NIU Libraries Digitization Projects
Lincoln/Net Prairie Fire Illinois During the Civil War Illinois During the Gilded Age Mark Twain's Mississippi Back to Digitization Projects Contact Us
BACK

Wilson, Douglas L., ed.; Davis, Rodney O., ed.; Carpenter, Francis B. 'Francis B. Carpenter to William H. Herndon' in 'Herndon's Informants: Letters, Interviews, and Statements About Abraham Lincoln' . Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 1998. [format: book], [genre: letter]. Permission: University of Illinois Press
Persistent link to this document: http://lincoln.lib.niu.edu/file.php?file=herndon520.html


Previous page

Next page

-- 522 --

— speak no language and know no language but English and poor at that. — But I loved Mr Lincoln, as I never loved but one or two men

He did not Know it. — Indeed I imagine he felt me a sort of nuisance, at times, but I kept on studying and loving him.

After the assassination, Tilton of the "Independent," [6] (newspaper) wished me to give him a sketch for a memorial number of his newswpaper, — I wrote out hastily three or four little stories,

These were so widely copied that I was induced to repeat the articles; and the result was the book — When I sat down deliberately with the book before my mind I was appalled. did not know how to begin or how to do it. — Finally determined to tell my story in my own way. How I came to conceive of painting the picture, — and the facts, right straight through —

Of course I do not "falter:" as you say, all between the the covers. But I know the origin and reliability of most of the matter. — Some of the stories, attributed to him inserted may possibly not have been told by him, but these are few, if any Most of them, which I did not hear myself, were told me by the parties, who heard them. — So much for that. — The reception the book has received from the public is very pleasant to me. The publisher's have not been able to supply the demand so far. The 15th thousand now printing the first edition published (about) four months since

Since I commenced this your note informing me of your having sent to me Mr Lincoln's "Byron", has come — I do not know what I can say to express to you my thanks. It is the only thing I shall have of his excepting his autograph, which leads the subscribers to my picture, — this "letter" too, — I shall treasure the two book & letter as the most precious of any presents.

— Later The book and the letter, have arrived, safely — a thousand blessings on you for thus remembering a stranger. I wish I could make you some adequate return, but I cannot.

still later Since I commenced this letter I have been variously interrupted Now I have also to acknowledge two letters about the engraving, of Lincoln, by Halpin, [7] which I sent you. The first, a note, was so good, so satisfactory, that I extracted the substance of it for an advertisement in Weekly Tribune. I hope I have not done wrong in this. But We have been put back by various things in getting the portrait before the public and the publisher of the portrait was so delighted with your note that he carried me with him in the matter of its publication.

Your last letter, the most perfect analysis of the portrait I have ever had, I shall reserve, for the present It deserved to be framed in gold — think I will have it so framed and hang in my studio. When I publish it, will send you proofs, as you wish. I trembled for your verdict. My heart and soul were in my work, I did not know if another would appreciate this. You do certainly, — bless you for it.

Previous page

Next page


Wilson, Douglas L., ed.; Davis, Rodney O., ed.; Carpenter, Francis B. 'Francis B. Carpenter to William H. Herndon' in 'Herndon's Informants: Letters, Interviews, and Statements About Abraham Lincoln' . Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 1998. [format: book], [genre: letter]. Permission: University of Illinois Press
Persistent link to this document: http://lincoln.lib.niu.edu/file.php?file=herndon520.html
Powered by PhiloLogic