NIU Libraries Digitization Projects
Lincoln/Net Prairie Fire Illinois During the Civil War Illinois During the Gilded Age Mark Twain's Mississippi Back to Digitization Projects Contact Us
BACK

Edwards, Richard; Hopewell, M.; Ashley, William; Barry, James G.; Belt and Priest; Casey, John; Hall, W.; Labaum, Louis A.; Leduc, Mary Philip; Lisa, Manuel; O'Fallon, Benjamin; Piernas; Port Folio; Risley, W.; Stoddard, Amos; Williams, Henry W.; Yore, John E. Edwards's Great West and Her Commercial Metropolis, Embracing a General View of the West, and a Complete History of St. Louis, from the Landing of Ligueste, in 1764, to the Present Time; with Portraits and Biographies of Some of the Old Settlers, and Many of the Most Prominent Buisiness Men . St. Louis: Office of Edwards's Monthly, A Journal of Progress, 1860. [format: book], [genre: biography; history; letter; narrative]. Permission: St. Louis Mercantile Library
Persistent link to this document: http://lincoln.lib.niu.edu/file.php?file=edwards.html


Next section

The Publications.

THERE are few cities in the Union, with the same population, which can boast of journals of a higher order than the city of St. Louis. They are all ably edited, and none of them but have a respectable circulation. We will give a list of them all, with the names of the respective editors. There will be a slight historical sketch of the most prominent, and accompanying the whole will be found the photographs and biographies of those gentlemen who most effectually represent the St. Louis press. We would gladly have inserted some other photographs and biographies of the talented gentlemen who represent the other journals, but this work has swelled into a magnitude little contemplated at its commencement.

The people of St. Louis are emphatically a reading people, and are sensibly aware of the colossal influence over all business pursuits which a generous support of newspapers always produces; and it is one of the most infallible signs of the business extent and success in St. Louis to see her journals thus handsomely supported.

The Missouri Republican.

The Missouri Republican is the oldest newspaper west of the Mississippi Valley, and, with but two exceptions, is the largest sheet in the Union. It was established in July, 1808, in a small room in a one-story building, under the name of the Missouri Gazette, and the man who set up the type for the first issue is still living in the state of Indiana, by the name of Hincle. He has been recently in St. Louis, and called to see the establishment of the journal that many years ago was no larger in dimensions than a quarto page. The paper has undergone many changes since that time. The little one-story house, in which first it had its being, has long since disappeared, and now a colossal six-story building is scarcely sufficient to afford room for the requirements of the journal.

The Republican, in the various gradations of its advance, is as sure an index of the growth of St. Louis as is a mathematical calculation. Its little small columns first suited the small village, and as year by year the town grew, it swelled in its dimensions; and when St. Louis became the metropolis of the West, it had outstripped in size and circulation every other journal west of the Alleghany Mountains. It has ever been devoted to the welfare of the city, and St. Louis owes much of its present important position to the influence of its columns.

The Missouri Republican is now owned by Messrs. George Knapp, Nathaniel Paschall, and John Knapp. It has a daily circulation the

-- 164 --

largest in the city, a tri-weekly, and weekly one, also two California editions. There are one hundred and seventy-six hands employed in its office, and the weekly expenses are $5,000. Nathaniel Paschall is its chief editor, assisted by an efficient corps of talented gentlemen.

The Missouri Democrat.

The Missouri Democrat was established in 1852 by William McKee and William Hill, under propitious auspices. All the patronage which had been bestowed upon the Sentinel and Union, two popular journals, was turned upon the new enterprise; for both of these papers were discontinued at the commencement of the Democrat; so that it could enter upon its career with the fairest prospects.

The wants of the community required the establishment of a journal of the political tenets advocated by the Democrat, for since the establishment of the "Barnburner" some years previously by Mr. McKee, in 1848, freesoilism had become very popular, and the new journal came into being with hosts of friends. In consequence of feeble health, Mr. Hill sold out his interest to Mr. George M. Fishback, a son of Judge Fishback, and a humorous and popular writer. He is the commercial editor of the paper, and is most efficient in that department.

Day by day the Democrat has been gathering strength and popularity, and now, in the eighth year of its existence, ranks second to no other paper in the great Mississippi Valley.

The Daily Evening News and Intelligencer.

The Daily Evening News, jointly owned by Charles G. Ramsey and Abraham S. Mitchell, was established in 1852, and started with the small circulation of five hundred copies. It was ably edited and soon became regarded with favor by the community. Its circulation has continually increased until it has reached 4,000 dailies, 7,000 weeklies, and 500 triweeklies, and the weekly expenses of the establishment are nearly $1,000 Mr. Abraham S. Mitchell, editor, Mr. Daniel N. Grisson, associate-editor. There are also able reporters connected with the journal.

The Evening Bulletin.

This already popular journal was established in 1859 by Messrs. Peckam & Bittenger, who, in a few months afterward, disposed of it to Mr. Eugene Lougmaier, a young gentleman of fine attainments, who has commenced his editorial career with much promise.

Mr. Longmaier is particularly suited to the atmosphere of St. Louis, for he was born in the Mound City — his parents also, and his grandparents; and his great-grandmother, Madame Elizabeth Ortes, is the oldest inhabitant of the place. His journal is decidedly partisan, and embraces the Democratic creed. It has a daily and weekly issue.

The St. Louis Daily Express.

The St. Louis Daily Express was established in 1858, by Wm. Cuddy, a gentleman for many years practically connected with journalism. Its first issue was in a miniature form, which continued for some months,

-- 165 --

until its increasing patronage justified its increasing size. It is now a large and respectable sheet, and progressing in influence and circulation. It is published also weekly.

