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Edwards, Richard; Hopewell, M.; Ashley, William; Barry, James G.; Belt and Priest; Casey, John; Hall, W.; Labaum, Louis A.; Leduc, Mary Philip; Lisa, Manuel; O'Fallon, Benjamin; Piernas; Port Folio; Risley, W.; Stoddard, Amos; Williams, Henry W.; Yore, John E. Edwards's Great West and Her Commercial Metropolis, Embracing a General View of the West, and a Complete History of St. Louis, from the Landing of Ligueste, in 1764, to the Present Time; with Portraits and Biographies of Some of the Old Settlers, and Many of the Most Prominent Buisiness Men . St. Louis: Office of Edwards's Monthly, A Journal of Progress, 1860. [format: book], [genre: biography; history; letter; narrative]. Permission: St. Louis Mercantile Library
Persistent link to this document: http://lincoln.lib.niu.edu/file.php?file=edwards.html


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Colonel Lewis V. Bogy.

COLONEL Louis V. BOGY is emphatically a Western man. His father, Joseph Bogy, who was of Scotch descent, was a native of Kaskaskia, Illinois; and his mother's family, of the name of Vital, were among the earliest settlers in Missouri; the mother, Mary Vital, is still living at an advanced age. Joseph Bogy filled the responsible position of private secretary to Governor Morales, while the states of Louisiana and Missouri were under the Spanish domination; when Missouri became a territory, he became a member of the territorial council; when she was received into the national confederacy, he was elected to the legislature; and for many years he was cashier of the old Bank of Missouri at St. Genevieve. He had a family of seven children, of whom Lewis V. Bogy, the subject of this memoir, was the fourth.

Lewis V. Bogy was born April 9th, 1813, in St. Genevieve county, Missouri, and learned the rudiments of the English language under a Swiss instructor, who kept the little school of the place. Much of his time was spent in working on the farm, until he was attacked by a malady which rendered him unfit to work for two years. While he was powerless and suffering from a "white swelling," he carefully cultivated his mind, and read all of the books he could obtain; by this means he garnered a variety of desultory information, and contracted a passion for information which probably influenced his after destiny. In 1830, he took the situation of clerk in a store at a salary of $200 per annum, half of which he had, according to contract, to take out in trade. However, by the frugality of his habits, he managed to purchase some books from his income, and read by snatches of time some of the elementary books of law, and also resolutely undertook the study of the Latin language under the guidance of Father Condamine, a Catholic priest and accomplished scholar. In January, 1832, he went from St. Genevieve to Kaskaskia, and read law in the office of Judge Pope, till May of that year. He volunteered for the Black Hawk war, was engaged in two desperate battles with the Indians, and was present at the taking of Black Hawk.

After the conclusion of the Indian campaign, Lewis V. Bogy returned to Kaskaskia, where he continued reading law till 1833, when he determined to go a short time to the distinguished University of Transylvania at Lexington, Kentucky, where the facility of getting books was so much greater than at Kaskaskia, He received a flattering letter of introduction from Judge Pope to Judge Mays at Lexington, and commenced reading under that eminent jurist. In the spring of 1834, he commenced teaching a country school, so as to liquidate the debt he contracted with Judge Mays, while studying in the winter, and also to gather resources to complete his course. With a will that never yields to opposing obstacles, he did complete his course, and returned to Missouri in the spring of 1835, settled in the city of St. Louis, and commenced the practice of his profession. From the very first Colonel Bogy was successful as a

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lawyer, and the first offering which he received from his clients he sent to Judge Mays, to discharge a debt due for instruction, and also interest on the amount. The worthy judge, however, returned the interest with a complimentary letter.

Colonel Bogy, by the popularity of his manners, and by the rare success which crowned his efforts, soon acquired an extensive and lucrative practice, and was nominated for the legislature and elected, in 1840. He also served in that respectable body in 1854-5, and made an effective speech on the passage of the railroad law, which Governor Price vetoed, but which was passed by the house over the veto. In 1847, he purchased an interest in Pilot Knob, the most distinguished iron deposit in Missouri, but owing to its great distance, forty-seven miles from the Mississippi, many owning shares in the corporation became discouraged, and disposed of their interest, which Colonel Bogy immediately bought up, having faith in the ultimate value of the country. The Iron Mountain Railroad, in which the Pilot Knob Iron Company invested $50,000 in stock, has now reached Pilot Knob, and the works are now carried on in full operation, and the business is of a most profitable nature. Colonel Bogy now owns one half of the stock of the company, and was its president for nine years.

Pilot Knob, the present terminus of the Iron Mountain Railroad, is one of the most romantic spots in the world. The village is situated at the base of the mountain, and lands which a few years ago could scarcely be given away, now are in great demand, and day by day are increasing in value. The Pilot Knob Company, over which Colonel Bogy so long presided, have made the beautiful little village, which is now so rapidly growing into importance.

For many years Colonel Bogy has retired from the legal profession, and devoted himself to developing the resources of that portion of the iron country in which he is so largely interested. He married a daughter of General Bernard Pratt, and has filled with honor the most important positions. He was first President of the Exchange Bank of this city; has been a Commissioner of Public Schools, and taken an active part in promoting their welfare; and in 1852, was the chosen candidate of the democratic party, and took the field against the late Honorable Thomas H. Benton, and is now the President of the Iron Mountain Railroad.

Colonel Bogy is a child of Missouri, and has been nursed amidst her institutions. He has, through a long course of successful life, shown himself worthy of all honor, and, still in the meridian of his existence, the state in which he first drew his breath can hope all things from his talents, patriotism, and integrity.

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Edwards, Richard; Hopewell, M.; Ashley, William; Barry, James G.; Belt and Priest; Casey, John; Hall, W.; Labaum, Louis A.; Leduc, Mary Philip; Lisa, Manuel; O'Fallon, Benjamin; Piernas; Port Folio; Risley, W.; Stoddard, Amos; Williams, Henry W.; Yore, John E. Edwards's Great West and Her Commercial Metropolis, Embracing a General View of the West, and a Complete History of St. Louis, from the Landing of Ligueste, in 1764, to the Present Time; with Portraits and Biographies of Some of the Old Settlers, and Many of the Most Prominent Buisiness Men . St. Louis: Office of Edwards's Monthly, A Journal of Progress, 1860. [format: book], [genre: biography; history; letter; narrative]. Permission: St. Louis Mercantile Library
Persistent link to this document: http://lincoln.lib.niu.edu/file.php?file=edwards.html
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