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Wilson, Douglas L., ed.; Davis, Rodney O., ed.; Chapman, A. H.. 'A. H. Chapman (Written Statement)' in 'Herndon's Informants: Letters, Interviews, and Statements About Abraham Lincoln' . Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 1998. [format: book], [genre: letter]. Permission: University of Illinois Press
Persistent link to this document: http://lincoln.lib.niu.edu/file.php?file=herndon095.html


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Brother in Law Ralph Croom to take his Waggons & Ho[rses] there, to Ind with there House Hol[d] Goods. Mrs Johnston having a large supp[ly] of House Hold goods for [a] family in those days. Mrs Johnston Had 3 children all young a Son & 2 Daughter. [12] these thy took with them to Ind & thy constituted a part of Lincolns family untill grown & Married. Mrs Johnston now Mrs Lincoln took with her to Ind one 1 fine Bureau, 1 Table, 1 sett Chairs, 1 large Cloth Chest, cooking utensils, Dishes, Knives, Forks, Spoons, 1 Spining wheel, clothing, 2 Beds & Bedding & other articles. Mrs Lincoln is still Living with her Grand Children in Coles Co Ills & has this same Bureau still in her possession, it was made by a man named Wm Parcells, in Elizabethtown Ky & cost when new 40 Dollars & was considered in those days a very fine peace of furniture & Still bears evidence of unusual fine workmanship. on there arrival at the residence of Thos Lincoln in Ind Mrs Lincoln was astonished to find that there was no floor or Door to the House of her Husband, no furniture of any Kind, no Beds or Bedding or scarcely any. thy used rough stools for chairs. had a Table Made by putt 4 Legs in a Hewed puncheon their bed was made by Boring holes in the wall & then resing a post at one corner inserting in them poles & on these poles were Boards & on these the family made there rude Beds. thy had no Dishes except a few Pewter & Tin ones. no cooking utensils except a Dut[ch] oven & Lid & 1 skellet & Lid. The Chil[dren] were Sufring greatly for clothes, thy [had] but one Suit each & these vy poo[r] the boys being Dressed mostly in Buck Skins. The Large Supply of goods brought by Mrs Lincoln came in good time. She at once had a floor Laid in the House Doors & Windows put in the Same Dressed the children up out of the Large supply she had brought with her in fact in a few week all had changed & where evry thing was wanting now all was snug & comfortable. Lincoln insisted on his Wife selling part of her furniture especially the Bureau, saying it was too fine for them to keep but this she refused to Do. She was a woman of great energy, of remarkable good sense, very industrious, & saving & also very neat & tidy in her person & Manners & Knew exactly how to Manage children. She took a an espical liking to young Abe, her love for him was warmly returned & continued to the day of his death. But few children loved there parents as he loved this Step Mother. She soon dressed him up in entire new clothes & from that time on he appeared to lead a new life. he was encouraged by her to Study & any wish on his part was gratified when it could be don[e] The 2 Setts of Children got along finely together as if thy had al[l] have been the children of the same parents. Mrs Lincoln soon Discovered that young Abe was a Boy of uncommon natural Talents & if rightly trained that a bright future was before him & She done all in her power to Develope those Talents, Lincolns Little Farm was well Stocked with Hogs, Horses & cattle & that year he had raised a fine crop of Wheat corn & Vegetables. a Little Town named Gentryville had sprung up near them & from there thy obtained many necessaries in life that up to this time thy had Done without. Thy taned there own Leather & Young Hanks made them Shoes out of their rude Leather. There
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Wilson, Douglas L., ed.; Davis, Rodney O., ed.; Chapman, A. H.. 'A. H. Chapman (Written Statement)' in 'Herndon's Informants: Letters, Interviews, and Statements About Abraham Lincoln' . Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 1998. [format: book], [genre: letter]. Permission: University of Illinois Press
Persistent link to this document: http://lincoln.lib.niu.edu/file.php?file=herndon095.html
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