The Home Press.

This is the name of a highly promising journal, born at the commencement of the year 1800, and under the charge of R. V. Kennedy, T. M. Halpin, and James Peckam. It is truly a family and literary paper, and the only one that can lay claim to that appellation west of the Mississippi.

The St. Louis Daily Herald.

This popular sheet was established in December, 1852. It is at present owned and ably edited by Mr. James L. Faucett, under whose efficient management it has reached an extensive circulation. It has a daily circulation, and likewise an extensive weekly one.

There are also in the city of St. Louis several other daily and weekly newspapers published in the English language — the St. Louis Observer, published weekly by A. F. Cox, and edited by the Rev. Milton Bird; the St. Louis Presbyterian, published weekly by Messrs. Keith & Woods, and edited by the Rev. James H. Page; the St. Louis Christian Advocate, a weekly sheet, published by the Methodist Conference, and edited by the Rev. D. R. M'Anally; the Western Watchman, published weekly, and edited by the Rev. William Cromwell; the Central Christian Advocate, a weekly sheet, edited by the Rev. Joseph Brooks; and the Western Banner, published weekly, and edited by Mr. B. D. Killian.

All of these journals are edited with ability, have a respectable circulation, and exercise an important influence in the various circles of society.

RICHARD EDWARDS' PUBLICATIONS.

The People's Press. — A daily journal, independent in politics and religion; its aim, the people's good.

The People's Weekly Press. — An Excelsior family newspaper.

Edwards' Monthly. — A journal of western progress, an organ of the progression in art, literature, science, agriculture, banking, internal improvements, etc., etc.

Edwards' Western Almanac — A correct and standard almanac for the million, containing also sprinklings in every department of knowledge — a yearly visitor which every family looks for with pleasure.

GERMAN NEWSPAPERS.

As the Germans form at least one-half of our Great Metropolis, it may well be supposed that their interest is fully represented by a number of journals in their native language. Wherever they are found the Germans are characterized by the possession of those elements of character which always contribute to their worldly prosperity. They are not as fast in their ideas as Young America, but they have more solidity of character, and are more constant and untiring in their pursuits, and are generally

-- 166 --

more sure of gaining the race in life and arriving at the goal of fortune They resemble the tortoise in the fable — slow, constant, and successful.

Anzeiger des Westens — (Henry Boernstein proprietor.)

This popular and influential journal was established October 20th, 1835. It is the oldest German newspaper in the city of St. Louis, but had to content itself with a small issue of only 500 copies the first year of its existence. The energy and talent of Henry Boernstein, to whom it owes its creation, soon made its merit apparent, and its circulation rapidly increased. Now it has a daily issue of 6,219, and a weekly one of 5,747. Editors, Henry Boernstein and Charles L. Bernays.

From the same office also issue two Sunday papers, the Saloon, established in 1854, and the Westliche Blaetter in 1859. They have conjointly a circulation of 1,500 copies. All of the papers are conducted in a manner which evinces a knowledge of the wants of the people, tact, and ability.

St. Louis Daily Chronicle.

This ably edited paper is owned by Mr. Francis Saler and Mr. Adelbert Loehr. It has not been in existence many years, but has already a large circulation and a widespread influence. The St. Louis Weekly Chronicle, under the charge of the same proprietor and editor, is in increasing demand and gotten up in an attractive form.

Der Herald des Glaubens.

Der Herald des Glaubens is a Catholic Sunday journal, under the charge of Mr. Anthony Bockling. It has many friends, and is rapidly increasing its circulation.

Wesliche Post.

Wesliche Post is published daily and weekly. It is received with much favor by the public, and its columns bear ample testimony that they are under charge of talented and experienced editors. They are journals of intrinsic value, and have an extensive and growing circulation. Messrs. Daenzer & Wenzell, editors and proprietors. The Mississippi Blaetter, a popular Sunday paper, is issued by the same gentlemen.

Mississippi Handel's Zeitung.

This is the only German paper west of New York that may be called a thorough commercial journal. It was established by Mr. Robert Widman in 1857. It commenced in the very midst of great pecuniary pressure, but has met with the most sanguine success. It has doubled its size and has a large circulation. It is a weekly sheet and under the editorial charge of Robert Widman, Dr. Koch, and Joseph Bauer.

Revue de l'Quest — (a French newspaper, J. Wolf proprietor).

This ably edited journal is well known amid the educated portion of the French inhabitants of the city, and likewise among those American families, of whom there is a great number, that are familiar with the French language. It was established in 1854, and has now a circulation of 2,500. It is a weekly sheet, and Mr. Louis Cortambert, a gentleman of fine literary attainments, is its accomplished editor.

-- 167 --

Next section


Edwards, Richard; Hopewell, M.; Ashley, William; Barry, James G.; Belt and Priest; Casey, John; Hall, W.; Labaum, Louis A.; Leduc, Mary Philip; Lisa, Manuel; O'Fallon, Benjamin; Piernas; Port Folio; Risley, W.; Stoddard, Amos; Williams, Henry W.; Yore, John E. Edwards's Great West and Her Commercial Metropolis, Embracing a General View of the West, and a Complete History of St. Louis, from the Landing of Ligueste, in 1764, to the Present Time; with Portraits and Biographies of Some of the Old Settlers, and Many of the Most Prominent Buisiness Men . St. Louis: Office of Edwards's Monthly, A Journal of Progress, 1860. [format: book], [genre: biography; history; letter; narrative]. Permission: St. Louis Mercantile Library
Persistent link to this document: http://lincoln.lib.niu.edu/file.php?file=edwards.html
Powered by PhiloLogic