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Wilson, Douglas L., ed.; Davis, Rodney O., ed.; Whitney, Henry C. 'Henry C. Whitney to William H. Herndon' in 'Herndon's Informants: Letters, Interviews, and Statements About Abraham Lincoln' . Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 1998. [format: book], [genre: letter]. Permission: University of Illinois Press
Persistent link to this document: http://lincoln.lib.niu.edu/file.php?file=herndon627.html


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Notes.

Note from page 627: 1. Ward Hill Lamon, "Abraham Lincoln's Strange Dreams: His Singular Philosophy in Regard to Dreams and Presentiments," Chicago Daily News (morning edition), Aug. 27, 1887. Lamon is referred to a few sentences later as Hill.

Note from page 627: 2. Whitney enumerates some of these "grave errors" at the end of this letter. See also his undated statement, §536.

Note from page 628: 3. Rice, 77 — 100.

Note from page 628: 4. Rice, 455 — 68.

Note from page 628: 5. Noah H. Swayne (1804 — 84) of Ohio was appointed to the U.S. Supreme Court by AL in 1862.

Note from page 628: 6. Justice John McLean of Ohio.

Note from page 628: 7. Samuel F. Miller (1816 — 90) of Iowa was appointed to the U.S. Supreme Court by AL in 1862.

Note from page 629: 8. Ward H. Lamon, Lawrence Weldon, Samuel C. Parks, Clifton H. Moore, Harvey Hogg (1833 — 62), Daniel W. Voorhees (1827 — 97), and Amzi McWilliams (d. 1862). All were from Illinois except Voorhees, who was from Terre Haute, Indiana. All practiced with AL in the courts of the Eighth Circuit.

Note from page 629: 9. Possibly intended as a reference to Oliver L. Davis.

Note from page 629: 10. Rice.

Note from page 629: 11. Clearly a mistake for "Lincoln."

Note from page 630: 12. Ezekiel Boyden was mayor of Urbana, 1856 — 57 and 1858 — 59.

Note from page 630: 13. Some of these cases and dates have been identied as follows: People v. Patterson (manslaughter), April term 1859; Spink v. Chiniquy (slander), October term 1856; Harvey v. Campbell et al. (bill for relief ), October term 1859; Dean v. Kelly et al. (injunction), April term 1858; People v. Barrett (murder), October term 1856; Brock, Hays & Co. v. Illinois Central R.R. (assumpsit), April term 1857 (appealed to the Illinois Supreme Court, December term 1857).

Note from page 630: 14. Probably Martin R. M. Wallace (1829 — 1902), who served during the war as colonel of the Fourth Illinois Cavalry and was awarded the brevet rank of brigadier general of volunteers.

Note from page 631: 15. George Bancroft, "The Necessity, the Reality, and the Promise of the Progress of the Human Race," delivered November 20, 1854. See Bancroft, Literary and Historical Miscellanies, 2 vols. (New York, 1855), 2:481 — 517.

Note from page 631: 16. Archibald Williams (1801 — 63).

Note from page 631: 17. Lamon.

Note from page 631: 18. The passage Whitney refers to describes AL coming to the law office too distraught by domestic affairs to talk or do business.

Note from page 631: 19. Chauncey F. Black (1839 — 1904), Lamon's ghostwriter, and his father, Jeremiah S. Black, former attorney general and secretary of state.

Note from page 632: 20. The biography associates Stuart with the view that certain physical conditions contributed to AL's famous melancholy and that "in some respects he was totally unlike other people." It adds that "blue pills were the medicinal remedy which he affected most" (Lamon, 475).

Note from page 632: 21. Canto 3, lines 280 — 397.

Note from page 632: 22. From Oliver Wendell Holmes's "The Last Leaf."

Note from page 632: 23. David Davis is quoted as saying that AL's humor was simulated and that his jokes and stories were meant to "whistle off sadness." John M. Scott states that Lincoln's humor seemed to be "put on" and that it "did not properly belong there" (Lamon, 479).

Note from page 632: 24. "Fully alive to the fact that no qualities of a public man are so charming to the people as simplicity and candor, he made simplicity and candor the mask of deep feelings carefully concealed, and subtle plans studiously veiled from all eyes but one. He had no reverence for great men, followed no leader with blind devotion, and yielded no opinion to mere authority. He felt that he was as great as anybody, and could do what another did. It was, however, the supreme desire of his heart to be right, and to do justice in all the relations of life." Whitney probably meant to include the balance of this paragraph, which runs over to the following page.

Note from page 633: 25. Lamon's biography states that AL refused to participate in Patterson's defense or accept his share of the fee.

Note from page 633: 26. There was, in fact, a jury trial at the April term 1857 of the McLean Circuit Court. See John J. Duff, A. Lincoln: Prairie Lawyer (New York, 1960), 316 — 17.

Note from page 633: 27. U.S. Supreme Court Justice John McLean presided at the trial of McCormick v. Manny et al. in Cincinnati in September 1855.

Note from page 633: 28. For other testimony on the "Peoria truce," see the index.

Note from page 633: 29. See p. 631, note 15.

Note from page 633: 30. AL delivered the first version of his lecture on "Discoveries and Inventions" in Bloomington on April 6, 1858.

Note from page 634: 31. On the verso in Whitney's hand: I will consider the question of a publisher and write you further about it The picture could not have been lost unless some one took it as directions to return it to me on the outside of the envelope.

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Wilson, Douglas L., ed.; Davis, Rodney O., ed.; Whitney, Henry C. 'Henry C. Whitney to William H. Herndon' in 'Herndon's Informants: Letters, Interviews, and Statements About Abraham Lincoln' . Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 1998. [format: book], [genre: letter]. Permission: University of Illinois Press
Persistent link to this document: http://lincoln.lib.niu.edu/file.php?file=herndon627.html
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