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Edwards, Richard; Hopewell, M.; Ashley, William; Barry, James G.; Belt and Priest; Casey, John; Hall, W.; Labaum, Louis A.; Leduc, Mary Philip; Lisa, Manuel; O'Fallon, Benjamin; Piernas; Port Folio; Risley, W.; Stoddard, Amos; Williams, Henry W.; Yore, John E. Edwards's Great West and Her Commercial Metropolis, Embracing a General View of the West, and a Complete History of St. Louis, from the Landing of Ligueste, in 1764, to the Present Time; with Portraits and Biographies of Some of the Old Settlers, and Many of the Most Prominent Buisiness Men . St. Louis: Office of Edwards's Monthly, A Journal of Progress, 1860. [format: book], [genre: biography; history; letter; narrative]. Permission: St. Louis Mercantile Library
Persistent link to this document: http://lincoln.lib.niu.edu/file.php?file=edwards.html


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Peter G. Camden.

THE parents of Peter G. Camden occupied a most respectable position in life, and were residents of Amherst county, Virginia, where the subject of this memoir was born, May 23d, 1801. His father, William Camden, and his mother both died in his infancy, and he was adopted by his uncle and aunt.

Peter G. Camden, after going through the usual routine of other schools, at the age of twenty was sent to Washington College, Virginia, to complete his course of study. After leaving college, he entered on the study of the law, and became a pupil under the instruction of Chancellor Taylor, an eminent jurist of Cumberland county, in the "Old Dominion." His legal education being completed, with all the ardor of the youthful aspirant, he came to the state of Missouri in 1827. At this time, the trade carried on between St. Louis and Santa Fé was becoming well established, and the fame of the beautiful country of New Mexico was luring many enterprising spirits within its borders.

So well taken was Mr. Camden with the reputation of the country, that he made every preparation for the journey, when a spell of sickness attacked him at Old Franklin, which made him forego the intended project. He then returned to Virginia, and, settling up his affairs, again started for the West, and became a resident of Lincoln county, Kentucky, where he had an uncle, who resided in that portion of the state. He married his cousin, Miss Anna B. Camden, February 16th, 1830, and for the seven ensuing years practised, with success, his profession in that state.

Mr. Camden had always been of the opinion that Missouri, when her great resources would commence to develop themselves, would become one of the most populous and wealthy states in the Union; and he had always determined, again to imigrate to her soil directly she had become a little older and more thickly settled. In 1837, he put his design in execution, and came to St. Louis, accompanied by two brothers of his wife. Abandoning the profession of the law, he established, with them, a dry-goods house, and the firm was titled J. B. and M. Camden & Co. This continued till 1840, when Mr. Camden became sole owner of the establishment, which he carried on for three years, and then commenced the provision business. In December, 1858, he again made a change in his business relations, and became a general commission merchant, and as such continues to this day. He is well known upon "'Change," and his house has the entire confidence of the public.

In politics, Mr. Camden was identified with the old American party and, as its candidate, became mayor of the city in 1846. It was during his administration that the city issued their bonds for $25,000, and it was used in purchasing stones to raise a portion of the eastern bank of the Mississippi, which threatened to forsake its old bed, and make for itself a

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new channel through the American bottom. The mayor strongly advocated the measure, for he did not wish to see the "Father of Waters" forsake the city which had so long been nurtured by the commerce which floated on its bosom. The harbor of St. Louis was also considerably improved during his term of office; it was owing to his efforts, while chief municipal officer, that gas was introduced as an agent for lighting up the streets. His administration was popular, and order was maintained in the most efficient manner.

Mr. Camden was one of the first directors in the Marine Insurance Company after its reorganization, and for many years has been a member of the Baptist Church.

Peter G. Camden possesses all the frankness of manner, cordiality of feeling, and hospitable disposition so characteristic of the true Virginian. He necessarily has become popular in St. Louis, and can number as his friends many of the most influential citizens. He has passed through many phases of private and public life without reproach, and in the evening of his life, a retrospect of the past must be associated with the most pleasing reminiscences.

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Edwards, Richard; Hopewell, M.; Ashley, William; Barry, James G.; Belt and Priest; Casey, John; Hall, W.; Labaum, Louis A.; Leduc, Mary Philip; Lisa, Manuel; O'Fallon, Benjamin; Piernas; Port Folio; Risley, W.; Stoddard, Amos; Williams, Henry W.; Yore, John E. Edwards's Great West and Her Commercial Metropolis, Embracing a General View of the West, and a Complete History of St. Louis, from the Landing of Ligueste, in 1764, to the Present Time; with Portraits and Biographies of Some of the Old Settlers, and Many of the Most Prominent Buisiness Men . St. Louis: Office of Edwards's Monthly, A Journal of Progress, 1860. [format: book], [genre: biography; history; letter; narrative]. Permission: St. Louis Mercantile Library
Persistent link to this document: http://lincoln.lib.niu.edu/file.php?file=edwards.html
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