NIU Libraries Digitization Projects
Lincoln/Net Prairie Fire Illinois During the Civil War Illinois During the Gilded Age Mark Twain's Mississippi Back to Digitization Projects Contact Us
BACK

Edwards, Richard; Hopewell, M.; Ashley, William; Barry, James G.; Belt and Priest; Casey, John; Hall, W.; Labaum, Louis A.; Leduc, Mary Philip; Lisa, Manuel; O'Fallon, Benjamin; Piernas; Port Folio; Risley, W.; Stoddard, Amos; Williams, Henry W.; Yore, John E. Edwards's Great West and Her Commercial Metropolis, Embracing a General View of the West, and a Complete History of St. Louis, from the Landing of Ligueste, in 1764, to the Present Time; with Portraits and Biographies of Some of the Old Settlers, and Many of the Most Prominent Buisiness Men . St. Louis: Office of Edwards's Monthly, A Journal of Progress, 1860. [format: book], [genre: biography; history; letter; narrative]. Permission: St. Louis Mercantile Library
Persistent link to this document: http://lincoln.lib.niu.edu/file.php?file=edwards.html


Previous section

Next section

Hon. John Marshall Krum.

JOHN MARSHALL KRUM, so well known throughout the state as eminent in his profession, was born in Columbia county, state of New York. From a boy, he was fond of mental culture, and, after passing through the grade of instruction afforded by the common schools, he went to Fairfield Academy, under the charge of the Rev. John Chassell, and remained nearly three years under the tuition of that eminent scholar and divine. Leaving Fairfield, he commenced the study of the law, and so well did the profession assimilate with his natural affinities, that he progressed by far faster than students who entered upon it with indifference, and in 1833 was admitted to practice.

Mr. Krum was early dazzled by those day-dreams of ambition which are incident to an aspiring nature, and, seeing but little opening in his county, he started for the West, and located himself at Alton, Illinois, in 1834. Here he soon entered upon a lucrative practice, and by his talents and integrity so won the respect and confidence of the community, that in 1835 he was appointed by the governor of the state to the office of probate judge of Madison county.

In 1837, when Alton was incorporated a city, Mr. Krum was nominated by the Democratic party as their candidate for the mayoralty, and though his opponent was a Methodist divine of great popularity, he was triumphantly elected. After the expiration of the term of office, he was again nominated, but declined the appointment.

In 1838, he was tendered the nomination of state Senator, but declined the nomination, as it interfered with his professional duties. In 1839, he was married to the daughter of Chester Harding, a distinguished artist of Boston, and in 1840 he moved to St. Louis, where he could have a more extensive arena to display his legal abilities. His reputation as a lawyer had preceded him, and his efforts were successful. After three years of successful practice, he was appointed judge of the St. Louis Circuit Court, whose jurisdiction was far more extensive than at present.

While on the bench, Mr. Krum published the "Missouri Justice," which was received with favor, and is a record of his industry and professional learning. Finding that the onerous duties of his office were undermining his health, he resigned his judgeship, and again resumed his profession. In 1848, he was nominated as candidate for mayor, and was elected, though opposed by one of the leading and most popular citizens of the place. He has since been attending to the duties of his profession, and is known as an able attorney, and one of the successful champions of the Democratic party.

-- 556 --

Previous section

Next section


Edwards, Richard; Hopewell, M.; Ashley, William; Barry, James G.; Belt and Priest; Casey, John; Hall, W.; Labaum, Louis A.; Leduc, Mary Philip; Lisa, Manuel; O'Fallon, Benjamin; Piernas; Port Folio; Risley, W.; Stoddard, Amos; Williams, Henry W.; Yore, John E. Edwards's Great West and Her Commercial Metropolis, Embracing a General View of the West, and a Complete History of St. Louis, from the Landing of Ligueste, in 1764, to the Present Time; with Portraits and Biographies of Some of the Old Settlers, and Many of the Most Prominent Buisiness Men . St. Louis: Office of Edwards's Monthly, A Journal of Progress, 1860. [format: book], [genre: biography; history; letter; narrative]. Permission: St. Louis Mercantile Library
Persistent link to this document: http://lincoln.lib.niu.edu/file.php?file=edwards.html
Powered by PhiloLogic