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Wilson, Douglas L., ed.; Davis, Rodney O., ed.; Hanks, Dennis F. 'Dennis F. Hanks to William H. Herndon (interview)' in 'Herndon's Informants: Letters, Interviews, and Statements About Abraham Lincoln' . Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 1998. [format: book], [genre: letter]. Permission: University of Illinois Press
Persistent link to this document: http://lincoln.lib.niu.edu/file.php?file=herndon035.html


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mother was 5-8 in high — Spare made — affectionate, the most affectionate I ever saw — never knew her to be out of temper — and thought strange of it.

He[ERROR: no link 8:8] seemed to be immovably Cam: she was keen — shrewd — smart & I do say highly intellectual by nature. Her memory was strong — her [perception?] was quick — her judgement was accute almost. She was Spiritually & ideally inclined — not dull — not material — not heavy in thought — feeling or action. Her hair was dark hair — Eyes bluish green — keen and loving. Her weight was one hundred-thirty — . Thomas Lincoln Abrahams father — was 5 — 10 ½ high — very stoutly built and weighed 196 pounds — His hair dark — his Eyes hazel. He was a man of great streght & courage — not one bit of Cowardice about him — He could [illegible] fatigue for any length of time — was a man of uncommon Endurance. Mr Lincoln's friends thought him the best man in Kentucky and others thought that a man by the name of Hardin was a better man — so the two men through the influence of their friends met at a tavern in Hardinsburg Ky. There the two men had a long & tedious fight and Lincoln whipped Hardin without a scratch. [9] They did not fight from anger or malice but to try who was the strongest man — to try manhood. These two men were great good friends ever after. Thomas Lincoln the father of Abraham could beat his son telling a story — cracking a joke — Mr Thomas Lincoln was a good, clean, social, truthful & honest man, loving like his wife Evry thing & every body. He was a man who took the world Easy — did not possess much Envy. He never thought that gold was God and the same idea runs through the family. One day when Lincolns mother was weaving in a little shed Abe came in and quizzically asked his good mother who was the father of Zebedee's Children: she saw the drift and laughed, saying get out of her you nasty little pup, you: he saw he had got his mother and ran off laughing. About Abs Early Education: and his sisters Education let me say this — Their mother first learned their Abc's and then Ab's. She learned them this out of Websters old spelling book: it belonged to me & cost in those days c75, it being Covered with Calf skin — or suchlike Covering. I taught Abe his first lesson in spelling — reading & writing — . I taught Abe to write with a buzzards quillen which I killed with a rifle & having made a pen — put Abes hand in mind & moving his fingers by my hand to to give him the idea of how to write — . We had no geese then — for the Country was a forrest. I tried to kill an Eagle but it was too smart — wanted to learn Abe to write with that. Lincolns mother learned him to read the Bible — study it & the stories in it and all that was moraly & affectionate it it, repeating it to Abe & his sister when very young. Lincoln was often & much moved by the stories. This Bible was bought in Philadelphia about 1801 — by my Father & Mother & was mine when Abe was taught to read in it. It is now burned together with all property — deeds if any & other records — This fire took place in Charleston — Coles Co Ills Decr. 5th 1864 — lost all I have — my wife died December
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Wilson, Douglas L., ed.; Davis, Rodney O., ed.; Hanks, Dennis F. 'Dennis F. Hanks to William H. Herndon (interview)' in 'Herndon's Informants: Letters, Interviews, and Statements About Abraham Lincoln' . Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 1998. [format: book], [genre: letter]. Permission: University of Illinois Press
Persistent link to this document: http://lincoln.lib.niu.edu/file.php?file=herndon035.html
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