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Edwards, Richard; Hopewell, M.; Ashley, William; Barry, James G.; Belt and Priest; Casey, John; Hall, W.; Labaum, Louis A.; Leduc, Mary Philip; Lisa, Manuel; O'Fallon, Benjamin; Piernas; Port Folio; Risley, W.; Stoddard, Amos; Williams, Henry W.; Yore, John E. Edwards's Great West and Her Commercial Metropolis, Embracing a General View of the West, and a Complete History of St. Louis, from the Landing of Ligueste, in 1764, to the Present Time; with Portraits and Biographies of Some of the Old Settlers, and Many of the Most Prominent Buisiness Men . St. Louis: Office of Edwards's Monthly, A Journal of Progress, 1860. [format: book], [genre: biography; history; letter; narrative]. Permission: St. Louis Mercantile Library
Persistent link to this document: http://lincoln.lib.niu.edu/file.php?file=edwards.html


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Henry Boernstein, Publisher of the "Anzeiger des Westens" the oldest German newspaper west of the Mississippi.

HENRY BOERNSTEIN was born November 4th, 1805, at the town of Hamburg, one of the free German cities of the Hanseatic league. He remained in that place until 1813, when his parents emigrated and settled in Lemberg, a city in Austrian Poland, where young Henry was sent to the University, and after being accomplished in the requisite preliminary education, commenced and completed the study of medicine.

After leaving the university, Henry Boernstein was so attracted by the ostentatious display of military life, that he entered the Austrian army, and remained connected with it during five years, and then, with all of the youthful romance which had been brought into play by the camp and epaulette banished forever, he resigned his commission in the army, and took up his residence in Vienna, and there he first became connected with the press, and was associated with one of the leading journals. Very soon he evinced decided dramatic talent, and wrote plays which became popular on the theatrical boards, and in 1826 was appointed secretary of the two great theatres of the Austrian metropolis — "An Der Wien" and Josephslads, under Director Carl, who was the justly-celebrated stage-manager of Germany, and who has won a world-wide renown from the success which has attended his management of the dramatic boards.

After remaining three years under the instruction of the greatest stage manager in Europe, Henry Boernstein became chief manager in several of the leading theatres of the cities of Germany and Italy — at Linz, Agram, Trieste, Venice, and other cities. He was not only known as a successful stage-manager, but was also known as a favorite and popular actor, and in 1841 he and Mrs. Boernstein entered upon a star-engagement tour through the principal cities of Germany, and crowded houses evinced the appreciation of the public of their claims as dramatic artistes.

So popular was Mr. Boernstein in Germany, that he determined to go to Paris, "the glass of fashion" of all European cities, and in 1842 he became manager of the German Opera, in that city, and afterward of the Italian Opera. He carried on at the same time correspondence with the leading journals of the day, and finding that he could not conveniently be an author and a stage-manager at the same time, he dedicated himself alone to literature, and wrote a number of plays, which had a fine run in the various German theatres.

Henry Boernstein was always an advocate for freedom. His first breath was drawn in a free city, and his beau ideal of a perfect government was the sovereignty of the people; consequently, when Louis Philippe was dethroned, he advocated the cause of those who supported the

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French Republic; but when Louis Napoleon became president, and finding France would again be under the dictatorial rule of a monarch, he resolved to go to a country which promised a continuance of the blessings arising from the expansive and elevating character of a well-organized government of the people. He embarked for the United States December 10th, 1848, and immediately on landing, wended his way to the west, and remained for a year at Highland, Illinois, looking about for a proper locality, finally to fix himself.

While at Highland, his literary abilities became known through his correspondence, and he was offered the editorship of the "Anzeiger des Western" at St. Louis. He accepted the offer, and entered upon his duties in March, 1850, and very soon after became the publisher and proprietor of the paper. This journal has always wielded an immense influence in St. Louis, and from the ability and good faith in which it has been edited has constantly received a cordial support from the Germans.

Mr. Boernstein has been true to the interest of his countrymen, and through many trying periods of political warfare, has stood forth fearlessly their champion. He contends, and rightfully, that the German interest is not a nullity, but should receive some consideration in legislative enactments, and they are not bound to sacrifice all their nationalities because they do not agree with the caprices and peculiar education of "native-born American citizens" who can claim the name, merely because their ancestors, natives of some foreign country, reached our shores some years previous to their birth. He contends that the German citizens are as true to this Republic, and love and would fight by the "star-spangled banner" with as much devotion, as any other class of citizens, and therefore they have equal claim to legislative consideration.

Mr. Boernstein was married November 13th, 1829, to Miss Mary Stolzer, and has four children, three sons and one daughter. By his talents and attention to business, he has already amassed a fortune, and in consequence of the amenity of his manners, he is both socially and politically popular. He is still the publisher and proprietor of the Anzeiger des Westens, and has recently leased the largest theatre in St. Louis, fitted it up in an expensive and tasteful manner, and converted it into an opera house, and is doing much to elevate and improve the taste of the citizens of St. Louis by the introduction of the true classical drama.

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Edwards, Richard; Hopewell, M.; Ashley, William; Barry, James G.; Belt and Priest; Casey, John; Hall, W.; Labaum, Louis A.; Leduc, Mary Philip; Lisa, Manuel; O'Fallon, Benjamin; Piernas; Port Folio; Risley, W.; Stoddard, Amos; Williams, Henry W.; Yore, John E. Edwards's Great West and Her Commercial Metropolis, Embracing a General View of the West, and a Complete History of St. Louis, from the Landing of Ligueste, in 1764, to the Present Time; with Portraits and Biographies of Some of the Old Settlers, and Many of the Most Prominent Buisiness Men . St. Louis: Office of Edwards's Monthly, A Journal of Progress, 1860. [format: book], [genre: biography; history; letter; narrative]. Permission: St. Louis Mercantile Library
Persistent link to this document: http://lincoln.lib.niu.edu/file.php?file=edwards.html
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