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Wilson, Douglas L., ed.; Davis, Rodney O., ed.; Sweet, Leonard. 'Leonard Swett to William H. Herndon' in 'Herndon's Informants: Letters, Interviews, and Statements About Abraham Lincoln' . Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 1998. [format: book], [genre: letter]. Permission: University of Illinois Press
Persistent link to this document: http://lincoln.lib.niu.edu/file.php?file=herndon162.html


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Notes.

Note from page 162: 1. Swett revised this letter in 1887, and it appeared in that form in WHH's biography. See H&W (1889), 528 — 38.

Note from page 162: 2. Probably intended by Springer, the copyist, as an elision.

Note from page 163: 3. Probably intended by the copyist as an elision.

Note from page 164: 4. James Gordon Bennett (1795 — 1872), editor of the New York Herald.

Note from page 164: 5. This parenthetical remark was omitted in the 1887 version.

Note from page 165: 6. In revising this letter in 1887, Swett at this point added: "It was here that he located his own greatness as a President. One time, about the middle of the war, I left his house about eleven o'clock at night, at the Soldiers' Home. We had been discussing the discords in the country, and particularly the States of Missouri and Kentucky. As we separated at the door he said, ‘I may not have made as great a President as some other men, but I believe I have kept these discordant elements together as well as anyone could.’"

Note from page 166: 7. In the margin: devil.

Note from page 166: 8. Omitted from the 1887 version: "I was one time . . . watching that thing."

Note from page 167: 9. In 1887 Swett inserted at this point: "It is said that some one of the crowned heads of Europe proposed to marry when he had a wife living. A gentleman, hearing of this proposition, replied, how could he? 'Oh,'replied his friend, 'he could marry and then he could get Mr. Gladstone to make an explanation about it.'This was said to illustrate the convincing power of Mr. Gladstone's statement.
"Mr. Lincoln had this power greater than any man I have ever known."

Note from page 167: 10. This sentence was omitted in the 1887 version.

Note from page 167: 11. For "Whether he went . . . moment of vexation;" Swett in 1887 substituted "In fact he cared nothing for the form of anything."

Note from page 168: 12. Probably intended by the copyist as an elision.

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Wilson, Douglas L., ed.; Davis, Rodney O., ed.; Sweet, Leonard. 'Leonard Swett to William H. Herndon' in 'Herndon's Informants: Letters, Interviews, and Statements About Abraham Lincoln' . Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 1998. [format: book], [genre: letter]. Permission: University of Illinois Press
Persistent link to this document: http://lincoln.lib.niu.edu/file.php?file=herndon162.html
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