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Edwards, Richard; Hopewell, M.; Ashley, William; Barry, James G.; Belt and Priest; Casey, John; Hall, W.; Labaum, Louis A.; Leduc, Mary Philip; Lisa, Manuel; O'Fallon, Benjamin; Piernas; Port Folio; Risley, W.; Stoddard, Amos; Williams, Henry W.; Yore, John E. Edwards's Great West and Her Commercial Metropolis, Embracing a General View of the West, and a Complete History of St. Louis, from the Landing of Ligueste, in 1764, to the Present Time; with Portraits and Biographies of Some of the Old Settlers, and Many of the Most Prominent Buisiness Men . St. Louis: Office of Edwards's Monthly, A Journal of Progress, 1860. [format: book], [genre: biography; history; letter; narrative]. Permission: St. Louis Mercantile Library
Persistent link to this document: http://lincoln.lib.niu.edu/file.php?file=edwards.html


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Henry T. Blow, President of the Collier White-Lead Oil Company.

HENRY T. BLOW was born July 15, 1817, in Southampton county, Virginia. He is descended from a very ancient English family, and can trace his lineage to the days of the unfortunate Charles I. He has a portrait of one of his ancestors, John Blow, who was an eminent musician and composer of music at that time, hung in his parlor. Captain Peter Blow, his father, was a respectable planter in Virginia, and removed for a brief time to Alabama, and from thence to St. Louis in 1830, and became proprietor of what was known as the Jefferson Hotel. He died a year afterward universally lamented. He was married to Miss Elizabeth Taylor, of an old Virginian family, and had twelve children, six of whom are living, Peter, Henry, Taylor, Elizabeth, William, and Mrs. Joseph Charless. The gentlemen are all highly esteemed for their business qualifications, integrity, and intelligence, in the localities where they reside.

Henry T. Blow, the subject of this biography, was early sent to school, and had all the advantages of early mental culture, being designed by his father for the profession of the law. He graduated at the St. Louis University, an institution which has always been eminent for its thorough scholarship; and having given up all ideas of the legal profession, he obtained the situation of clerk in the drug establishment of Messrs. Joseph Charless & Son.

Mr. Blow was always remarkable for his industry, his energy, and ambition to excel in business pursuits. He very soon became indispensable to the establishment of his employers, and in 1836, after the elder Mr. Charless retired, he was taken as partner in the house by the son, and the firm was known as Charless & Blow. The firm did a very heavy and lucrative business, till 1839, when Mr. Charless wishing to retire, Mr. Blow bought out his interest, and became sole owner of the drug store. This continued until 1840, when Mr. Charless again became a partner, and the firm became Joseph Charless & Company. The business soon became much enlarged, and the White-Lead Works, which formed the commencement of the present Collier White-Lead and Oil Company were connected with their business.

In 1844, Mr. Blow and Mr. Charless dissolved partnership; the former having determined to carry on the White-Lead Works which he had set apart for himself on the dissolution of copartnership; Mr. Charless still carrying on the drug-store. Fortune had always been propitious to Mr. Blow, but she became lavish of her favors; for in the short period of tour years after his sole possession of the White-Lead Works he amassed all the wealth he desired, and then determined to retire, having an ample fortune. He applied for an act of incorporation of the White-Lead Works, and a charter was granted under the style of the Collier White Lead

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Lead and Oil Company. From the very commencement in its corporate character, Mr. Blow has been its President, and the works do a business of immense magnitude and profit.

Mr. Blow was married July 15, 1840, to Miss Grimsley, the accomplished daughter of Thornton Grimsley, Esq., of St. Louis. He has never been an ardent politician, and never had much relish for the feverish excitement of political life, yet he yielded to the earnest importunities of his friends, and was elected to the state senate for four years. He was a hard-working and efficient member, and took an active part in all the important measures that were agitated. Whilst at Jefferson City he was chairman of the committee on banks and corporations.

Mr. Blow has been one of the directors of the Iron Mountain Railroad, and through his efficient exertion, assisted by others who possessed a taste for the fine arts, the Western Academy of Art came into being. This institution has been brought into existence by its corporators with much labor and expense, so as to form and encourage a taste for a love of the beautiful. Such an institution was much needed in St. Louis, and it will form a nucleus around which will cluster the votaries of art, who will contribute generously to its advance, and its refining influence will direct the sensibilities of the inhabitants in more delicate channels, and encourage a love of the elegant. Mr. Blow is president of the institution.

Mr. Blow has always taken a prominent part in the affairs of the Agricultural and Mechanical Association, now so widely known throughout the Union, and has been one of its most efficient officers since its incorporation. During the last Fair of 1858, so as to create a general emulation among the architects of St. Louis, he offered, as a private premium, the sum of two hundred dollars for the best plan of a suburban residence, the cost not exceeding $20,000. He is well known to the citizens of St. Louis; and in connection with his acknowledged business qualifications, he is highly esteemed for his moral attributes. He is now in the full vigor of manhood, and has already accomplished what most men lay out as the work of a protracted life — "wealth, honor, and the good-will of all men."

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Edwards, Richard; Hopewell, M.; Ashley, William; Barry, James G.; Belt and Priest; Casey, John; Hall, W.; Labaum, Louis A.; Leduc, Mary Philip; Lisa, Manuel; O'Fallon, Benjamin; Piernas; Port Folio; Risley, W.; Stoddard, Amos; Williams, Henry W.; Yore, John E. Edwards's Great West and Her Commercial Metropolis, Embracing a General View of the West, and a Complete History of St. Louis, from the Landing of Ligueste, in 1764, to the Present Time; with Portraits and Biographies of Some of the Old Settlers, and Many of the Most Prominent Buisiness Men . St. Louis: Office of Edwards's Monthly, A Journal of Progress, 1860. [format: book], [genre: biography; history; letter; narrative]. Permission: St. Louis Mercantile Library
Persistent link to this document: http://lincoln.lib.niu.edu/file.php?file=edwards.html
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