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Edwards, Richard; Hopewell, M.; Ashley, William; Barry, James G.; Belt and Priest; Casey, John; Hall, W.; Labaum, Louis A.; Leduc, Mary Philip; Lisa, Manuel; O'Fallon, Benjamin; Piernas; Port Folio; Risley, W.; Stoddard, Amos; Williams, Henry W.; Yore, John E. Edwards's Great West and Her Commercial Metropolis, Embracing a General View of the West, and a Complete History of St. Louis, from the Landing of Ligueste, in 1764, to the Present Time; with Portraits and Biographies of Some of the Old Settlers, and Many of the Most Prominent Buisiness Men . St. Louis: Office of Edwards's Monthly, A Journal of Progress, 1860. [format: book], [genre: biography; history; letter; narrative]. Permission: St. Louis Mercantile Library
Persistent link to this document: http://lincoln.lib.niu.edu/file.php?file=edwards.html


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Religious Newspapers in St. Louis.

[We are indebted to the Rev. John Hogan, of St. Louis, for the following history of the religious newspapers that have been and are published in St. Louis.]

The first religious newspaper published in St. Louis, according to my recollection, was The St. Louis Observer, Rev. E. P. Lovejoy, editor. It was started, I think, in 1833, and was the organ of the Presbyterian Church. Some time after its commencement, there were many and very strong articles in favor of "abolitionism" published in the paper, which very much incensed the community, and the consequence was, the press and office were destroyed, and Mr. Lovejoy removed to Alton, where he published the Alton Observer.

The next paper (religious, I mean) started here — I think, in 1834, or 1835, as the organ of the Catholic Church — was The Shepherd of the Valley. I do not now recollect who was the editor, nor yet when the paper ceased to exist.

In 1839, I think, another Catholic paper was started here, by Mr. Thomas Mullen. My impression is, its title was The Catholic Banner. I am not able to state how long this paper was continued.

In July, 1844, Rev. H. Chamberlin started a paper, mainly in the interest of the Presbyterian Church, denominated The Herald of Religious Liberty. Do not know how long it continued.

In August, 1851, The St. Louis Christian Advocate, Rev. D. R. McAnally, editor, was started into being, and still exists, as the organ of the Methodist Episcopal Church, South, for Missouri and Kansas.

In 1844, or 1845, Rev. J. T. Hinton, D. D., commenced here the publication of a paper called The Missouri Baptist, which was the avowed organ of the Baptist denomination in this and the surrounding states; but I am not now prepared to say how long it was published.

The Western Watchman, in the interest of the same denomination (Baptist), and which was commenced about 1848, by Rev. T. W. Lynd, D. D., as editor, most probably succeeded to the former, and only changed the title. Still continued.

In 1851, Mr. R. A. Bakewell started The Shepherd of the Valley, as organ of the Catholic Church; it existed some three years.

In 1852, The St. Louis Presbyterian, as the organ of the Presbyterian Church, was commenced by the Rev. E. Thompson Baird, as editor, and is still published, although the editor has been changed.

The Cumberland Presbyterian was commenced to be published here, I think, in 1852, as the organ of that denomination, by Rev. J. B. Logan, editor.

In the fall of 1853, I think, Rev. D. W. R. Trotter commenced here the publication of a paper called The Central Christian Advocate, as the organ of the Methodist Episcopal Church for Missouri, southern Illinois,

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Iowa, etc. This paper, after various vicissitudes, was finally adopted as a general Conference paper, and in 1856, or 1857, passed into the editorial charge of Rev. James Brooks, and is still published.

In 1855, I think it was, J. V. Huntington, LL. D., commenced the publication of another Catholic paper, in place of The Shepherd of the Valley, called The Leader. This paper only continued as a religious paper about a year, when it became a political paper under the same name, and subsequently ceased.

In July, 1858, the Observer took the place and patronage of The Cumberland Presbyterian, and was edited by Rev. Mr. Bird, who has now given place to Mr. A. F. Cox, who is editor and publisher.

In 1850, The Western Banner, organ of the Catholic Church, was commenced by Mr. B. D. Killian, and is still continued.

In 1860, another paper was started, called The Missouri Baptist, but I do not know who its editor is, nor yet what particular church it is to be the organ of.

The Herald and Era, as the organ of the Universalist Church. I do not recollect when the publication of this paper commenced here. Mr. Libby was, I think, connected with its origin, but I have not been able to see him, to get the date. I believe it is now published simultaneously here and at Indianapolis, Indiana.

The above is, I believe, a pretty full history of the religious newspapers that have been and are published here in the English language. Mr. A. F. Cox publishes here a quarterly, which is the organ of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church, and is as yet, I think, alone in that species of religious publication.

I deem it proper to add the publications in the German language here, of religious newspapers, and have purposely kept them by themselves.

The Lutheran, organ of that denomination, was commenced here in 1844, by Rev. F. W. Walter, and is still continued under the same editorial charge.

The Gott's Freund (in English, God's Friend) was commenced in 1852, by Mr. Besel, editor, and is still continued. It is, I believe, a Protestant publication, but I do not know to what denomination it belongs.

Herald des Glaubins (in English, Herald of Faith), under the auspices of the Catholic Church, was commenced in 1852, under the editorial charge of Rev. Mr. Vincent, and is still continued.

Her Frieadensbote (in English, Messenger of Peace), a Protestant publication, under the auspices of the Evangelical Churches, was commenced here in 1849, by Rev. Mr. Wull, and is still continued as a publication, but has recently been removed to Marthasville, Missouri.

Another publication in German, denominated the Protestant, has recently been commenced here. I do not know who the editor is.

There is also published here a paper called The Icarian, of which I know nothing.

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Edwards, Richard; Hopewell, M.; Ashley, William; Barry, James G.; Belt and Priest; Casey, John; Hall, W.; Labaum, Louis A.; Leduc, Mary Philip; Lisa, Manuel; O'Fallon, Benjamin; Piernas; Port Folio; Risley, W.; Stoddard, Amos; Williams, Henry W.; Yore, John E. Edwards's Great West and Her Commercial Metropolis, Embracing a General View of the West, and a Complete History of St. Louis, from the Landing of Ligueste, in 1764, to the Present Time; with Portraits and Biographies of Some of the Old Settlers, and Many of the Most Prominent Buisiness Men . St. Louis: Office of Edwards's Monthly, A Journal of Progress, 1860. [format: book], [genre: biography; history; letter; narrative]. Permission: St. Louis Mercantile Library
Persistent link to this document: http://lincoln.lib.niu.edu/file.php?file=edwards.html
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