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Wilson, Douglas L., ed.; Davis, Rodney O., ed.; Burba, E. R. 'E. R. Burba to William H. Herndon' in 'Herndon's Informants: Letters, Interviews, and Statements About Abraham Lincoln' . Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 1998. [format: book], [genre: letter]. Permission: University of Illinois Press
Persistent link to this document: http://lincoln.lib.niu.edu/file.php?file=herndon256.html


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201. E. R. Burba to William H. Herndon.

Hodginville Ky May 25th 1866

Dear Sir

our very Kind letter of the 2d. inst was duly Recd and after Some delay I reply by Saying that I am unable to give you much more information than I did before — As to your first inquiry in regard to Thos Lincoln not being able to get a "Baby" from his first Marriage, that seems to be the impression from the best information I can get — He was married it appears in this County but when no one Seems to recollect — At that day this part of the country was Sparsly settled & from what I have heard old men Say there was very little attention given to Books papers or records and as the Lincoln Family at that day Cut no Considerable figure all of these mior incidents are lost Sight of — In Most of Cases they

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Settleled all their difficulties out of the Court House at some public gathering or old fashioned Ky — Knock down was the order of the day get up drink make Friends & all went on well — the man that came off second best must find Some one that he Could whip — unless a Man Could boast of whipping some body he was not taken up in the best of Society — yet if he was game he could pass. I never heard of any of the Lincoln family thus ingaged their history seems to be quiet & for peace this with some other things Might be the Cause of Lincolns mooving away this is only my guess as before stated I doubt whether the Negro cut much figure here at that time

Hodgenville is rather an old place of about 5 or 600 hundred inhabitants, rather a pretty country round about it land about rolling enough to be healthy — a beautiful little creek running through it (Nolin) large enough to Carry a Mill all the year — Some very good land as much so as river bottom — then Some as poor as Need be — in Some Cases it changes within a few rods. I might say from 1st to 4th rate — The country is pretty well Supplied with Small young timber. at the birth of Lincoln it was a barran waste So to Speak, Save Some little patches on the creek bottom — the place on which Abe was Born is rather poor yet it would sell for say 20$ per acre but it would take a Man a long time to get his Money out of it — the country round about is rather level, that is no hills of note but in many places Small Basins (as they are called here) which renders the face of the country uneven & disagreeable to work for farming, in these little Sinks or basins, ponds from which in many cases answer valuable purposes to the famer for Stock It takes very little trouble to make a pond Just tramp one of these sinks & it has a red clay bottom & will hold water like a tub — Altogether the place is rather pretty all things taken together — It lies about 3 ½ miles near due south from this place near a creek called the South fork of Nolin (Say from one to two miles Wheat, Corn Oats & Tobacco grow very well on it, the latter Stands very high in market as does all Tobacco raised on that Kind of Soil — Knob Creek runs out of the gorges of Muldrews hill which skirts this County East & S East it is only a few Miles in lenth, but one of the prettiest Streams I ever Saw you can See a pebble in 10 feet Water — it empties into the Rolling fork about two miles above New Haven — The Rolling fork is a tributary of Salt River — & Salt River empties into the Ohio about 24 miles below Louisville, at the mouth there is a little village called West point quite a romantic Country round about it — get a late Map of Ky — & you will see at a glance the localities You Spoke of Coming out in June. I have no doubt that you could make your trip quite interesting, as to the danger I apprehend none whatever more than travelling in any other quarter and I think you may be enabled to geather many little items that would be of interest to you After you arrive at Louisville you can then come here by way of Elizabeth Town or New Haven which are about equal distances from here say 12 miles You come to these points by the Cars & we have a Daily Stage running to N Haven & Connects with the train — I Hope you may Come out if so I will take great pleasure in rendering you all assistance I can & you will find many others who will take an interest in giving you all in formation they Can

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I Regret writing so much & Saying so litle — yet perhaps you May cull out Some thing of interest

Very Respectfully Yours
E. R. Burba

Library of Congress: Herndon-Weik Collection. Manuscript Division. Library of Congress. Washington, D.C. 2575 — 76; Huntington Library: LN2408, 1:44 — 48

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Wilson, Douglas L., ed.; Davis, Rodney O., ed.; Burba, E. R. 'E. R. Burba to William H. Herndon' in 'Herndon's Informants: Letters, Interviews, and Statements About Abraham Lincoln' . Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 1998. [format: book], [genre: letter]. Permission: University of Illinois Press
Persistent link to this document: http://lincoln.lib.niu.edu/file.php?file=herndon256.html
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