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Wilson, Douglas L., ed.; Davis, Rodney O., ed.; Hanks, John. 'John Hanks (William H. Herndon Interview)' in 'Herndon's Informants: Letters, Interviews, and Statements About Abraham Lincoln' . Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 1998. [format: book], [genre: interview]. Permission: University of Illinois Press
Persistent link to this document: http://lincoln.lib.niu.edu/file.php?file=herndon453.html


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about 2 weeks Cutting our timber — suppose it was on Congress land — Abe walked afoot to Springfield — thence to Judy's ferry — got the Canoe and floated it down to the mouth of Spring Creek where the timber was Cut: we then rafted the logs down to Sangamon River to what is Called Sangamon town 7 miles N.W of Springfield. We boarded when we were working at the mouth of Spring Creek — walked 1. M — Eat 2 meals a dy. When we got to Sangamon town we made a shantee-shed — Abe was Elected Cook. We sawed our lumber at Kirkpatricks Mill on Prairie Creek about 1 ½ M S.W. of Sangamon Town. We hewed & scored the timber at the mouth of Spring Creek. We finished making & launching the boat in about 4 Weeks — we loaded the boat with barrell pork — Corn & live hogs — and left Sangamon twn. I remember a jugglers show at Sangamon Town. Abe went to it. Abe was full of jokes during all this time — Kept us alive. Offutt was a whig — so was Lincoln but he Could not hear Jackson wrongfully abused — Especially where a lie & malace did the abuse. I can say that Abe never was a democrat: he was always a whig — so was his father before him.

We landed at the New Salem mill about the 19th April and got fast on Rutledges Mill dam — now called Bales Mill dam. We unloaded the boat — that is we Changed goods from one boat to a borrowed one — rolled the barrels forward — bored a hole in the end of the boat over the dam — water ran out and thus we got over — on the dam part of a day and one night. We then went on down to the Yellow bank or blue banks on the Sangamon River near Squire Godbys [12] about 1 M above the mouth of Salt Creek. We purchased Some hogs of I think Squire Godby — am not sure — tried to drive them, Couldnt — ran them back in the pen — Caught them — Abe held the head of them — I the tail — and Offutt sewed up their Eyes — wouldn't drive — couldn't — put them in a cart — Carried them to the boat about one mile to the river — Abe recd the hogs — Cut open there [13] — Johnson & I halled them — to Abe —

We then proceeded — Offutt — John Johnson — Abe Lincoln & Myself, down the Sangamon River — thence into Ills — . We Kept our victuals & in fact Slept down in the boat — at one End — went down by a Kind of ladder through a scuttle hole. We used plank as Sails — & Cloth — Sometimes — rushed through Beardstown in a hurry — people Came out & laughed at us — passed Alton — Cairo — and Stopt at Memphis — Vicksburg — Natches — &c. There is nothing worthy of being Known going down the river.

I Can say we soon — Say in May we landed in N.O. [14] There it was we Saw Negroes Chained — maltreated — whipt & scourged. Lincoln Saw it — his heart bled — Said nothing much — was silent from feeling — was Sad — looked bad — felt bad — was thoughtful & abstracted — I Can say Knowingly that it was on this trip that he formed his opinions of Slavery: it ran its iron in him then & there — May 1831. I have heard him say — often & often — Offutt — Johnson
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Wilson, Douglas L., ed.; Davis, Rodney O., ed.; Hanks, John. 'John Hanks (William H. Herndon Interview)' in 'Herndon's Informants: Letters, Interviews, and Statements About Abraham Lincoln' . Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 1998. [format: book], [genre: interview]. Permission: University of Illinois Press
Persistent link to this document: http://lincoln.lib.niu.edu/file.php?file=herndon453.html
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