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Edwards, Richard; Hopewell, M.; Ashley, William; Barry, James G.; Belt and Priest; Casey, John; Hall, W.; Labaum, Louis A.; Leduc, Mary Philip; Lisa, Manuel; O'Fallon, Benjamin; Piernas; Port Folio; Risley, W.; Stoddard, Amos; Williams, Henry W.; Yore, John E. Edwards's Great West and Her Commercial Metropolis, Embracing a General View of the West, and a Complete History of St. Louis, from the Landing of Ligueste, in 1764, to the Present Time; with Portraits and Biographies of Some of the Old Settlers, and Many of the Most Prominent Buisiness Men . St. Louis: Office of Edwards's Monthly, A Journal of Progress, 1860. [format: book], [genre: biography; history; letter; narrative]. Permission: St. Louis Mercantile Library
Persistent link to this document: http://lincoln.lib.niu.edu/file.php?file=edwards.html


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Dr. Anderson.

THIS learned and eminent divine was born in Prince Edward's county, state of Virginia, December 5, 1814. His father, Stephen C. Anderson, was a respectable planter, and served as a magistrate of the commonwealth in which he resided. The early days of young Anderson were spent upon the farm of his father, and usually attending the little village school of the place, which afforded him instruction in the common branches of an English education; and with the aid of a tutor he was instructed in the mysteries of the Latin and Greek languages, until 1831; he then went to the University of Ohio, at Athens, and from there to Andover, Indiana, and graduated in 1835.

After having, by the study of years, formed the groundwork on which he could build any profession, young Anderson, following the bent of his inclinations, which had long fostered a love for religious pursuits, went to the Union Theological Seminary, for the purpose of fitting himself for the duties of the ministry. After passing through the fall course suitable to his future calling, Mr. Anderson went to Oxford, North Carolina, where he remained one year: and receiving an invitation from Danville, Virginia, he accepted the call, and for five years preached to a respectable and continually-increasing congregation. From Danville he removed to Norfolk, where he soon became most popular in his calling. The fame of his learning, his piety, and his effective delivery from the pulpit, soon spread beyond the precincts of the little city in which he lived, and his name became associated with the constellation of ministers whose talents can best invest Religion with her true and heavenly attributes.

After remaining in Norfolk for five years, Dr. Anderson came to St. Louis in 1857, and engaged as the pastor of the Central Church, which at that time was far from being in a flourishing condition. Nothing discouraged, he went earnestly to work, and by the daily example of a well regulated life, and by precepts from the pulpit, bathed in the Hyblaean dew of eloquence, he awakened emotions in hearts which had before remained indifferent to the duties of religion, and by degrees the congregation increased in number, and the church was soon relieved from the debt which had so long oppressed it. The church is now in the most prosperous condition.

Dr. Anderson was married April 9th, 1840, to Miss Lucy A. Jones, of Nottaway county, Virginia, and the domestic fireside and ministerial duties form the elements of his happiness. The secret of his success as a preacher is owing to his earnestness of manner, to the strength and purity of his language, and the possession of true piety, which gives that genial glow to his discourse, which, by sympathetic fervor, invites the listener to partake of the pure joys which spring from a religious life. He lives, and has lived, to good purpose, and his watchfulness over his congregation shows that he truly acts the part of a good shepherd to his flock.

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Edwards, Richard; Hopewell, M.; Ashley, William; Barry, James G.; Belt and Priest; Casey, John; Hall, W.; Labaum, Louis A.; Leduc, Mary Philip; Lisa, Manuel; O'Fallon, Benjamin; Piernas; Port Folio; Risley, W.; Stoddard, Amos; Williams, Henry W.; Yore, John E. Edwards's Great West and Her Commercial Metropolis, Embracing a General View of the West, and a Complete History of St. Louis, from the Landing of Ligueste, in 1764, to the Present Time; with Portraits and Biographies of Some of the Old Settlers, and Many of the Most Prominent Buisiness Men . St. Louis: Office of Edwards's Monthly, A Journal of Progress, 1860. [format: book], [genre: biography; history; letter; narrative]. Permission: St. Louis Mercantile Library
Persistent link to this document: http://lincoln.lib.niu.edu/file.php?file=edwards.html
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