NIU Libraries Digitization Projects
Lincoln/Net Prairie Fire Illinois During the Civil War Illinois During the Gilded Age Mark Twain's Mississippi Back to Digitization Projects Contact Us
BACK

Edwards, Richard; Hopewell, M.; Ashley, William; Barry, James G.; Belt and Priest; Casey, John; Hall, W.; Labaum, Louis A.; Leduc, Mary Philip; Lisa, Manuel; O'Fallon, Benjamin; Piernas; Port Folio; Risley, W.; Stoddard, Amos; Williams, Henry W.; Yore, John E. Edwards's Great West and Her Commercial Metropolis, Embracing a General View of the West, and a Complete History of St. Louis, from the Landing of Ligueste, in 1764, to the Present Time; with Portraits and Biographies of Some of the Old Settlers, and Many of the Most Prominent Buisiness Men . St. Louis: Office of Edwards's Monthly, A Journal of Progress, 1860. [format: book], [genre: biography; history; letter; narrative]. Permission: St. Louis Mercantile Library
Persistent link to this document: http://lincoln.lib.niu.edu/file.php?file=edwards.html


Previous section

Next section

Sullivan Blood. President of the Boatmens' Savings Institution.

THE subject of this memoir was born in the town of Windsor, state of Vermont, on the 24th of April, 1795. His life has been one of progression; and, as we follow him from his humble commencement in the city of St. Louis, and see how step by step he has risen to position and affluence, we feel that his biography will exert a salutary influence; and many an ambitious youth, denied the influence of friends and wealth, will be encouraged to fight manfully and hopefully the great battle of life.

The parents of Sullivan Blood were natives of Massachusetts, and emigrated to Vermont, then called the new state, in 1793, there lived upon a farm, and both died during the years 1813 and 1814. Two years after losing his parents, Sullivan Blood, who always possessed an enterprising and ambitious mind, determined to emigrate to the far West, and there manfully to work out his destiny. After examining thoroughly on the map the different locations, he selected that of the city of St. Louis as the most proper place to commence his fortune, and in 1817 fixed his residence in that spot. St. Louis, at that time, was just passing the barrier in municipal existence which divides the village from a town, and according to an edict issued by the authorities, a night-watch was appointed the following year, and among the number of candidates for the new appointment Mr. Blood was elected as one of the watchmen; but when he became known, and his character and talents appreciated, he was soon exalted to the position of captain.

During the time that Captain Blood held his responsible position, the property of the city and citizens was well protected from the thief, the burglar, and the incendiary; and so efficient was he in the discharge of his duties, that he retained the position of captain for the space of some years. After remaining six years in St. Louis, Captain Blood determined to revisit the Green Mountain state, and, during his visit, married Miss Sophia Hall, whose mother still survives, at the venerable age of ninety-one years.

Captain Blood was a constable in the city for ten years; and served in the capacity of deputy sheriff during the terms of Robert Simpson and John R. Walker. In 1833, he was elected an alderman from the second ward, and served one year. Beyond this, Captain Blood has not been identified with political life, which he knew would interfere with his private business and domestic happiness. He has often been solicited to become the candidate for many important offices, but for the reasons we have given, has always declined political interference. Captain Blood early turned his attention to steamboating, and in the palmy days of steamboat navigation, before railroads had crossed the western prairies, he became engaged in the trade between New Orleans and St. Louis, and plentifully gathered of the harvest which belonged to

-- 216 --

those who were engaged in the profitable pursuit of steamboating. He built two boats, both of which he commanded, and by the kindness of his disposition, and the amenities of his manners, the boats he commanded became the general favorites of the travelling and commercial world. Many citizens of St. Louis, and inhabitants of all parts of the Union can call up pleasant reminiscences, while a passenger in the boats commanded by the careful and friendly Captain Blood. He probably knew the Mississippi, during the time he was an officer on its waters, as well as any pilot engaged upon it.

The circumstance of Captain Blood being once a boatman, and his popularity with all who followed that profession, made it proper that he should be appointed a director in the "Boatmens' Saving Institution," which was created with especial reference to the wants, and for the benefit of that numerous class of individuals who follow the western rivers as a means of subsistence. It was thought that the name would enlist the attention of numerous hardworking but improvident individuals, who might be induced to deposit a small portion of their hard-earned money, and by that means contract habits of calculation, and a desire to create a store on which they could draw, should some malady assail them, or old age render them unfit for manual exertion. From the very first, Captain Blood became the supporter and friend of this institution, which, from an humble commencement, has become one of the most extensive and favorite moneyed institutions in St. Louis.

The confidence reposed in an institution necessarily arises from the character of its officers; and Captain Blood was appointed a director in 1847, and during the last five years has been its president, and the weight of his character is manifested by the popularity of the institution. He has always been a working man, and still works, enjoying a "green old age." He has not frittered away his time either in visionary impossibilities or slothful inaction, but "honorable labor" has been the maxim of his life, and to it he is indebted for the worldly comforts he possesses in the decline of his life; and to his industry, integrity, philanthropy, and domestic virtues, he owes the tribute of respect that is paid to his character.

-- 219 --

Previous section

Next section


Edwards, Richard; Hopewell, M.; Ashley, William; Barry, James G.; Belt and Priest; Casey, John; Hall, W.; Labaum, Louis A.; Leduc, Mary Philip; Lisa, Manuel; O'Fallon, Benjamin; Piernas; Port Folio; Risley, W.; Stoddard, Amos; Williams, Henry W.; Yore, John E. Edwards's Great West and Her Commercial Metropolis, Embracing a General View of the West, and a Complete History of St. Louis, from the Landing of Ligueste, in 1764, to the Present Time; with Portraits and Biographies of Some of the Old Settlers, and Many of the Most Prominent Buisiness Men . St. Louis: Office of Edwards's Monthly, A Journal of Progress, 1860. [format: book], [genre: biography; history; letter; narrative]. Permission: St. Louis Mercantile Library
Persistent link to this document: http://lincoln.lib.niu.edu/file.php?file=edwards.html
Powered by PhiloLogic