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Edwards, Richard; Hopewell, M.; Ashley, William; Barry, James G.; Belt and Priest; Casey, John; Hall, W.; Labaum, Louis A.; Leduc, Mary Philip; Lisa, Manuel; O'Fallon, Benjamin; Piernas; Port Folio; Risley, W.; Stoddard, Amos; Williams, Henry W.; Yore, John E. Edwards's Great West and Her Commercial Metropolis, Embracing a General View of the West, and a Complete History of St. Louis, from the Landing of Ligueste, in 1764, to the Present Time; with Portraits and Biographies of Some of the Old Settlers, and Many of the Most Prominent Buisiness Men . St. Louis: Office of Edwards's Monthly, A Journal of Progress, 1860. [format: book], [genre: biography; history; letter; narrative]. Permission: St. Louis Mercantile Library
Persistent link to this document: http://lincoln.lib.niu.edu/file.php?file=edwards.html


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Abram S. Mitchell, Editor of the St. Louis Evening News.

THE subject of this sketch was born December 1st, 1820, near the city of Nashville, Davidson county, Tennessee. His parents were both natives of Virginia. His grandfather, Thomas Mitchell, was a merchant in Lynchburgh, Virginia, during the Revolution, and was a man of education and fine literary attainments. But his store was plundered by the British, and he was reduced to poverty. He next resorted to teaching; but died before his own children had derived much benefit from his instruction. The family being now quite destitute and helpless, were driven to emigrate to the wilds of Tennessee. There were two sons, Thomas and Robert J., and two or three daughters. After struggling in various ways to support himself as he grew up, among others, working at the shoe business, Robert J. Mitchell, the father of the subject of this sketch, joined the standard of General Jackson, who was raising volunteers for the Indian wars, and served under that leader in a campaign against the Creeks, and also in one against the Seminoles. Returning to Tennessee, he married, commenced farming, and in 1827 removed to the Hatchess River, in West Tennessee, and there, in Tipton county, the family still resides.

Abram S. Mitchell was sent by his father to the schools of the neighborhood, but he soon exhausted the little that the schools in that new country could impart, but was fortunate enough to meet at that time with an excellent teacher in the person of the Rev. James Holmes, who had formerly been a missionary among the Indians, and who earnestly advised him, when he could make circumstances suit, to complete his education at college. During intermissions of school, he sought work to aid in his own support. He applied for work unsuccessfully in a brickyard, where he was rejected for want of strength, and was afterward employed in tending a bark-mill in a tannery. In 1837, just as he was preparing to finish his education by a collegiate course, his father became bankrupt by having become security for a sheriff, and all of his property was sold to meet his bond. However, a few years later, Mr. Robert W. Sandford, a friend of the family, feeling an interest in young Mitchell, and appreciating his desire for an education, aided him in going to college at Danville, Kentucky, where he remained only eighteen months, and graduated with full honors, having, by dint of application, accomplished in that time what usually required a much longer time to perform. He taught school until he relieved himself of the debt he incurred in his education (about $700), and then studied law in Danville, and established a newspaper called the Weekly Kentucky Tribune, in connection with Mr. James S. Hall. That year he supported the whig candidate for governor, who, after election, before making any other appointment, bestowed upon him the office of assistant-secretary of state.

About this time Mr. Mitchell married Miss Bodley, of Lexington, Kentucky. After serving the term of his appointment, he and his father-in-law,

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law, Mr. H. I. Bodley, determined on removing to St. Louis, which they did in 1849, the season of the dreadful visitation by the cholera, by which he lost his wife and child. This domestic desolation induced him to return to Kentucky, where, in a short time, he received an invitation to become assistant-editor of the St. Louis Intelligencer, then about to come into existence. He accepted the invitation, but did not long remain connected with the paper. He received an invitation to become editor of the Republican Banner at Nashville, Tennessee, which he declined. He became land-agent, and then secretary of the Pacific Railroad Company, and some time after leaving this appointment, at the instigation of some of the most prominent citizens of Missouri, Mr. Mitchell, in connection with Charles G. Ramsey, established the Evening News. He is half-owner and chief editor of the journal.

Mr. Mitchell is a vigorous and graceful writer, and his journal has an extensive circulation. He was married the second time, in September, 1851, to Miss Mary Brent Talbot, granddaughter of Governor William Owsley, Kentucky, whom he politically supported when he first wielded the editorial pen.

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Edwards, Richard; Hopewell, M.; Ashley, William; Barry, James G.; Belt and Priest; Casey, John; Hall, W.; Labaum, Louis A.; Leduc, Mary Philip; Lisa, Manuel; O'Fallon, Benjamin; Piernas; Port Folio; Risley, W.; Stoddard, Amos; Williams, Henry W.; Yore, John E. Edwards's Great West and Her Commercial Metropolis, Embracing a General View of the West, and a Complete History of St. Louis, from the Landing of Ligueste, in 1764, to the Present Time; with Portraits and Biographies of Some of the Old Settlers, and Many of the Most Prominent Buisiness Men . St. Louis: Office of Edwards's Monthly, A Journal of Progress, 1860. [format: book], [genre: biography; history; letter; narrative]. Permission: St. Louis Mercantile Library
Persistent link to this document: http://lincoln.lib.niu.edu/file.php?file=edwards.html
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