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Edwards, Richard; Hopewell, M.; Ashley, William; Barry, James G.; Belt and Priest; Casey, John; Hall, W.; Labaum, Louis A.; Leduc, Mary Philip; Lisa, Manuel; O'Fallon, Benjamin; Piernas; Port Folio; Risley, W.; Stoddard, Amos; Williams, Henry W.; Yore, John E. Edwards's Great West and Her Commercial Metropolis, Embracing a General View of the West, and a Complete History of St. Louis, from the Landing of Ligueste, in 1764, to the Present Time; with Portraits and Biographies of Some of the Old Settlers, and Many of the Most Prominent Buisiness Men . St. Louis: Office of Edwards's Monthly, A Journal of Progress, 1860. [format: book], [genre: biography; history; letter; narrative]. Permission: St. Louis Mercantile Library
Persistent link to this document: http://lincoln.lib.niu.edu/file.php?file=edwards.html


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Rev. John Hogan, Postmaster of St. Louis.

JOHN HOGAN was born January 2d, 1805, in Mallow, county of Cork, Ireland. His parents, Thomas and Mary Hogan, without being wealthy, were in comfortable circumstances by their own industry, the father pursuing the avocation of a baker, and doing an extensive business. He had some relatives residing in the United States, and, from the favorable statements he received from them, and at their earnest solicitation, he sailed, in 1817, for America, and, on landing at Norfolk, immediately proceeded from thence to Baltimore, where his friends resided. The hopes of Mr. Hogan, from continual communications, had been highly elevated. He had formed extravagant expectations of the country across the Atlantic. He gave up his home, abandoned business, parted with friends, and sundered a thousand ties which naturally cluster around a person during years of residence in a place. Thus, when he looked upon the country which was to be the future home of his family, he was sadly disappointed in his expectations; and then a deep melancholy seized upon him, and he died from grief.

The situation of the family at this juncture was a distressing one — they were deprived of their natural protector and left in destitute circumstances. It was necessary to make some provision for the children, and John, who was the eldest, was apprenticed to a shoemaker, by the name of James Hance, father of the present Seth C. Hance, a well-known and extensive druggist in the city of Baltimore.

The elements which form the leading principles in the character of an individual, will make an effort to develop themselves under all circumstances; and John Hogan's anxiety for knowledge was evinced by the means to which he resorted to attain it. With some little assistance from his fellow workmen, he learned his letters, and then to read, from copies of the Federal Gazette, a popular journal at that time, and printed in large type. He also attended regularly the Sunday-schools, where he garnered both mental and moral instruction, and feeling the force of religious influences, became a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church at sixteen years of age.

After completing his term of indenture, he commenced preaching the gospel, and was sent by the Conference of his church, as an itinerant preacher, to the West. He joined the Illinois Conference, and traveled much through that state and Indiana. After spending some time in this preaching pilgrimage, he applied to the Conference for a location, and subsequently united himself in wedlock to Miss Mary M. West, of St. Clair county, Illinois. His application was finally granted, and Mr.

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Hogan opened a store at Edwardsville, Illinois. He remained in Edwardsville until 1833, and then located himself at Alton, and, whilst there, was elected to the Illinois legislature. In 1837, he succumbed, as most others did, to the financial revulsion of that period, having endorsed largely.

Whilst a citizen of Illinois Mr. Hogan largely enjoyed the confidence of the community, and filled, very efficiently, several important offices. He was commissioner of public works for two years, and was appointed, in 1841, by General Harrison, register of the land office in Dixon, of that state. These appointments were very satisfactory to the people, and he filled them in the most creditable manner.

In 1845, Mr. Hogan lost his wife, and he determined to remove from the scenes which would continually remind him of his domestic affliction, and went to St. Louis the same year, and became salesman in the large grocery establishment of Edward J. Gay & Co. He continued in this house for several years, first as salesman, and then as partner. He then retired from commercial pursuits, and, in 1850, became agent for the Missouri State Mutual Insurance Company, where he continued five years; and it was during that period a series of articles appeared in the Missouri Republican, styled, "Thoughts on St. Louis," which were read with avidity by the community, and excited a general interest. The author who had displayed in such an attractive manner the commercial and manufacturing business of the city, could not remain incognito, and the merchants of the city presented Mr. Hogan with a beautiful service of silver, as a testimonial of their appreciation of his literary efforts, which had given the public an insight into the manufacturing and commercial world of St. Louis. In 1858, he was appointed postmaster of St. Louis, under the administration of Mr. Buchanan, which office he still holds.

Mr. Hogan has filled many positions of trust in St. Louis. He was president of the Dollar Saving Institution, now Exchange Bank, and was then a director; and, from the high order of his business capacities, he could have been connected with many corporations, but his time, absorbed by other pursuits, forbade too many connections of this kind. As a politician, he is well known as an able champion of the Democratic party, firm and fearless in the expression of his principles, but never indulging in the wholesale vituperation which ever marks the character of the blustering demagogue. As an author, he is well and favorably known, and has won "golden opinions," not only from the, work which we have before mentioned — "Thoughts on the City of St. Louis" — but also from being the author of the "History of Methodism in the West," and of a little pamphlet, titled "The Resources of Missouri." His style is terse, clear, and spirited, and characterized with an originality that is refreshing, in these days of literary productions — "Nothing new under the sun."

Mr. Hogan was married the second time, in 1847, to Miss Harriett Gamier, daughter of Joseph V. Gamier, of St. Louis. He has always been connected with the Methodist persuasion, and is now a trustee and member of the Methodist Episcopal Centenary Church of this city.

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Edwards, Richard; Hopewell, M.; Ashley, William; Barry, James G.; Belt and Priest; Casey, John; Hall, W.; Labaum, Louis A.; Leduc, Mary Philip; Lisa, Manuel; O'Fallon, Benjamin; Piernas; Port Folio; Risley, W.; Stoddard, Amos; Williams, Henry W.; Yore, John E. Edwards's Great West and Her Commercial Metropolis, Embracing a General View of the West, and a Complete History of St. Louis, from the Landing of Ligueste, in 1764, to the Present Time; with Portraits and Biographies of Some of the Old Settlers, and Many of the Most Prominent Buisiness Men . St. Louis: Office of Edwards's Monthly, A Journal of Progress, 1860. [format: book], [genre: biography; history; letter; narrative]. Permission: St. Louis Mercantile Library
Persistent link to this document: http://lincoln.lib.niu.edu/file.php?file=edwards.html
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