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Edwards, Richard; Hopewell, M.; Ashley, William; Barry, James G.; Belt and Priest; Casey, John; Hall, W.; Labaum, Louis A.; Leduc, Mary Philip; Lisa, Manuel; O'Fallon, Benjamin; Piernas; Port Folio; Risley, W.; Stoddard, Amos; Williams, Henry W.; Yore, John E. Edwards's Great West and Her Commercial Metropolis, Embracing a General View of the West, and a Complete History of St. Louis, from the Landing of Ligueste, in 1764, to the Present Time; with Portraits and Biographies of Some of the Old Settlers, and Many of the Most Prominent Buisiness Men . St. Louis: Office of Edwards's Monthly, A Journal of Progress, 1860. [format: book], [genre: biography; history; letter; narrative]. Permission: St. Louis Mercantile Library
Persistent link to this document: http://lincoln.lib.niu.edu/file.php?file=edwards.html


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Dr. M. L. Linton.

THIS eminent physician was born in Nelson county, Kentucky, April 12th, 1808. His father was a respectable fanner, who had immigrated to Kentucky from Loudon county, Virginia. Young Linton was raised as the sons of industrious farmers are usually raised in Virginia and Kentucky, by going to school and occasionally working upon the farm; but the schools in which it was his fortune to become the inmate were of a very inferior quality. However, there was a grammar-school established in his neighborhood, to which he went for a few weeks, and learned effectually the principles of the English language.

A little circumstance will often give a direction to the life of an individual, and turn the thoughts into channels for which they have a natural affinity, and from which they never after depart. A physician dwelt in the house of young Linton's father, and the young boy, anxious to glean knowledge from every source, would read the medical books thus accidentally thrown in his way, and at once evinced a strong inclination to become master of their contents. This influenced him in the choice of his profession, and, on arriving at the age of manhood, he went to Springfield, and studied medicine under the instruction of Dr. J. H. Polin. With him he remained two years, with great benefit, and possessing rare advantages; for Dr. Polin was at once biased in his favor, and not only carefully gave him the instruction necessary for his profession, but, being an accomplished scholar, instructed him in the Latin and Greek languages, and other branches which had before been neglected, and which are so essential to the education of the physician and the gentleman. After leaving Dr. Polin, he graduated at Transylvania College, Lexington, and commenced practice in Hancock county, where he remained for two years, and then went to Springfield, where he entered into partnership with his former friend and instructor, Dr. Polin. In 1839 Dr. Linton went to Europe for the purpose of accomplishing himself still more in his profession, by visiting the various hospitals and institutions with which that country abounds. He passed one year abroad; a portion of the time was agreeably spent in the company of Dr. Charles A. Pope, whom he fortunately encountered in Paris.

On Dr. Linton's return to the United States, he was invited to take a professor's chair in the medical department of the St. Louis University, which he still occupies.

Dr. Linton married Miss Anna Rachel Booker, daughter of Judge Booker of Kentucky. He has never strayed from the orbit of his profession, and has been untiring in his devotion to the pursuit he has chosen. He established the St. Louis Medical Journal in 1843, which has always been edited with great ability, and has the entire confidence of the profession. Dr. McPheeters is associated with him in the editorial charge of the journal. Dr. Linton has contributed many ably-written treatises on medical subjects, and is the author of a volume called the "Outlines of Pathology," which, by its simple and lucid arrangement, was not only suitable as a text-book for the student, but for general instruction. He has the confidence of the public, a most extensive practice, and is the president of the Medical Society of St. Louis.

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Edwards, Richard; Hopewell, M.; Ashley, William; Barry, James G.; Belt and Priest; Casey, John; Hall, W.; Labaum, Louis A.; Leduc, Mary Philip; Lisa, Manuel; O'Fallon, Benjamin; Piernas; Port Folio; Risley, W.; Stoddard, Amos; Williams, Henry W.; Yore, John E. Edwards's Great West and Her Commercial Metropolis, Embracing a General View of the West, and a Complete History of St. Louis, from the Landing of Ligueste, in 1764, to the Present Time; with Portraits and Biographies of Some of the Old Settlers, and Many of the Most Prominent Buisiness Men . St. Louis: Office of Edwards's Monthly, A Journal of Progress, 1860. [format: book], [genre: biography; history; letter; narrative]. Permission: St. Louis Mercantile Library
Persistent link to this document: http://lincoln.lib.niu.edu/file.php?file=edwards.html
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