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Wilson, Douglas L., ed.; Davis, Rodney O., ed.; Hanks, John. 'John Hanks to William H. Herndon (interview)' in 'Herndon's Informants: Letters, Interviews, and Statements About Abraham Lincoln' . Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 1998. [format: book], [genre: interview]. Permission: University of Illinois Press
Persistent link to this document: http://lincoln.lib.niu.edu/file.php?file=herndon043.html


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went down the River was the spring after the deep snow. Lincoln went into Sangamon Co in 1831. We went from Springfield — to the mouth of Spring Creek where it Empties into the Sangamon River and there we cut & cared — & hewed timber to frame a flat boat — 80 feet long & 18 feet wide. The timbers were floated down to Sangamon town on a raft. The timbers were taken out of the Sangamon River — framed & put together at that place. The boat was then 1831. & there built. We Camped in a Camp on the Sangamon River — done our own Cooking — mending & washing. Lincoln boarded awhile with Carman. I don't think he ever worked for Kirkpatrick at that time, for he was continually and busily Engaged on the boat. David Offutt was our Employer and it was for him we worked, getting about $16 — or $20 pr mo. The boat was loaded, for I saw it loaded with bacon — pork — Corn & live hogs. We proceeded on the lst of May down the Sangamon River & landed for a short time at New Salem now in Menard Co. Ills. The boat got on the mill dam and was fast. We got a small ferry boat & partly unloaded — got over the dam — reloaded & proceeded down the river — Abe — his step brother — Johnston & myself doing the navigating of the boat — feeding the hogs &c — We got near the mouth of Salt Creek and it was there that the pigs got their Eyes sewed up by Offutts men. Abe did not do this — Abe was fixing. Abe said I Can't sew the Eyes up, He held the head of hogs whilst Offutt did so up their Eyes — Lincoln did bore a hole in the bottom of one End of the boat, for the water to run out which it did — It did so in this way By putting out Pork — corn & one one of the boat sprang upwards — so that End did not touch the water way below the dam and a foot or two below the boat. When the other End was lightened the heavy End Sank, but did not reach the water or dam — The water in the other End of the boat ran down hill according to him and did run out at the hole bored by Abe this I saw — After the hogs a new & additional lot were put in the at or near the mouth of Salt Creek where it Empties into the Sangamon River we then proceeded down the Sangamon — got into the Ills — passed Beardstown — Alton St Louis &c. we landed in New Orleans — in the year 1831. We both Came back to St Louis from New Orleans together, Johnston being with us from Decatur to New Orleans, and back with us. [2] There can be and is no mistake in these facts or the time when they took place. We walked from St Louis out to Edwards afoot and there the Roads parted, he taking the Charleston — Coles Co road & I the Decatur Road — both afoot all the way. The next time I saw him he was at Dixon on Rock River — called Dixons ferry in the year 1832 — month of May. He was the Capt of a Company from Menard Co — then Sangamon. This was a few days before the Stillman defeat on Sycamore Creek — about 30 miles from Dixons ferry — North east from there — Abe Lincoln footed it from Beardstown in 1832 coming from the Black Hawk war and not as we went down the River to New Orleans. Thomas Lincoln moved to Coles
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Wilson, Douglas L., ed.; Davis, Rodney O., ed.; Hanks, John. 'John Hanks to William H. Herndon (interview)' in 'Herndon's Informants: Letters, Interviews, and Statements About Abraham Lincoln' . Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 1998. [format: book], [genre: interview]. Permission: University of Illinois Press
Persistent link to this document: http://lincoln.lib.niu.edu/file.php?file=herndon043.html
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