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Dickson, Moses. Manual of the International Order of the Twelve of Knights and Daughters of Tabor, Containing General Laws, Regulations, Ceremonies, Drill and a Taborian Lexicon . St. Louis: A. R. Fleming and Co., 1891. [format: book], [genre: report; proceedings]. Permission: Public domain
Persistent link to this document: http://lincoln.lib.niu.edu/file.php?file=dickson.html


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Secrecy of the Knights of Liberty.

"This organization was known among its members by the name of Knights of Tabor — a name that gave the members courage. That God was with Barak and Deborah, in Israel's great battle with the immense army of Sisera; they, with only ten thousand men, assembled on Tabor, to fight Jabin's army, and, if possible, win the victory and break the bondage of the Israelites. God was with Israel, and gave the victory to the bondsmen, though they were opposed by twenty times their number. Our cause was just, and we believed in the justice of the God of Israel and the rights of man. Under the old name of Tabor, we resolved to make full preparation to strike the blow for liberty. We felt sure that the Lord God was on the side of right and justice, our faith and trust was in him, and that he would help us in our needy time.

SECRECY.

"From the very origin of the organization of the Knights of Liberty, the necessity of secrecy was impressed on each member. Let not your right hand know what your left hand does; trust no one, and test every man before he is admitted to membership. A part of the oath was: ‘We can die, but we can't reveal the name of a member, or make known the organization and its objects.’ It was

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absolutely a secret organized body. We know of the failure of Nat. Turner and others, the Abolitionist in the North and East. The under-ground railroad was in good running order, and the Knights of Liberty sent many passengers over the road to freedom.

"We feel that we have said enough on this subject. If the War of the Rebellion had not occurred just at the time it did, the Knights of Liberty would have made public history. Let the past sleep; enough has been said.
Faithfully Yours,
MOSES DICKSON.

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Dickson, Moses. Manual of the International Order of the Twelve of Knights and Daughters of Tabor, Containing General Laws, Regulations, Ceremonies, Drill and a Taborian Lexicon . St. Louis: A. R. Fleming and Co., 1891. [format: book], [genre: report; proceedings]. Permission: Public domain
Persistent link to this document: http://lincoln.lib.niu.edu/file.php?file=dickson.html
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