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Edwards, Richard; Hopewell, M.; Ashley, William; Barry, James G.; Belt and Priest; Casey, John; Hall, W.; Labaum, Louis A.; Leduc, Mary Philip; Lisa, Manuel; O'Fallon, Benjamin; Piernas; Port Folio; Risley, W.; Stoddard, Amos; Williams, Henry W.; Yore, John E. Edwards's Great West and Her Commercial Metropolis, Embracing a General View of the West, and a Complete History of St. Louis, from the Landing of Ligueste, in 1764, to the Present Time; with Portraits and Biographies of Some of the Old Settlers, and Many of the Most Prominent Buisiness Men . St. Louis: Office of Edwards's Monthly, A Journal of Progress, 1860. [format: book], [genre: biography; history; letter; narrative]. Permission: St. Louis Mercantile Library
Persistent link to this document: http://lincoln.lib.niu.edu/file.php?file=edwards.html


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Colonel George Knapp.

GEORGE KNAPP was born September 25th, 1814, in Montgomery, Orange county, New York, and when but a child, his parents immigrated to St. Louis in December, 1819. At the early age of twelve he entered as an apprentice in the Republican office, then owned by Messrs. Charless & Paschall. In 1834 he reached the age of manhood proficient in his business, and, by his uprightness of character possessed of the esteem of a large circle of acquaintances. He still continued in the Republican, and two years afterward, August of 1836, he received from the proprietors of the journal an expressive mark of their esteem, by being presented with an interest in the book and jobbing department; and when Messrs. Charless & Paschall sold out in 1837, he became one of the proprietors with Messrs. Chambers & Harris.

It is natural for all men to feel a commendable pride when they see that their merit has become acknowledged, and their efforts have become rewarded by a well-deserved success, and George Knapp must have felt to the utmost the whispering praise of self-respect, when he found that at the early age of twenty-three he had become one of the proprietors of the most widely circulated and most influential journals in Missouri. When a small boy he entered the office in an humble capacity, and by the possession of sterling merit, and with a will that was determined upon success, he carved his way to fortune and position. He has been one of the proprietors of the Republican through all of its changes, from 1837 to the present.

George Knapp, in 1835, took a part in the volunteer military service; and when the news flew through the Union like wild-fire that the troops of the United States and those of Mexico were in conflict, he was among the first to volunteer his services in 1846, and served in Mexico as lieutenant in the St. Louis Grays of the St. Louis Legion. He afterward became captain and then colonel of the first battalion of the St. Louis Legion. As an officer he has always been most popular and respected.

Colonel Knapp, by his virtues and his connection with the Republican is well known in St. Louis, and there is none whose fair fame is more pure. He is zealous in advocating and assisting all public-spirited enterprises; and many of the public buildings which now ornament the city owe their erection much to the zealous part he took in personally soliciting subscriptions. He has also been a stanch friend to railroads, and has subscribed liberally to their stock. He has, by his industry and business qualifications, amassed a large fortune, but it has not chilled or destroyed the warm sympathies which make him so sensibly alive to the misfortunes of others. He is social, charitable, and public-spirited — alive to misfortune, and ready to relieve it; and quick to advocate any measure that will advance the interest of St. Louis or his adopted state.

Colonel George Knapp was married December 22d, 1840, to Miss Eleanor McCartan, daughter of Thomas McCartan, late of St. Louis. He is of a retiring disposition, more ready at all times to advance the merits of others than display his own; and among the one hundred and ninety thousand citizens of St. Louis, there is no one more popular and respected.

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Edwards, Richard; Hopewell, M.; Ashley, William; Barry, James G.; Belt and Priest; Casey, John; Hall, W.; Labaum, Louis A.; Leduc, Mary Philip; Lisa, Manuel; O'Fallon, Benjamin; Piernas; Port Folio; Risley, W.; Stoddard, Amos; Williams, Henry W.; Yore, John E. Edwards's Great West and Her Commercial Metropolis, Embracing a General View of the West, and a Complete History of St. Louis, from the Landing of Ligueste, in 1764, to the Present Time; with Portraits and Biographies of Some of the Old Settlers, and Many of the Most Prominent Buisiness Men . St. Louis: Office of Edwards's Monthly, A Journal of Progress, 1860. [format: book], [genre: biography; history; letter; narrative]. Permission: St. Louis Mercantile Library
Persistent link to this document: http://lincoln.lib.niu.edu/file.php?file=edwards.html
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