NIU Libraries Digitization Projects
Lincoln/Net Prairie Fire Illinois During the Civil War Illinois During the Gilded Age Mark Twain's Mississippi Back to Digitization Projects Contact Us
BACK

Edwards, Richard; Hopewell, M.; Ashley, William; Barry, James G.; Belt and Priest; Casey, John; Hall, W.; Labaum, Louis A.; Leduc, Mary Philip; Lisa, Manuel; O'Fallon, Benjamin; Piernas; Port Folio; Risley, W.; Stoddard, Amos; Williams, Henry W.; Yore, John E. Edwards's Great West and Her Commercial Metropolis, Embracing a General View of the West, and a Complete History of St. Louis, from the Landing of Ligueste, in 1764, to the Present Time; with Portraits and Biographies of Some of the Old Settlers, and Many of the Most Prominent Buisiness Men . St. Louis: Office of Edwards's Monthly, A Journal of Progress, 1860. [format: book], [genre: biography; history; letter; narrative]. Permission: St. Louis Mercantile Library
Persistent link to this document: http://lincoln.lib.niu.edu/file.php?file=edwards.html


Previous section

William Glasgow, Jr., President of the Missouri Wine Company.

WILLIAM GLASGOW, Jr., was born at Christiana, state of Delaware, July 4, 1813. Some five years after his birth, his parents, James and Ann Glasgow, removed from that state to Missouri, and settled at Chariton, and removed from there to St. Louis in 1836.

William Glasgow, Jr., was the second child, and he received the rudiments of his education at Chariton, but on attaining a proper age, was sent to a fine school in Wilmington, state of Delaware, where he remained three years completing his education. After leaving school he commenced business in that town, where he remained until 1836, and, joining his father, came to St. Louis.

After a residence of some years in Missouri, William Glasgow became convinced that the soil of a large portion of the state was adapted to the growth of the grape. He drew his conclusions from the nature of the soil, the climate, and the plenty and luxuriance with which the wild grape abounded and flourished in almost every locality. So well convinced was he of the fact that the grape could be successfully cultivated, that he planted a small vineyard at his present residence, in 1844, amid the jeers of many who derided the idea that wine could be made in Missouri. However, the crop was an abundant one, and the experiment even surpassed the expectations of Mr. Glasgow. This was the first vineyard ever established in the state of Missouri, and to Mr. Glasgow belongs the credit of introducing into the state an article of agriculture, which will soon rank as one of its staples, and become one of the chief elements of wealth and national industry. Mr. Glasgow, in 1847, obtained the first premium for grapes and wine that was conferred by any society in the state of Missouri. It is natural for man to link himself with successful measures; and finding that the cultivation of the grape would prove profitable, in 1853 there was formed a company called William Glasgow, Jr., & Company, which consisted of William Glasgow, Jr., Amadee Vallé, and Allen H. Glasby, for the purpose of manufacturing wine from grape produced in Missouri, on an extensive scale. The company obtained a charter in 1855, under the name of the Missouri Wine Company, with a cash capital of $65,000, and Mr. Glasgow was chosen President, which office he still holds. The fame of the wine now extends over both hemispheres.

Mr. Glasgow was married April 16, 1840, to Miss Sarah L. Lane, daughter of Dr. William Carr Lane, first mayor of St. Louis. He has the confidence and respect which the purity of his character so well deserves.

-- 238 --

Previous section


Edwards, Richard; Hopewell, M.; Ashley, William; Barry, James G.; Belt and Priest; Casey, John; Hall, W.; Labaum, Louis A.; Leduc, Mary Philip; Lisa, Manuel; O'Fallon, Benjamin; Piernas; Port Folio; Risley, W.; Stoddard, Amos; Williams, Henry W.; Yore, John E. Edwards's Great West and Her Commercial Metropolis, Embracing a General View of the West, and a Complete History of St. Louis, from the Landing of Ligueste, in 1764, to the Present Time; with Portraits and Biographies of Some of the Old Settlers, and Many of the Most Prominent Buisiness Men . St. Louis: Office of Edwards's Monthly, A Journal of Progress, 1860. [format: book], [genre: biography; history; letter; narrative]. Permission: St. Louis Mercantile Library
Persistent link to this document: http://lincoln.lib.niu.edu/file.php?file=edwards.html
Powered by PhiloLogic