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Wilson, Douglas L., ed.; Davis, Rodney O., ed.; Clary, Royal. 'Royal Clary (William H. Herndon Interview)' in 'Herndon's Informants: Letters, Interviews, and Statements About Abraham Lincoln' . Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 1998. [format: book], [genre: interview]. Permission: University of Illinois Press
Persistent link to this document: http://lincoln.lib.niu.edu/file.php?file=herndon370c.html


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-- 372 --

Stillman battle ground — the boats Came up to within 3 or 4 miles of the old man creek: the boats were discharged & went down to Rock River. We got provisions — packed our horse & having heard that the Indians had Committed depredations on Fox river — had killed some men women & Children we started for them — generally in a southerly direction — say south East — The Indians had gone — the Indians: they had Killed Davis & Pettigrews family — halls [4] 2 girls with them: they were young women. We Saw the Scalps they had taken — scalps of old women & children. This was near Pottowatomy village — farming place. The Indians Scalped an old Grand Mother — Scalped her — hung her scalp on a ram rod — that it might be seen & aggravate the whites — They cut one woman open — hung a child that they had murdered in the womans belly that they had gutted — strong men wept at this — hard hearted men Cried [5] — We staid here one night and proceed on for Ottowa on the Ills — went food & provisions — no roads — no bridges — no Conveniences — Bill Clary had 2 ox 2 yoke each teams — The ox teams did more good than a thousand horses: they could go through mud & mire — slosh & rain and do well — not so with horses. We couldn't follow the Indians for more than 3 or 4 days: it was impossible for our horses to carry man — gun — & his food — the horse — himself & his food through the muck & mire — swamp & brush. The horses gave out — wore litterally out — no grass — no nothing — too early for grass — in May — cold up there. The horses were jaded. The clothes of the men gave out — torn to pieces by briar & brush. We carried our tents on our horse — the poor horse carried everything: the baggage waggons Couldnt keep up — no roads — no bridges & no ways to travel — and hence the horses suffered all — and bore all. We were mustered out of Service at Ottowa about 28 or 29. The Govr Said "The mens times are up — horses jaded & worn out — men naked &c and they must be discharged & so wer were. He said he would send the Lieut Govr [6] for new men — He called on the men — all who could stay by possibility to stay 20 days more as a Kind of Guard — Abe re-enlisted for the 20 days — staid it out — Lincoln never got out of Ills — never got into the Wisconsin line — was in no battle — Demint [7] scoured the N. western part of Ills. Lincoln was with him —

In the Camps of the Evening we played Cards — sometimes — We were generally to tired & hungry to have sport & fun. An Indian came into Camp or was Caught by Doct Early's [8] Company and our boys thought he was a spy — sprang to our feet — was going to shoot the man — he had a line or Certificate from Cass. Lincoln jumped between our men & Indian and said we must not shed his blood — that it must not be on our Skirts — some one thought Lincoln was a coward because he was not savage: he said if any one doubts my Courage Let him try it.

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Wilson, Douglas L., ed.; Davis, Rodney O., ed.; Clary, Royal. 'Royal Clary (William H. Herndon Interview)' in 'Herndon's Informants: Letters, Interviews, and Statements About Abraham Lincoln' . Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 1998. [format: book], [genre: interview]. Permission: University of Illinois Press
Persistent link to this document: http://lincoln.lib.niu.edu/file.php?file=herndon370c.html
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