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Edwards, Richard; Hopewell, M.; Ashley, William; Barry, James G.; Belt and Priest; Casey, John; Hall, W.; Labaum, Louis A.; Leduc, Mary Philip; Lisa, Manuel; O'Fallon, Benjamin; Piernas; Port Folio; Risley, W.; Stoddard, Amos; Williams, Henry W.; Yore, John E. Edwards's Great West and Her Commercial Metropolis, Embracing a General View of the West, and a Complete History of St. Louis, from the Landing of Ligueste, in 1764, to the Present Time; with Portraits and Biographies of Some of the Old Settlers, and Many of the Most Prominent Buisiness Men . St. Louis: Office of Edwards's Monthly, A Journal of Progress, 1860. [format: book], [genre: biography; history; letter; narrative]. Permission: St. Louis Mercantile Library
Persistent link to this document: http://lincoln.lib.niu.edu/file.php?file=edwards.html


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Nathaniel Paschall, Editor of "The Republican."

IN writing the biography of Nathaniel Paschall it is but proper to premise that he is the oldest editor west of the Mississippi River, and from his long connection with the most influential journal in the west, is more extensively known than any citizen in Missouri.

He was born April 4th, 1804, at Knoxville, Tennessee. When he was but a child his father removed to St. Genevieve, where he remained but a limited time; for, having lost his wife in his new abode, he came to St. Louis. While in St. Genevieve, the little advantages afforded by the village school were enjoyed by the subject of this memoir, and when he came to St. Louis, though but twelve years of age, his business life commenced, and he became a worker in the busy hive of population.

At the time of his advent in St. Louis, the Republican, under another name, had been in existence some eight years, and being agreeable to his inclinations, which even at that early age tended to a love of knowledge, he was apprenticed to Mr. Joseph Charless, its proprietor, and commenced learning a pursuit for which a predisposition appears to have fitted him, and which he has pursued with so much success. His ambition, his tact, and natural talents quickly passed him through the various gradations of his art. He was not only ambitious to excel in the mechanical execution of his business, but having a thirst for literature, he read with avidity the standard authors of his language, and, studying their style, learned the art of composition, and long before he was free from his indenture, he could, and did write spicy editorials.

Two years after the retirement of Mr. Joseph Charless from the printing business, his son, Edward Charless, assumed the proprietorship, and under his charge the paper took the name which it now bears. The paper then underwent some changes in its proprietorship, all of which time Mr. Paschall remained connected with it, until, in 1827, the firm became Charless & Paschall, and while in this connection the little weekly sheet was increased several times in size, as the wants of the community required, and first came to have a tri-weekly and then a daily existence. From his first advent as a writer he became devoted to the interests of his adopted state and city, and the almost omnipotent influence of the Republican, from his first connection with it, was lent to advance and advocate all measures that were likely to forward the progress of St. Louis and subserve the interest of Missouri. He became one of the proprietors of the Republican in 1827, and in 1837 he and Mr. Charless disposed of the Republican to Messrs. Chambers, Harris, and Knapp.

When Mr. Paschall retired from the Republican he had amassed an ample competency, but, meeting with some pecuniary reverses, which rendered it necessary for him again to take up the pen, which before had been the means that raised him to wealth and position, he then commenced,

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in connection with Charles G. Ramsay, the publication of a journal styled the New Era, which was received with great favor by the people, and for some time exercised an important influence over the current events of the day. Being elected clerk of the Court of Common Pleas, he gave up, to some extent, the editorial chair, to fulfil the duties of his new appointment. About this time he was invited to become associate editor of the Republican, then under the charge of Colonel Chambers and George Knapp, and again became connected with the journal, which he had raised to importance and influence during his proprietorship. As associate-editor he continued in connection with the Republican until the death of Colonel Chambers; and when the family of the lamented deceased disposed of his interest, Mr. Paschall again became one of the proprietors of the journal, and the firm of George Knapp & Co. came into existence.

In politics Mr. Paschall has ever been allied with the old Whig party, and during its existence was its most efficient champion in advocating and defending its principles, and the Republican was the organ of the party. When the Whig party died, Mr. Paschall, being identified with no other, in the presidential contest of 1856 advocated the election of Buchanan, as being the least objectionable of the candidates, without committing himself to the support of the party to which he belonged. Since the old Whig party, with which he was so long identified, is no more in existence, he has become pledged to no other, and reserves to himself the independence and privilege of supporting what men and measures will be most subservient to the interests of the state and country.

There are few men now living more intimately acquainted with the political history of the western country than Mr. Paschall, and, becoming a resident of Missouri while it was a territory, he has efficiently aided her in her colossal progress.

In his friendship Mr. Paschall is warm and constant, and those who possess it regard it as an invaluable boon. His name adds weight with whatever it is associated, and is familiar to almost every hearthstone in Missouri.

In 1832, Mr. Paschall was married to Mrs. Martha E. Edgar, and has a large family of children. He may be said to have spent a long life amid the wearing labors and mental excitement incident to editorial life. As a writer he is remarkable for his perspicuity, and his language possesses a massiveness which is overwhelming in argument. Though possessing sufficient acrimony as a politician to make him dreaded by his opponents, he never forgets the pride of self-respect, which prevents him from indulging in the low, brawling slang of Billingsgate abuse. He has exercised the duties of an editor for nearly forty years in St. Louis, and has ever been an advocate of every measure, and gave them the powerful support of his columns, which had for their aim the benefit of the city or state.

"Beneath the rule of men entirely great,
The pen is mightier than the sword —
The arch-enchanter's wand" —

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Edwards, Richard; Hopewell, M.; Ashley, William; Barry, James G.; Belt and Priest; Casey, John; Hall, W.; Labaum, Louis A.; Leduc, Mary Philip; Lisa, Manuel; O'Fallon, Benjamin; Piernas; Port Folio; Risley, W.; Stoddard, Amos; Williams, Henry W.; Yore, John E. Edwards's Great West and Her Commercial Metropolis, Embracing a General View of the West, and a Complete History of St. Louis, from the Landing of Ligueste, in 1764, to the Present Time; with Portraits and Biographies of Some of the Old Settlers, and Many of the Most Prominent Buisiness Men . St. Louis: Office of Edwards's Monthly, A Journal of Progress, 1860. [format: book], [genre: biography; history; letter; narrative]. Permission: St. Louis Mercantile Library
Persistent link to this document: http://lincoln.lib.niu.edu/file.php?file=edwards.html
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