NIU Libraries Digitization Projects
Lincoln/Net Prairie Fire Illinois During the Civil War Illinois During the Gilded Age Mark Twain's Mississippi Back to Digitization Projects Contact Us
BACK

Edwards, Richard; Hopewell, M.; Ashley, William; Barry, James G.; Belt and Priest; Casey, John; Hall, W.; Labaum, Louis A.; Leduc, Mary Philip; Lisa, Manuel; O'Fallon, Benjamin; Piernas; Port Folio; Risley, W.; Stoddard, Amos; Williams, Henry W.; Yore, John E. Edwards's Great West and Her Commercial Metropolis, Embracing a General View of the West, and a Complete History of St. Louis, from the Landing of Ligueste, in 1764, to the Present Time; with Portraits and Biographies of Some of the Old Settlers, and Many of the Most Prominent Buisiness Men . St. Louis: Office of Edwards's Monthly, A Journal of Progress, 1860. [format: book], [genre: biography; history; letter; narrative]. Permission: St. Louis Mercantile Library
Persistent link to this document: http://lincoln.lib.niu.edu/file.php?file=edwards.html


Previous section

Next section

Colonel Joshua B. Brant.

COLONEL JOSHUA B. BRANT was born April 8th, 1790, in the town of Hampshire, Hampton county, Massachusetts. His father, John Brant, was a gallant soldier in the trying times of the Revolution, and lived to the remarkable age of ninety-nine years and three months, dying in the year 1852. His mother's maiden name was Bosworth, of a large and respectable family of that name who still reside in Massachusetts.

The early days of young Joshua Brant were passed in the healthful exercise of farming avocations, and he ploughed the land and drove oxen till he reached eighteen years of age. The schooling that he obtained he received at night, the day being devoted to bodily labor. At the age of eighteen, Joshua Brant determined to leave the wholesome trammels of parental authority, and try his fortune in the world uncontrolled and unguided except through the agency of his own faculties. When he left home his capital amounted to thirteen dollars in cash. He went to Troy, New York, and engaged in a drug store, kept by Erastus Corning, for twelve dollars per month and board; this gentleman has since become President of the New York Central Railroad, and a member of the national Congress.

Wishing to enter upon some occupation where he could advance more rapidly in worldly thrift, Joshua B. Brant removed to Dutchess county, New York, and in partnership with a Mr. Snyder, commenced the distilling business, and in a short time amassed the sum of seven hundred dollars. When the war of 1812 became known through his neighborhood, he was busily engaged in the harvest field, cradling wheat; but burning to serve the country, for whose independence his father had fought, he left all employment, and prepared himself for the battle-field. He joined a detachment of troops at Rhinebeck, commanded by Captain H. W. Odell, that were proceeding to rendezvous at Greenbush, where he received the appointment of sergeant, February, 12, 1813, in the twenty-third regiment, commanded by Colonel Brown. From Greenbush the troops proceeded to Fort George, where there was a hard-fought battle; the vanguard of the American army being led by Colonel Scott, now General Scott, and commander-in-chief of the United States army. From Fort George the army proceeded to "Forty Mile Creek," where another battle was fought, and then retired into winter-quarters at Plattsburg.

During the war of 1812, Joshua B. Brant was in other battles than those we have mentioned. He was in the battles of Lundy's Lane, Fort George, Salter, and Fort Erie. In July, 1815, he was appointed by General Brown ensign of his regiment, which appointment was confirmed by the authorities at Washington the subsequent month, and the same year he was made second lieutenant, James Madison being president, and James Monroe secretary of war. During the intervening years from 1815 to 1838, he passed through all of the progressive stages of military promotion under Presidents Madison, Monroe. Adams, and Jackson, until he

-- 198 --

was appointed by President Van Buren lieutenant-colonel of the United States Army, in 1838.

Colonel Brant came to St. Louis in 1823, but was engaged in military duty until 1839, when he resigned. He took part in the various Indian wars in the West, and was also in Florida. Since 1839 he has devoted himself to his private pursuits, and was the first who had the spirit and enterprise to commence the erection of large buildings in St. Louis. He has always been a firm friend of his city, and by his individual efforts has contributed much to its adornment and prosperity.

Colonel Brant has been twice married. His first wife was Miss Elizabeth Lovejoy, of Stratford, Connecticut, whom he married January, 1818. She was the sister-in-law to General Leavenworth, so well known in the West. She bore him two children, one of whom is Henry B. Brant, of Booneville, Missouri. His second wife, whom he married December 31st, 1829, was Miss Sarah Benton, daughter of Samuel and Mary Benton, and niece of the illustrious statesman and author, Thomas H. Benton, who for many years represented the state of Missouri at Washington. Two children were the issue of this marriage, and a daughter is married to Doctor James McDowell, son of Governor McDowell, of Virginia, who is now consul-general at Constantinople.

Colonel Brant, by his business habits and talents has amassed a large fortune; yet, though he has been frugal, he never has been parsimonious in his manner of life, and with a liberal hand has dispensed his charities. He is a regular attendant at church, and for many years has been a member of the Presbyterian persuasion. Whatever of wealth and social position he has achieved, he owes it all to himself. He has been the architect of his own fortune, and his life will illustrate the old maxim, "where there is a will there is a way." Without injuring any one he has accomplished much; and as a soldier, a citizen, and a man, he deserves the esteem of posterity.

-- 201 --

Previous section

Next section


Edwards, Richard; Hopewell, M.; Ashley, William; Barry, James G.; Belt and Priest; Casey, John; Hall, W.; Labaum, Louis A.; Leduc, Mary Philip; Lisa, Manuel; O'Fallon, Benjamin; Piernas; Port Folio; Risley, W.; Stoddard, Amos; Williams, Henry W.; Yore, John E. Edwards's Great West and Her Commercial Metropolis, Embracing a General View of the West, and a Complete History of St. Louis, from the Landing of Ligueste, in 1764, to the Present Time; with Portraits and Biographies of Some of the Old Settlers, and Many of the Most Prominent Buisiness Men . St. Louis: Office of Edwards's Monthly, A Journal of Progress, 1860. [format: book], [genre: biography; history; letter; narrative]. Permission: St. Louis Mercantile Library
Persistent link to this document: http://lincoln.lib.niu.edu/file.php?file=edwards.html
Powered by PhiloLogic