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Edwards, Richard; Hopewell, M.; Ashley, William; Barry, James G.; Belt and Priest; Casey, John; Hall, W.; Labaum, Louis A.; Leduc, Mary Philip; Lisa, Manuel; O'Fallon, Benjamin; Piernas; Port Folio; Risley, W.; Stoddard, Amos; Williams, Henry W.; Yore, John E. Edwards's Great West and Her Commercial Metropolis, Embracing a General View of the West, and a Complete History of St. Louis, from the Landing of Ligueste, in 1764, to the Present Time; with Portraits and Biographies of Some of the Old Settlers, and Many of the Most Prominent Buisiness Men . St. Louis: Office of Edwards's Monthly, A Journal of Progress, 1860. [format: book], [genre: biography; history; letter; narrative]. Permission: St. Louis Mercantile Library
Persistent link to this document: http://lincoln.lib.niu.edu/file.php?file=edwards.html


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John Sappington.

JOHN SAPPINGTON was born May 28, 1790, in Madison county, Ky. His parents were of a respectable family in the state of Maryland, and his father, after whom he was named, when he became a resident of Kentucky, served in its legislative halls as senator, at the same period that Henry Clay was serving as a member. Mr. Sappington had a large family of eighteen children, and moved to Missouri in 1806.

Young John Sappington was early put to work on the farm of his father, and was regularly brought up to the business of a farmer. When he came to St. Louis with his father, the now great city contained but a few hundred inhabitants, and were made up of such a low mixture of French, Indians, and negroes; of ruffians, robbers, swearers, and swindlers; that the forty families which had come together from Kentucky determined to purchase land some distance from the town, rather than mingle in such rascally society, although they could have purchased most of the land on which St. Louis now stands for one gallon of whiskey per acre. [4]

The place on which Mr. Sappington now resides, consisting of six hundred and forty acres, was purchased at that time for the usual current price, one gallon of whiskey per acre. This was the golden epoch in the history of whiskey. It represented the currency of the time, and was known and esteemed in every domicile.

Young John Sappington was delighted with his new abode. The rich soil had lain fallow probably for hundreds of centuries, and the yield in all kinds of grain was almost fabulous. In 1812 when the military enthusiasm spread abroad in the land, on account of the rupture between this country and Great Britain, he volunteered under Colonel Nathan Boone, son of Daniel Boone, the Kentucky pioneer, and served under Governor Howard; and was the first one of the fifteen hundred horsemen, to plunge into the Mississippi and lead the way across to Illinois, where they were going to join Governor Edwards. John Sappington was held in high estimation by Governor Howard, and he was appointed one of the trusty scouts, who were sent in advance of the army to detect ambush, and apprise of danger.

Mr. Sappington was married January 8, 1815, to Miss Sarah Wells, daughter of John Wells, and has had eleven children. He has lived upon the farm where he now resides since 1806, to which he has added six hundred and forty acres, and so perfected is its condition, and so high its state of cultivation, that he was awarded a diploma, which was given as the premium at the last fair in St. Louis for "The Model Farm." He takes a great interest in all things pertaining to agriculture, and joined with the Hon. J. R. Barrett and others, in organizing the Agricultural and Mechanical Association, which is now so well-known throughout the Union. He has also served in the legislative council of Missouri for three periods, and was always popular with his constituents. He is still hale and vigorous, and early hardships appear not to have affected his iron constitution.

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Edwards, Richard; Hopewell, M.; Ashley, William; Barry, James G.; Belt and Priest; Casey, John; Hall, W.; Labaum, Louis A.; Leduc, Mary Philip; Lisa, Manuel; O'Fallon, Benjamin; Piernas; Port Folio; Risley, W.; Stoddard, Amos; Williams, Henry W.; Yore, John E. Edwards's Great West and Her Commercial Metropolis, Embracing a General View of the West, and a Complete History of St. Louis, from the Landing of Ligueste, in 1764, to the Present Time; with Portraits and Biographies of Some of the Old Settlers, and Many of the Most Prominent Buisiness Men . St. Louis: Office of Edwards's Monthly, A Journal of Progress, 1860. [format: book], [genre: biography; history; letter; narrative]. Permission: St. Louis Mercantile Library
Persistent link to this document: http://lincoln.lib.niu.edu/file.php?file=edwards.html
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