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Wilson, Douglas L., ed.; Davis, Rodney O., ed.; Crawford, Elizabeth. 'Elizabeth Crawford (William H. Herndon Interview)' in 'Herndon's Informants: Letters, Interviews, and Statements About Abraham Lincoln' . Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 1998. [format: book], [genre: interview]. Permission: University of Illinois Press
Persistent link to this document: http://lincoln.lib.niu.edu/file.php?file=herndon125.html


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-- 126 --

frequently — almost Every week — Sarah Lincoln Abe's Sister worked for me: She was a good, kind, amiable girl, resembling Abe. The Lincoln family were good people — good neighbors — : they were honest & hospitable and very — very sociable. We moved to Indiana in 1824 — Came from Ky. I Knew as a matter of Course Sarah & Sally Lincoln very well. and I say to you that she was a gentle, Kind, smart — shrewd — social, intelligent woman — She was quick & strong minded: She had no Education, Except what She gathered up herself. I Speak more of what she was by nature than by culture. I never was a politician in all my life, but when such men ran as Abe Lincoln — as in 1860 I as it were took the Stump: he was the noblest specimen of man I Ever saw. Gentryville lies 4 m from here NW. Abe worked for us at various times at 25c per day — worked hard & faithful and when he missed time would not charge for it. I took some of the rails which Abe cut and Split for us and had Canes made from them. They were white oak — cut from this Stump here — some one got into my house and Stole my cane.

Can't say what books Abe read, but I have a book called "The Kentucky Preceptor" [4], which we brought from Ky and in which & from which Abe learned his school orations, Speeches & pieces to recite. School Exhibitions used to be the order of the day — not as now however. Abe attended them — Spoke & acted his part — always well free from rant & swell: he was a modest and Sensitive lad — never coming where he was not wanted: he was gentle, tender and Kind. Abe was a moral & a model boy, and while other boys were out hooking water melons & trifling away their time, he was studying his books — thinking and reflecting. Abe used to visit the sick boys & girls of his acquaintance. When he worked for us he read all our books — would sit up late in the night — kindle up the fire — read by it — cipher by it. We had a broad wooden shovel on which Abe would work out his sums — wipe off and repeat till it got too black for more: then he would scrape and wash off. and repeat again and again — rose Early. went to work — Come to Dinner — Sit down and read — joke — tell Stories &c. &c — Here is my husbands likeness — you need not look at mine. My husband was a substantial Man (and I say a cruel hard husband, Judging from his looks — ). Sarah Lincoln was a strong healthy woman [5] — was Cool — not Excitable — truthful — do to tie to — Shy Shrinking. Thomas Lincoln was blind in one Eye and the other was weak — so he felt his way in the work much of the time: his sense of touch was Keen — Abe did wear buck Skin pants — Coon Skin — opossum skin Caps. Abe ciphered with a coal or with red Keel [6] got from the branches: he smoothed and planed boards — wrote on them — ciphered on them. I have seen this over and over again. Abe was Sometimes Sad — not often — he was reflective — was witty & humorous.

Abe Lincoln was one day bothering the girls — his sister & others playing yonder and his Sister Scolded him — Saying Abe you ought to be ashamed of
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Wilson, Douglas L., ed.; Davis, Rodney O., ed.; Crawford, Elizabeth. 'Elizabeth Crawford (William H. Herndon Interview)' in 'Herndon's Informants: Letters, Interviews, and Statements About Abraham Lincoln' . Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 1998. [format: book], [genre: interview]. Permission: University of Illinois Press
Persistent link to this document: http://lincoln.lib.niu.edu/file.php?file=herndon125.html
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