, and ate so fast, no wonder they got sick At last — Were very near dying of colic. This is the way we passed the da[ys] We passed our evenings by jumping, playing checkers, chess, swimming our horses, which was a favorite sport when near Rock-river, to give them exercise and cool them, and telling tales, stories &c. &c.

Yours truly
Geo. M. Harrison

Library of Congress: Herndon-Weik Collection. Manuscript Division. Library of Congress. Washington, D.C. 2991 — 94

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Wilson, Douglas L., ed.; Davis, Rodney O., ed.; Harrison, George M. 'George M. Harrison to William H. Herndon' in 'Herndon's Informants: Letters, Interviews, and Statements About Abraham Lincoln' . Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 1998. [format: book], [genre: letter]. Permission: University of Illinois Press
Persistent link to this document: http://lincoln.lib.niu.edu/file.php?file=herndon553.html
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