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Wilson, Douglas L., ed.; Davis, Rodney O., ed.; Chandler, Charles. 'Charles Chandler (William H. Herndon Interview)' in 'Herndon's Informants: Letters, Interviews, and Statements About Abraham Lincoln' . Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 1998. [format: book], [genre: interview]. Permission: University of Illinois Press
Persistent link to this document: http://lincoln.lib.niu.edu/file.php?file=herndon719b.html


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— has wind and grit: he'l take you to Springfield in quick time — put him up at Herndon's Tavern [2] and he'l be well attended to. This Coming from a mere stranger except by reputation made Chandler think that there was a providence at last in all things. Chandler thanked Lincoln and got on the horse and was off again: he put whip and spur too to the horse: it was a noble one. Chandler soon struck the village of Springfield — hitched the horse to the rack in front of the Register's office — ran in and Said — "Here Mr. Register — I want to enter this piece of land," Explaining by numbers — section — township and range & its location — "Well," said the Register, "Your turn will soon come — . Mr Clerk take a note of the land and the Man's name," which was done, and Chandler was a happy man — for he was first on time and on demand: he Counted off his hundred dollars and handed it to the Register of the land office, who gave him his Certificate of Entry. Chandler now was fixed — glad — happy. Just about this time in Came the man and to his utter astonishment he saw Chandler there with a grin on his face and the Certificate of the entry of the land in his hand: he knew that the fates had beaten him: he took it and a good "Cussing" from Chandler as well as he could — quit the office and started back for home a whipt man. Chandler did put up Lincoln's horse at Herndon's tavern, and did hire a man to rub him dry and to blanket him. In some two or three hours after the entry of the land Lincoln landed in the village and quickly asked — Chandler — "How did you succeed;" and to which Chandler replied — "All's well — got my land — see here," Showing his certificate of entry. Chandler and Lincoln were strangers no more but were ever afterwards firm personal and political friends. Chandler thanked Lincoln a thousand times for his kindness. Lincoln subsequently surveyed off the land for Chandler — such were the "barbarian" — "Savages" of Illinois in 1832-40.

Library of Congress: Herndon-Weik Collection. Manuscript Division. Library of Congress. Washington, D.C. 3781-83

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Wilson, Douglas L., ed.; Davis, Rodney O., ed.; Chandler, Charles. 'Charles Chandler (William H. Herndon Interview)' in 'Herndon's Informants: Letters, Interviews, and Statements About Abraham Lincoln' . Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 1998. [format: book], [genre: interview]. Permission: University of Illinois Press
Persistent link to this document: http://lincoln.lib.niu.edu/file.php?file=herndon719b.html
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