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Wilson, Douglas L., ed.; Davis, Rodney O., ed.; Wickizer, J. D. 'J. D. Wickizer to William H. Herndon' in 'Herndon's Informants: Letters, Interviews, and Statements About Abraham Lincoln' . Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 1998. [format: book], [genre: letter]. Permission: University of Illinois Press
Persistent link to this document: http://lincoln.lib.niu.edu/file.php?file=herndon423b.html


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312. J. D. Wickizer to William H. Herndon.

Chicago. Illinois 25th Nov. 1866

My Dr Sir —

some time ago you asked me to relate any anecdote or incident, I might Know connected with the late lamented President Lincoln The following "pig story" No. 2 [1] is literally true

In 1855 Mr Lincoln and myself were traveling by buggy from Woodford Co. court to Bloomington Ills. — and in passing through a little grove, we suddenly

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heard this terrific sqealing of a little pig near by us. Quick as thought Mr L. leaped out of the buggy, seized a club, and pounced upon an old sow, and beat her lustily, that was in the act of eating one of her young ones. and thus he saved the pig and then remarked "By jings! the unnatural old brute shall not devour her own progeny" This, I think was his first proclamation of Freedom The following, shows his ready wit In 1858 in this Court at Bloomington Ills. Mr. Lincoln was ingaged in a case, of no very great importance, but the atty on the other side, Mr S. [2] a young lawyer of fine abilities (now a judge) was always very sensitive about being beaten, and in this case manifested, unusual zeal and interest. The case lasted till late at night, when it was finally submitted to the jury — Mr. S. spent a sleepless night in anxiety, and early next morning, learned to his great chagrin, he had lost the case — Mr Lincoln met him at the Court House and asked him what had become of his case with lugubrious countenance and melancholy tone, Mr S. said "It's gone to h—l" "O well" said Mr L. "then you'll see it again"

When do you expect to finish the Life of Mr Lincoln? I opine it will be a very readible Book, from what I have seen of it

I think your portraiture of him is most excellent [3] But I think, take him all in all, we shall never look upon his like again

I have a letter writ in his own hand writing, he gave me at Washington 22 Aug. /64, the last time I ever saw him which I intend to Keep most suredly and hand down to "posterity yet unborn"

Let me hear from you

God and Liberty — Amen

J. D. Wickizer

Library of Congress: Herndon-Weik Collection. Manuscript Division. Library of Congress. Washington, D.C. 2802 — 3; Huntington Library: LN2408, 2:446 — 47

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Wilson, Douglas L., ed.; Davis, Rodney O., ed.; Wickizer, J. D. 'J. D. Wickizer to William H. Herndon' in 'Herndon's Informants: Letters, Interviews, and Statements About Abraham Lincoln' . Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 1998. [format: book], [genre: letter]. Permission: University of Illinois Press
Persistent link to this document: http://lincoln.lib.niu.edu/file.php?file=herndon423b.html
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