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Edwards, Richard; Hopewell, M.; Ashley, William; Barry, James G.; Belt and Priest; Casey, John; Hall, W.; Labaum, Louis A.; Leduc, Mary Philip; Lisa, Manuel; O'Fallon, Benjamin; Piernas; Port Folio; Risley, W.; Stoddard, Amos; Williams, Henry W.; Yore, John E. Edwards's Great West and Her Commercial Metropolis, Embracing a General View of the West, and a Complete History of St. Louis, from the Landing of Ligueste, in 1764, to the Present Time; with Portraits and Biographies of Some of the Old Settlers, and Many of the Most Prominent Buisiness Men . St. Louis: Office of Edwards's Monthly, A Journal of Progress, 1860. [format: book], [genre: biography; history; letter; narrative]. Permission: St. Louis Mercantile Library
Persistent link to this document: http://lincoln.lib.niu.edu/file.php?file=edwards.html


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Henry Ames.

THE subject of this memoir was born in Oneida county, New York, March 4, 1818. His father, Nathan Ames, was engaged for some time in agricultural pursuits, until, in 1828, he came to the city of Cincinnati, and engaged in the pork-packing business. His two sons, Henry and Edgar, who are all of the children that are living, were sent early to school, and taught thoroughly the useful branches of an English education. That accomplished, they were taken into the establishment of their father, and instructed carefully in all the duties connected with the pork-packing business.

In 1841, Mr. Nathan Ames, the father, believing that St. Louis, from her geographical position, would, in time, become the great metropolis of the West, and far outstrip the city in which he was located, established himself in the growing town in the same business he had pursued in Cincinnati, and died in 1852, aged fifty-six years, respected for his many virtues.

Henry Ames had been connected with his father as early as 1833, and for many years floated down the Ohio and Mississippi Rivers on flatboats laden for the New Orleans market. At that time the Mississippi was filled with snags, and the navigation was most perilous. Henry Ames narrowly escaped with his life on several occasions, from his boat coming in contact with these obstructions, and rapidly sinking. He was looked upon, even when a boy, by the business men who knew him, as possessing all the elements suitable for the avocation he pursued; and many predicted that he would in time attain the first rank in his business, and stand at its head. That prophecy is already fulfilled; for we believe that Henry Ames & Co., are the largest beef and pork packers in the Union.

Henry Ames was married February, 1855, to Mrs. McCloud, daughter of Doctor Scudder. He is one of the most honorable and liberal of men; and his enterprise and business capacity are undoubted. He has been, and is, connected with many offices of trust and importance. He has been President of the Chamber of Commerce for two years, is Vice-President of the State Saving Institution, is a director in the Merchants' Insurance Company, in the United States Insurance Company, and other institutions. Still young and in the prime of manhood, he has already garnered wealth and reputation, without creating the envy which so usually accompanies success. He has won golden opinions from all, and there are none but who respect his name, and appreciate his character.

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Edwards, Richard; Hopewell, M.; Ashley, William; Barry, James G.; Belt and Priest; Casey, John; Hall, W.; Labaum, Louis A.; Leduc, Mary Philip; Lisa, Manuel; O'Fallon, Benjamin; Piernas; Port Folio; Risley, W.; Stoddard, Amos; Williams, Henry W.; Yore, John E. Edwards's Great West and Her Commercial Metropolis, Embracing a General View of the West, and a Complete History of St. Louis, from the Landing of Ligueste, in 1764, to the Present Time; with Portraits and Biographies of Some of the Old Settlers, and Many of the Most Prominent Buisiness Men . St. Louis: Office of Edwards's Monthly, A Journal of Progress, 1860. [format: book], [genre: biography; history; letter; narrative]. Permission: St. Louis Mercantile Library
Persistent link to this document: http://lincoln.lib.niu.edu/file.php?file=edwards.html
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